Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 587
Filter
Add filters

Document Type
Year range
1.
Toxins (Basel) ; 12(4)2020 04 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1453289

ABSTRACT

Bacterial toxins play a key role in the pathogenesis of lung disease. Based on their structural and functional properties, they employ various strategies to modulate lung barrier function and to impair host defense in order to promote infection. Although in general, these toxins target common cellular signaling pathways and host compartments, toxin- and cell-specific effects have also been reported. Toxins can affect resident pulmonary cells involved in alveolar fluid clearance (AFC) and barrier function through impairing vectorial Na+ transport and through cytoskeletal collapse, as such, destroying cell-cell adhesions. The resulting loss of alveolar-capillary barrier integrity and fluid clearance capacity will induce capillary leak and foster edema formation, which will in turn impair gas exchange and endanger the survival of the host. Toxins modulate or neutralize protective host cell mechanisms of both the innate and adaptive immunity response during chronic infection. In particular, toxins can either recruit or kill central players of the lung's innate immune responses to pathogenic attacks, i.e., alveolar macrophages (AMs) and neutrophils. Pulmonary disorders resulting from these toxin actions include, e.g., acute lung injury (ALI), the acute respiratory syndrome (ARDS), and severe pneumonia. When acute infection converts to persistence, i.e., colonization and chronic infection, lung diseases, such as bronchitis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and cystic fibrosis (CF) can arise. The aim of this review is to discuss the impact of bacterial toxins in the lungs and the resulting outcomes for pathogenesis, their roles in promoting bacterial dissemination, and bacterial survival in disease progression.


Subject(s)
Bacteria/pathogenicity , Bacterial Infections/microbiology , Bacterial Toxins/metabolism , Lung/microbiology , Respiratory Tract Infections/microbiology , Adaptive Immunity , Animals , Bacteria/immunology , Bacteria/metabolism , Bacterial Infections/immunology , Bacterial Infections/metabolism , Bacterial Infections/pathology , Disease Progression , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Lung/immunology , Lung/metabolism , Lung/pathology , Respiratory Tract Infections/immunology , Respiratory Tract Infections/metabolism , Respiratory Tract Infections/pathology , Signal Transduction
2.
Int J Mol Sci ; 21(11)2020 May 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1456326

ABSTRACT

In the development of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), the gut microbiota has been established as a key factor. Recently, metabolomics has become important for understanding the functional relevance of gut microbial changes in disease. Animal models for IBD enable the study of factors involved in disease development. However, results from animal studies may not represent the human situation. The aim of this study was to investigate whether results from metabolomics studies on animal models for IBD were similar to those from studies on IBD patients. Medline and Embase were searched for relevant studies up to May 2017. The Covidence systematic review software was used for study screening, and quality assessment was conducted for all included studies. Data showed a convergence of ~17% for metabolites differentiated between IBD and controls in human and animal studies with amino acids being the most differentiated metabolite subclass. The acute dextran sodium sulfate model appeared as a good model for analysis of systemic metabolites in IBD, but analytical platform, age, and biological sample type did not show clear correlations with any significant metabolites. In conclusion, this systematic review highlights the variation in metabolomics results, and emphasizes the importance of expanding the applied detection methods to ensure greater coverage and convergence between the various different patient phenotypes and animal models of inflammatory bowel disease.


Subject(s)
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases/metabolism , Metabolome , Metabolomics/methods , /methods , Animals , Disease Models, Animal , Humans , Inflammatory Bowel Diseases/etiology , Inflammatory Bowel Diseases/pathology , Mice , Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate/toxicity
3.
Dig Surg ; 37(3): 181-191, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1455782

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is characterised by pain, functional deficits, nutritional and mechanical complications. Frequently managed in out-patient settings, the clinical course is unpredictable and requires multi-disciplinary care. There remains substantial variation in management. In contrast to acute pancreatitis, there are no globally accepted classification or severity scores to predict the disease course or compare interventions. We conducted a systematic review to determine the scope and clinical use of existing scoring systems. METHODS: A systematic search was developed with a medical librarian using the Embase, Medline and Cochrane databases. Original articles and conference abstracts describing an original or modified classification or scoring system in CP that stratified patients into clinical and/or severity categories were included. To assess clinical application/validation, studies using all or part of a score as a stratification tool to measure another parameter or outcome were selected. Studies reporting on diagnosis or aetiology only were excluded. Four authors performed the search in independent pairs and conflicts were resolved by a fifth author using CovidenceTM systematic review software. RESULTS: Following screening 6,652 titles and 235 full-text reviews, 48 papers were analysed. Eleven described original scores and 6 described modifications of published scores. Many were comprehensive but limited in capturing the full spectrum of disease. In 31 studies, a score was used to categorise patients to compare or correlate various outcome measures. Exocrine and endocrine dysfunction and pain were included in 6, 5, and 4 scoring systems, respectively. No score included other nutrition parameters, such as bone health, malnutrition, or nutrient deficiency. Only one score has been objectively validated prospectively and independently for monitoring clinical progression and prognosis, but this had been applied to an in-patient population. CONCLUSION: Available systems and scores do not reflect recent advances and guidelines in CP and are not commonly used. A practical clinical classification and scoring system, validated prospectively for prognostication would be useful for the meaningful analysis in observational and interventional studies in CP.


Subject(s)
Pancreatitis, Chronic/classification , Pancreatitis, Chronic/diagnosis , Severity of Illness Index , Humans , Pancreatitis, Chronic/complications , Prognosis
4.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev ; 6: CD013333, 2020 06 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1453528

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Demodex blepharitis is a chronic condition commonly associated with recalcitrant dry eye symptoms though many people with Demodex mites are asymptomatic. The primary cause of this condition in humans is two types of Demodex mites: Demodex folliculorum and Demodex brevis. There are varying reports of the prevalence of Demodex blepharitis among adults, and it affects both men and women equally. While Demodex mites are commonly treated with tea tree oil, the effectiveness of tea tree oil for treating Demodex blepharitis is not well documented. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effects of tea tree oil on ocular Demodex infestation in people with Demodex blepharitis. SEARCH METHODS: We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Trials Register) (2019, Issue 6); Ovid MEDLINE; Embase.com; PubMed; LILACS; ClinicalTrials.gov; and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP). We used no date or language restrictions in the electronic search for trials. We last searched the databases on 18 June 2019. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared treatment with tea tree oil (or its components) versus another treatment or no treatment for people with Demodex blepharitis. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors independently screened the titles and abstracts and then full text of records to determine their eligibility. The review authors independently extracted data and assessed risk of bias using Covidence. A third review author resolved any conflicts at all stages. MAIN RESULTS: We included six RCTs (1124 eyes of 562 participants; 17 to 281 participants per study) from the US, Korea, China, Australia, Ireland, and Turkey. The RCTs compared some formulation of tea tree oil to another treatment or no treatment. Included participants were both men and women, ranging from 39 to 55 years of age. All RCTs were assessed at unclear or high risk of bias in one or more domains. We also identified two RCTs that are ongoing or awaiting publications. Data from three RCTs that reported a short-term mean change in the number of Demodex mites per eight eyelashes contributed to a meta-analysis. We are uncertain about the mean reduction for the groups that received the tea tree oil intervention (mean difference [MD] 0.70, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.24 to 1.16) at four to six weeks as compared to other interventions. Only one RCT reported data for long-term changes, which found that the group that received intense pulse light as the treatment had complete eradication of Demodex mites at three months. We graded the certainty of the evidence for this outcome as very low. Three RCTs reported no evidence of a difference for participant reported symptoms measured on the Ocular Surface Disease Index (OSDI) between the tea tree oil group and the group receiving other forms of intervention. Mean differences in these studies ranged from -10.54 (95% CI - 24.19, 3.11) to 3.40 (95% CI -0.70 7.50). We did not conduct a meta-analysis for this outcome given substantial statistical heterogeneity and graded the certainty of the evidence as low. One RCT provided information concerning visual acuity but did not provide sufficient data for between-group comparisons. The authors noted that mean habitual LogMAR visual acuity for all study participants improved post-treatment (mean LogMAR 1.16, standard deviation 0.26 at 4 weeks). We graded the certainty of evidence for this outcome as low. No RCTs provided data on mean change in number of cylindrical dandruff or the proportion of participants experiencing conjunctival injection or experiencing meibomian gland dysfunction. Three RCTs provided information on adverse events. One reported no adverse events. The other two described a total of six participants randomized to treatment with tea tree oil who experienced ocular irritation or discomfort that resolved with re-educating the patient on application techniques and continuing use of the tea tree oil. We graded the certainty of the evidence for this outcome as very low. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: The current review suggests that there is uncertainty related to the effectiveness of 5% to 50% tea tree oil for the short-term treatment of Demodex blepharitis; however, if used, lower concentrations may be preferable in the eye care arena to avoid induced ocular irritation. Future studies should be better controlled, assess outcomes at long term (e.g. 10 to 12 weeks or beyond), account for patient compliance, and study the effects of different tea tree oil concentrations.


Subject(s)
Anti-Infective Agents, Local/therapeutic use , Blepharitis/drug therapy , Mite Infestations/drug therapy , Tea Tree Oil/therapeutic use , Adult , Blepharitis/parasitology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Mite Infestations/complications , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
6.
Vascul Pharmacol ; 130: 106680, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1386723

ABSTRACT

Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) and its homologue, ACE2, have been mostly associated with hypertensive disorder. However, recent pandemia of SARS-CoV-2 has put these proteins at the center of attention, as this virus has been shown to exploit ACE2 protein to enter cells. Clear difference in the response of affected patients to this virus has urged researchers to find the molecular basis and pathophysiology of the cell response to this virus. Different levels of expression and function of ACE proteins, underlying disorders, consumption of certain medications and the existence of certain genomic variants within ACE genes are possible explanations for the observed difference in the response of individuals to the SARS-CoV-2 infection. In the current review, we discuss the putative mechanisms for this observation.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/enzymology , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/biosynthesis , Pneumonia, Viral/enzymology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Humans , Pandemics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/blood , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/genetics , Pneumonia, Viral/genetics , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology
8.
Front Physiol ; 11: 802, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389234

ABSTRACT

We dissect the mechanism of SARS-CoV-2 in human lung host from the initial phase of receptor binding to viral replication machinery. Two independent lung protein interactome were constructed to reveal the signaling process on receptor activation and host protein hijacking machinery in the pathogenesis of virus. Further, we test the functional role of the hubs derived from the interactome. Most hubs proteins were differentially regulated on SARS-CoV-2 infection. Also, the proteins in viral replication hubs were related with cardiovascular disease, diabetes and hypertension confirming the vulnerability and severity of infection in the risk individual. Additionally, the hub proteins were closely linked with other viral infection, including MERS and HCoVs which suggest similar infection pattern in SARS-CoV-2. We identified five hubs that interconnect both networks that show the preparation of optimal environment in the host for viral replication process upon receptor attachment. Interestingly, we propose that seven potential miRNAs, targeting the intermediate phase that connects receptor and viral replication process a better choice as a drug for SARS-CoV-2.

9.
Front Pharmacol ; 11: 588480, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389229

ABSTRACT

Periodontitis is a complex multifactorial disease that can lead to destruction of tooth supporting tissues and subsequent tooth loss. The most recent global burden of disease studies highlight that severe periodontitis is one of the most prevalent chronic inflammatory conditions affecting humans. Periodontitis risk is attributed to genetics, host-microbiome and environmental factors. Empirical diagnostic and prognostic systems have yet to be validated in the field of periodontics. Early diagnosis and intervention prevents periodontitis progression in most patients. Increased susceptibility and suboptimal control of modifiable risk factors can result in poor response to therapy, and relapse. The chronic immune-inflammatory response to microbial biofilms at the tooth or dental implant surface is associated with systemic conditions such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes or gastrointestinal diseases. Oral fluid-based biomarkers have demonstrated easy accessibility and potential as diagnostics for oral and systemic diseases, including the identification of SARS-CoV-2 in saliva. Advances in biotechnology have led to innovations in lab-on-a-chip and biosensors to interface with oral-based biomarker assessment. This review highlights new developments in oral biomarker discovery and their validation for clinical application to advance precision oral medicine through improved diagnosis, prognosis and patient stratification. Their potential to improve clinical outcomes of periodontitis and associated chronic conditions will benefit the dental and overall public health.

10.
Front Immunol ; 11: 624411, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389173

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 is wreaking havoc around the world. To get the world back on track, hundreds of vaccines are under development. A deeper understanding of how the immune system responds to SARS-CoV-2 re-infection will certainly help. Studies have highlighted various aspects of T cell response in resolving acute infection and preventing re-infections. Lung resident memory T (TRM) cells are sentinels in the secondary immune response. They are mostly differentiated from effector T cells, construct specific niches and stay permanently in lung tissues. If the infection recurs, locally activated lung TRM cells can elicit rapid immune response against invading pathogens. In addition, they can significantly limit tumor growth or lead to pathologic immune responses. Vaccines targeting TRM cells are under development, with the hope to induce stable and highly reactive lung TRM cells through mucosal administration or "prime-and-pull" strategy. In this review, we will summarize recent advances in lung TRM cell generation and maintenance, explore their roles in different diseases and discuss how these cells may guide the development of future vaccines targeting infectious disease, cancer, and pathologic immune response.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Immunotherapy, Adoptive/methods , Lung/immunology , Neoplasms/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Vaccines/immunology , Animals , Humans , Immunologic Memory , Lymphocyte Activation , T-Lymphocytes/transplantation
11.
Front Immunol ; 11: 605688, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389170

ABSTRACT

Aim: SARS-CoV-2 infection is a world-wide public health problem. Several aspects of its pathogenesis and the related clinical consequences still need elucidation. In Italy, Sardinia has had very low numbers of infections. Taking advantage of the low genetic polymorphism in the Sardinian population, we analyzed clinical, genetic and immunogenetic factors, with particular attention to HLA class I and II molecules, to evaluate their influence on susceptibility to SARS-CoV-2 infection and the clinical outcome. Method and Materials: We recruited 619 healthy Sardinian controls and 182 SARS-CoV-2 patients. Thirty-nine patients required hospital care and 143 were without symptoms, pauci-symptomatic or with mild disease. For all participants, we collected demographic and clinical data and analyzed the HLA allele and haplotype frequencies. Results: Male sex and older age were more frequent in hospitalized patients, none of whom had been vaccinated during the previous seasonal flu vaccination campaignes. Compared to the group of asymptomatic or pauci-symptomatic patients, hospitalized patients also had a higher frequency of autoimmune diseases and glucose-6-phosphate-dehydrogenase (G6PDH) deficiency. None of these patients carried the beta-thalassemia trait, a relatively common finding in the Sardinian population. The extended haplotype HLA-A*02:05, B*58:01, C*07:01, DRB1*03:01 [OR 0.1 (95% CI 0-0.6), Pc = 0.015] was absent in all 182 patients, while the HLA-C*04:01 allele and the three-loci haplotype HLA-A*30:02, B*14:02, C*08:02 [OR 3.8 (95% CI 1.8-8.1), Pc = 0.025] were more frequently represented in patients than controls. In a comparison between in-patients and home care patients, the HLA-DRB1*08:01 allele was exclusively present in the hospitalized patients [OR > 2.5 (95% CI 2.7-220.6), Pc = 0.024]. Conclusion: The data emerging from our study suggest that the extended haplotype HLA-A*02:05, B*58:01, C*07:01, DRB1*03:01 has a protective effect against SARS-CoV-2 infection in the Sardinian population. Genetic factors that resulted to have a negative influence on the disease course were presence of the HLA-DRB1*08:01 allele and G6PDH deficiency, but not the beta-thalassemic trait. Absence of influenza vaccination could be a predisposing factor for more severe disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Gene Frequency , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , HLA-DRB1 Chains , Histocompatibility Antigens Class I , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/pathology , Female , HLA-DRB1 Chains/genetics , HLA-DRB1 Chains/immunology , Histocompatibility Antigens Class I/genetics , Histocompatibility Antigens Class I/immunology , Humans , Immunogenetics , Italy , Male , Middle Aged , Severity of Illness Index
12.
Front Immunol ; 11: 604759, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389169

ABSTRACT

Objective: To first describe and estimate the potential pathogenic role of Ig4 autoantibodies in complement-mediated thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) in a patient with IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD). Methods: This study is a case report presenting a retrospective review of the patient's medical chart. Plasma complement C3 and C4 levels, immunoglobulin isotypes and subclasses were determined by nephelometry, the complement pathways' activity (CH50, AP50, MBL) using WIESLAB® Complement System assays. Human complement factor H levels, anti-complement factor H auto-antibodies were analyzed by ELISA, using HRP-labeled secondary antibodies specific for human IgG, IgG4, and IgA, respectively. Genetic analyses were performed by exome sequencing of 14 gens implicated in complement disorders, as well as multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification looking specifically for CFH, CFHR1-2-3, and 5. Results: Our brief report presents the first case of IgG4-RD with complement-mediated TMA originating from both pathogenic CFHR 1 and CFHR 4 genes deletions, and inhibitory anti-complement factor H autoantibodies of the IgG4 subclass. Remission was achieved with plasmaphereses, corticosteroids, and cyclophosphamide. Following remission, the patient was diagnosed with lymphocytic meningitis and SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia with an uneventful recovery. Conclusion: IgG4-RD can be associated with pathogenic IgG4 autoantibodies. Genetic predisposition such as CFHR1 and CFHR4 gene deletions enhance the susceptibility to the formation of inhibitory anti-Factor H IgG4 antibodies.


Subject(s)
Apolipoproteins/genetics , Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome/genetics , Autoantibodies/immunology , Complement C3b Inactivator Proteins/genetics , Complement Factor H/immunology , Immunoglobulin G4-Related Disease/genetics , Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome/immunology , Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome/pathology , Female , Gene Deletion , Genetic Predisposition to Disease/genetics , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Immunoglobulin G4-Related Disease/immunology , Immunoglobulin G4-Related Disease/pathology , Middle Aged , Thrombotic Microangiopathies/immunology , Thrombotic Microangiopathies/pathology
13.
Nature ; 588(7837): 315-320, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1337122

ABSTRACT

There is increasing evidence that coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) produces more severe symptoms and higher mortality among men than among women1-5. However, whether immune responses against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) differ between sexes, and whether such differences correlate with the sex difference in the disease course of COVID-19, is currently unknown. Here we examined sex differences in viral loads, SARS-CoV-2-specific antibody titres, plasma cytokines and blood-cell phenotyping in patients with moderate COVID-19 who had not received immunomodulatory medications. Male patients had higher plasma levels of innate immune cytokines such as IL-8 and IL-18 along with more robust induction of non-classical monocytes. By contrast, female patients had more robust T cell activation than male patients during SARS-CoV-2 infection. Notably, we found that a poor T cell response negatively correlated with patients' age and was associated with worse disease outcome in male patients, but not in female patients. By contrast, higher levels of innate immune cytokines were associated with worse disease progression in female patients, but not in male patients. These findings provide a possible explanation for the observed sex biases in COVID-19, and provide an important basis for the development of a sex-based approach to the treatment and care of male and female patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Cytokines/immunology , Immunity, Innate/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Sex Characteristics , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/virology , Chemokines/blood , Chemokines/immunology , Cohort Studies , Cytokines/blood , Disease Progression , Female , Humans , Lymphocyte Activation , Male , Monocytes/immunology , Phenotype , Prognosis , RNA, Viral/analysis , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Viral Load
14.
Pharmacol Res ; 158: 104931, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1318940

ABSTRACT

Italy was the first European country hit by the COVID-19 pandemic and has the highest number of recorded COVID-19 deaths in Europe. This prospective cohort study of the correlates of the risk of death in COVID-19 patients was conducted at the Infectious Diseases and Intensive Care units of Luigi Sacco Hospital, Milan, Italy. The clinical characteristics of all the COVID-19 patients hospitalised in the early days of the epidemic (21 February -19 March 2020) were recorded upon admission, and the time-dependent probability of death was evaluated using the Kaplan-Meier method (censored as of 20 April 2020). Cox proportional hazard models were used to assess the factors independently associated with the risk of death. Forty-eight (20.6 %) of the 233 patients followed up for a median of 40 days (interquartile range 33-47) died during the follow-up. Most were males (69.1 %) and their median age was 61 years (IQR 50-72). The time-dependent probability of death was 19.7 % (95 % CI 14.6-24.9 %) 30 days after hospital admission. Age (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] 2.08, 95 % CI 1.48-2.92 per ten years more) and obesity (aHR 3.04, 95 % CI 1.42-6.49) were independently associated with an increased risk of death, which was also associated with critical disease (aHR 8.26, 95 % CI 1.41-48.29), C-reactive protein levels (aHR 1.17, 95 % CI 1.02-1.35 per 50 mg/L more) and creatinine kinase levels above 185 U/L (aHR 2.58, 95 % CI 1.37-4.87) upon admission. Case-fatality rate of patients hospitalized with COVID-19 in the early days of the Italian epidemic was about 20 %. Our study adds evidence to the notion that older age, obesity and more advanced illness are factors associated to an increased risk of death among patients hospitalized with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Age Factors , Aged , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Pharmacol Res ; 157: 104849, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1318926

ABSTRACT

Taking anti-inflammatory drugs, including non-steroidal (NSAIDs), during Covid-19 infection, how much is risky? The French Minister of Health, who has raised an alarm on a possible risk deriving from the use of ibuprofen for the control of fever and other symptoms during the disease, opened the debate a few days ago. In this paper we examine available evidence from preclinical and clinical studies that had analysed the role of COX in the inflammatory process and the effects of NSAIDs in patients with infections. Most of the published studies that suggested not protective effects of NSAIDs were mainly performed in vitro or on animals. Therefore, their meaning in humans is to be considered with great caution. Based also on data suggesting protective effects of NSAIDs, we concluded that currently there is no evidence suggesting a correlation between NSAIDs and a worsening of infections. Further studies will be certainly needed to better define the role of NSAIDs and particularly COX2 inhibitors in patients with infections. In the meantime, we must wait for results of the revision started by the PRAC on May 2019 on the association ibuprofen/ketoprofen​​​​​​ and worsening of infections. Since nowadays no scientific evidence establishes a correlation between NSAIDS and worsening of COVID-19, patients should be advice against any NSAIDs self-medication when COVID-19 like symptoms are present.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/adverse effects , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/adverse effects , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Virus Diseases/drug therapy , Animals , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , COVID-19 , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
16.
J Alzheimers Dis Rep ; 4(1): 537-551, 2020 Dec 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1256348

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic-triggered mortality is significantly higher in older than in younger populations worldwide. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is related to aging and was recently reported to be among the major risk factors for COVID-19 mortality in older people. The symptomatology of COVID-19 indicates that lethal outcomes of infection rely on neurogenic mechanisms. The present review compiles the available knowledge pointing to the convergence of COVID-19 complications with the mechanisms of autonomic dysfunctions in AD and aging. The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) is prone to neuroinvasion from the lung along the vagus nerve up to the brainstem autonomic nervous centers involved in the coupling of cardiovascular and respiratory rhythms. The brainstem autonomic network allows SARS-CoV-2 to trigger a neurogenic switch to hypertension and hypoventilation, which may act in synergy with aging- and AD-induced dysautonomias, along with an inflammatory "storm". The lethal outcomes of COVID-19, like in AD and unhealthy aging, likely rely on a critical hypoactivity of the efferent vagus nerve cholinergic pathway, which is involved in lowering cardiovascular pressure and systemic inflammation tone. We further discuss the emerging evidence supporting the use of 1) the non-invasive stimulation of vagus nerve as an additional therapeutic approach for severe COVID-19, and 2) the demonstrated vagal tone index, i.e., heart rate variability, via smartphone-based applications as a non-serological low-cost diagnostic of COVID-19. These two well-known medical approaches are already available and now deserve large-scale testing on human cohorts in the context of both AD and COVID-19.

17.
Sci Rep ; 10(1): 19117, 2020 11 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1242032

ABSTRACT

Podocyte injury has recently been described as unifying feature in idiopathic nephrotic syndromes (INS). Puumala hantavirus (PUUV) infection represents a unique RNA virus-induced renal disease with significant proteinuria. The underlying pathomechanism is unclear. We hypothesized that PUUV infection results in podocyte injury, similar to findings in INS. We therefore analyzed standard markers of glomerular proteinuria (e.g. immunoglobulin G [IgG]), urinary nephrin excretion (podocyte injury) and serum levels of the soluble urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR), a proposed pathomechanically involved molecule in INS, in PUUV-infected patients. Hantavirus patients showed significantly increased urinary nephrin, IgG and serum suPAR concentrations compared to healthy controls. Nephrin and IgG levels were significantly higher in patients with severe proteinuria than with mild proteinuria, and nephrin correlated strongly with biomarkers of glomerular proteinuria over time. Congruently, electron microcopy analyses showed a focal podocyte foot process effacement. suPAR correlated significantly with urinary nephrin, IgG and albumin levels, suggesting suPAR as a pathophysiological mediator in podocyte dysfunction. In contrast to INS, proteinuria recovered autonomously in hantavirus patients. This study reveals podocyte injury as main cause of proteinuria in hantavirus patients. A better understanding of the regenerative nature of hantavirus-induced glomerulopathy may generate new therapeutic approaches for INS.


Subject(s)
Glomerular Filtration Barrier/pathology , Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome/pathology , Kidney Glomerulus/pathology , Nephrotic Syndrome/pathology , Puumala virus , Adolescent , Adult , Female , Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome/blood , Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome/urine , Humans , Male , Membrane Proteins/urine , Middle Aged , Nephrotic Syndrome/blood , Nephrotic Syndrome/urine , Podocytes/pathology , Receptors, Urokinase Plasminogen Activator/blood , Young Adult
18.
Int J Clin Health Psychol ; 22(1): 100253, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1240382

ABSTRACT

A subset of recovered COVID-19 patients report persistent neurological symptoms. These include non-specific symptoms (e.g., headaches and fatigue) which were found to be affected by psychological processes in other disorders (e.g., post-concussion syndrome, PCS, after mild traumatic brain injury). The current study assessed the impact of diagnosis threat (i.e., information regarding the long-term neurological impact of COVID-19) and suggestibility on endorsed symptoms of both recovered patients and healthy controls. Method: Recovered patients (n = 90) and healthy controls (n = 210) described their cognitive functioning after being randomly assigned to: (a) Experimental group: These participants read an article that explored long-term neurological symptoms among COVID-19 survivors. (b) Control group: These participants read an article providing general information regarding the disease. Results: Recovered patients, but not healthy controls, endorsed more symptoms in the experimental condition compared to the control condition. Moreover, suggestibility was correlated with endorsement of symptoms. Conclusions: Post COVID-19 neurological symptoms may, at least partially, be affected by non-neurological factors such as diagnosis threat. Information regarding long-term effects of COVID-19 may skew reported symptoms with highly suggestible individuals particularly susceptible to these effects. Further research, however, is needed to validate and elaborate upon these initial findings.

19.
Vet Microbiol ; 242: 108569, 2020 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1207086

ABSTRACT

In the present study, we analyzed the immune response of calves to Brucella abortus strain 19 vaccine (S19) and its association with MHC class I (BoLA-A) alleles (exons 2-3 and 4-5). Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) was used for typing of BoLA-A exon 2-3 with DdeI and TaqI restriction enzymes; and exon 4-5 with HinfI in 45 crossbred calves. The PCR-RFLP analysis revealed five BoLA-A alleles each for exon 2-3 (A10/A19, A19, A18/19, A18 and A31) and exon 4-5 (A, B, C, D and E). Immune response against B. abortus S19 was assessed at the 4th week post vaccination; antibody response by standard tube agglutination test (STAT) and cell-mediated immunity by lymphocyte proliferation and lymphocyte-mediated cytotoxicity assays. Further, the macrophage function in terms of nitrite production was also analyzed. The association analysis of various BoLA-A alleles with the elicitation of immune response revealed that calves with certain defined genotypes induced significantly higher cell-mediated immune response in terms of lymphocyte proliferation with higher stimulation indices (S.I.) of 1.59 (BoLA-A19), 1.49 (A18/19) and 1.52 (HinfI-D); lymphocyte mediated cytotoxicity (55.52 % in A19) and nitrite production (43.40 µM in A31). It is assumed that allelic variants of BoLA-A (exons 2-3 and 4-5) were associated with the differential immune response of calves to B. abortus S19 vaccination. Therefore, further studies on association analysis of MHC class-I genes in large number of cattle may generate more information and might be useful for adapting the alternative approach of exploring genetic resistance in the cattle herd against bovine brucellosis.


Subject(s)
Brucellosis, Bovine/immunology , Histocompatibility Antigens Class I/genetics , Histocompatibility Antigens Class I/immunology , Immunity, Cellular , Age Factors , Alleles , Animals , Brucella Vaccine/administration & dosage , Brucella abortus/genetics , Brucellosis, Bovine/genetics , Cattle/immunology , Cattle/microbiology , Genetic Association Studies , Genetic Variation , Genotype , Lymphocyte Activation , Nitrites/metabolism
20.
Front Cardiovasc Med ; 7: 588692, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1206264

ABSTRACT

Cardiovascular disease causes almost one third of deaths worldwide, and more than half are related to primary arterial hypertension (PAH). The occurrence of several deleterious events, such as hyperactivation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), and oxidative and inflammatory stress, contributes to the development of small vessel disease in PAH. Small resistance arteries are found at various points through the arterial tree, act as the major site of vascular resistance, and actively regulate local tissue perfusion. Experimental and clinical studies demonstrate that alterations in small resistance artery properties are important features of PAH pathophysiology. Diseased small vessels in PAH show decreased lumens, thicker walls, endothelial dysfunction, and oxidative stress and inflammation. These events may lead to altered blood flow supply to tissues and organs, and can increase the risk of thrombosis. Notably, PAH is prevalent among patients diagnosed with COVID-19, in whom evidence of small vessel disease leading to cardiovascular pathology is reported. The SARS-Cov2 virus, responsible for COVID-19, achieves cell entry through an S (spike) high-affinity protein binding to the catalytic domain of the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), a negative regulator of the RAS pathway. Therefore, it is crucial to examine the relationship between small resistance artery disease, ACE2, and PAH, to understand COVID-19 morbidity and mortality. The scope of the present review is to briefly summarize available knowledge on the role of small resistance artery disease and ACE2 in PAH, and critically discuss their clinical relevance in the context of cardiovascular pathology associated to COVID-19.

SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...