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1.
Pediatr Infect Dis J ; 40(7): e274-e276, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1700567

ABSTRACT

Underlying mechanisms on the association between severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection and neurologic complications are still poorly understood. Cases of Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS) have been linked to the SARS-CoV-2 infection as the result of dysregulated immune response with damage in neuronal tissues. In the current report, we present the first pediatric case of GBS with detection of SARS-CoV-2 in the cerebrospinal fluid (CFS). This unique case of COVID-19-associated GBS with detection of SARS-CoV-2 RNA in the CSF indicates direct viral involvement inducing peripheral nerve inflammation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/cerebrospinal fluid , COVID-19/diagnosis , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/complications , RNA, Viral/cerebrospinal fluid , Adolescent , COVID-19/complications , Cauda Equina/diagnostic imaging , Cauda Equina/pathology , Cauda Equina/virology , Female , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/virology , Humans , Inflammation/virology , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
2.
Eur J Ophthalmol ; 32(1): NP168-NP172, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1633471

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Papillophlebitis is a rare condition characterized by venous congestion and optic disc edema, which has been suggested to occur as a consequence of inflammation of the retinal veins or, possibly, the capillaries of the optic disc, leading to venous insufficiency and compression of the central retina vein. The disease affects healthy young adults and commonly has a benign course, however, if complications such as macular edema or ischemia appears, treatment should be instituted immediately to avoid poor prognosis. CASE REPORT: A 40-year old white male patient consulted for a slight decrease in the sensitivity of the visual field in his left eye (OS). Visual acuities (VA) were 20/20 in both eyes. OS fundus examination showed dilated and tortuous retinal vessels, disc edema, and retinal hemorrhages. The patient was diagnosed with papillophlebitis. OS VA decreased to 20/200 due to macular edema, and he was treated with a intravitreal dexamethasone implant. An exhaustive and interdisciplinary exploration process was performed, identifying a recent disease and recovery of Covid-19 as the only factor of inflammation and coagulation alteration. Other systemic diseases were excluded. We also describe a rapid decrease in disc and macular edema after intravitreal dexametasone injection, which could support the inflammatory hypothesis. CONCLUSION: The importance of this case lies in the possible association of papillophlebitis with the new Covid-19 disease. We believe that the inflammatory reaction and the coagulation alteration present in our patient due to Sars-Cov2 coronavirus may have acted as risk factors for the development of papillophlebitis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Macular Edema , Retinal Vein Occlusion , Adult , Humans , Inflammation , Male , RNA, Viral , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Eur J Neurol ; 28(10): 3411-3417, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1607226

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Since the outbreak of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic, several reports indicated neurological involvement in COVID-19 disease. Muscle involvement has also been reported as evidenced by creatine kinase (CK) elevations and reports of myalgia. METHODS: Creatine kinase, markers of inflammation, pre-existing diseases and statin use were extracted from records of Austrian hospitalised COVID-19 patients. Disease severity was classified as severe in case of intensive care unit (ICU) admission or mortality. COVID-19 patients were additionally compared to an historical group of hospitalised influenza patients. RESULTS: Three hundred fifty-one patients with SARS-CoV-2 and 258 with influenza were included in the final analysis. CK was elevated in 27% of COVID-19 and in 28% of influenza patients. CK was higher in severe COVID-19 as were markers of inflammation. CK correlated significantly with inflammation markers, which had an independent impact on CK when adjusted for demographic variables and disease severity. Compared to influenza patients, COVID-19 patients were older, more frequently male, had more comorbidities, and more frequently had a severe disease course. Nevertheless, influenza patients had higher baseline CK than COVID-19, and 35.7% of intensive care unit (ICU)-admitted patients had CK levels >1,000 U/L compared to only 4.7% of ICU-admitted COVID-19 patients. CONCLUSIONS: HyperCKemia occurs in a similar frequency in COVID-19 and influenza infection. CK levels were lower in COVID-19 than in influenza in mild and severe disease. CK levels strongly correlate with disease severity and markers of inflammation. To date, it remains unclear whether hyperCKemia is due to a virus-triggered inflammatory response or direct muscle toxicity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Influenza, Human , Humans , Influenza, Human/complications , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , Male , Muscles , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
4.
J Bras Nefrol ; 43(4): 551-571, 2021.
Article in English, Portuguese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575271

ABSTRACT

Acute kidney injury (AKI) in hospitalized patients with COVID-19 is associated with higher mortality and a worse prognosis. Nevertheless, most patients with COVID-19 have mild symptoms, and about 5% can develop more severe symptoms and involve hypovolemia and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. In a pathophysiological perspective, severe SARS-CoV-2 infection is characterized by numerous dependent pathways triggered by hypercytokinemia, especially IL-6 and TNF-alpha, leading to systemic inflammation, hypercoagulability, and multiple organ dysfunction. Systemic endotheliitis and direct viral tropism to proximal renal tubular cells and podocytes are important pathophysiological mechanisms leading to kidney injury in patients with more critical infection, with a clinical presentation ranging from proteinuria and/or glomerular hematuria to fulminant AKI requiring renal replacement therapies. Glomerulonephritis, rhabdomyolysis, and nephrotoxic drugs are also associated with kidney damage in patients with COVID-19. Thus, AKI and proteinuria are independent risk factors for mortality in patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection. We provide a comprehensive review of the literature emphasizing the impact of acute kidney involvement in the evolutive prognosis and mortality of patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury , COVID-19 , Acute Kidney Injury/therapy , Humans , Proteinuria , Renal Replacement Therapy , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Life Sci ; 284: 119201, 2021 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574805

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Cytokine storm is the exaggerated immune response often observed in viral infections. It is also intimately linked with the progression of COVID-19 disease as well as associated complications and mortality. Therefore, targeting the cytokine storm might help in reducing COVID-19-associated health complications. The number of COVID-19 associated deaths (as of January 15, 2021; https://www.worldometers.info/coronavirus/) in the USA is high (1199/million) as compared to countries like India (110/million). Although the reason behind this is not clear, spices may have some role in explaining this difference. Spices and herbs are used in different traditional medicines, especially in countries such as India to treat various chronic diseases due to their potent antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. AIM: To evaluate the literature available on the anti-inflammatory properties of spices which might prove beneficial in the prevention and treatment of COVID-19 associated cytokine storm. METHOD: A detailed literature search has been conducted on PubMed for collecting information pertaining to the COVID-19; the history, origin, key structural features, and mechanism of infection of SARS-CoV-2; the repurposed drugs in use for the management of COVID-19, and the anti-inflammatory role of spices to combat COVID-19 associated cytokine storm. KEY FINDINGS: The literature search resulted in numerous in vitro, in vivo and clinical trials that have reported the potency of spices to exert anti-inflammatory effects by regulating crucial molecular targets for inflammation. SIGNIFICANCE: As spices are derived from Mother Nature and are inexpensive, they are relatively safer to consume. Therefore, their anti-inflammatory property can be exploited to combat the cytokine storm in COVID-19 patients. This review thus focuses on the current knowledge on the role of spices for the treatment of COVID-19 through suppression of inflammation-linked cytokine storm.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Cytokines/metabolism , Inflammation/pathology , Spices , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/pathology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
6.
Turk J Med Sci ; 51(5): 2256-2262, 2021 10 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1566691

ABSTRACT

Background/aim: Biochemical markers are needed to show lung involvement in COVID-19 disease. Galectin-3 is known to play a key role in the inflammation and fibrosis process. We aimed to evaluate the predictive role of galectin-3 levels for pneumonia in patients with COVID-19. Materials and methods: Total of 176 patients with COVID-19, confirmed with reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction, admitted to the Erzurum Regional Training and Research Hospital was analyzed. The study was designed as a cross sectional. The baseline data of laboratory examinations, including galectin-3 were collected at the time of diagnosis. CT images evaluated by a single radiologist according to the recommendation of the Radiological Society of North America Expert Consensus Document for pulmonary involvement. The severity of COVID-19 pneumonia was assessed using the total severity score. Results: The mean galectin-3 level in patients with typical pneumonia was found to be significantly higher than those patients with atypical (p < 0.01) and indeterminate appearance (p < 0.01) and patients without pneumonia (p < 0.01). The severity of lung involvement was significantly associated with Galectin-3 levels (p < 0.01 r: 0.76). Stepwise logistic regression model showed that the levels of ferritin (odds ratio [OR] = 0.05, p: 0.08) and galectin-3 (OR = 0.1, p < 0.01) were significantly and independently associated with typical pneumoniain COVID-19 patients. When COVID-19 patients were evaluated in terms of typical pneumonia, we determined a cut-off value of 18.9 ng/mL for galectin-3 via ROC analysis (87% sensitivity; 73% specificity; area under curve (AUC): 0.89; p < 0.001). Conclusion: Galectin-3 was found as a diagnostic tool for COVID-19 associated typical pneumonia and as an indicator of both pneumonia and its severity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , Galectins/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Aged , Biomarkers/blood , Blood Proteins , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Predictive Value of Tests
7.
Angiogenesis ; 24(3): 677-693, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1549443

ABSTRACT

Endothelial barrier disruption and vascular leak importantly contribute to organ dysfunction and mortality during inflammatory conditions like sepsis and acute respiratory distress syndrome. We identified the kinase Arg/Abl2 as a mediator of endothelial barrier disruption, but the role of Arg in endothelial monolayer regulation and its relevance in vivo remain poorly understood. Here we show that depletion of Arg in endothelial cells results in the activation of both RhoA and Rac1, increased cell spreading and elongation, redistribution of integrin-dependent cell-matrix adhesions to the cell periphery, and improved adhesion to the extracellular matrix. We further show that Arg is activated in the endothelium during inflammation, both in murine lungs exposed to barrier-disruptive agents, and in pulmonary microvessels of septic patients. Importantly, Arg-depleted endothelial cells were less sensitive to barrier-disruptive agents. Despite the formation of F-actin stress fibers and myosin light chain phosphorylation, Arg depletion diminished adherens junction disruption and intercellular gap formation, by reducing the disassembly of cell-matrix adhesions and cell retraction. In vivo, genetic deletion of Arg diminished vascular leak in the skin and lungs, in the presence of a normal immune response. Together, our data indicate that Arg is a central and non-redundant regulator of endothelial barrier integrity, which contributes to cell retraction and gap formation by increasing the dynamics of adherens junctions and cell-matrix adhesions in a Rho GTPase-dependent fashion. Therapeutic inhibition of Arg may provide a suitable strategy for the treatment of a variety of clinical conditions characterized by vascular leak.


Subject(s)
Extracellular Matrix/metabolism , Gap Junctions/enzymology , Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells/enzymology , Protein-Tyrosine Kinases/metabolism , Pulmonary Alveoli/enzymology , Animals , Cell Adhesion/genetics , Enzyme Activation , Extracellular Matrix/genetics , Gap Junctions/genetics , Humans , Inflammation/enzymology , Inflammation/genetics , Mice , Mice, Knockout , Protein-Tyrosine Kinases/genetics
8.
Neurol Neuroimmunol Neuroinflamm ; 8(4)2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1518341
9.
Neurol Neuroimmunol Neuroinflamm ; 8(4)2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1518339

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Pediatric inflammatory multisystem syndrome temporally associated with SARS-CoV-2 (PIMS-TS) is a severe immune-mediated disorder. We aim to report the neurologic features of children with PIMS-TS. METHODS: We identified children presenting to a large children's hospital with PIMS-TS from March to June 2020 and performed a retrospective medical note review, identifying clinical and investigative features alongside short-term outcome of children presenting with neurologic symptoms. RESULTS: Seventy-five patients with PIMS-TS were identified, 9 (12%) had neurologic involvement: altered conciseness (3), behavioral changes (3), focal neurology deficits (2), persistent headaches (2), hallucinations (2), excessive sleepiness (1), and new-onset focal seizures (1). Four patients had cranial images abnormalities. At 3-month follow-up, 1 child had died, 1 had hemiparesis, 3 had behavioral changes, and 4 completely recovered. Systemic inflammatory and prothrombotic markers were higher in patients with neurologic involvement (mean highest CRP 267 vs 202 mg/L, p = 0.05; procalcitonin 30.65 vs 13.11 µg/L, p = 0.04; fibrinogen 7.04 vs 6.17 g/L, p = 0.07; d-dimers 19.68 vs 7.35 mg/L, p = 0.005). Among patients with neurologic involvement, these markers were higher in those without full recovery at 3 months (ferritin 2284 vs 283 µg/L, p = 0.05; d-dimers 30.34 vs 6.37 mg/L, p = 0.04). Patients with and without neurologic involvement shared similar risk factors for PIMS-TS (Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic ethnicity 78% vs 70%, obese/overweight 56% vs 42%). CONCLUSIONS: Broad neurologic features were found in 12% patients with PIMS-TS. By 3-month follow-up, half of these surviving children had recovered fully without neurologic impairment. Significantly higher systemic inflammatory markers were identified in children with neurologic involvement and in those who had not recovered fully.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Inflammation/complications , Nervous System Diseases/etiology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/complications , Adolescent , Biomarkers/blood , Brain/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/psychology , Child , Child Behavior Disorders/epidemiology , Child Behavior Disorders/etiology , Child, Preschool , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Infant , Inflammation/pathology , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , Nervous System Diseases/pathology , Nervous System Diseases/psychology , Retrospective Studies , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/pathology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/psychology , Thrombosis/blood , Thrombosis/etiology
10.
J Am Soc Nephrol ; 32(1): 69-85, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496661

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In children, the acute pyelonephritis that can result from urinary tract infections (UTIs), which commonly ascend from the bladder to the kidney, is a growing concern because it poses a risk of renal scarring and irreversible loss of kidney function. To date, the cellular mechanisms underlying acute pyelonephritis-driven renal scarring remain unknown. METHODS: We used a preclinical model of uropathogenic Escherichia coli-induced acute pyelonephritis to determine the contribution of neutrophils and monocytes to resolution of the condition and the subsequent development of kidney fibrosis. We used cell-specific monoclonal antibodies to eliminate neutrophils, monocytes, or both. Bacterial ascent and the cell dynamics of phagocytic cells were assessed by biophotonic imaging and flow cytometry, respectively. We used quantitative RT-PCR and histopathologic analyses to evaluate inflammation and renal scarring. RESULTS: We found that neutrophils are critical to control bacterial ascent, which is in line with previous studies suggesting a protective role for neutrophils during a UTI, whereas monocyte-derived macrophages orchestrate a strong, but ineffective, inflammatory response against uropathogenic, E. coli-induced, acute pyelonephritis. Experimental neutropenia during acute pyelonephritis resulted in a compensatory increase in the number of monocytes and heightened macrophage-dependent inflammation in the kidney. Exacerbated macrophage-mediated inflammatory responses promoted renal scarring and compromised renal function, as indicated by elevated serum creatinine, BUN, and potassium. CONCLUSIONS: These findings reveal a previously unappreciated outcome for neutrophil-macrophage imbalance in promoting host susceptibility to acute pyelonephritis and the development of permanent renal damage. This suggests targeting dysregulated macrophage responses might be a therapeutic tool to prevent renal scarring during acute pyelonephritis.


Subject(s)
Cicatrix/physiopathology , Kidney/physiopathology , Macrophages/cytology , Neutrophils/cytology , Pyelonephritis/metabolism , Animals , Escherichia coli , Female , Fibrosis/microbiology , Fibrosis/physiopathology , Inflammation , Kidney/microbiology , Mice , Mice, Inbred C3H , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Neutrophils/metabolism , Phagocytosis , Pyelonephritis/microbiology , Pyelonephritis/physiopathology , Urinary Tract Infections/microbiology , Urinary Tract Infections/physiopathology
11.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(11)2021 May 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389398

ABSTRACT

Trypsin-like proteases (TLPs) belong to a family of serine enzymes with primary substrate specificities for the basic residues, lysine and arginine, in the P1 position. Whilst initially perceived as soluble enzymes that are extracellularly secreted, a number of novel TLPs that are anchored in the cell membrane have since been discovered. Muco-obstructive lung diseases (MucOLDs) are characterised by the accumulation of hyper-concentrated mucus in the small airways, leading to persistent inflammation, infection and dysregulated protease activity. Although neutrophilic serine proteases, particularly neutrophil elastase, have been implicated in the propagation of inflammation and local tissue destruction, it is likely that the serine TLPs also contribute to various disease-relevant processes given the roles that a number of these enzymes play in the activation of both the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) and protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2). More recently, significant attention has focused on the activation of viruses such as SARS-CoV-2 by host TLPs. The purpose of this review was to highlight key TLPs linked to the activation of ENaC and PAR2 and their association with airway dehydration and inflammatory signalling pathways, respectively. The role of TLPs in viral infectivity will also be discussed in the context of the inhibition of TLP activities and the potential of these proteases as therapeutic targets.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/enzymology , Lung Diseases, Obstructive/enzymology , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Trypsin/metabolism , Animals , COVID-19/pathology , Epithelial Sodium Channels/metabolism , Humans , Lung Diseases, Obstructive/pathology , Receptor, PAR-2/metabolism
12.
mBio ; 12(2)2021 04 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1388457

ABSTRACT

Mammalian cells detect microbial molecules known as pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) as indicators of potential infection. Upon PAMP detection, diverse defensive responses are induced by the host, including those that promote inflammation and cell-intrinsic antimicrobial activities. Host-encoded molecules released from dying or damaged cells, known as damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs), also induce defensive responses. Both DAMPs and PAMPs are recognized for their inflammatory potential, but only the latter are well established to stimulate cell-intrinsic host defense. Here, we report a class of DAMPs that engender an antiviral state in human epithelial cells. These DAMPs include oxPAPC (oxidized 1-palmitoyl-2-arachidonoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine), PGPC (1-palmitoyl-2-glutaryl phosphatidylcholine), and POVPC [1-palmitoyl-2-(5-oxovaleroyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine], oxidized lipids that are naturally released from dead or dying cells. Exposing cells to these DAMPs prior to vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) infection limits viral replication. Mechanistically, these DAMPs prevent viral entry, thereby limiting the percentage of cells that are productively infected and consequently restricting viral load. We found that the antiviral actions of oxidized lipids are distinct from those mediated by the PAMP Poly I:C, in that the former induces a more rapid antiviral response without the induction of the interferon response. These data support a model whereby interferon-independent defensive activities can be induced by DAMPs, which may limit viral replication before PAMP-mediated interferon responses are induced. This antiviral activity may impact viruses that disrupt interferon responses in the oxygenated environment of the lung, such as influenza virus and SARS-CoV-2.IMPORTANCE In this work, we explored how a class of oxidized lipids, spontaneously created during tissue damage and unprogrammed cell lysis, block the earliest events in RNA virus infection in the human epithelium. This gives us novel insight into the ways that we view infection models, unveiling a built-in mechanism to slow viral growth that neither engages the interferon response nor is subject to known viral antagonism. These oxidized phospholipids act prior to infection, allowing time for other, better-known innate immune mechanisms to take effect. This discovery broadens our understanding of host defenses, introducing a soluble factor that alters the cellular environment to protect from RNA virus infection.


Subject(s)
Alarmins/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , RNA Viruses/drug effects , Virus Internalization/drug effects , Virus Replication/drug effects , A549 Cells , Cell Death/drug effects , Humans , Immunity, Innate , Interferons/genetics , Interferons/metabolism , Kinetics , Pathogen-Associated Molecular Pattern Molecules/pharmacology , Phosphatidylcholines/pharmacology , RNA Viruses/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Vesiculovirus/drug effects , Vesiculovirus/physiology , Viral Load
13.
Clin Rheumatol ; 40(10): 4179-4189, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1384475

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) is a new clinical condition characterized by signs of inflammation and multiorgan dysfunction due to cytokine storm associated with SARS-CoV-2. The clinical spectrum of MIS-C ranges from mild to severe, and even to mortal multisystem involvement. To guide clinicians, we evaluated detailed demographic characteristics, clinical features, laboratory findings, and outcomes of MIS-C cases. METHODS: We performed a retrospective study of patients with MIS-C who were managed in the Department of Pediatric Infectious Disease in the Selcuk University Faculty of Medicine, Konya, Turkey. MIS-C patients were divided into three clinical severity groups (mild, moderate, and severe) and separated into three age groups (< 5 years, 5-10 years, > 10 years). We compared the characteristics of MIS-C cases according to the severity of the disease and by age groups. RESULT: Thirty-six children with MIS-C were evaluated (52.8% male, median age of 7.8 years). A clinical spectrum overlapping with Kawasaki disease (KD) was the most common presentation (69.4%) in all age groups. The most common clinical symptoms were fever (100%), mucocutaneous rash (69.4%), and gastrointestinal symptoms (66.6%). There was no statistically significant difference in echocardiographic abnormality between KD-like and the other clinical spectra (p > 0.05). All life-threatening rhythm disturbances were observed in severe cases. No patients died. CONCLUSION: It is important to increase the awareness of physicians about the MIS-C disease, which can present with different combinations of different systemic findings, so that patients can be diagnosed and treated in a timely manner. Key Points • A single tertiary centre study shows that children with MIS-C can present with different clinic spectra other than Kawasaki diseases. • Electrocardiographic and echocardiographic evaluation is important in early diagnosis of children with MIS-C. • Pro-BNP can be used as a screening test in the emergency room for children with prolonged and unexplained fever for determine early cardiac involvement of MIS-C. • The lack of require biological agents and favourable outcomes in children with MIS-C may be related with administration of steroid therapy with IVIG in early stage of disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Male , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome , Turkey/epidemiology
14.
Eur J Clin Pharmacol ; 76(11): 1615-1618, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1384377

ABSTRACT

AIM: SARS-CoV-2 infection has been divided by scientific opinion into three phases: the first as asymptomatic or slightly symptomatic and the second and the third with greater severity, characterized by a hyperinflammatory and fibrotic state, responsible for lung lesions, in some cases fatal. The development of antiviral drugs directed against SARS-CoV-2 and effective vaccines is progressing; meanwhile, the best pharmacological objective is related to the management of all the complications caused by this viral infection, mainly controlling the inflammatory and fibrotic state and preventing the infection from moving into the most serious phases. SUBJECT AND METHOD: Describe the scientific rationale related to the use of an antifibrotic therapy with pirfenidone, as monotherapy and/or in combination with anti-inflammatory drugs to manage and control complications of SARS-CoV-2 infection. RESULTS: Based on the scientific literature and epidemiological results and considering the pathophysiological, biological, and molecular characteristics of SARS-CoV-2, an antifibrotic drug such as pirfenidone as monotherapy or in combination with anti-inflammatory drugs can be (acting early, at the right doses and at the right time) therapeutically effective to avoid serious complications during viral infection. The same approach can also be effective as postinfection therapy in patients with residual pulmonary fibrotic damage. Management of inflammation and fibrotic status with a combination therapy of pirfenidone and IL-6 or IL-1 inhibitors could represent a pharmacological synergy with added value. CONCLUSION: In this article, we consider the role of antifibrotic therapy with pirfenidone in patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection on going or in the stage of postinfection with pulmonary fibrotic consequences. The scientific rationale for its use is also described.


Subject(s)
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/therapeutic use , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pulmonary Fibrosis/drug therapy , Pulmonary Fibrosis/etiology , Pyridones/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Drug Therapy, Combination , Humans , Inflammation/drug therapy , Interleukin-1/antagonists & inhibitors , Interleukin-6/antagonists & inhibitors , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Front Immunol ; 12: 624703, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1354863

ABSTRACT

Accumulating evidence suggests that the breakdown of immune tolerance plays an important role in the development of myocarditis triggered by cardiotropic microbial infections. Genetic deletion of immune checkpoint molecules that are crucial for maintaining self-tolerance causes spontaneous myocarditis in mice, and cancer treatment with immune checkpoint inhibitors can induce myocarditis in humans. These results suggest that the loss of immune tolerance results in myocarditis. The tissue microenvironment influences the local immune dysregulation in autoimmunity. Recently, tenascin-C (TN-C) has been found to play a role as a local regulator of inflammation through various molecular mechanisms. TN-C is a nonstructural extracellular matrix glycoprotein expressed in the heart during early embryonic development, as well as during tissue injury or active tissue remodeling, in a spatiotemporally restricted manner. In a mouse model of autoimmune myocarditis, TN-C was detectable before inflammatory cell infiltration and myocytolysis became histologically evident; it was strongly expressed during active inflammation and disappeared with healing. TN-C activates dendritic cells to generate pathogenic autoreactive T cells and forms an important link between innate and acquired immunity.


Subject(s)
Autoimmune Diseases/metabolism , Autoimmunity , Cardiomyopathies/metabolism , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , Myocarditis/metabolism , Myocardium/metabolism , Tenascin/metabolism , Animals , Autoimmune Diseases/immunology , Autoimmune Diseases/pathology , Cardiomyopathies/immunology , Cardiomyopathies/pathology , Cellular Microenvironment , Humans , Myocarditis/immunology , Myocarditis/pathology , Myocardium/immunology , Myocardium/pathology , Self Tolerance , Signal Transduction
16.
Am J Ther ; 28(3): e358-e360, 2020 Aug 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1349825

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a rapidly expanding global health crisis. A disintegrin and metalloproteinase 17 (ADAM17), an ectodomain sheddase, is a key component of ACE2 modulation and plays a complex role in inflammation and immunosurveillance. AREAS OF UNCERTAINTY: Much remains unknown regarding the immunopathogenesis of COVID-19, including how the virus affects ADAM17 expression, activity, and regulation. SEARCH STRATEGY: Three electronic databases (MEDLINE through PubMed, Embase through Ovid, and Google Scholar) were searched to identify articles relevant to ADAM17 and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 1 and 2. Relevant articles published from January 1, 2005, to April 30, 2020, were selected, and reference lists were screened and cross-referenced. We also searched preprint studies on medRxiv and bioRxiv given the rapidly evolving data on COVID-19 SARS-CoV-2. THERAPEUTIC OPINION: Infection with SARS-CoV-2 may lead to an increase in ADAM17 sheddase activity contributing to an exuberant macrophage-predominant inflammatory response and diminished immunosurveillance capacity for viral clearance. Emerging data suggest severe lung injury in COVID-19 is associated with higher levels of TNF-α and IL-6, T-cell lymphopenia and exhaustion, hypercoagulability, and a macrophage-predominant immune response. This clinical picture is consistent with dysregulation of many of the molecular pathways in which ADAM17 participates. CONCLUSIONS: Elucidation of the role of ADAM17 in COVID-19 may identify novel molecular targets for drug development and therapeutic repurposement.


Subject(s)
ADAM17 Protein , COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Signal Transduction/immunology , ADAM17 Protein/immunology , ADAM17 Protein/metabolism , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Drug Discovery , Gene Expression , Humans , Immunity
17.
Brief Bioinform ; 22(2): 1023-1037, 2021 03 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1343648

ABSTRACT

Dihydroorotate dehydrogenase (DHODH) is a key enzyme required for de novo pyrimidine synthesis and it is suggested as a target for COVID19 treatment due to high pyrimidine demand by the virus replication in the infected host cells as well as its proven effect of blocking of cytokine release by the immune cells to prevent inflammation leading to acute respiratory distress. There are a number of clinical trials underway for COVID19 treatment using DHODH inhibitors; however, there are only a small number of known DHODH antagonists available for testing. Here, we have applied a methodology to identify DHODH antagonist candidates, and compared them using in silico target prediction tools. A large set of 7900 FDA-approved and clinical stage drugs obtained from DrugBank were docked against 20 different structures DHODH available in PDB. Drugs were eliminated according to their predicted affinities by Autodock Vina. About 28 FDA-approved and 79 clinical trial ongoing drugs remained. The mode of interaction of these molecules was analyzed by repeating docking using Autodock 4 and DS Visualiser. Finally, the target region predictions of 28 FDA-approved drugs were determined through PASS and SwissTargetPrediction tools. Interestingly, the analysis of in silico target predictions revealed that serotonin-dopamine receptor antagonists could also be potential DHODH inhibitors. Our candidates shared a common attribute, a possible interaction with serotonin-dopamine receptors as well as other oxidoreductases, like DHODH. Moreover, the Bruton Tyrosine Kinase-inhibitor acalabrutunib and serotonin-dopamine receptor inhibitor drugs on our list have been found in the literature that have shown to be effective against Sars-CoV-2, while the path of activity is yet to be identified. Identifying an effective drug that can suppress both inflammation and virus proliferation will play a crucial role in the treatment of COVID. Therefore, we suggest experimental investigation of the 28 FDA-approved drugs on DHODH activity and Sars-CoV-2 virus proliferation. Those who are found experimentally effective can play an important role in COVID19 treatment. Moreover, we suggest investigating COVID19 case conditions in patients using schizophrenia and depression drugs.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Drug Repositioning , Enzyme Inhibitors/pharmacology , Oxidoreductases Acting on CH-CH Group Donors/antagonists & inhibitors , Receptors, Dopamine/drug effects , Receptors, Serotonin/drug effects , COVID-19/drug therapy , Computer Simulation , Humans , Molecular Docking Simulation , Oxidoreductases Acting on CH-CH Group Donors/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Biomolecules ; 11(5)2021 04 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1334991

ABSTRACT

The vascular endothelium acts as a selective barrier to regulate macromolecule exchange between the blood and tissues. However, the integrity of the endothelium barrier is compromised in an array of pathological settings, including ischemic disease and cancer, which are the leading causes of death worldwide. The resulting vascular hyperpermeability to plasma molecules as well as leukocytes then leads to tissue damaging edema formation and inflammation. The vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) is a potent permeability factor, and therefore a desirable target for impeding vascular hyperpermeability. However, VEGFA also promotes angiogenesis, the growth of new blood vessels, which is required for reperfusion of ischemic tissues. Moreover, edema increases interstitial pressure in poorly perfused tumors, thereby affecting the delivery of therapeutics, which could be counteracted by stimulating the growth of new functional blood vessels. Thus, targets must be identified to accurately modulate the barrier function of blood vessels without affecting angiogenesis, as well as to develop more effective pro- or anti-angiogenic therapies. Recent studies have shown that the VEGFA co-receptor neuropilin 1 (NRP1) could be playing a fundamental role in steering VEGFA-induced responses of vascular endothelial cells towards angiogenesis or vascular permeability. Moreover, NRP1 is involved in mediating permeability signals induced by ligands other than VEGFA. This review therefore focuses on current knowledge on the role of NRP1 in the regulation of vascular permeability signaling in the endothelium to provide an up-to-date landscape of the current knowledge in this field.


Subject(s)
Capillary Permeability , Endothelium, Vascular/metabolism , Neuropilin-1/metabolism , Animals , Gene Expression Regulation , Humans , Signal Transduction , Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A/metabolism
19.
Br J Pharmacol ; 179(10): 2121-2127, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1297572

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 (SARS-CoV-2) causes multiple inflammatory complications, resulting not only in severe lung inflammation but also harm to other organs. Although the current focus is on the management of acute COVID-19, there is growing concern about long-term effects of COVID-19 (Long Covid), such as fibroproliferative changes in the lung, heart and kidney. Therefore, the identification of therapeutic targets not only for the management of acute COVID-19 but also for preventing Long Covid are needed, and would mitigate against long-lasting health burden and economic costs, in addition to saving lives. COVID-19 induces pathological changes via multiple pathways, which could be targeted simultaneously for optimal effect. We discuss the potential pathologic function of increased activity of the endocannabinoid/CB1 receptor system and inducible NO synthase (iNOS). We advocate a polypharmacology approach, wherein a single chemical entity simultaneously interacts with CB1 receptors and iNOS causing inhibition, as a potential therapeutic strategy for COVID-19-related health complications. LINKED ARTICLES: This article is part of a themed issue on The second wave: are we any closer to efficacious pharmacotherapy for COVID 19? (BJP 75th Anniversary). To view the other articles in this section visit http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/bph.v179.10/issuetoc.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/drug therapy , Endocannabinoids , Humans , Lung , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Acta Neuropsychiatr ; 33(4): 165-177, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1297283

ABSTRACT

Neuropsychiatric sequalae to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection are beginning to emerge, like previous Spanish influenza and severe acute respiratory syndrome episodes. Streptococcal infection in paediatric patients causing obsessive compulsive disorder (PANDAS) is another recent example of an infection-based psychiatric disorder. Inflammation associated with neuropsychiatric disorders has been previously reported but there is no standard clinical management approach established. Part of the reason is that it is unclear what factors determine the specific neuronal vulnerability and the efficacy of anti-inflammatory treatment in neuroinflammation. The emerging COVID-19 data suggested that in the acute stage, widespread neuronal damage appears to be the result of abnormal and overactive immune responses and cytokine storm is associated with poor prognosis. It is still too early to know if there are long-term-specific neuronal or brain regional damages associated with COVID-19, resulting in distinct neuropsychiatric disorders. In several major psychiatric disorders where neuroinflammation is present, patients with abnormal inflammatory markers may also experience less than favourable response or treatment resistance when standard treatment is used alone. Evidence regarding the benefits of co-administered anti-inflammatory agents such as COX-2 inhibitor is encouraging in selected patients though may not benefit others. Disease-modifying therapies are increasingly being applied to neuropsychiatric diseases characterised by abnormal or hyperreactive immune responses. Adjunct anti-inflammatory treatment may benefit selected patients and is definitely an important component of clinical management in the presence of neuroinflammation.


Subject(s)
Autoimmune Diseases/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder/psychology , Streptococcal Infections/psychology , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , Autoimmune Diseases/epidemiology , Autoimmune Diseases/immunology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cyclooxygenase 2 Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Cytokine Release Syndrome/complications , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/mortality , Female , Humans , Inflammation/complications , Inflammation/immunology , Inflammation/psychology , Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder/epidemiology , Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder/etiology , Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Streptococcal Infections/complications , Streptococcal Infections/epidemiology , Streptococcal Infections/immunology
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