Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 466
Filter
1.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 17(12)2020 06 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1725662

ABSTRACT

Sars-cov-2 virus (Covid-19) is a member of the coronavirus family and is responsible for the pandemic recently declared by the World Health Organization. A positive correlation has been observed between the spread of the virus and air pollution, one of the greatest challenges of our millennium. Covid-19 could have an air transmission and atmospheric particulate matter (PM) could create a suitable environment for transporting the virus at greater distances than those considered for close contact. Moreover, PM induces inflammation in lung cells and exposure to PM could increase the susceptibility and severity of the Covid-19 patient symptoms. The new coronavirus has been shown to trigger an inflammatory storm that would be sustained in the case of pre-exposure to polluting agents. In this review, we highlight the potential role of PM in the spread of Covid-19, focusing on Italian cities whose PM daily concentrations were found to be higher than the annual average allowed during the months preceding the epidemic. Furthermore, we analyze the positive correlation between the virus spread, PM, and angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), a receptor involved in the entry of the virus into pulmonary cells and inflammation.


Subject(s)
Air Pollution/adverse effects , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Particulate Matter , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Aerosols , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , COVID-19 , Cities , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Humans , Inflammation/etiology , Italy/epidemiology , Morbidity , Oxidative Stress , Pandemics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Brain Behav Immun ; 87: 53-54, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1719338

ABSTRACT

While all groups are affected by the COVID-19 pandemic, the elderly, underrepresented minorities, and those with underlying medical conditions are at the greatest risk. The high rate of consumption of diets high in saturated fats, sugars, and refined carbohydrates (collectively called Western diet, WD) worldwide, contribute to the prevalence of obesity and type 2 diabetes, and could place these populations at an increased risk for severe COVID-19 pathology and mortality. WD consumption activates the innate immune system and impairs adaptive immunity, leading to chronic inflammation and impaired host defense against viruses. Furthermore, peripheral inflammation caused by COVID-19 may have long-term consequences in those that recover, leading to chronic medical conditions such as dementia and neurodegenerative disease, likely through neuroinflammatory mechanisms that can be compounded by an unhealthy diet. Thus, now more than ever, wider access to healthy foods should be a top priority and individuals should be mindful of healthy eating habits to reduce susceptibility to and long-term complications from COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/epidemiology , Diet, Western/statistics & numerical data , Inflammation/epidemiology , Obesity/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Adaptive Immunity/immunology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Dementia/epidemiology , Dementia/immunology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/immunology , Diet , Disease Susceptibility , Humans , Immunity, Innate/immunology , Inflammation/immunology , Neurodegenerative Diseases/epidemiology , Neurodegenerative Diseases/immunology , Nutritional Status , Obesity/immunology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Pediatr Infect Dis J ; 40(7): e274-e276, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1700567

ABSTRACT

Underlying mechanisms on the association between severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection and neurologic complications are still poorly understood. Cases of Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS) have been linked to the SARS-CoV-2 infection as the result of dysregulated immune response with damage in neuronal tissues. In the current report, we present the first pediatric case of GBS with detection of SARS-CoV-2 in the cerebrospinal fluid (CFS). This unique case of COVID-19-associated GBS with detection of SARS-CoV-2 RNA in the CSF indicates direct viral involvement inducing peripheral nerve inflammation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/cerebrospinal fluid , COVID-19/diagnosis , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/complications , RNA, Viral/cerebrospinal fluid , Adolescent , COVID-19/complications , Cauda Equina/diagnostic imaging , Cauda Equina/pathology , Cauda Equina/virology , Female , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/virology , Humans , Inflammation/virology , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
4.
J Bras Nefrol ; 43(4): 551-571, 2021.
Article in English, Portuguese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575271

ABSTRACT

Acute kidney injury (AKI) in hospitalized patients with COVID-19 is associated with higher mortality and a worse prognosis. Nevertheless, most patients with COVID-19 have mild symptoms, and about 5% can develop more severe symptoms and involve hypovolemia and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. In a pathophysiological perspective, severe SARS-CoV-2 infection is characterized by numerous dependent pathways triggered by hypercytokinemia, especially IL-6 and TNF-alpha, leading to systemic inflammation, hypercoagulability, and multiple organ dysfunction. Systemic endotheliitis and direct viral tropism to proximal renal tubular cells and podocytes are important pathophysiological mechanisms leading to kidney injury in patients with more critical infection, with a clinical presentation ranging from proteinuria and/or glomerular hematuria to fulminant AKI requiring renal replacement therapies. Glomerulonephritis, rhabdomyolysis, and nephrotoxic drugs are also associated with kidney damage in patients with COVID-19. Thus, AKI and proteinuria are independent risk factors for mortality in patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection. We provide a comprehensive review of the literature emphasizing the impact of acute kidney involvement in the evolutive prognosis and mortality of patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury , COVID-19 , Acute Kidney Injury/therapy , Humans , Proteinuria , Renal Replacement Therapy , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Life Sci ; 284: 119201, 2021 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574805

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Cytokine storm is the exaggerated immune response often observed in viral infections. It is also intimately linked with the progression of COVID-19 disease as well as associated complications and mortality. Therefore, targeting the cytokine storm might help in reducing COVID-19-associated health complications. The number of COVID-19 associated deaths (as of January 15, 2021; https://www.worldometers.info/coronavirus/) in the USA is high (1199/million) as compared to countries like India (110/million). Although the reason behind this is not clear, spices may have some role in explaining this difference. Spices and herbs are used in different traditional medicines, especially in countries such as India to treat various chronic diseases due to their potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. AIM: To evaluate the literature available on the anti-inflammatory properties of spices which might prove beneficial in the prevention and treatment of COVID-19 associated cytokine storm. METHOD: A detailed literature search has been conducted on PubMed for collecting information pertaining to the COVID-19; the history, origin, key structural features, and mechanism of infection of SARS-CoV-2; the repurposed drugs in use for the management of COVID-19, and the anti-inflammatory role of spices to combat COVID-19 associated cytokine storm. KEY FINDINGS: The literature search resulted in numerous in vitro, in vivo and clinical trials that have reported the potency of spices to exert anti-inflammatory effects by regulating crucial molecular targets for inflammation. SIGNIFICANCE: As spices are derived from Mother Nature and are inexpensive, they are relatively safer to consume. Therefore, their anti-inflammatory property can be exploited to combat the cytokine storm in COVID-19 patients. This review thus focuses on the current knowledge on the role of spices for the treatment of COVID-19 through suppression of inflammation-linked cytokine storm.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Cytokines/metabolism , Inflammation/pathology , Spices , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/pathology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
6.
Front Immunol ; 12: 587146, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574304

ABSTRACT

The Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is a fast spreading virus leading to the development of Coronavirus Disease-2019 (COVID-19). Severe and critical cases are characterized by damage to the respiratory system, endothelial inflammation, and multiple organ failure triggered by an excessive production of proinflammatory cytokines, culminating in the high number of deaths all over the world. Sedentarism induces worse, continuous, and progressive consequences to health. On the other hand, physical activity provides benefits to health and improves low-grade systemic inflammation. The aim of this review is to elucidate the effects of physical activity in physical fitness, immune defense, and its contribution to mitigate the severe inflammatory response mediated by SARS-CoV-2. Physical exercise is an effective therapeutic strategy to mitigate the consequences of SARS-CoV-2 infection. In this sense, studies have shown that acute physical exercise induces the production of myokines that are secreted in tissues and into the bloodstream, supporting its systemic modulatory effect. Therefore, maintaining physical activity influence balance the immune system and increases immune vigilance, and also might promote potent effects against the consequences of infectious diseases and chronic diseases associated with the development of severe forms of COVID-19. Protocols to maintain exercise practice are suggested and have been strongly established, such as home-based exercise (HBE) and outdoor-based exercise (OBE). In this regard, HBE might help to reduce levels of physical inactivity, bed rest, and sitting time, impacting on adherence to physical activity, promoting all the benefits related to exercise, and attracting patients in different stages of treatment for COVID-19. In parallel, OBE must improve health, but also prevent and mitigate COVID-19 severe outcomes in all populations. In conclusion, HBE or OBE models can be a potent strategy to mitigate the progress of infection, and a coadjutant therapy for COVID-19 at all ages and different chronic conditions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Exercise , Healthy Lifestyle , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Sedentary Behavior , Animals , Home Care Services , Humans , Physical Fitness , Social Isolation
7.
J Am Soc Nephrol ; 32(1): 69-85, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496661

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In children, the acute pyelonephritis that can result from urinary tract infections (UTIs), which commonly ascend from the bladder to the kidney, is a growing concern because it poses a risk of renal scarring and irreversible loss of kidney function. To date, the cellular mechanisms underlying acute pyelonephritis-driven renal scarring remain unknown. METHODS: We used a preclinical model of uropathogenic Escherichia coli-induced acute pyelonephritis to determine the contribution of neutrophils and monocytes to resolution of the condition and the subsequent development of kidney fibrosis. We used cell-specific monoclonal antibodies to eliminate neutrophils, monocytes, or both. Bacterial ascent and the cell dynamics of phagocytic cells were assessed by biophotonic imaging and flow cytometry, respectively. We used quantitative RT-PCR and histopathologic analyses to evaluate inflammation and renal scarring. RESULTS: We found that neutrophils are critical to control bacterial ascent, which is in line with previous studies suggesting a protective role for neutrophils during a UTI, whereas monocyte-derived macrophages orchestrate a strong, but ineffective, inflammatory response against uropathogenic, E. coli-induced, acute pyelonephritis. Experimental neutropenia during acute pyelonephritis resulted in a compensatory increase in the number of monocytes and heightened macrophage-dependent inflammation in the kidney. Exacerbated macrophage-mediated inflammatory responses promoted renal scarring and compromised renal function, as indicated by elevated serum creatinine, BUN, and potassium. CONCLUSIONS: These findings reveal a previously unappreciated outcome for neutrophil-macrophage imbalance in promoting host susceptibility to acute pyelonephritis and the development of permanent renal damage. This suggests targeting dysregulated macrophage responses might be a therapeutic tool to prevent renal scarring during acute pyelonephritis.


Subject(s)
Cicatrix/physiopathology , Kidney/physiopathology , Macrophages/cytology , Neutrophils/cytology , Pyelonephritis/metabolism , Animals , Escherichia coli , Female , Fibrosis/microbiology , Fibrosis/physiopathology , Inflammation , Kidney/microbiology , Mice , Mice, Inbred C3H , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Neutrophils/metabolism , Phagocytosis , Pyelonephritis/microbiology , Pyelonephritis/physiopathology , Urinary Tract Infections/microbiology , Urinary Tract Infections/physiopathology
8.
Biomed Pharmacother ; 137: 111419, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1392160

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Atherosclerosis, inflammatory disease, is a major reason for cardiovascular diseases and stroke. Kaempferol (Kae) has been well-documented to have pharmacological activities in the previous studies. However, the detailed mechanisms by which Kae regulates inflammation, oxidative stress, and apoptosis in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVECs) remain unknown. METHODS AND RESULTS: The real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) was used to measure expression levels of circNOL12, nucleolar protein 12 (NOL12), miR-6873-3p, and Fibroblast growth factor receptor substrate 2 (FRS2) in HUVECs treated with either oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) alone or in combination with Kae. The cells viability was assessed by 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazol-3-ium bromide (MTT) assay. The inflammation and oxidative stress were assessed by checking inflammatory factors, Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS), Superoxide Dismutase (SOD), and Malondialdehyde (MDA) levels in ox-LDL-induced HUVECs. The apoptotic cells were quantified by flow cytometry assay. The western blot assay was used for measuring protein expression. The interaction relationship between miR-6873-3p and circNOL12 or FRS2 was analyzed by dual-luciferase reporter and RNA pull-down assays. Treatment with Kae could inhibit ox-LDL-induced the upregulation of circNOL12 in HUVECs. Importantly, Kae weakened ox-LDL-induced inflammation, oxidative stress, and apoptosis in HUVECs, which was abolished by overexpression of circNOL12. What's more, miR-6873-3p was a target of circNOL12 in HUVECs, and the upregulation of miR-6873-3p overturned circNOL12 overexpression-induced effects on HUVECs treated with ox-LDL and Kae. FRS2 was negatively regulated by miR-6873-3p in HUVECs. CONCLUSION: Kae alleviated ox-LDL-induced inflammation, oxidative stress, and apoptosis in HUVECs by regulating circNOL12/miR-6873-3p/FRS2 axis.


Subject(s)
Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/drug effects , Endothelial Cells/drug effects , Kaempferols/pharmacology , Membrane Proteins/drug effects , MicroRNAs/drug effects , Nuclear Proteins/drug effects , RNA-Binding Proteins/drug effects , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology , Antioxidants/pharmacology , Apoptosis/drug effects , Female , Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells , Humans , Oxidative Stress/drug effects , Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism
9.
Med Hypotheses ; 146: 110396, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1386308

ABSTRACT

We have reviewed a considerable amount of recent scientific papers relating inflammation caused by air pollution with chronic and severe medical conditions. Furthermore, there are evidences relating organ inflammation caused by not only outdoor long-term but also short-term inhaled radioisotopes contained in high polluted air or in household natural radioactive background aerosols, in addition to SARS-COV-2 attached to bioaerosols, which are related with a worst evolution of severe acute respiratory syndrome patients. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production induced by the interaction with environmental ionizing radiation contained in pollution is pointed out as a critical mechanism that predispose mainly to elder population, but not excluding young subjects, presenting previous chronic conditions of lung inflammation or neuroinflammation, which can lead to the most serious consequences.


Subject(s)
Air Pollution, Radioactive/adverse effects , COVID-19/etiology , Climate Change , Inflammation/etiology , NLR Family, Pyrin Domain-Containing 3 Protein/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Aerosols , Air Microbiology , COVID-19/mortality , Causality , Humans , Inflammasomes/metabolism , Inflammasomes/radiation effects , Models, Biological , Nervous System Diseases/etiology , Pandemics , Particle Size , Particulate Matter/adverse effects , Pneumonia/etiology
10.
Clin Rheumatol ; 40(10): 4179-4189, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1384475

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) is a new clinical condition characterized by signs of inflammation and multiorgan dysfunction due to cytokine storm associated with SARS-CoV-2. The clinical spectrum of MIS-C ranges from mild to severe, and even to mortal multisystem involvement. To guide clinicians, we evaluated detailed demographic characteristics, clinical features, laboratory findings, and outcomes of MIS-C cases. METHODS: We performed a retrospective study of patients with MIS-C who were managed in the Department of Pediatric Infectious Disease in the Selcuk University Faculty of Medicine, Konya, Turkey. MIS-C patients were divided into three clinical severity groups (mild, moderate, and severe) and separated into three age groups (< 5 years, 5-10 years, > 10 years). We compared the characteristics of MIS-C cases according to the severity of the disease and by age groups. RESULT: Thirty-six children with MIS-C were evaluated (52.8% male, median age of 7.8 years). A clinical spectrum overlapping with Kawasaki disease (KD) was the most common presentation (69.4%) in all age groups. The most common clinical symptoms were fever (100%), mucocutaneous rash (69.4%), and gastrointestinal symptoms (66.6%). There was no statistically significant difference in echocardiographic abnormality between KD-like and the other clinical spectra (p > 0.05). All life-threatening rhythm disturbances were observed in severe cases. No patients died. CONCLUSION: It is important to increase the awareness of physicians about the MIS-C disease, which can present with different combinations of different systemic findings, so that patients can be diagnosed and treated in a timely manner. Key Points • A single tertiary centre study shows that children with MIS-C can present with different clinic spectra other than Kawasaki diseases. • Electrocardiographic and echocardiographic evaluation is important in early diagnosis of children with MIS-C. • Pro-BNP can be used as a screening test in the emergency room for children with prolonged and unexplained fever for determine early cardiac involvement of MIS-C. • The lack of require biological agents and favourable outcomes in children with MIS-C may be related with administration of steroid therapy with IVIG in early stage of disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Male , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome , Turkey/epidemiology
11.
J Med Virol ; 93(9): 5350-5357, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1384240

ABSTRACT

PARP14 and PARP9 play a key role in macrophage immune regulation. SARS-CoV-2 is an emerging viral disease that triggers hyper-inflammation known as a cytokine storm. In this study, using in silico tools, we hypothesize about the immunological phenomena of molecular mimicry between SARS-CoV-2 Nsp3 and the human PARP14 and PARP9. The results showed an epitope of SARS-CoV-2 Nsp3 protein that contains consensus sequences for both human PARP14 and PARP9 that are antigens for MHC Classes 1 and 2, which can potentially induce an immune response against human PARP14 and PARP9; while its depletion causes a hyper-inflammatory state in SARS-CoV-2 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Coronavirus Papain-Like Proteases/chemistry , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Neoplasm Proteins/chemistry , Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerases/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Amino Acid Sequence , Binding Sites , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Computer Simulation , Consensus Sequence , Coronavirus Papain-Like Proteases/genetics , Coronavirus Papain-Like Proteases/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/genetics , Cytokine Release Syndrome/pathology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Epitopes/chemistry , Epitopes/genetics , Epitopes/immunology , Gene Expression , Histocompatibility Antigens Class I/chemistry , Histocompatibility Antigens Class I/genetics , Histocompatibility Antigens Class I/immunology , Histocompatibility Antigens Class II/chemistry , Histocompatibility Antigens Class II/genetics , Histocompatibility Antigens Class II/immunology , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Humans , Macrophages/immunology , Macrophages/virology , Molecular Docking Simulation , Molecular Mimicry , Neoplasm Proteins/genetics , Neoplasm Proteins/immunology , Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerases/genetics , Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerases/immunology , Protein Binding , Protein Conformation, alpha-Helical , Protein Conformation, beta-Strand , Protein Interaction Domains and Motifs , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Sequence Alignment , Sequence Homology, Amino Acid , Thermodynamics
12.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(11)2021 May 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389398

ABSTRACT

Trypsin-like proteases (TLPs) belong to a family of serine enzymes with primary substrate specificities for the basic residues, lysine and arginine, in the P1 position. Whilst initially perceived as soluble enzymes that are extracellularly secreted, a number of novel TLPs that are anchored in the cell membrane have since been discovered. Muco-obstructive lung diseases (MucOLDs) are characterised by the accumulation of hyper-concentrated mucus in the small airways, leading to persistent inflammation, infection and dysregulated protease activity. Although neutrophilic serine proteases, particularly neutrophil elastase, have been implicated in the propagation of inflammation and local tissue destruction, it is likely that the serine TLPs also contribute to various disease-relevant processes given the roles that a number of these enzymes play in the activation of both the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) and protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2). More recently, significant attention has focused on the activation of viruses such as SARS-CoV-2 by host TLPs. The purpose of this review was to highlight key TLPs linked to the activation of ENaC and PAR2 and their association with airway dehydration and inflammatory signalling pathways, respectively. The role of TLPs in viral infectivity will also be discussed in the context of the inhibition of TLP activities and the potential of these proteases as therapeutic targets.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/enzymology , Lung Diseases, Obstructive/enzymology , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Trypsin/metabolism , Animals , COVID-19/pathology , Epithelial Sodium Channels/metabolism , Humans , Lung Diseases, Obstructive/pathology , Receptor, PAR-2/metabolism
13.
BMJ Case Rep ; 14(5)2021 May 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1388477

ABSTRACT

We describe the case of a 31-year-old man who presented with a 3-day history of right iliac fossa pain with associated nausea and vomiting. He denied any previous incidents of abdominal pain and had no relevant medical history or family history to note. Given the typical history, examination findings of localised peritonism and infection risk, he was taken to theatre for laparoscopic appendicectomy without diagnostic imaging. Intraoperatively, we noted gut malrotation and an inflammatory jejunal mass which was resected after converting to a mini-laparotomy. The inflammatory mass was reported to be an ectopic pancreatic tissue from histology. Given that this patient had tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 on admission, we propose a possible case of SARS-CoV-2 infection triggering inflammation of the ectopic pancreatic tissue.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Intestinal Volvulus , Adult , Humans , Ilium , Intestinal Volvulus/diagnosis , Intestinal Volvulus/diagnostic imaging , Male , Pancreas/diagnostic imaging , Pancreas/surgery , SARS-CoV-2
14.
mBio ; 12(2)2021 04 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1388457

ABSTRACT

Mammalian cells detect microbial molecules known as pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) as indicators of potential infection. Upon PAMP detection, diverse defensive responses are induced by the host, including those that promote inflammation and cell-intrinsic antimicrobial activities. Host-encoded molecules released from dying or damaged cells, known as damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), also induce defensive responses. Both DAMPs and PAMPs are recognized for their inflammatory potential, but only the latter are well established to stimulate cell-intrinsic host defense. Here, we report a class of DAMPs that engender an antiviral state in human epithelial cells. These DAMPs include oxPAPC (oxidized 1-palmitoyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine), PGPC (1-palmitoyl-2-glutaryl phosphatidylcholine), and POVPC [1-palmitoyl-2-(5-oxovaleroyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine], oxidized lipids that are naturally released from dead or dying cells. Exposing cells to these DAMPs prior to vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) infection limits viral replication. Mechanistically, these DAMPs prevent viral entry, thereby limiting the percentage of cells that are productively infected and consequently restricting viral load. We found that the antiviral actions of oxidized lipids are distinct from those mediated by the PAMP Poly I:C, in that the former induces a more rapid antiviral response without the induction of the interferon response. These data support a model whereby interferon-independent defensive activities can be induced by DAMPs, which may limit viral replication before PAMP-mediated interferon responses are induced. This antiviral activity may impact viruses that disrupt interferon responses in the oxygenated environment of the lung, such as influenza virus and SARS-CoV-2.IMPORTANCE In this work, we explored how a class of oxidized lipids, spontaneously created during tissue damage and unprogrammed cell lysis, block the earliest events in RNA virus infection in the human epithelium. This gives us novel insight into the ways that we view infection models, unveiling a built-in mechanism to slow viral growth that neither engages the interferon response nor is subject to known viral antagonism. These oxidized phospholipids act prior to infection, allowing time for other, better-known innate immune mechanisms to take effect. This discovery broadens our understanding of host defenses, introducing a soluble factor that alters the cellular environment to protect from RNA virus infection.


Subject(s)
Alarmins/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , RNA Viruses/drug effects , Virus Internalization/drug effects , Virus Replication/drug effects , A549 Cells , Cell Death/drug effects , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Interferons/genetics , Interferons/metabolism , Kinetics , Pathogen-Associated Molecular Pattern Molecules/pharmacology , Phosphatidylcholines/pharmacology , RNA Viruses/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Vesiculovirus/drug effects , Vesiculovirus/physiology , Viral Load
15.
Eur J Clin Pharmacol ; 76(11): 1615-1618, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1384377

ABSTRACT

AIM: SARS-CoV-2 infection has been divided by scientific opinion into three phases: the first as asymptomatic or slightly symptomatic and the second and the third with greater severity, characterized by a hyperinflammatory and fibrotic state, responsible for lung lesions, in some cases fatal. The development of antiviral drugs directed against SARS-CoV-2 and effective vaccines is progressing; meanwhile, the best pharmacological objective is related to the management of all the complications caused by this viral infection, mainly controlling the inflammatory and fibrotic state and preventing the infection from moving into the most serious phases. SUBJECT AND METHOD: Describe the scientific rationale related to the use of an antifibrotic therapy with pirfenidone, as monotherapy and/or in combination with anti-inflammatory drugs to manage and control complications of SARS-CoV-2 infection. RESULTS: Based on the scientific literature and epidemiological results and considering the pathophysiological, biological, and molecular characteristics of SARS-CoV-2, an antifibrotic drug such as pirfenidone as monotherapy or in combination with anti-inflammatory drugs can be (acting early, at the right doses and at the right time) therapeutically effective to avoid serious complications during viral infection. The same approach can also be effective as postinfection therapy in patients with residual pulmonary fibrotic damage. Management of inflammation and fibrotic status with a combination therapy of pirfenidone and IL-6 or IL-1 inhibitors could represent a pharmacological synergy with added value. CONCLUSION: In this article, we consider the role of antifibrotic therapy with pirfenidone in patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection on going or in the stage of postinfection with pulmonary fibrotic consequences. The scientific rationale for its use is also described.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/therapeutic use , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pulmonary Fibrosis/drug therapy , Pulmonary Fibrosis/etiology , Pyridones/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Drug Therapy, Combination , Humans , Inflammation/drug therapy , Interleukin-1/antagonists & inhibitors , Interleukin-6/antagonists & inhibitors , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Front Immunol ; 11: 565521, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389164

ABSTRACT

Neurological disorders caused by neuroviral infections are an obvious pathogenic manifestation. However, non-neurotropic viruses or peripheral viral infections pose a considerable challenge as their neuropathological manifestations do not emerge because of primary infection. Their secondary or bystander pathologies develop much later, like a syndrome, during and after the recovery of patients from the primary disease. Massive inflammation caused by peripheral viral infections can trigger multiple neurological anomalies. These neurological damages may range from a general cognitive and motor dysfunction up to a wide spectrum of CNS anomalies, such as Acute Necrotizing Hemorrhagic Encephalopathy, Guillain-Barré syndrome, Encephalitis, Meningitis, anxiety, and other audio-visual disabilities. Peripheral viruses like Measles virus, Enteroviruses, Influenza viruses (HIN1 series), SARS-CoV-1, MERS-CoV, and, recently, SARS-CoV-2 are reported to cause various neurological manifestations in patients and are proven to be neuropathogenic even in cellular and animal model systems. This review presents a comprehensive picture of CNS susceptibilities toward these peripheral viral infections and explains some common underlying themes of their neuropathology in the human brain.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/immunology , Neurogenic Inflammation/complications , Neurogenic Inflammation/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/complications , /immunology , Animals , Blood-Brain Barrier/immunology , Blood-Brain Barrier/virology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Cytokines/blood , Disease Models, Animal , Humans , Microglia/immunology , Microglia/virology , Neurogenic Inflammation/virology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/immunology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/virology
19.
Front Immunol ; 12: 683879, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1369666

ABSTRACT

Diseases caused by pathogenic bacteria in animals (e.g., bacterial pneumonia, meningitis and sepsis) and plants (e.g., bacterial wilt, angular spot and canker) lead to high prevalence and mortality, and decomposition of plant leaves, respectively. Melatonin, an endogenous molecule, is highly pleiotropic, and accumulating evidence supports the notion that melatonin's actions in bacterial infection deserve particular attention. Here, we summarize the antibacterial effects of melatonin in vitro, in animals as well as plants, and discuss the potential mechanisms. Melatonin exerts antibacterial activities not only on classic gram-negative and -positive bacteria, but also on members of other bacterial groups, such as Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Protective actions against bacterial infections can occur at different levels. Direct actions of melatonin may occur only at very high concentrations, which is at the borderline of practical applicability. However, various indirect functions comprise activation of hosts' defense mechanisms or, in sepsis, attenuation of bacterially induced inflammation. In plants, its antibacterial functions involve the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway; in animals, protection by melatonin against bacterially induced damage is associated with inhibition or activation of various signaling pathways, including key regulators such as NF-κB, STAT-1, Nrf2, NLRP3 inflammasome, MAPK and TLR-2/4. Moreover, melatonin can reduce formation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS, RNS), promote detoxification and protect mitochondrial damage. Altogether, we propose that melatonin could be an effective approach against various pathogenic bacterial infections.


Subject(s)
Anti-Bacterial Agents/pharmacology , Inflammasomes/metabolism , Melatonin/pharmacology , Sepsis/metabolism , Signal Transduction/drug effects , Animals , Humans , Inflammasomes/drug effects , Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases/drug effects , Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases/metabolism , NF-kappa B/drug effects , NF-kappa B/metabolism , Plant Leaves , Reactive Oxygen Species , Sepsis/genetics , Sepsis/immunology
20.
Pharmacol Res ; 163: 105224, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1364404

ABSTRACT

Acute lung injury (ALI) and its more severe form, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) as common life-threatening lung diseases with high mortality rates are mostly associated with acute and severe inflammation in lungs. With increasing in-depth studies of ALI/ARDS, significant breakthroughs have been made, however, there are still no effective pharmacological therapies for treatment of ALI/ARDS. Especially, the novel coronavirus pneumonia (COVID-19) is ravaging the globe, and causes severe respiratory distress syndrome. Therefore, developing new drugs for therapy of ALI/ARDS is in great demand, which might also be helpful for treatment of COVID-19. Natural compounds have always inspired drug development, and numerous natural products have shown potential therapeutic effects on ALI/ARDS. Therefore, this review focuses on the potential therapeutic effects of natural compounds on ALI and the underlying mechanisms. Overall, the review discusses 159 compounds and summarizes more than 400 references to present the protective effects of natural compounds against ALI and the underlying mechanism.


Subject(s)
Acute Lung Injury/drug therapy , Lung/drug effects , Phytochemicals/pharmacology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/drug therapy , Acute Lung Injury/etiology , Acute Lung Injury/metabolism , Acute Lung Injury/pathology , Animals , Humans , Lung/metabolism , Lung/pathology , Phytochemicals/isolation & purification , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/metabolism , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/pathology , Signal Transduction
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL