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1.
Ecancermedicalscience ; 15: 1213, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1809338

ABSTRACT

Burnout (BO) syndrome is a condition that results in physical and mental distress. The current COVID-19 pandemic is strongly affecting the mental health of the general population. We aimed to assess the incidence of BO among medical oncologists and determine factors associated with burnout levels during the current pandemic. METHODS: A digital survey was created for this study. The Spanish-validated version of Maslach BO Inventory was incorporated to define BO. Social and demographic information was analysed to remove duplicated answers. RESULTS: A total of 188 Argentinian medical oncologists from 16 cities participated in the survey. The median age of the participants was 43 years (IQR 38-50) and a similar distribution between male and female was observed. At the time of the survey, Argentina was in the third month of strict lockdown. Most of the participants practiced in both public and private practice facilities (55.3%) and the majority reported more than 10 years of experience (53.2%). Twenty-five percent (43) of subjects reported high levels of DP, 39.9% (75) reported high levels of EE and 53.7% (101) reported low levels of PA. BO Maslach criteria were fulfilled by 14.9% (28). We compared this result with other burnout assessment tools. Using the Gil-Monte and Neira tool, BO-associated domains were altered in 77.1%, 42% and 42% for EE, DP, and PA domains, respectively. Concomitantly, under Neira assessment a domain impairment was appreciated in 77.1%, 76% and 54% respectively. BO criteria were met by 30.3% (57) according to Gil-Monte and 47.9% (90) to Neira. CONCLUSION: BO is a multifaceted issue with a negative impact on physicians, patients, and institutions. During the COVID-19 pandemic, BO criteria was met in a considerable proportion of survey respondents using MBI, and Peiro and Neiro tools and younger age, use of antidepressants and psychological medications and income reduction arose as statistically significant factors after multivariate analysis.

2.
Acta Neurol Scand ; 143(2): 206-209, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1388169

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Lockdown due to the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic became a challenge to maintain care for patients with epilepsy; we aimed to find out how the pandemic affected them. METHODS: We sent an online 22-item questionnaire to patients from our outpatient clinic, a reference centre in Spain for drug-resistant epilepsy, inquiring about the effects of lockdown, from March to May 2020. RESULTS: We sent the survey to 627 patients; 312 (58% women) sent a complete response and were included. Of all respondents, 57% took >2 antiseizure medications. One-third of respondents (29%) declared an associated cognitive or motor disability. A minority had confirmed infection with SARS-CoV-2 (1.92%). Seizure frequency remained like usual in 56% of patients, while 31.2% reported an increase. Less than 10% needed emergent assistance. Almost half reported anxiety or depression, and 25% increased behavioural disorders. Mood (F: 5.40; p: 0.002) and sleep disorders (F = 2.67; p: 0.05) were associated with increase in seizure frequency. Patients were able to contact their physicians when needed and were open to a future telematic approach to follow-up visits. CONCLUSIONS: Seizure frequency and severity remained unchanged in most patients during the lockdown. Mood and sleep disorders were common and associated with seizure worsening. Patients were open to telematic care in the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Epilepsy/therapy , Pandemics , Quarantine/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Anticonvulsants/therapeutic use , Anxiety/complications , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cognition Disorders/complications , Communicable Disease Control , Depression/complications , Disabled Persons , Epilepsy/complications , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Disorders/complications , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Motor Disorders/complications , Outpatients , Seizures/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/classification , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Spain/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine
3.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(9)2021 04 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1302239

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 affects persons living with HIV (PLWH) both directly (via morbidity/mortality) and indirectly (via disruption of HIV care). From July-November 2020, an online survey was conducted to investigate the psychosocial well-being of PLWH and changes in HIV care during the second semester of the COVID-19 outbreak. Data were collected on the socio-demographic characteristics of PLWH, their psychosocial well-being, impact of COVID-19 preventive measures on their daily routines and HIV follow-up. Of the 247 responses analyzed (mean age: 44.5 ± 13.2 years; 73.7% male), 67 (27.1%) and 69 (27.9%) respondents screened positive for anxiety (GAD-2 score ≥ 3) and depression (PHQ-2 score ≥ 3), respectively. HIV care had returned to pre-COVID-19 state for 48.6% PLWH, and 108 (43.7%) had no HIV follow-up during the past month. Over three quarters (76.1%) of respondents expressed willingness to receive the COVID-19 vaccine. Compared to previous findings in April 2020, substance use increased from 58.6% to 67.2% (p < 0.001). Our findings suggest that the well-being and medical follow-up of PLWH are still affected after almost a year into the COVID-19 outbreak. Remote HIV follow-up (telemedicine) with psychosocial support should be envisaged in the medium to long-term. Given that most PLWH accept COVID-19 vaccination, they may be prioritized for this intervention.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , HIV Infections , Adult , COVID-19 Vaccines , Female , Follow-Up Studies , HIV Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
4.
Obesity (Silver Spring) ; 29(7): 1128-1137, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1279387

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to assess attitudes toward coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccination and the degree of fear of COVID-19 among those living with obesity. METHODS: Two samples were recruited for an online survey: one sample was a representative sample of Canadians living with overweight and obesity (n = 1,089), and the second was a convenience sample of individuals recruited from obesity clinical services or patient organizations (n = 980). Respondents completed ratings of their comfort receiving a COVID-19 vaccination along with the Vaccine Hesitancy Scale and the Fear of COVID-19 Scale. RESULTS: Approximately one-third of respondents, regardless of sample or weight category, were not comfortable receiving a vaccination, and one-half expressed moderate or greater perceived risks of vaccination. Confidence in vaccinations was extremely low, especially for those in the clinical sample. Fear of COVID-19 was substantial and predicted attitudes toward vaccination. Females were less comfortable receiving the vaccine and perceived more risks than males. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest those living with obesity are highly ambivalent about COVID-19 vaccination. Despite their being at high risk, their confidence in vaccines is very low. Results suggest the need for patient-centered counseling, with a focus on shared decision-making to strengthen confidence and reduce perceived risk.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , COVID-19/prevention & control , Overweight/psychology , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/psychology , Vaccination Refusal/psychology , Vaccination/psychology , Adult , Attitude , COVID-19/psychology , Canada , Female , Humans , Male
5.
BMJ Open ; 11(6): e048856, 2021 06 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1270894

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: A key challenge towards a successful COVID-19 vaccine uptake is vaccine hesitancy. We examine and provide novel insights on the key drivers and barriers towards COVID-19 vaccine uptake. DESIGN: This study involved an anonymous cross-sectional online survey circulated across the UK in September 2020. The survey was designed to include several sections to collect demographic data and responses on (1) extent of agreement regarding various statements about COVID-19 and vaccinations, (2) previous vaccination habits (eg, if they had previously declined vaccination) and (3) interest in participation in vaccine trials. Multinominal logistic models examined demographic factors that may impact vaccine uptake. We used principle component analysis and text mining to explore perception related to vaccine uptake. SETTING: The survey was circulated through various media, including posts on social media networks (Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn and Instagram), national radio, news articles, Clinical Research Network website and newsletter, and through 150 West Midlands general practices via a text messaging service. PARTICIPANTS: There were a total of 4884 respondents of which 9.44% were black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) group. The majority were women (n=3416, 69.9%) and of white ethnicity (n=4127, 84.5%). RESULTS: Regarding respondents, overall, 3873 (79.3%) were interested in taking approved COVID-19 vaccines, while 677 (13.9%) were unsure, and 334 (6.8%) would not take a vaccine. Participants aged over 70 years old (OR=4.63) and the BAME community (OR=5.48) were more likely to take an approved vaccine. Smokers (OR=0.45) and respondents with no known illness (OR=0.70) were less likely to accept approved vaccines. The study identified 16 key reasons for not accepting approved vaccines, the most common (60%) being the possibility of the COVID-19 vaccine having side effects. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides an insight into focusing on specific populations to reduce vaccine hesitancy. This proves crucial in managing the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vaccines , Aged , COVID-19 Vaccines , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , United Kingdom , Vaccination
6.
Global Spine J ; : 21925682211022311, 2021 Jun 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1268187

ABSTRACT

STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional, anonymous, international survey. OBJECTIVES: The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in the rapid adoption of telemedicine in spine surgery. This study sought to determine the extent of adoption and global perspectives on telemedicine in spine surgery. METHODS: All members of AO Spine International were emailed an anonymous survey covering the participant's experiences with and perceptions of telemedicine. Descriptive statistics were used to depict responses. Responses were compared among regions. RESULTS: 485 spine surgeons participated in the survey. Telemedicine usage rose from <10.0% to >39.0% of all visits. A majority of providers (60.5%) performed at least one telemedicine visit. The format of "telemedicine" varied widely by region: European (50.0%) and African (45.2%) surgeons were more likely to use phone calls, whereas North (66.7%) and South American (77.0%) surgeons more commonly used video (P < 0.001). North American providers used telemedicine the most during COVID-19 (>60.0% of all visits). 81.9% of all providers "agreed/strongly agreed" telemedicine was easy to use. Respondents tended to "agree" that imaging review, the initial appointment, and postoperative care could be performed using telemedicine. Almost all (95.4%) surgeons preferred at least one in-person visit prior to the day of surgery. CONCLUSION: Our study noted significant geographical differences in the rate of telemedicine adoption and the platform of telemedicine utilized. The results suggest a significant increase in telemedicine utilization, particularly in North America. Spine surgeons found telemedicine feasible for imaging review, initial visits, and follow-up visits although the vast majority still preferred at least one in-person preoperative visit.

7.
Mult Scler J Exp Transl Clin ; 7(2): 20552173211017159, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1262487

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Hesitancy to receive COVID-19 vaccination is a major public health concern. COVID-19 vaccine willingness and the factors contributing to willingness in adults with multiple sclerosis (MS) is unknown. We administered an online survey from 1 December 2020 to 7 January 2021 to adults with MS to estimate COVID-19 vaccine willingness among adults with MS. Bivariate analysis with chi-square testing compared categorical variables associated with vaccine willingness. RESULTS: Of 401 respondents, 70.1% were willing to receive an authorized COVID-19 vaccination if it was available to them, 22.7% were unsure, and 7.2% were unwilling. The most frequent concern for those unsure was vaccine safety. Vaccine willingness was associated with increased perceived personal risk of COVID-19 (χ2 = 45.4; p < 0.0001), prior influenza vaccine acceptance (χ2 = 97.6; p < 0.0001), higher educational level (χ2 = 50.2; p < 0.0001), and if respondents discussed or planned to discuss the COVID-19 vaccine with their neurologists (χ2 = 64.3; p < 0.0001). CONCLUSION: While COVID-19 vaccination willingness is high among people with MS, nearly 30% were either unwilling or unsure about being vaccinated. Neurologists should be aware of patient-centered factors associated with COVID-19 vaccine willingness and address COVID-19 vaccine safety concerns in discussions with their vaccine-unsure MS patients.

8.
Hum Vaccin Immunother ; 17(10): 3348-3354, 2021 Oct 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1258722

ABSTRACT

Vaccination is a key protective factor against COVID-19. Some vaccines have already received emergency authorization from Health Agencies, but growing skepticism and vaccine hesitancy will probably affect COVID-19 vaccination campaigns. In the attempt to shed light on this issue, we conducted an online survey in a population of parents referring to 4 pediatric practices in Naples, Italy in whom we evaluated potential vaccine acceptability in relation to socio-demographic characteristics, perception of personal health and of the impact of COVID-19, and attitudes toward general vaccination practices. Vaccination rates were analyzed also in the corresponding pediatric population.Almost 27% of participants declared they were in favor of vaccinations, and in fact real life vaccination rates in children exceeded the national mean. Only 26.5% of respondents declared they would receive COVID-19 vaccine. Vaccine refusal was attributed to safety concerns in 76% of parents. Specific vaccine attributes further reduced the acceptance rate. Female gender, younger age and lower education level were associated with non-adherence to vaccination. Among extrinsic factors of COVID-19 vaccination, only information from National Health Authorities was significantly associated to vaccine acceptance.The rate of potential COVID-19 vaccine acceptability was very poor in our population of parents. Vaccine hesitancy was mainly due to safety concerns. Demographic and educational factors were correlated to vaccine acceptability. Health education and communication strategies are needed to achieve large-scale vaccine acceptability and finally herd immunity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vaccines , COVID-19 Vaccines , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Vaccination
9.
Telemed J E Health ; 28(3): 325-333, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1254372

ABSTRACT

Background: Public health measures that prevent the spread of COVID-19, such as social distancing, may increase the risk for suicide among American Indians due to decreased social connectedness that is crucial to wellbeing. Telehealth represents a potential solution, but barriers to effective suicide prevention may exist. Materials and Methods: In collaboration with Tribal and Urban Indian Health Center providers, this study measured suicide prevention practices during COVID-19. A 44-item Likert-type, web-based survey was distributed to Montana-based professionals who directly provide suicide prevention services to American Indians at risk for suicide. Descriptive statistics were calculated for survey items, and Mann-Whitney U tests examined the differences in telehealth use, training, skills among Montana geographic areas, and barriers between providers and their clients/patients. Results: Among the 80 respondents, two-thirds agreed or strongly agreed that American Indians experienced greater social disconnection since the COVID-19 pandemic began. Almost 98% agreed that telehealth was needed, and 93% were willing to use telehealth for suicide prevention services. Among current users, 75% agreed telehealth was effective for suicide prevention. Over one-third of respondents reported using telehealth for the first time during COVID-19 pandemic, and 30% use telehealth at least "usually" since the COVID-19 pandemic began, up from 6.3%. Compared with their own experiences, providers perceive their American Indian client/patients as experiencing greater barriers to telehealth. Discussion: Telehealth was increasingly utilized for suicide prevention during the COVID-19 pandemic. Opportunities to improve telehealth access should be explored, including investments in telehealth technologies for American Indians at risk for suicide.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Suicide , Telemedicine , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Montana , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Suicide/prevention & control
10.
BMC Public Health ; 21(1): 1017, 2021 05 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1247586

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The success of any COVID-19 vaccine program ultimately depends on high vaccine uptake. This study determined overall intention to receive a COVID-19 vaccine and identified factors that predict intentions to be vaccinated against COVID-19 in Canada, specifically in key priority groups identified by the American Committee on Immunization Practice (ACIP) and the National Advisory Committee on Immunization (NACI) for early immunization. METHODS: Individuals from research cohorts from the general population of British Columbia aged 25-69 were invited complete an online survey based on validated scales and theoretical frameworks to explore intention to receive a COVID-19 vaccine. Two multivariable logistic regression models were conducted to determine factors associated with intention to receive the COVID-19 vaccine. RESULTS: Of 4948 respondents, 79.8% intended to receive a COVID-19 vaccine. In multivariable modeling, respondents who intended to receive the vaccine had higher vaccine attitudinal scores (p <  0.001), reported greater influence of direct social norms (p = 0.001), and indirect social norms, including their family physician (p = 0.024), and Provincial Health Officer (p = 0.011). Older individuals (> 60 years) were more likely to intend to receive the vaccine, while females (95%CI 0.57,0.93), those with less than high school education (95%CI 0.5,0.76), those who self-identified as non-white (95%CI 0.60,0.92), self-identified as Indigenous (95%CI 0.36,0.84) and essential non-health care workers (95%CI 0.59,0.86) had lower adjusted odds of intending to receive a COVID-19 vaccine. CONCLUSIONS: To optimize vaccine coverage, public health should focus on key messages around vaccine safety and benefit, and leverage trusted practitioners for messaging. As certain key populations identified by NACI and ACIP for early immunization report a lower intention to vaccinate, there is a need for in-depth education and support for these communities to ensure optimal uptake.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vaccines , British Columbia , COVID-19 Vaccines , Female , Humans , Intention , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
11.
Vaccines (Basel) ; 9(6)2021 May 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1244157

ABSTRACT

Most countries are currently gravitating towards vaccination as mainstay strategy to quell COVID-19 transmission. Between December 2020 and January 2021, we conducted a follow-up online survey in Somalia to monitor adherence to COVID-19 preventive measures, and COVID-19 vaccine acceptability and reasons for vaccine hesitancy. Adherence was measured via a composite adherence score based on four measures (physical distancing, face mask use, hand hygiene, and mouth covering when coughing/sneezing). We analyzed 4543 responses (mean age: 23.5 ± 6.4 years, 62.4% males). The mean adherence score during this survey was lower than the score during a similar survey in April 2020. A total of 76.8% of respondents were willing to receive the COVID-19 vaccine. Flu-like symptoms were more frequently reported in the current survey compared to previous surveys. Multiple logistic regression showed that participants who experienced flu-like symptoms, those in the healthcare sector, and those with higher adherence scores had higher odds for vaccine acceptability while being a female reduced the willingness to be vaccinated. In conclusion, our data suggest that the decreasing adherence to COVID-19 preventive measures may have caused increased flu-like symptoms over time. COVID-19 vaccine acceptance in Somalia is relatively high but could be improved by addressing factors that contribute to vaccine hesitancy.

12.
Vaccine ; 39(26): 3467-3472, 2021 06 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1240641

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: There has been a recent recognized shift towards a whole-of-life or life-course approach to immunisation. However, coverage amongst at-risk adults for recommended vaccines continues to be suboptimal. This study examined the perceptions of middle and older aged Australian adults towards hospital-based immunization programs and their previous exposures to receiving vaccines via tertiary care. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey was conducted with Australian adults 45 years and older in late 2019 to capture influenza and pneumococcal vaccine uptake, exposure to hospital-based immunization programs, missed opportunities to vaccinate and receptiveness towards the promotion and/or delivery of vaccines in the hospital setting. RESULTS: Only 13 respondents reported receiving a vaccine at hospital, yet 72.2% (931/1292) indicated that they were willing to be vaccinated in that setting. Amongst those who attended hospital during 2019 and were eligible for vaccination, 57.2% and 28.3% of respondents were not immunized for pneumococcal and influenza, respectively. Missed opportunities for both vaccines were significantly higher amongst those at low-risk for influenza (≤65 years (low-risk): 52.9%, ≤65 years (high-risk): 18.3%, >65 years: 15.1%; p < 0.001) and pneumococcal (≤65 years (low-risk): 79.1%, ≤65 years (high-risk): 52.4%, >65 years: 44%; p < 0.001). Among those with a missed opportunity for hospital-based vaccination, the most common reason for not getting immunized was a lack of recommendation. Most (86.4%) reported that their general practitioner was the person or group they trusted most to receive vaccine information from. CONCLUSIONS: The findings from this Australian study support international work that shows very low rates of opportunistic vaccination in hospitals despite national recommendations to vaccinate prior to discharge. Considering the need for high levels of uptake of the COVID-19 vaccine, hospitals may need to be considered to opportunistically capture those not accessing the vaccine in other settings.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Influenza Vaccines , Adult , Aged , Australia , COVID-19 Vaccines , Cross-Sectional Studies , Hospitals , Humans , Immunization , Immunization Programs , Middle Aged , Pneumococcal Vaccines , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
13.
Telemed J E Health ; 28(2): 219-226, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1231015

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The use of technology in the medical field has been rising rapidly and offering, in many cases, an alternative to traditional ways of practicing medicine, especially when remote medical services are required. This background has laid the foundation for telemedicine to play a role in controlling the current coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Telemedicine has the potential to allow the facilitation of providing the necessary medical care to patients without exposing them to contact with other patients or the general population. Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the utilization of telemedicine by the Lebanese physicians during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: This cross-sectional online study was conducted using LimeSurvey® through an e-mail-based questionnaire sent to physicians currently enrolled in both Beirut and Tripoli Lebanese Order of Physicians. Results: Four hundred one physicians completed the survey resulting in a response rate of 5.85%. Most of the respondents (N = 401, 75.8%) reported using telemedicine to provide health care services to patients without in-person visits during the pandemic. Among those using telemedicine (N = 304), around 40% reported that they started using it during COVID-19 pandemic. Discussion: Literature states that the average time of an in-person clinic consultation is more than 15 min. This implies that telemedicine can play a role in saving physicians' time; this conclusion is supported by other studies that consider telemedicine a time-saving method of providing health care services. Conclusions: Our study indicated that telemedicine is used by the majority of Lebanese physicians and that this use has been accelerated by the COVID-19 pandemic. Our results showed that telemedicine does have a potential that can allow it to be integrated in the health care system and implemented on a national organized level.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Physicians , Telemedicine , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Curr Probl Diagn Radiol ; 51(2): 196-203, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1230911

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Radiology departments around the world have been faced with the challenge to adapt, and recover to the COVID-19 pandemic. This study is part of a worldwide survey of radiologists' responses to COVID-19 in 18 different countries in Africa, Asia, Europe, and Latin America. The purpose of this study is to analyze the changes made in international radiology departments and practices in response to the pandemic. METHODS: The 18-item survey was sent via email from April to May 2020 to radiologists in Africa, Asia, Europe, and Latin America to assess their response to COVID-19. Our survey included questions regarding imaging, workforce adjustments, testing availability, staff and patient safety, research and education, and infrastructure availability. RESULTS: Twenty-eight survey responses were reviewed. Of the 28 respondents, 42.9% have shortages of infrastructure and 78.6% responded that COVID-19 testing was available. Regarding the use of Chest CT in COVID-19 patients, 28.6% respondents used Chest CT as screening for COVID-19. For staff safety, interventions included encouraging use of masks in patient encounters, social distancing and PPE training. To cope with their education and research mission, radiology departments are doing online lectures, reducing the number of residents in rotations, and postponing any non-urgent activities. CONCLUSION: In conclusion, there are disparities in infrastructure, research, and educational initiatives during COVID-19 which also provides opportunity for the global radiology community to work together on these issues.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Radiology , COVID-19 Testing , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
15.
J Dev Behav Pediatr ; 43(1): 32-37, 2022 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1228545

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study aims to describe the extent of telehealth use by global developmental-behavioral pediatrics (DBP) clinicians and barriers (if any) in adopting telehealth during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. METHODS: A survey was disseminated to DBP clinicians through contact with international professional organizations to determine the use of telehealth in DBP care, before and since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic. Descriptive statistics and χ2 tests were used for analysis. RESULTS: A total of 271 respondents from 38 countries completed the survey. The number of respondents offering telehealth increased from 36% to 88% after the pandemic, with the greatest shift to telehealth among high-income countries (HICs). Among respondents using telehealth, 75.1% were conducting interactive video visits, with HICs using more telehealth modalities embedded in electronic health records. Most patients (98.7%) were at home for the telehealth encounter. Almost half (46.5%) could not include an interpreter in telehealth visits. Barriers reported by telehealth users included concerns about limited patient access to technology (74.3%), home environment distractions (56.5%), preference for in-person care (53.6%), telehealth effectiveness (48.1%), workflow efficiency (42.2%), and cost/reimbursement (32.1%). CONCLUSION: Global DBP clinicians rapidly adopted telehealth and continued to have interprofessional practice while doing so, with the largest adoption occurring in HICs. Provider concerns about effectiveness and patient access to technology emerged as key organizational and patient barriers, respectively. Increased provider confidence in telehealth and its sustained use in the future depends on supportive regulatory policies and availability and use of measures to monitor quality and effectiveness.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pediatrics/methods , Telemedicine , Child , Child Development , Humans , Pandemics
16.
Vaccines (Basel) ; 9(5)2021 May 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1224277

ABSTRACT

Despite research conducted worldwide, there is no treatment specifically targeting SARS-CoV-2 infection with efficacy proven by randomized controlled trials. A chance for a breakthrough is vaccinating most of the global population. Public opinion surveys on vaccine hesitancy prompted our team to investigate Polish healthcare workers' (HCWs) attitudes towards the SARS-CoV-2 and influenza vaccinations. In-person and online surveys of HCWs: doctors, nurses, medical students, and other allied health professionals (n = 419) were conducted between 14 September 2020 and 5 November 2020. In our study, 68.7% of respondents would like to be vaccinated against COVID-19. The safety and efficacy of COVID-19 vaccinations would persuade 86.3% of hesitant and those who would refuse to be vaccinated. 3.1% of all respondents claimed that no argument would convince them to get vaccinated. 61.6% of respondents declared a willingness to receive an influenza vaccination, of which 83.3% were also inclined to receive COVID-19 vaccinations. Although most respondents-62.5% (262/419) indicated they trusted in the influenza vaccine more, more respondents intended to get vaccinated against COVID-19 in the 2020/2021 season. The study is limited by its nonrandom sample of HCWs but provides a preliminary description of attitudes towards SARS-CoV-2 vaccination.

17.
Vaccines (Basel) ; 9(5)2021 May 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1224264

ABSTRACT

(1) Background: More coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccines are gradually being developed and marketed. Improving the vaccination intention will be the key to increasing the vaccination rate in the future; (2) Methods: A self-designed questionnaire was used to collect data on COVID-19 vaccination intentions, protection motivation and control variables. Pearson Chi-square test and multivariate ordered logistic regression models were specified to analyze the determinants of intention to receive COVID-19 vaccine; (3) Results: Although the vaccine was free, 17.75% of the 2377 respondents did not want, or were hesitant, to receive the COVID-19 vaccine. Respondents' cognition of vaccine safety, external reward and response efficacy were positively related to COVID-19 vaccination intention, while age, income and response cost were negatively related to the intention to receive the COVID-19 vaccine. Professionals and people without medical insurance had the lowest intention to vaccinate; (4) Conclusions: The older aged, people without health insurance, those with higher incomes and professionals should be treated as the key intervention targets. Strengthening publicity and education about the safety and efficacy of COVID-19 vaccines, training vaccinated people and community leaders as propagandists for the vaccine, and improving the accessibility to the COVID-19 vaccine are recommended to improve COVID-19 vaccination intention.

18.
J Am Heart Assoc ; 10(3): e018510, 2021 02 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1221677

ABSTRACT

Background The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic disproportionately affects individuals with hypertension and health disparities. Methods and Results We assessed the experiences and beliefs of low-income and minority patients with hypertension during the COVID-19 pandemic. Participants (N=587) from the IMPACTS-BP (Implementation of Multifaceted Patient-Centered Treatment Strategies for Intensive Blood Pressure Control) study completed a telephone survey in May and June of 2020. Participants were 65.1% Black and 59.7% female, and 57.7% reported an income below the federal poverty level. Overall, 2.7% tested positive and 15.3% had lost a family member or friend to COVID-19. These experiences were significantly more common in Black (3.9% and 19.4%, respectively) than in non-Black participants (0.5% and 7.8%, respectively). In addition, 14.5% lost a job and 15.9% reported food shortages during the pandemic. Most participants complied with stay-at-home orders (98.3%), social distancing (97.8%), and always wearing a mask outside their home (74.6%). Participants also reported high access to needed health care (94.7%) and prescription medications (97.6%). Furthermore, 95.7% of respondents reported that they continued to take their regular dosage of antihypertensive medications. Among the 44.5% of participants receiving a healthcare appointment by telehealth, 96.6% got the help they needed, and 80.8% reported that the appointment quality was as good as or better than in-person visits. Finally, 88.9% were willing to return to their primary care clinic. Conclusions These data suggest that low-income patients, especially Black patients, were negatively impacted by COVID-19. However, most patients were able to access needed healthcare services and were willing to return to their primary care clinic for hypertension management. Registration URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov; Unique identifier: NCT03483662.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care/methods , Hypertension/epidemiology , Income , Pandemics , Telemedicine/methods , Comorbidity , Culture , Female , Humans , Louisiana/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Mississippi/epidemiology , Poverty , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(9)2021 05 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1219427

ABSTRACT

The worldwide COVID-19 vaccination program is already underway, raising hopes and aspirations to contain the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic that halted economic and social activities. However, the issue of vaccine effectiveness and its side-effects is influencing the potential acceptance of vaccines. In this uncertain situation, we used data from a nationwide survey in Japan during February 2021, following the Japanese government's initial phase of COVID-19 vaccination. Our results show that 47% of the respondents are willing to take a vaccine once it is available, while 22% are not willing and another 31% remain indecisive. Our ordered probit regression results show that demographic, socioeconomic, and behavioral variables such as gender, age, subjective health status, children, household income, household assets, financial literacy, future anxiety, and myopic view of the future are associated with willingness to take a COVID-19 vaccine. Our findings suggest that Japan's government should not adopt a one-size-fits-all policy to promote the vaccination program, but rather target people with specific socioeconomic backgrounds who are less willing and more hesitant to take a vaccine.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Child , Humans , Japan , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Socioeconomic Factors , Vaccination
20.
PLoS One ; 16(5): e0251382, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1218947

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The presence of COVID-19 has led to the disruption of health systems globally, including essential reproductive, maternal, newborn and child health (RMNCH) services. This study aimed to assess the challenges faced by women who used RMNCH services in Nigeria's epicentre, their satisfaction with care received during the COVID-19 pandemic and the factors associated with their satisfaction. METHODS: This cross-sectional survey was conducted in Lagos, southwest Nigeria among 1,241 women of reproductive age who had just received RMNCH services at one of twenty-two health facilities across the primary, secondary and tertiary tiers of health care. The respondents were selected via multi-stage sampling and face to face exit interviews were conducted by trained interviewers. Client satisfaction was assessed across four sub-scales: health care delivery, health facility, interpersonal aspects of care and access to services. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were used to assess the relationship between personal characteristics and client satisfaction. RESULTS: About 43.51% of respondents had at least one challenge in accessing RMNCH services since the COVID-19 outbreak. Close to a third (31.91%) could not access service because they could not leave their houses during the lockdown and 18.13% could not access service because there was no transportation. The mean clients' satisfaction score among the respondents was 43.25 (SD: 6.28) out of a possible score of 57. Satisfaction scores for the interpersonal aspects of care were statistically significantly lower in the PHCs and general hospitals compared to teaching hospitals. Being over 30 years of age was significantly associated with an increased clients' satisfaction score (ß = 1.80, 95%CI: 1.10-2.50). CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 lockdown posed challenges to accessing RMNCH services for a significant proportion of women surveyed. Although overall satisfaction with care was fairly high, there is a need to provide tailored COVID-19 sensitive inter-personal care to clients at all levels of care.


Subject(s)
Child Health Services , Maternal Health Services , Patient Satisfaction , Reproductive Health Services , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Facilities/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Linear Models , Male , Middle Aged , Nigeria/epidemiology , Pandemics , Patient Satisfaction/statistics & numerical data , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Young Adult
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