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1.
Crit Care Explor ; 2(10): e0266, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1795045

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: There is accumulating evidence of a distinct coagulopathy in severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection which is associated with poor prognosis in coronavirus disease 2019. Coagulation abnormalities in blood samples resemble systemic coagulopathies in other severe infections but demonstrate specific features such as a very high d-dimer. These clinical observations are consistent with histopathologic findings of locally disturbed pulmonary microvascular thrombosis and angiopathy in end-stage coronavirus disease 2019. However, exact underlying processes and the sequence of events are not fully understood. DATA SOURCES: CT perfusion may provide insight in the dynamic aspect of the vascularity in pulmonary lesions in coronavirus disease 2019 infection as, in contrast to dual energy CT, a multiphase perfusion pattern is displayed. STUDY SELECTION: In six patients with coronavirus disease 2019 pneumonia, findings on additional CT perfusion series were correlated with known histopathologic vascular patterns upon pulmonary autopsy of patients who had died of coronavirus disease 2019. DATA EXTRACTION: In this case series, we were able to show perfusion changes on CT scans in typical pulmonary lesions illustrating diverse patterns. DATA SYNTHESIS: We demonstrated hyperperfusion in areas with ground glass and a severely decreased perfusion pattern in more consolidated areas often seen later in the course of disease. A combination was also observed, illustrating temporal heterogeneity. CONCLUSIONS: These findings provide new insights into the pathophysiology of coronavirus disease 2019 pneumonia and further understanding of the mechanisms that lead to respiratory failure in these patients.

2.
Allergy ; 77(1): 118-129, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1597019

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 can present with lymphopenia and extraordinary complex multiorgan pathologies that can trigger long-term sequela. AIMS: Given that inflammasome products, like caspase-1, play a role in the pathophysiology of a number of co-morbid conditions, we investigated caspases across the spectrum of COVID-19 disease. MATERIALS & METHODS: We assessed transcriptional states of multiple caspases and using flow cytometry, the expression of active caspase-1 in blood cells from COVID-19 patients in acute and convalescent stages of disease. Non-COVID-19 subject presenting with various comorbid conditions served as controls. RESULTS: Single-cell RNA-seq data of immune cells from COVID-19 patients showed a distinct caspase expression pattern in T cells, neutrophils, dendritic cells, and eosinophils compared with controls. Caspase-1 was upregulated in CD4+ T-cells from hospitalized COVID-19 patients compared with unexposed controls. Post-COVID-19 patients with lingering symptoms (long-haulers) also showed upregulated caspase-1activity in CD4+ T-cells that ex vivo was attenuated with a select pan-caspase inhibitor. We observed elevated caspase-3/7levels in red blood cells from COVID-19 patients compared with controls that was reduced following caspase inhibition. DISCUSSION: Our preliminary results suggest an exuberant caspase response in COVID-19 that may facilitate immune-related pathological processes leading to severe outcomes. Further clinical correlations of caspase expression in different stages of COVID-19 will be needed. CONCLUSION: Pan-caspase inhibition could emerge as a therapeutic strategy to ameliorate or prevent severe COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Caspase Inhibitors , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/drug therapy , Caspase 1 , Caspase 3 , Caspase 7 , Caspase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Caspases/genetics , Humans
3.
Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis ; 40(11): 2295-2303, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1479485

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study is to present the first nationwide microbiological and epidemiological study of invasive group A Streptococcus (iGAS) disease in Spain. One thousand eight hundred ninety-three iGAS isolates were analyzed over 2007-2019. emm typing was performed by sequencing the gene's variable 5' end, exotoxin genes were identified by PCR, and antimicrobial susceptibility explored via the E test and disk diffusion. Five hundred twenty-three isolates were associated with sepsis, 292 with cellulitis, 232 with scarlet fever, 153 with pneumonia, 141 with streptococcal toxic shock syndrome, and 94 with necrotizing fasciitis. The most prevalent emm types were emm1 (449/1893 isolates), emm89 (210/1893), emm3 (208/1893), emm4 (150/1893), emm12 (112/1893) emm6 (107/1893), emm87 (89/1893), emm28 (88/1893), emm75 (78/1893), emm77 (78/1893), emm11 (58/1893), and emm22 (35/1893). emm1, emm3, emm4, and emm6 were the predominant types affecting children (mostly respiratory infections), while emm11, emm77, and emm89 prevailed in the elderly (mostly skin infections). Each emm type was associated with one or more exotoxin gene (spe, sme, and ssa) profiles. speA was detected in 660 isolates, speB in 1829, speC in 1014, speF in 1826, speG in 1651, speJ in 716, speH in 331, smeZ in 720, and ssa in 512. Isolates with speA were associated with the most severe infections. Penicillin susceptibility was universal. Two hundred twenty-four isolates were resistant to tetracycline, 169 to erythromycin, and 81 to clindamycin. Tetracycline, erythromycin, and clindamycin resistance rates declined over the study period. The above information could serve as the basis for continued surveillance efforts designed to control disease cause by this bacterium.


Subject(s)
Streptococcal Infections/microbiology , Streptococcus pyogenes/isolation & purification , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anti-Bacterial Agents/pharmacology , Bacterial Proteins/genetics , Bacterial Proteins/metabolism , Carrier Proteins/genetics , Carrier Proteins/metabolism , Child , Child, Preschool , Erythromycin/pharmacology , Exotoxins/genetics , Exotoxins/metabolism , Female , Humans , Infant , Male , Membrane Proteins/genetics , Membrane Proteins/metabolism , Microbial Sensitivity Tests , Middle Aged , Penicillins/pharmacology , Spain/epidemiology , Streptococcal Infections/epidemiology , Streptococcus pyogenes/classification , Streptococcus pyogenes/drug effects , Streptococcus pyogenes/genetics , Young Adult
4.
Sci Rep ; 10(1): 14186, 2020 08 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1434143

ABSTRACT

Infections cause varying degrees of haemostatic dysfunction which can be detected by clot waveform analysis (CWA), a global haemostatic marker. CWA has been shown to predict poor outcomes in severe infections with disseminated intravascular coagulopathy. The effect of less severe bacterial and viral infections on CWA has not been established. We hypothesized that different infections influence CWA distinctively. Patients admitted with bacterial infections, dengue and upper respiratory tract viral infections were recruited if they had an activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) measured on admission. APTT-based CWA was performed on Sysmex CS2100i automated analyser using Dade Actin FSL reagent. CWA parameters [(maximum velocity (min1), maximum acceleration (min2) and maximum deceleration (max2)] were compared against control patients. Infected patients (n = 101) had longer aPTT than controls (n = 112) (34.37 ± 7.72 s vs 27.80 ± 1.59 s, p < 0.001), with the mean (± SD) aPTT longest in dengue infection (n = 36) (37.99 ± 7.93 s), followed by bacterial infection (n = 52) (33.96 ± 7.33 s) and respiratory viral infection (n = 13) (29.98 ± 3.92 s). Compared to controls (min1; min2; max2) (5.53 ± 1.16%/s; 0.89 ± 0.19%/s2; 0.74 ± 0.16%/s2), bacterial infection has higher CWA results (6.92 ± 1.60%/s; 1.04 ± 0.28%/s2; 0.82 ± 0.24%/s2, all p < 0.05); dengue infection has significantly lower CWA values (3.93 ± 1.32%/s; 0.57 ± 0.17%/s2; 0.43 ± 0.14%/s2, all p < 0.001) whilst respiratory virus infection has similar results (6.19 ± 1.32%/s; 0.95 ± 0.21%/s2; 0.73 ± 0.18%/s2, all p > 0.05). CWA parameters demonstrated positive correlation with C-reactive protein levels (min1: r = 0.54, min2: r = 0.44, max2: r = 0.34; all p < 0.01). Different infections affect CWA distinctively. CWA could provide information on the haemostatic milieu triggered by infection and further studies are needed to better define its application in this area.


Subject(s)
Bacterial Infections/blood , Hemostasis , Partial Thromboplastin Time/methods , Virus Diseases/blood , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , C-Reactive Protein/analysis , Dengue/blood , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/blood , Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation/etiology , Elective Surgical Procedures , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Procalcitonin/blood , Respiratory Tract Infections/blood
7.
Pharmacol Res ; 161: 105107, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1318943

ABSTRACT

Currently, coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is spreading rapidly around the world. This study aimed to investigate whether the presence of acute kidney injury (AKI) might increase the risk of severe infection and fatality in COVID-19 patients. We searched the PubMed, Web of Science, ScienceDirect, MedRxiv and COVID-19 academic research communication platforms for studies reporting severe infection rates and case-fatality rates in COVID-19 patients with and without AKI up to June 20, 2020. The main outcomes were the comparisons of the severe infection rates and fatality rates in COVID-19 patients with and without AKI and the estimation of the odds ratio (OR) and its 95 % confidence interval (CI) for severe infection and mortality. Statistical analyses were performed with R statistical software. A total of 40 studies involving 24,527 patients with COVID-19 were included in our meta-analysis. The incidence of AKI was 10 % (95 % CI 8%-13 %) in COVID-19 patients. The patients had higher severe infection and fatality rates (55.6 % vs. 17.7 % and 63.1 % vs. 12.9 %, respectively, all P < 0.01) with COVID-19. AKI was a predictor of fatality (OR = 14.63, 95 % CI: 9.94-21.51, P < 0.00001) and severe infection (OR = 8.11, 95 % CI: 5.01-13.13, P < 0.00001) in patients with COVID-19. Higher levels of serum creatinine (Scr) and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) were associated with a significant increase in fatality [Scr: mean difference (MD): 20.19 µmol/L, 95 % CI: 14.96-25.42, P < 0.001; BUN: MD: 4.07 mmol/L, 95 % CI: 3.33-4.81, P < 0.001] and severe infection (Scr: MD: 7.78 µmol/L, 95 % CI: 4.43-11.14, P < 0.00001, BUN: MD: 2.12 mmol/L, 95 % CI: 1.74-2.50, P < 0.00001) in COVID-19 patients. In conclusion, AKI is associated with severe infection and higher fatality rates in patients with COVID-19. Clinicians should pay more attention to the monitoring and treatment of COVID-19 patients with AKI.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/complications , Acute Kidney Injury/mortality , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , Acute Kidney Injury/therapy , COVID-19/therapy , Humans
8.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(8)2021 Apr 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1298166

ABSTRACT

The virus responsible for the current COVID-19 pandemic is severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2): a new virus with high infectivity and moderate mortality. The major clinical manifestation of COVID-19 is interstitial pneumonia, which may progress to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). However, the disease causes a potent systemic hyperin-flammatory response, i.e., a cytokine storm or macrophage activation syndrome (MAS), which is associated with thrombotic complications. The complexity of the disease requires appropriate intensive treatment. One of promising treatment is statin administration, these being 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitors that exert pleiotropic anti-inflammatory effects. Recent studies indicate that statin therapy is associated with decreased mortality in COVID-19, which may be caused by direct and indirect mechanisms. According to literature data, statins can limit SARS-CoV-2 cell entry and replication by inhibiting the main protease (Mpro) and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp). The cytokine storm can be ameliorated by lowering serum IL-6 levels; this can be achieved by inhibiting Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and modulating macrophage activity. Statins can also reduce the complications of COVID-19, such as thrombosis and pulmonary fibrosis, by reducing serum PAI-1 levels, attenuating TGF-ß and VEGF in lung tissue, and improving endothelial function. Despite these benefits, statin therapy may have side effects that should be considered, such as elevated creatinine kinase (CK), liver enzyme and serum glucose levels, which are already elevated in severe COVID-19 infection. The present study analyzes the latest findings regarding the benefits and limitations of statin therapy in patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/pharmacology , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Animals , COVID-19/complications , Endothelium/drug effects , Humans , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/adverse effects , Inflammation/complications , Inflammation/drug therapy , Lipid Metabolism/drug effects , Macrophage Activation/drug effects , Pulmonary Fibrosis/complications , Pulmonary Fibrosis/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , Thrombosis/complications , Thrombosis/drug therapy
9.
J Transl Med ; 19(1): 230, 2021 05 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1280592

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Infections are a major disease burden worldwide. While they are caused by external pathogens, host genetics also plays a part in susceptibility to infections. Past studies have reported diverse associations between human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles and infections, but many were limited by small sample sizes and/or focused on only one infection. METHODS: We performed an immunogenetic association study examining 13 categories of severe infection (bacterial, viral, central nervous system, gastrointestinal, genital, hepatitis, otitis, pregnancy-related, respiratory, sepsis, skin infection, urological and other infections), as well as a phenotype for having any infection, and seven classical HLA loci (HLA-A, B, C, DPB1, DQA1, DQB1 and DRB1). Additionally, we examined associations between infections and specific alleles highlighted in our previous studies of psychiatric disorders and autoimmune disease, as these conditions are known to be linked to infections. RESULTS: Associations between HLA loci and infections were generally not strong. Highlighted associations included associations between DQB1*0302 and DQB1*0604 and viral infections (P = 0.002835 and P = 0.014332, respectively), DQB1*0503 and sepsis (P = 0.006053), and DQA1*0301 with "other" infections (a category which includes infections not included in our main categories e.g. protozoan infections) (P = 0.000369). Some HLA alleles implicated in autoimmune diseases showed association with susceptibility to infections, but the latter associations were generally weaker, or with opposite trends (in the case of HLA-C alleles, but not with alleles of HLA class II genes). HLA alleles associated with psychiatric disorders did not show association with susceptibility to infections. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that classical HLA alleles do not play a large role in the etiology of severe infections. The discordant association trends with autoimmune disease for some alleles could contribute to mechanistic theories of disease etiology.


Subject(s)
HLA-A Antigens , Mental Disorders , Alleles , Gene Frequency , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , HLA-A Antigens/genetics , HLA-DQ beta-Chains/genetics , HLA-DRB1 Chains/genetics , Haplotypes , Humans , Mental Disorders/genetics
11.
Ann Pharmacother ; 56(3): 319-329, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1273209

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the literature on a potential dexamethasone-direct oral anticoagulant (DOAC) drug interaction and provide management considerations with COVID hypercoagulability. DATA SOURCES: A search of EMBASE, PubMed, and Google Scholar (January 1990 to May 2021), limited to the English language, using applicable search terms resulted in 137 articles, with 21 relevant articles included. Regulatory agency and clinical guidance documents were also reviewed. STUDY SELECTION AND DATA EXTRACTION: Included articles describe in vitro or in vivo animal or human data for dexamethasone induction of cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 or P-glycoprotein (P-gp). DATA SYNTHESIS: Dexamethasone has the potential to interact with the DOACs via CYP3A4 and/or P-gp induction. Only apixaban and rivaroxaban have CYP3A4 metabolism. Dexamethasone can increase CYP3A4 activity by up to 70% and reduce the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) of CYP3A4 substrates by >40%, which is consistent with criteria for a weak CYP inducer. In rodents, dexamethasone P-gp induction is associated with AUC reductions of 20% to 50%. Human data are lacking. RELEVANCE TO PATIENT CARE AND CLINICAL PRACTICE: Severe COVID-19 infection is associated with hypercoagulability. Although heparins are the preferred anticoagulants for hospitalized COVID-19 patients, DOACs are being utilized. Dexamethasone is recommended for hospitalized COVID-19 patients requiring supplemental oxygen. The concurrent use of dexamethasone and apixaban or rivaroxaban in such patients carries the potential for reduced anticoagulant effect during a state of heightened thrombotic risk. CONCLUSIONS: Concurrent use of dexamethasone and apixaban or rivaroxaban in hospitalized COVID-19 patients with laboratory evidence of COVID coagulopathy should be avoided until higher-quality data are available.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Administration, Oral , Animals , Anticoagulants/adverse effects , COVID-19/drug therapy , Dabigatran , Dexamethasone , Drug Interactions , Humans , Pyridones , Rivaroxaban , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Int J Lab Hematol ; 43(6): 1291-1301, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1258939

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The clinical and laboratory features of severe COVID-19 infection overlap with those of hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (HLH), a hyperinflammatory disorder often associated with several viral infections. The clinical syndrome of HLH encompasses fever, organomegaly, cytopenias, hyperferritinemia, hypertriglyceridemia, raised transaminases, hypofibrinogenemia, absent natural killer (NK) cell activity, increased soluble CD25 and hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis in bone marrow, spleen, and lymph nodes. METHODS: We analyzed clinicopathological and laboratory features of thirteen patients with severe COVID-19 infection suspected to have HLH and found to have hemophagocytic histiocytosis on bone marrow examination (BME). RESULTS: Five of thirteen (38.46%) patients fulfilled five of eight HLH 2004 criteria and/or had a H-score ≥169. Three (23.08%) satisfied four of eight and remainder five (38.46%) satisfied three of eight HLH 2004 criteria. Fever, raised serum ferritin (13/13, 100%), transaminases (9/13, 69.23%), triglycerides (4/13, 30.76%), cytopenias (5/13, 38.46%), hypofibrinogenemia (2/13, 15.38%), and organomegaly (1/13, 7.69%) were observed in our patients. BME showed hemophagocytic histiocytosis without lymphocytosis in all. Contrary to HLH, lymphocytopenia (11/13, 84.61%), leukocytosis (7/13, 53.84%), neutrophilia (7/13, 53.84%), and hyperfibrinogenemia (7/13, 53.84%) were observed. Serum CRP, LDH, and plasma D-dimer were elevated in all, while serum albumin was decreased in 12 of 13 (92.3%) patients. Five patients recovered with high-dose pulsed corticosteroid therapy. CONCLUSION: The immune response associated with severe COVID-19 infection is similar to HLH with few differences. HLH should be suspected in severe COVID-19 infection although all patients may not fulfill required HLH diagnostic criteria. BME should be done in suspected cases so that appropriate therapy may be initiated early.


Subject(s)
Bone Marrow/pathology , COVID-19/complications , Lymphohistiocytosis, Hemophagocytic/etiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use , Adult , Aged , Biomarkers/blood , Blood Proteins/analysis , Bone Marrow Examination , COVID-19/immunology , Creatinine/blood , Diagnosis, Differential , Female , Humans , Leukocyte Count , Lymphohistiocytosis, Hemophagocytic/blood , Lymphohistiocytosis, Hemophagocytic/diagnosis , Lymphohistiocytosis, Hemophagocytic/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Neutrophils , Severity of Illness Index , Symptom Assessment , Triglycerides/blood
13.
Front Immunol ; 11: 575074, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1256374

ABSTRACT

Combined cellular and humoral host immune response determine the clinical course of a viral infection and effectiveness of vaccination, but currently the cellular immune response cannot be measured on simple blood samples. As functional activity of immune cells is determined by coordinated activity of signaling pathways, we developed mRNA-based JAK-STAT signaling pathway activity assays to quantitatively measure the cellular immune response on Affymetrix expression microarray data of various types of blood samples from virally infected patients (influenza, RSV, dengue, yellow fever, rotavirus) or vaccinated individuals, and to determine vaccine immunogenicity. JAK-STAT1/2 pathway activity was increased in blood samples of patients with viral, but not bacterial, infection and was higher in influenza compared to RSV-infected patients, reflecting known differences in immunogenicity. High JAK-STAT3 pathway activity was associated with more severe RSV infection. In contrast to inactivated influenza virus vaccine, live yellow fever vaccine did induce JAK-STAT1/2 pathway activity in blood samples, indicating superior immunogenicity. Normal (healthy) JAK-STAT1/2 pathway activity was established, enabling assay interpretation without the need for a reference sample. The JAK-STAT pathway assays enable measurement of cellular immune response for prognosis, therapy stratification, vaccine development, and clinical testing.


Subject(s)
Dengue Virus/immunology , Immunity, Cellular , Orthomyxoviridae/immunology , Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human/immunology , Rotavirus/immunology , Viral Vaccines/therapeutic use , Virus Diseases/immunology , Yellow fever virus/immunology , Biomarkers/blood , Dengue/blood , Dengue/immunology , Dengue/prevention & control , Dengue/virology , Dengue Vaccines/therapeutic use , Dengue Virus/pathogenicity , Diagnosis, Differential , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , Influenza Vaccines/therapeutic use , Influenza, Human/blood , Influenza, Human/immunology , Influenza, Human/prevention & control , Influenza, Human/virology , Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis , Orthomyxoviridae/pathogenicity , Predictive Value of Tests , RNA, Messenger/blood , RNA, Messenger/genetics , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/blood , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/immunology , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/prevention & control , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/virology , Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human/pathogenicity , Rotavirus/pathogenicity , Rotavirus Infections/blood , Rotavirus Infections/immunology , Rotavirus Infections/prevention & control , Rotavirus Infections/virology , Rotavirus Vaccines , Signal Transduction/genetics , Virus Diseases/blood , Virus Diseases/prevention & control , Virus Diseases/virology , Yellow Fever/blood , Yellow Fever/immunology , Yellow Fever/prevention & control , Yellow Fever/virology , Yellow Fever Vaccine/therapeutic use , Yellow fever virus/pathogenicity
14.
Exp Gerontol ; 151: 111423, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1242982

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a new infectious respiratory disease, which has caused a pandemic that has become the world's leading public health emergency, threatening people of all ages worldwide, especially the elderly. Complications of COVID-19 are closely related to an upregulation of the inflammatory response revealed by the pro-inflammatory profile of plasma cytokines (to the point of causing a cytokine storm), which is also a contributing cause of the associated coagulation disorders with venous and arterial thromboembolisms, causing multiple organ dysfunction and failure. In severe fulminant cases of COVID-19, there is an activation of coagulation and consumption of clotting factors leading to a deadly disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). It is well established that human immune response changes with age, and also that the pro-inflammatory profile of plasma cytokines is upregulated in both healthy and diseased elderly people. In fact, normal aging is known to be associated with a subclinical, sterile, low-grade, systemic pro-inflammatory state linked to the chronic activation of the innate immune system, a phenomenon known as "inflammaging". Inflammaging may play a role as a condition contributing to the co-occurrence of the severe hyper-inflammatory state (cytokine storm) during COVID-19, and also in other severe infections (sepsis) in older people. Moreover, we must consider the impact of inflammation on coagulation due to the crosstalk between inflammation and coagulation. The systemic inflammatory state and coagulation disorders are closely related, a phenomenon that here we call "coagul-aging" (Giunta S.). In this review, we discuss the various degrees of inflammation in older adults after being infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), and the adverse effects of aging on the inflammatory response and coagulation system. It is important to note that although there is no gender difference in susceptibility to COVID-19 infection, however, due to differences in angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) expression, innate immunity, and comorbidities, older men exhibit more severe disease and higher mortality than older women. There are currently no FDA-approved specific antiviral drugs that can be used against the virus. Therapies used in patients with COVID-19 consist of remdesivir, dexamethasone, low-molecular-weight heparin, in addition to monoclonal antibodies against the spike protein of SARS-CoV-2 in the early phase of the disease. Future pharmacological research should also consider targeting the possible role of the underlying scenario of inflammaging in healthy older people to prevent or mitigate disease complications. It is worth mentioning that some specific cytokine antagonists and traditional Chinese medicine preparations can reduce the elderly's inflammatory state.


Subject(s)
Blood Coagulation Disorders , COVID-19 , Aged , Aging , Cytokine Release Syndrome , Female , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Surg Neurol Int ; 12: 187, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1209982

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 is responsible for over 83 million cases of infection and over 1.8 million deaths since the emergence of the COVID-19 pandemic. Because COVID-19 infection is associated with a devastating mortality rate and myriad complications, it is critical that clinicians better understand its pathophysiology to develop effective treatment. Cumulative evidence is suggestive of cerebral aneurysms being intertwined with the hyperinflammatory state and hypercytokinemia observed in severe COVID-19 infections. CASE DESCRIPTION: In case example 1, the patient presents with chills, a mild cough, and sore throat. The patient develops high-grade fever of 39.8° C, decreased oxygen saturation of 93% on room air, and an extensive spontaneous subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in the basal cisterns from a ruptured left posterior communicating artery aneurysm. In case example 2, the patient presents with a positive PCR test for COVID-19 2 weeks prior with spontaneous SAH and found to have a large multilobulated bulbous ruptured aneurysm of the anterior communicating artery. Both patients' symptoms and high-grade fever are consistent with hypercytokinemia and a hyperinflammatory state, with elevated granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, inducible protein-10, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, M1P1A, and tumor necrosis factor-α inflammatory mediators found to be elevated in COVID-19 intensive care unit admissions. CONCLUSION: COVID-19 effect on cerebral aneurysms requires future studies to clearly delineate correlation, however, hypercytokinemia and a hyperinflammatory state are strongly implicated to cause degenerative vascular changes that may predispose patients to cerebral aneurysm formation, change in size or morphology, and resultant aneurysm rupture.

16.
Skelet Muscle ; 11(1): 10, 2021 04 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1197351

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: SARS-CoV2 virus could be potentially myopathic. Serum creatinine phosphokinase (CPK) is frequently found elevated in severe SARS-CoV2 infection, which indicates skeletal muscle damage precipitating limb weakness or even ventilatory failure. CASE PRESENTATION: We addressed such a patient in his forties presented with features of severe SARS-CoV2 pneumonia and high serum CPK. He developed severe sepsis and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and received intravenous high dose corticosteroid and tocilizumab to counter SARS-CoV2 associated cytokine surge. After 10 days of mechanical ventilation (MV), weaning was unsuccessful albeit apparently clear lung fields, having additionally severe and symmetric limb muscle weakness. Ancillary investigations in addition with serum CPK, including electromyogram, muscle biopsy, and muscle magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) suggested acute myopathy possibly due to skeletal myositis. CONCLUSION: We wish to stress that myopathogenic medication in SARS-CoV2 pneumonia should be used with caution. Additionally, serum CPK could be a potential marker to predict respiratory failure in SARS-CoV2 pneumonia as skeletal myopathy affecting chest muscles may contribute ventilatory failure on top of oxygenation failure due to SARS-CoV2 pneumonia.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/physiopathology , Creatine Kinase/blood , Muscle, Skeletal/physiopathology , Muscular Diseases/physiopathology , Quadriplegia/physiopathology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/physiopathology , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine Monophosphate/therapeutic use , Adult , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , Critical Illness , Dexamethasone/therapeutic use , Electromyography , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Heparin, Low-Molecular-Weight/therapeutic use , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus , Muscle, Skeletal/diagnostic imaging , Muscle, Skeletal/pathology , Muscular Diseases/blood , Muscular Diseases/diagnosis , Muscular Diseases/etiology , Neural Conduction , Pulmonary Embolism/diagnosis , Pulmonary Embolism/drug therapy , Pulmonary Embolism/etiology , Pulmonary Embolism/physiopathology , Quadriplegia/etiology , Respiration, Artificial , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Staphylococcal Infections/complications , Staphylococcal Infections/diagnosis , Staphylococcal Infections/drug therapy , Ventilator Weaning
17.
JACC Basic Transl Sci ; 6(3): 219-221, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1195312
18.
J Inflamm Res ; 14: 1207-1216, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1175488

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Disease severity in COVID-19 ranges from asymptomatic infection to severe disease and death, especially in older subjects. The risk for severe infection and death has been reported to be 2X in those between 30 and 40 years, 3X in those between 40 and 50 years, and 4X in those between 50 and 65 years, compared to the reference group of 18-29 years. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the early changes in host immune responses that are altered with age and the difference in the early host inflammatory response that dictates a symptomatic versus asymptomatic course of COVID-19. PATIENTS AND METHODS: COVID-19 subjects were identified by screening at the airport upon arrival from a foreign destination to China. Patients were either asymptomatic or had a mild disease when the first oro-pharyngeal (OP) swab samples were collected. Patients were quarantined and blood and throat swabs were collected during the course of the disease, allowing identification of the earliest host response to COVID-19. These patients were followed until their OP sample turned COVID-19 negative. RESULTS: Data were obtained from 126 PCR-confirmed COVID-19 patients. The blood samples were obtained within 48 days of qPCR confirmation of viral infection. Older subjects (>30 years) had significantly elevated levels of anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10, a significant decrease in the percentage of CD8+ T cells, and expansion in NKT cell fraction. This was associated with significantly elevated viral load and a delayed humoral response in older subjects. Compared to symptomatic subjects, asymptomatic patients had an early increase in pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-2, while a decrease in both T regulatory cells and anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Further, asymptomatic disease was associated with early humoral response and faster viral clearance. CONCLUSION: Early inflammatory response potentially plays a critical role for host-defense in COVID-19. The impaired early inflammatory response was associated with older age while a robust early inflammation was associated with asymptomatic disease.

19.
PLoS One ; 16(4): e0249570, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1171207

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Neutrophil-derived heparin binding protein (HBP; also known as azurocidin or CAP-37) is a key player in bacterial sepsis and a promising biomarker in severe infections. The aims of this study were to assess whether HBP is involved in the pathophysiology of COVID-19 and, if so, whether it can be used to predict severe disease preferably using a point-of-care test. METHODS: This was a prospective convenience sample study of biomarkers in patients admitted to Skåne University hospital in Sweden with a confirmed COVID-19 diagnosis. Plasma samples and clinical data were collected within 72h after admission, during hospital stay and at discharge. Plasma HBP concentrations samples were measured both with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and with a novel dry immunofluorescence analyzer (Joinstar) point-of-care test. RESULTS: Thirty-five COVID-19 patients were enrolled in the study. Twenty-nine patients had blood samples taken within 72h after admission. We compared the highest HBP value taken within 72h after admission in patients who eventually developed organ dysfunction (n = 23) compared to those who did not (n = 6), and found that HBP was significantly elevated in those who developed organ dysfunction (25.0 ng/mL (interquartile range (IQR) 16.6-48.5) vs 10.6 ng/mL (IQR 4.8-21.7 ng/mL), p = 0.03). Point-of-care test measurements correlated well with ELISA measurements (R = 0.83). HBP measured by the POC device predicted development of COVID-induced organ dysfunction with an AUC of 0.88 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.70-1.0). CONCLUSIONS: HBP is elevated prior to onset of organ dysfunction in patients with severe COVID-19 using a newly developed point-of-care test and hence HBP could be used in a clinical setting as a prognostic marker in COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Antimicrobial Cationic Peptides/blood , COVID-19 Testing , COVID-19 , Point-of-Care Testing , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Biomarkers/blood , Blood Proteins , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Severity of Illness Index
20.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(6)2021 Mar 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1148303

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is without any doubt the worst pandemic we have faced since the H1N1 virus outbreak. Even if vaccination against SARS-CoV-2 infection is becoming increasingly available, a more feasible approach for COVID-19 prevention and therapy is still needed. Evidence of a pathological link between metabolic diseases and severe forms of COVID-19 has stimulated critical reflection and new considerations. In particular, an abnormal immune response observed in certain patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection suggested possible common predisposing risk factors with autoimmune diseases such as Type 1 Diabetes (T1D). Correct supplementation with dietary factors may be key to preventing and counteracting both the underlying metabolic impairment and the complications of COVID-19. A set of agents may inhibit the cytokine storm and hypercoagulability that characterize severe COVID-19 infection: vitamin D3, omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, polyphenols like pterostilbene, polydatin and honokiol, which can activate anti-inflammatory and antioxidant sirtuins pathways, quercetin, vitamin C, zinc, melatonin, lactoferrin and glutathione. These agents could be highly beneficial for subjects who have altered immune responses. In this review, we discuss the antiviral and metabolic effects of these dietary factors and propose their combination for potential applications in the prevention and treatment of COVID-19. Rigorous studies will be fundamental for validating preventive and therapeutic protocols that could be of assistance to mitigate disease progression following SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
Autoimmune Diseases/diet therapy , COVID-19/diet therapy , Diet , Metabolic Diseases/diet therapy , Autoimmune Diseases/complications , COVID-19/complications , Cytokine Release Syndrome/diet therapy , Cytokine Release Syndrome/etiology , Disease Progression , Humans , Metabolic Diseases/complications , Thrombophilia/diet therapy , Thrombophilia/etiology
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