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1.
Pediatr Infect Dis J ; 40(7): e274-e276, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1700567

ABSTRACT

Underlying mechanisms on the association between severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection and neurologic complications are still poorly understood. Cases of Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS) have been linked to the SARS-CoV-2 infection as the result of dysregulated immune response with damage in neuronal tissues. In the current report, we present the first pediatric case of GBS with detection of SARS-CoV-2 in the cerebrospinal fluid (CFS). This unique case of COVID-19-associated GBS with detection of SARS-CoV-2 RNA in the CSF indicates direct viral involvement inducing peripheral nerve inflammation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/cerebrospinal fluid , COVID-19/diagnosis , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/complications , RNA, Viral/cerebrospinal fluid , Adolescent , COVID-19/complications , Cauda Equina/diagnostic imaging , Cauda Equina/pathology , Cauda Equina/virology , Female , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/virology , Humans , Inflammation/virology , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
2.
Lancet Infect Dis ; 21(10): 1383-1394, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1621119

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Given the scale of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, the development of vaccines based on different platforms is essential, particularly in light of emerging viral variants, the absence of information on vaccine-induced immune durability, and potential paediatric use. We aimed to assess the safety and immunogenicity of an MF59-adjuvanted subunit vaccine for COVID-19 based on recombinant SARS-CoV-2 spike glycoprotein stabilised in a pre-fusion conformation by a novel molecular clamp (spike glycoprotein-clamp [sclamp]). METHODS: We did a phase 1, double-blind, placebo-controlled, block-randomised trial of the sclamp subunit vaccine in a single clinical trial site in Brisbane, QLD, Australia. Healthy adults (aged ≥18 to ≤55 years) who had tested negative for SARS-CoV-2, reported no close contact with anyone with active or previous SARS-CoV-2 infection, and tested negative for pre-existing SARS-CoV-2 immunity were included. Participants were randomly assigned to one of five treatment groups and received two doses via intramuscular injection 28 days apart of either placebo, sclamp vaccine at 5 µg, 15 µg, or 45 µg, or one dose of sclamp vaccine at 45 µg followed by placebo. Participants and study personnel, except the dose administration personnel, were masked to treatment. The primary safety endpoints included solicited local and systemic adverse events in the 7 days after each dose and unsolicited adverse events up to 12 months after dosing. Here, data are reported up until day 57. Primary immunogenicity endpoints were antigen-specific IgG ELISA and SARS-CoV-2 microneutralisation assays assessed at 28 days after each dose. The study is ongoing and registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT04495933. FINDINGS: Between June 23, 2020, and Aug 17, 2020, of 314 healthy volunteers screened, 120 were randomly assigned (n=24 per group), and 114 (95%) completed the study up to day 57 (mean age 32·5 years [SD 10·4], 65 [54%] male, 55 [46%] female). Severe solicited reactions were infrequent and occurred at similar rates in participants receiving placebo (two [8%] of 24) and the SARS-CoV-2 sclamp vaccine at any dose (three [3%] of 96). Both solicited reactions and unsolicited adverse events occurred at a similar frequency in participants receiving placebo and the SARS-CoV-2 sclamp vaccine. Solicited reactions occurred in 19 (79%) of 24 participants receiving placebo and 86 (90%) of 96 receiving the SARS-CoV-2 sclamp vaccine at any dose. Unsolicited adverse events occurred in seven (29%) of 24 participants receiving placebo and 35 (36%) of 96 participants receiving the SARS-CoV-2 sclamp vaccine at any dose. Vaccination with SARS-CoV-2 sclamp elicited a similar antigen-specific response irrespective of dose: 4 weeks after the initial dose (day 29) with 5 µg dose (geometric mean titre [GMT] 6400, 95% CI 3683-11 122), with 15 µg dose (7492, 4959-11 319), and the two 45 µg dose cohorts (8770, 5526-13 920 in the two-dose 45 µg cohort; 8793, 5570-13 881 in the single-dose 45 µg cohort); 4 weeks after the second dose (day 57) with two 5 µg doses (102 400, 64 857-161 676), with two 15 µg doses (74 725, 51 300-108 847), with two 45 µg doses (79 586, 55 430-114 268), only a single 45 µg dose (4795, 2858-8043). At day 57, 67 (99%) of 68 participants who received two doses of sclamp vaccine at any concentration produced a neutralising immune response, compared with six (25%) of 24 who received a single 45 µg dose and none of 22 who received placebo. Participants receiving two doses of sclamp vaccine elicited similar neutralisation titres, irrespective of dose: two 5 µg doses (GMT 228, 95% CI 146-356), two 15 µg doses (230, 170-312), and two 45 µg doses (239, 187-307). INTERPRETATION: This first-in-human trial shows that a subunit vaccine comprising mammalian cell culture-derived, MF59-adjuvanted, molecular clamp-stabilised recombinant spike protein elicits strong immune responses with a promising safety profile. However, the glycoprotein 41 peptide present in the clamp created HIV diagnostic assay interference, a possible barrier to widespread use highlighting the criticality of potential non-spike directed immunogenicity during vaccine development. Studies are ongoing with alternative molecular clamp trimerisation domains to ameliorate this response. FUNDING: Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations, National Health and Medical Research Council, Queensland Government, and further philanthropic sources listed in the acknowledgments.


Subject(s)
Adjuvants, Immunologic/pharmacology , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19/prevention & control , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Squalene/immunology , Adult , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Australia , Female , Healthy Volunteers , Humans , Male , Pandemics/prevention & control , Polysorbates , Vaccination/adverse effects , Young Adult
3.
Viral Immunol ; 34(3): 165-173, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1569564

ABSTRACT

The current pandemic is caused by the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), which is, in turn, induced by a novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) that triggers an acute respiratory disease. In recent years, the emergence of SARS-CoV-2 is the third highly pathogenic event and large-scale epidemic affecting the human population. It follows the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) in 2003 and the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) in 2012. This novel SARS-CoV-2 employs the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptor, like SARS-CoV, and spreads principally in the respiratory tract. The viral spike (S) protein of coronaviruses facilities the attachment to the cellular receptor, entrance, and membrane fusion. The S protein is a glycoprotein and is critical to elicit an immune response. Glycosylation is a biologically significant post-translational modification in virus surface proteins. These glycans play important roles in the viral life cycle, structure, immune evasion, and cell infection. However, it is necessary to search for new information about viral behavior and immunological host's response after SARS-CoV-2 infection. The present review discusses the implications of the CoV-2 S protein glycosylation in the SARS-CoV-2/ACE2 interaction and the immunological response. Elucidation of the glycan repertoire on the spike protein can propel research for the development of an appropriate vaccine.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/physiology , COVID-19/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/physiology , Glycosylation , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/genetics
4.
Emerg Microbes Infect ; 10(1): 365-375, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1490458

ABSTRACT

Concerns about vaccine safety are an important reason for vaccine hesitancy, however, limited information is available on whether common adverse reactions following vaccination affect the immune response. Data from three clinical trials of recombinant vaccines were used in this post hoc analysis to assess the correlation between inflammation-related solicited adverse reactions (ISARs, including local pain, redness, swelling or induration and systematic fever) and immune responses after vaccination. In the phase III trial of the bivalent HPV-16/18 vaccine (Cecolin®), the geometric mean concentrations (GMCs) for IgG anti-HPV-16 and -18 (P<0.001) were significantly higher in participants with any ISAR following vaccination than in those without an ISAR. Local pain, induration, swelling and systemic fever were significantly correlated with higher GMCs for IgG anti-HPV-16 and/or anti-HPV-18, respectively. Furthermore, the analyses of the immunogenicity bridging study of Cecolin® and the phase III trial of a hepatitis E vaccine yielded similar results. Based on these results, we built a scoring model to quantify the inflammation reactions and found that the high score of ISAR indicates the strong vaccine-induced antibody level. In conclusion, this study suggests inflammation-related adverse reactions following vaccination potentially indicate a stronger immune response.


Subject(s)
Hepatitis E/immunology , Human papillomavirus 16/immunology , Human papillomavirus 18/immunology , Papillomavirus Infections/immunology , Papillomavirus Vaccines/immunology , Vaccines, Synthetic/immunology , Viral Hepatitis Vaccines/immunology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Female , Hepatitis E/prevention & control , Hepatitis E/virology , Human papillomavirus 16/genetics , Human papillomavirus 18/genetics , Humans , Immunity , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Papillomavirus Infections/prevention & control , Papillomavirus Infections/virology , Papillomavirus Vaccines/administration & dosage , Papillomavirus Vaccines/adverse effects , Papillomavirus Vaccines/genetics , Vaccination/adverse effects , Vaccines, Synthetic/administration & dosage , Vaccines, Synthetic/adverse effects , Vaccines, Synthetic/genetics , Viral Hepatitis Vaccines/administration & dosage , Viral Hepatitis Vaccines/adverse effects , Viral Hepatitis Vaccines/genetics , Young Adult
5.
Infect Disord Drug Targets ; 21(4): 541-552, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496791

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since December 2019, a novel coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, has caused global public health issues after being reported for the first time in Wuhan province of China. So far, there have been approximately 14.8 million confirmed cases and 0.614 million deaths due to the SARS-CoV-2 infection globally, and still, numbers are increasing. Although the virus has caused a global public health concern, no effective treatment has been developed. OBJECTIVE: One of the strategies to combat the COVID-19 disease caused by SARS-CoV-2 is the development of vaccines that can make humans immune to these infections. Considering this approach, in this study, an attempt has been made to design epitope-based vaccine for combatting COVID-19 disease by analyzing the complete proteome of the virus by using immuno-informatics tools. METHODS: The protein sequence of the SARS-CoV-2 was retrieved and the individual proteins were checked for their allergic potential. Then, from non-allergen proteins, antigenic epitopes were identified that could bind with MHCII molecules. The epitopes were modeled and docked to predict the interaction with MHCII molecules. The stability of the epitope-MHCII complex was further analyzed by performing a molecular dynamics simulation study. The selected vaccine candidates were also analyzed for their global population coverage and conservancy among SARS-related coronavirus species. RESULTS: The study has predicted 5 peptide molecules that can act as potential candidates for epitope- based vaccine development. Among the 5 selected epitopes, the peptide LRARSVSPK can be the most potent epitope because of its high geometric shape complementarity score, low ACE and very high response towards it by the world population (81.81% global population coverage). Further, molecular dynamic simulation analysis indicated the formation of a stable epitope-MHCII complex. The epitope LRARSVSPK was also found to be highly conserved among the SARS-CoV- -2 isolated from different countries. CONCLUSION: The study has predicted T-cell epitopes that can elicit a robust immune response in the global human population and act as potential vaccine candidates. However, the ability of these epitopes to act as vaccine candidate needs to be validated in wet lab studies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vaccines , Epitopes, B-Lymphocyte , Epitopes, T-Lymphocyte , Humans , Molecular Docking Simulation , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus
6.
Aging Clin Exp Res ; 33(7): 2031-2041, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1491488

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The rapid global spread of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the virus that causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), has re-ignited interest in the possible role of vitamin D in modulation of host responses to respiratory pathogens. Indeed, vitamin D supplementation has been proposed as a potential preventative or therapeutic strategy. Recommendations for any intervention, particularly in the context of a potentially fatal pandemic infection, should be strictly based on clinically informed appraisal of the evidence base. In this narrative review, we examine current evidence relating to vitamin D and COVID-19 and consider the most appropriate practical recommendations. OBSERVATIONS: Although there are a growing number of studies investigating the links between vitamin D and COVID-19, they are mostly small and observational with high risk of bias, residual confounding, and reverse causality. Extrapolation of molecular actions of 1,25(OH)2-vitamin D to an effect of increased 25(OH)-vitamin D as a result of vitamin D supplementation is generally unfounded, as is the automatic conclusion of causal mechanisms from observational studies linking low 25(OH)-vitamin D to incident disease. Efficacy is ideally demonstrated in the context of adequately powered randomised intervention studies, although such approaches may not always be feasible. CONCLUSIONS: At present, evidence to support vitamin D supplementation for the prevention or treatment of COVID-19 is inconclusive. In the absence of any further compelling data, adherence to existing national guidance on vitamin D supplementation to prevent vitamin D deficiency, predicated principally on maintaining musculoskeletal health, appears appropriate.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vitamin D Deficiency , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Vitamin D , Vitamins
7.
J Clin Endocrinol Metab ; 106(9): 2600-2605, 2021 08 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1409863

ABSTRACT

CONTEXT: Autoimmune/inflammatory syndrome induced by adjuvants (ASIA syndrome) can be seen as a postvaccination phenomenon that occurs after exposure to adjuvants in vaccines that increase the immune responses. There are very limited data regarding ASIA syndrome following severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) vaccines. OBJECTIVES: This work aims to report cases of subacute thyroiditis related to the SARS-CoV-2 vaccine. METHODS: We describe the clinical, laboratory, and imaging features of 3 cases of subacute thyroiditis after inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccine (CoronaVac®). Three female healthcare workers have applied to our clinic with anterior neck pain and fatigue 4 to 7 days after SARS-CoV-2 vaccination. Two of them were in the breastfeeding period. They were negative for thyroid antibodies, and there was no previous history of thyroid disease, upper respiratory tract infection, or COVID-19. Laboratory test results and imaging findings were consistent with subacute thyroiditis. RESULTS: SARS-CoV-2 vaccination can lead to subacute thyroiditis as a phenomenon of ASIA syndrome. Subacute thyroiditis may develop within a few days after the SARS-CoV-2 vaccination. Being in the postpartum period may be a facilitating factor for the development of ASIA syndrome after the SARS-CoV-2 vaccination. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first report of subacute thyroiditis as a phenomenon of ASIA syndrome after inactivated COVID-19 vaccination. Clinicians should be aware that subacute thyroiditis may develop as a manifestation of ASIA syndrome after the inactive SARS-CoV-2 vaccine.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Personnel , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Thyroiditis, Subacute/diagnosis , Adult , COVID-19/virology , Female , Humans , Prognosis , Thyroiditis, Subacute/etiology
8.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 70(23): 846-850, 2021 Jun 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389869

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, is constantly mutating, leading to new variants (1). Variants have the potential to affect transmission, disease severity, diagnostics, therapeutics, and natural and vaccine-induced immunity. In November 2020, CDC established national surveillance for SARS-CoV-2 variants using genomic sequencing. As of May 6, 2021, sequences from 177,044 SARS-CoV-2-positive specimens collected during December 20, 2020-May 6, 2021, from 55 U.S. jurisdictions had been generated by or reported to CDC. These included 3,275 sequences for the 2-week period ending January 2, 2021, compared with 25,000 sequences for the 2-week period ending April 24, 2021 (0.1% and 3.1% of reported positive SARS-CoV-2 tests, respectively). Because sequences might be generated by multiple laboratories and sequence availability varies both geographically and over time, CDC developed statistical weighting and variance estimation methods to generate population-based estimates of the proportions of identified variants among SARS-CoV-2 infections circulating nationwide and in each of the 10 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) geographic regions.* During the 2-week period ending April 24, 2021, the B.1.1.7 and P.1 variants represented an estimated 66.0% and 5.0% of U.S. SARS-CoV-2 infections, respectively, demonstrating the rise to predominance of the B.1.1.7 variant of concern† (VOC) and emergence of the P.1 VOC in the United States. Using SARS-CoV-2 genomic surveillance methods to analyze surveillance data produces timely population-based estimates of the proportions of variants circulating nationally and regionally. Surveillance findings demonstrate the potential for new variants to emerge and become predominant, and the importance of robust genomic surveillance. Along with efforts to characterize the clinical and public health impact of SARS-CoV-2 variants, surveillance can help guide interventions to control the COVID-19 pandemic in the United States.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Epidemiological Monitoring , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , United States/epidemiology
10.
J Med Virol ; 93(9): 5350-5357, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1384240

ABSTRACT

PARP14 and PARP9 play a key role in macrophage immune regulation. SARS-CoV-2 is an emerging viral disease that triggers hyper-inflammation known as a cytokine storm. In this study, using in silico tools, we hypothesize about the immunological phenomena of molecular mimicry between SARS-CoV-2 Nsp3 and the human PARP14 and PARP9. The results showed an epitope of SARS-CoV-2 Nsp3 protein that contains consensus sequences for both human PARP14 and PARP9 that are antigens for MHC Classes 1 and 2, which can potentially induce an immune response against human PARP14 and PARP9; while its depletion causes a hyper-inflammatory state in SARS-CoV-2 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Coronavirus Papain-Like Proteases/chemistry , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Neoplasm Proteins/chemistry , Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerases/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Amino Acid Sequence , Binding Sites , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Computer Simulation , Consensus Sequence , Coronavirus Papain-Like Proteases/genetics , Coronavirus Papain-Like Proteases/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/genetics , Cytokine Release Syndrome/pathology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Epitopes/chemistry , Epitopes/genetics , Epitopes/immunology , Gene Expression , Histocompatibility Antigens Class I/chemistry , Histocompatibility Antigens Class I/genetics , Histocompatibility Antigens Class I/immunology , Histocompatibility Antigens Class II/chemistry , Histocompatibility Antigens Class II/genetics , Histocompatibility Antigens Class II/immunology , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Humans , Macrophages/immunology , Macrophages/virology , Molecular Docking Simulation , Molecular Mimicry , Neoplasm Proteins/genetics , Neoplasm Proteins/immunology , Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerases/genetics , Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerases/immunology , Protein Binding , Protein Conformation, alpha-Helical , Protein Conformation, beta-Strand , Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Sequence Alignment , Sequence Homology, Amino Acid , Thermodynamics
11.
Genes Dis ; 7(4): 491-501, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1343219

ABSTRACT

Since the beginning of the 21st century, several viral outbreaks have threatened humankind and posed a new challenge to the modern healthcare system. The recent outbreak in Wuhan (December 2019), China, represents a beta coronavirus classified as novel Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Corona Virus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) which belongs to the Coronaviridae family. Novel SARS-CoV-2 represents a significant similarity with previous coronaviruses such as SARS-CoV in 2002, China and MERS-CoV in 2015, Middle East. However, preliminary research investigations have shown the novel SARS-CoV-2 evolved with several mutations and developed the capacity to cross the species, i.e., animal to human. The initial findings have shown that spike proteins are vital molecules target hACE2 receptor for its attachment and entry into cells. After successful entry virus primarily focuses on respiratory airway cell lines and triggers a massive immune response leading to mucus generation. In severe conditions, the virus is capable of forcing viral pneumonia leading to the collapse of the respiratory system, i.e., COVID19. So far, there is a lack of immunity against the virus in humans. At the same in the absence of therapeutic interventions, many countries experienced high mortality, such as the United States, European countries, i.e., Italy, Spain, France, and the United Kingdom. The vaccine development is underway and experiencing challenges, as many reports demonstrated genetic variations in viral genome and proteins as well. The present study provides a complete comprehensive overview of the novel SARS-CoV-2 outbreak, human transmission, and global spread.

12.
J Virol ; 95(15): e0020321, 2021 07 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1305505

ABSTRACT

The majority of SARS-CoV-2 vaccines in use or advanced development are based on the viral spike protein (S) as their immunogen. S is present on virions as prefusion trimers in which the receptor binding domain (RBD) is stochastically open or closed. Neutralizing antibodies have been described against both open and closed conformations. The long-term success of vaccination strategies depends upon inducing antibodies that provide long-lasting broad immunity against evolving SARS-CoV-2 strains. Here, we have assessed the results of immunization in a mouse model using an S protein trimer stabilized in the closed state to prevent full exposure of the receptor binding site and therefore interaction with the receptor. We compared this with other modified S protein constructs, including representatives used in current vaccines. We found that all trimeric S proteins induced a T cell response and long-lived, strongly neutralizing antibody responses against 2019 SARS-CoV-2 and variants of concern P.1 and B.1.351. Notably, the protein binding properties of sera induced by the closed spike differed from those induced by standard S protein constructs. Closed S proteins induced more potent neutralizing responses than expected based on the degree to which they inhibit interactions between the RBD and ACE2. These observations suggest that closed spikes recruit different, but equally potent, immune responses than open spikes and that this is likely to include neutralizing antibodies against conformational epitopes present in the closed conformation. We suggest that closed spikes, together with their improved stability and storage properties, may be a valuable component of refined, next-generation vaccines. IMPORTANCE Vaccines in use against SARS-CoV-2 induce immune responses against the spike protein. There is intense interest in whether the antibody response induced by vaccines will be robust against new variants, as well as in next-generation vaccines for use in previously infected or immunized individuals. We assessed the use as an immunogen of a spike protein engineered to be conformationally stabilized in the closed state where the receptor binding site is occluded. Despite occlusion of the receptor binding site, the spike induces potently neutralizing sera against multiple SARS-CoV-2 variants. Antibodies are raised against a different pattern of epitopes to those induced by other spike constructs, preferring conformational epitopes present in the closed conformation. Closed spikes, or mRNA vaccines based on their sequence, can be a valuable component of next-generation vaccines.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , Antibodies, Neutralizing , Antibodies, Viral , Epitopes , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/chemistry , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/immunology , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/chemistry , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/chemistry , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/chemistry , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Epitopes/chemistry , Epitopes/immunology , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Mice , Protein Stability , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology
13.
Hormones (Athens) ; 20(4): 657-667, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1275039

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) is the pathogen agent causing coronavirus disease (COVID)-19, which was declared a global pandemic in 2020. The spike protein of this virus and the angiotensin-converter enzyme (ACE)-2 in host cells in humans play a vital role in infection and in COVID-19 pathogenesis. Estradiol is known to modulate the actions of immune cells, and, therefore, the antiviral mechanisms of these cells could also be modified by this hormone stimulus. Even though estradiol is not considered a protective factor, evidence shows that women with high levels of this hormone have a lower risk of developing severe symptoms and an even a lower incidence of death. Understanding the mechanism of action of estradiol with regard to viral infections and COVID-19 is essential for the improvement of therapeutic strategies. This review aims to describe the effects that estradiol exerts on immune cells during viral infections and COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Estradiol/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Female , Humans , Immunity , Pandemics
14.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 118(27)2021 07 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1276013

ABSTRACT

The spike (S) protein of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) plays a key role in viral infectivity. It is also the major antigen stimulating the host's protective immune response, specifically, the production of neutralizing antibodies. Recently, a new variant of SARS-CoV-2 possessing multiple mutations in the S protein, designated P.1, emerged in Brazil. Here, we characterized a P.1 variant isolated in Japan by using Syrian hamsters, a well-established small animal model for the study of SARS-CoV-2 disease (COVID-19). In hamsters, the variant showed replicative abilities and pathogenicity similar to those of early and contemporary strains (i.e., SARS-CoV-2 bearing aspartic acid [D] or glycine [G] at position 614 of the S protein). Sera and/or plasma from convalescent patients and BNT162b2 messenger RNA vaccinees showed comparable neutralization titers across the P.1 variant, S-614D, and S-614G strains. In contrast, the S-614D and S-614G strains were less well recognized than the P.1 variant by serum from a P.1-infected patient. Prior infection with S-614D or S-614G strains efficiently prevented the replication of the P.1 variant in the lower respiratory tract of hamsters upon reinfection. In addition, passive transfer of neutralizing antibodies to hamsters infected with the P.1 variant or the S-614G strain led to reduced virus replication in the lower respiratory tract. However, the effect was less pronounced against the P.1 variant than the S-614G strain. These findings suggest that the P.1 variant may be somewhat antigenically different from the early and contemporary strains of SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Virus Replication , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/pathology , Cricetinae , Humans , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , Lung/pathology , Mesocricetus , Mice , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , X-Ray Microtomography
15.
Sci Immunol ; 6(60)2021 06 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1270873

ABSTRACT

The inclusion of infants in the SARS-CoV-2 vaccine roll-out is important to prevent severe complications of pediatric SARS-CoV-2 infections and to limit transmission and could possibly be implemented via the global pediatric vaccine schedule. However, age-dependent differences in immune function require careful evaluation of novel vaccines in the pediatric population. Toward this goal, we assessed the safety and immunogenicity of two SARS-CoV-2 vaccines. Two groups of 8 infant rhesus macaques (RMs) were immunized intramuscularly at weeks 0 and 4 with stabilized prefusion SARS-CoV-2 S-2P spike (S) protein encoded by mRNA encapsulated in lipid nanoparticles (mRNA-LNP) or the purified S protein mixed with 3M-052, a synthetic TLR7/8 agonist in a squalene emulsion (Protein+3M-052-SE). Neither vaccine induced adverse effects. Both vaccines elicited high magnitude IgG binding to RBD, N terminus domain, S1, and S2, ACE2 blocking activity, and high neutralizing antibody titers, all peaking at week 6. S-specific memory B cells were detected by week 4 and S-specific T cell responses were dominated by the production of IL-17, IFN-γ, or TNF-α. Antibody and cellular responses were stable through week 22. The immune responses for the mRNA-LNP vaccine were of a similar magnitude to those elicited by the Moderna mRNA-1273 vaccine in adults. The S-2P mRNA-LNP and Protein-3M-052-SE vaccines were well-tolerated and highly immunogenic in infant RMs, providing proof-of concept for a pediatric SARS-CoV-2 vaccine with the potential for durable immunity that might decrease the transmission of SARS-CoV-2 and mitigate the ongoing health and socioeconomic impacts of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Animals , Animals, Newborn , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/prevention & control , Macaca mulatta , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/administration & dosage , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology
16.
Emerg Microbes Infect ; 10(1): 1284-1292, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1268056

ABSTRACT

The circulation of SARS-CoV-2 has resulted in the emergence of variants of concern (VOCs). It is currently unclear whether the previous infection with SARS-CoV-2 provides protection against reinfection with VOCs. Here, we show that low dose aerosol exposure to hCoV-19/human/USA/WA-CDC-WA1/2020 (WA1, lineage A), resulted in a productive mild infection. In contrast, a low dose of SARS-CoV-2 via fomites did not result in productive infection in the majority of exposed hamsters and these animals remained non-seroconverted. After recovery, hamsters were re-exposed to hCoV-19/South African/KRISP-K005325/2020 (VOC B.1.351) via an intranasal challenge. Seroconverted rechallenged animals did not lose weight and shed virus for three days. They had a little infectious virus and no pathology in the lungs. In contrast, shedding, weight loss and extensive pulmonary pathology caused by B.1.351 replication were observed in the non-seroconverted animals. The rechallenged seroconverted animals did not transmit the virus to naïve sentinels via direct contact transmission, in contrast to the non-seroconverted animals. Reinfection with B.1.351 triggered an anamnestic response that boosted not only neutralizing titres against lineage A, but also titres against B.1.351. Our results confirm that aerosol exposure is a more efficient infection route than fomite exposure. Furthermore, initial infection with SARS-CoV-2 lineage A does not prevent heterologous reinfection with B.1.351 but prevents disease and onward transmission. These data suggest that previous SARS-CoV-2 exposure induces partial protective immunity. The reinfection generated a broadly neutralizing humoral response capable of effectively neutralizing B.1.351 while maintaining its ability to neutralize the virus to which the initial response was directed against.


Subject(s)
Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies/blood , COVID-19/immunology , Fomites/virology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Sequence Analysis, RNA/methods , Animals , Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19/virology , Chlorocebus aethiops , Cricetinae , Disease Models, Animal , Female , High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Seroconversion , Severity of Illness Index , Vero Cells , Viral Load , Virus Replication
17.
Virologie (Montrouge) ; 25(3): 141-147, 2021 06 01.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1266596

ABSTRACT

Outside of SARS-CoV-2 vaccines, there is little positive outlook for the control of Covid-19 epidemic. Schematically, two antagonistic and extreme strategies have been proposed, zero-covid and herd immunity. Between the two, often oscillating measures, based on medical but also societal and political considerations, have been taken without any major effect on the course of the epidemic. Vaccines are a game-changer by providing a real opportunity to sustainably protect everyone against infection and eliminate the circulation of the virus. The Pfizer, Moderna and AstraZeneca vaccines, the three currently authorized in France, overall induce remarkable protection rates of 95 %, 94 % and 70 % respectively. The surprise came from that this efficacy was obtained after a rapid development, by targeting only the viral protein S as antigen, and by using the administration of expression vectors innovative in vaccinology, consisting of either messenger RNA or recombinant adenovirus. However, bringing the epidemic under control requires a well-organized mass vaccination campaign. It also requires careful monitoring of many parameters such as the occurrence of adverse events, duration of induced immunity, vaccine efficacy against emerging variants of SARS-CoV-2, interest or not of vaccinating people already infected, vaccination of immunocompromised patients. Vaccination must be accompanied by the maintenance of barrier measures and gestures and an amplification of clinical and biological investigations both to validate its effectiveness on the Covid-19 epidemic and to prepare for future developments in vaccinology.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19 Vaccines , France , Humans , Immunity, Herd , SARS-CoV-2
18.
J Virol ; 95(13): e0223220, 2021 06 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1263906

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has initiated a global pandemic, and several vaccines have now received emergency use authorization. Using the reference strain SARS-CoV-2 USA-WA1/2020, we evaluated modes of transmission and the ability of prior infection or vaccine-induced immunity to protect against infection in ferrets. Ferrets were semipermissive to infection with the USA-WA1/2020 isolate. When transmission was assessed via the detection of viral RNA (vRNA) at multiple time points, direct contact transmission was efficient to 3/3 and 3/4 contact animals in 2 respective studies, while respiratory droplet transmission was poor to only 1/4 contact animals. To determine if previously infected ferrets were protected against reinfection, ferrets were rechallenged 28 or 56 days postinfection. Following viral challenge, no infectious virus was recovered in nasal wash samples. In addition, levels of vRNA in the nasal wash were several orders of magnitude lower than during primary infection, and vRNA was rapidly cleared. To determine if intramuscular vaccination protected ferrets, ferrets were vaccinated using a prime-boost strategy with the S protein receptor-binding domain formulated with an oil-in-water adjuvant. Upon viral challenge, none of the mock or vaccinated animals were protected against infection, and there were no significant differences in vRNA or infectious virus titers in the nasal wash. Combined, these studies demonstrate direct contact is the predominant mode of transmission of the USA-WA1/2020 isolate in ferrets and that immunity to SARS-CoV-2 is maintained for at least 56 days. Our studies also indicate protection of the upper respiratory tract against SARS-CoV-2 will require vaccine strategies that mimic natural infection or induce site-specific immunity. IMPORTANCE The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) USA-WA1/2020 strain is a CDC reference strain used by multiple research laboratories. Here, we show that the predominant mode of transmission of this isolate in ferrets is by direct contact. We further demonstrate ferrets are protected against reinfection for at least 56 days even when levels of neutralizing antibodies are low or undetectable. Last, we show that when ferrets were vaccinated by the intramuscular route to induce antibodies against SARS-CoV-2, ferrets remain susceptible to infection of the upper respiratory tract. Collectively, these studies suggest that protection of the upper respiratory tract will require vaccine approaches that mimic natural infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/transmission , Disease Models, Animal , Reinfection/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Animals , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Ferrets , Injections, Intramuscular , Nose/virology , Reinfection/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/administration & dosage , Viral Load
19.
Cell Discov ; 7(1): 42, 2021 Jun 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1261993

ABSTRACT

The pathophysiology of coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) involves a multitude of host responses, yet how they unfold during the course of disease progression remains unclear. Here, through integrative analysis of clinical laboratory tests, targeted proteomes, and transcriptomes of 963 patients in Shanghai, we delineate the dynamics of multiple circulatory factors within the first 30 days post-illness onset and during convalescence. We show that hypercortisolemia represents one of the probable causes of acute lymphocytopenia at the onset of severe/critical conditions. Comparison of the transcriptomes of the bronchoalveolar microenvironment and peripheral blood indicates alveolar macrophages, alveolar epithelial cells, and monocytes in lungs as the potential main sources of elevated cytokines mediating systemic immune responses and organ damages. In addition, the transcriptomes of patient blood cells are characterized by distinct gene regulatory networks and alternative splicing events. Our study provides a panorama of the host responses in COVID-19, which may serve as the basis for developing further diagnostics and therapy.

20.
Cytokine Growth Factor Rev ; 60: 52-60, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1252646

ABSTRACT

Antiphospholipid antibodies (aPLs), present in 1-5 % of healthy individuals, are associated with the risk of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS), which is the most common form of acquired thrombophilia. APLs may appear following infections or vaccinations and have been reported in patients with COronaVIrus Disease-2019 (COVID-19). However, their association with COVID-19 vaccination is unclear. Notably, a few cases of thrombocytopenia and thrombotic events resembling APS have been reported to develop in recipients of either adenoviral vector- or mRNA-based COVID-19 vaccines. The aim of this review is therefore to speculate on the plausible role of aPLs in the pathogenesis of these rare adverse events. Adenoviral vector-based vaccines can bind platelets and induce their destruction in the reticuloendothelial organs. Liposomal mRNA-based vaccines may instead favour activation of coagulation factors and confer a pro-thrombotic phenotype to endothelial cells and platelets. Furthermore, both formulations may trigger a type I interferon response associated with the generation of aPLs. In turn, aPLs may lead to aberrant activation of the immune response with participation of innate immune cells, cytokines and the complement cascade. NETosis, monocyte recruitment and cytokine release may further support endothelial dysfunction and promote platelet aggregation. These considerations suggest that aPLs may represent a risk factor for thrombotic events following COVID-19 vaccination, and deserve further investigations.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Antiphospholipid/analysis , Antibodies, Antiphospholipid/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Thrombophilia/etiology , Antiphospholipid Syndrome/etiology , Antiphospholipid Syndrome/immunology , Contraindications, Drug , Humans , Thrombophilia/immunology
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