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1.
Curr Psychol ; 41(8): 5723-5730, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1982341

ABSTRACT

Home quarantine may lead to families developing a variety of psychological distress. The purpose of this study was to examine the psychological status of children and their parent during 2019 coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak in China. Data were collected from children (n = 1360) and their parent (n = 1360) in China using online survey during February 2020. Demographic information, media exposure, and psychological status including anxiety, depression and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms were assessed using self-report measures. The results indicated that, for children, 1.84% experienced moderate anxiety, 2.22% experienced depression and 3.16% met the diagnostic criteria for PTSD; for parent, 1.18%, 0.01% and 3.60% experienced moderate anxiety, severe depression, and moderate depression, respectively, and 3.53% met the diagnostic criteria for PTSD. Moreover, excessive media exposure (ß = -0.08 ~ 0.13, ps < 0.05) was a risk factor for anxiety and PTSD for children, a positive factor against anxiety and depression for parent. Being a mother (ß = 0.07 ~ 0.21, ps < 0.01), being younger (ß = -0.09 ~ -0.07, ps < 0.05), lower levels of educational attainment (ß = -0.17 ~ -0.08, ps < 0.01) and family monthly income (ß = -0.17 ~ -0.11, ps < 0.05) were risk factors for anxiety, depression and PTSD for parent. Findings suggested that children and their parent in non-severe area didn't suffer major psychological distress during the outbreak. Factors associated with lower levels of mental health problems were identified to inform the use of psychological interventions to improve the mental health of vulnerable groups during the pandemic.

2.
Psychosom Med ; 83(4): 368-372, 2021 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1931979

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Infectious diseases can cause psychological changes in patients. This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence and related risk factors for anxiety and depression in patients with COVID-19. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was performed on patients with COVID-19 admitted to the Sino-French New City branch of Wuhan Tongji Hospital from January to February 2020. The Zung Self-Rating Anxiety and Depression Scales were used to evaluate the prevalence of anxiety and depression. Demographic, clinical, and sociological data were also collected. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to identify independent risk factors of anxiety and depression in patients with COVID-19. RESULTS: In the current study, 183 patients were enrolled (mean age = 53 ± 9 years; 41.1% women). The prevalences of anxiety and depression were 56.3% and 39.3%, respectively. Logistic regression analysis revealed that older age, female sex, being divorced or widowed, COVID-19 disease duration, renal disease, and depression were identified as independent risk factors for anxiety in patients with COVID-19. Factors that were associated with depression were female sex, being widowed, COVID-19 disease duration, and anxiety. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates a high prevalence of anxiety and depression in patients with COVID-19 at the peak of the epidemic in Wuhan, China. The identification of demographic, clinical, and social factors may help identify health care professionals to provide psychological care as part of treatment for patients with COVID-19 and other life-threatening infectious diseases.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Depression/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , COVID-19/complications , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/etiology , Female , Humans , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Prevalence , Psychiatric Status Rating Scales , Risk Factors
3.
J Taibah Univ Med Sci ; 15(6): 536-543, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1796394

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study aims to assess the magnitude of depression, anxiety, and stress among health care workers by the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in Almadinah Almunawwarah, KSA. METHODS: This cross-sectional study examined 122 health care workers between April and May 2020 through the electronic use of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression (HAD) questionnaire, and Perceived Stress Scale (PSS). The perceptions of the participants towards stigmatisation of their profession during the COVID-19 pandemic were also assessed through a Likert's scale. The magnitude of anxiety, depression, and stress were analysed using a mean ± SD, correlation and percentages in respective statistics. A p value of <0.05 was considered significant. RESULTS: This study found that 32.9% of the healthcare workers frequently faced COVID-19 cases during the ongoing pandemic. As many as 35.6% were unusually anxious. A mean anxiety score of 8.43 ± 4.6 was noted, with significantly higher scores for women and those workers with inadequate training (p < 0.001 and 0.028). Moreover, a mean depression score of 7.6 ± 4.7 (p < 0.002) was recorded for the healthcare workers with inadequate training. About 27.9% of the participants were depressed. The mean stress score of the study cohort was 6.86 ± 2.5. From the cohort, 24.5% and 72.8% experienced mild and moderate stress, respectively. This study found that inadequate training for infection control was associated with a higher proportion of anxiety and depression [OR 1.86 (95% CI: 1.5-2.3; p < 0.043) and OR 2.21 (95% CI: 1.7-2.8; p < 0.018), respectively. CONCLUSION: This study found a high prevalence of anxiety, depression, and moderate stress among healthcare workers, regardless of their job specifications. The associated risk factors for anxiety and depression included inadequate training for infection control, and pre-existing stress-provoking medical conditions.

4.
Brain Behav Immun ; 87: 172-176, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1719352

ABSTRACT

The pandemic caused by Covid-19 has been an unprecedented social and health emergency worldwide. This is the first study in the scientific literature reporting the psychological impact of the Covid-19 outbreak in a sample of the Spanish population. A cross-sectional study was conducted through an online survey of 3480 people. The presence of depression, anxiety and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) was evaluated with screening tests from 14 March. Sociodemographic and Covid-19-related data was collected. Additionally, spiritual well-being, loneliness, social support, discrimination and sense of belonging were assessed. Descriptive analyses were carried out and linear regression models compiled. The 18.7% of the sample revealed depressive, 21.6% anxiety and 15.8% PTSD symptoms. Being in the older age group, having economic stability and the belief that adequate information had been provided about the pandemic were negatively related to depression, anxiety and PTSD. However, female gender, previous diagnoses of mental health problems or neurological disorders, having symptoms associated with the virus, or those with a close relative infected were associated with greater symptomatology in all three variables. Predictive models revealed that the greatest protector for symptomatology was spiritual well-being, while loneliness was the strongest predictor of depression, anxiety and PTSD. The impact on our mental health caused by the pandemic and the measures adopted during the first weeks to deal with it are evident. In addition, it is possible to identify the need of greater psychological support in general and in certain particularly vulnerable groups.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Mental Health/trends , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Adult , Aged , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , COVID-19 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depressive Disorder/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Spain/epidemiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
Med J Armed Forces India ; 77: S404-S412, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1525883

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A prospective study was conducted during the second phase of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic in India to assess the prevalence of anxiety and depressive symptoms among healthcare workers (HCWs) and factors that influence the outcome. METHODS: A self-administered questionnaire was completed by 1124 HCWs during the COVID-19 pandemic (March 30, 2020, to April 2, 2020). Demographic data, questions on COVID-19 and scores of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale were analysed using the chi-square test (Bonferroni correction) and binary logistic regression. RESULTS: The study consists of 1124 HCWs, including 749 doctors, 207 nurses, 135 paramedics, 23 administrators and ten supporting staff members. The prevalence of anxiety and depressive symptoms were reported as 37.2% and 31.4%, respectively. The risk factors for anxiety were female gender (30.6% vs 45.5%), age group (20-35 years) (50.4% vs 61.2%), unmarried (21.2% vs 30.6%) and job profile (nurse) (14.7% vs 26.4%). The protective factor was having service of more than 20 years (23.4% vs 14.8%). The risk factors for depression were age group (20-35 years) (51.3% vs 61.3%) and employed at a primary care hospital (16.2% vs 23.4%). The protective factors were job profile (doctor) (69.9% vs 59.6%) and having service of more than 20 years (22.3% vs 15.5%). CONCLUSION: Approximately one-third of the HCWs reported anxiety and depressive symptoms. The risk factors for anxiety symptoms were female gender, younger age and job profile (nurse) and for depressive symptoms were younger age and working at a primary care hospital. Future research studies should identify strategies for providing a safer and supportive work environment for HCWs to face epidemics/pandemics.

6.
Int J Psychiatry Med ; 56(4): 240-254, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1495823

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: We aimed to evaluate the relationship between perceived social support, coping strategies, anxiety, and depression symptoms among hospitalized COVID-19 patients by comparing them with a matched control group in terms of age, gender, and education level. METHOD: The patient group (n = 84) and the healthy controls (HCs, n = 92) filled in the questionnaire including the socio-demographic form, Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale, Multidimensional Perceived Social Support Scale, and Brief Coping Orientation to Problems Experienced through the online survey link. RESULTS: The COVID-19 patients had higher perceived social support and coping strategies scores than the HCs. However, anxiety and depression scores did not differ significantly between the two groups. In logistic regression analysis performed in COVID-19 patients, the presence of chest CT finding (OR = 4.31; 95% CI = 1.04-17.95) was a risk factor for anxiety and the use of adaptive coping strategies (OR = 0.86; 95% CI = 0.73-0.99) had a negative association with anxiety. In addition, the use of adaptive coping strategies (OR = 0.89; 95% CI = 0.79-0.98) and high perceived social support (OR = 0.97; 95% CI = 0.93- 0,99) had a negative association with depression symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: Longitudinal studies involving the return to normality phase of the COVID-19 pandemic are needed to investigate the effects of factors such as coping strategies and perceived social support that could increase the psychological adjustment and resilience of individuals on anxiety and depression.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Depressive Disorder/epidemiology , Inpatients/psychology , Social Support , Adult , Anxiety Disorders/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Comorbidity , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depressive Disorder/psychology , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Inpatients/statistics & numerical data , Male , Pandemics , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Turkey/epidemiology
7.
Endocr Metab Immune Disord Drug Targets ; 21(8): 1392-1405, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389051

ABSTRACT

The complications of the SARS-CoV-2 infection and its COVID-19 disease on mothers and their offspring are less known. This review aimed to determine the transmission, severity, and complications of SARS- CoV-2 infection during pregnancy. This review showed the influence of COVID-19 disease on neonatal neurogenesis. Owing medicines that were reported for the treatment of COVID-19 disease, this review suggested some control strategies like treatments (medicinal plants, antiviral therapy, cellular therapy, and immunotherapy), nutrition uptake, prevention, and recommendations. This overview showed that severe infection of SARS-CoV-2 during the early stage of pregnancy might increase the risk of stress, panic, and anxiety. This disorder can disturb the maternal immune system, and thus causing a neurodevelopmental disturbance. This hypothesis may be depending on the severity and intensity of the SARS-CoV-2 infection during pregnancy. However, vertical transmission of SARS-CoV-2 from dams to their fetuses is absent until now. During this global pandemic disease, maintaining safety during pregnancy, vaginal delivery, and breastfeeding may play a vital role in a healthy life for the offspring. Thus, international, and national organizations should be continuing for perinatal management, particularly during the next pandemic or disaster time.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/transmission , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical/prevention & control , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/immunology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/therapy , Animals , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/therapy , Female , Humans , Immunotherapy/methods , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/immunology
8.
Int J Clin Pract ; 75(10): e14328, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1352471

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: During the pandemic, anxiety and depression may occur increasingly in the whole society. The aim of this study was to evaluate the possible cause, incidence and levels of anxiety and depression in the relatives of the patients in the intensive care unit (ICU) in accordance with the patients' SARS-CoV-2 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) result. MATERIALS AND METHOD: The study was prospectively conducted on relatives of patients admitted to tertiary intensive care units during COVID-19 pandemic. Sociodemographic characteristics of the patients and their relatives were recorded. "The Turkish version of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale" was applied twice to the relatives of 120 patients to determine the symptoms of anxiety and depression in accordance with the PCR results of the patients (PCR positive n = 60, PCR negative n = 60). RESULTS: The ratios above cut-off values for anxiety and depression among relatives of the patients were 45.8% and 67.5% for the first questionnaire and 46.7% and 62.5% for the second questionnaire, respectively. The anxiety and depression in the relatives of PCR-positive patients was more frequent than the PCR negative (P < .001 for HADS-A and P = .034 for HADS-D). The prevalence of anxiety and depression was significantly higher in female relatives (P = .046 for HADS-A and P = .009 for HADS-A). There was no significant correlation between HADS and age of the patient or education of the participants. The fact that the patients were hospitalised in the ICU during the pandemic was an independent risk factor for anxiety (AUC = 0.746) while restricted visitation in the ICU was an independent risk factor for depression (AUC = 0.703). CONCLUSION: Positive PCR and female gender were associated with both anxiety and depression while hospitalisation in the ICU due to COVID-19 was an independent risk factor for anxiety and restricted visitation in the ICU is an independent risk factor for depression.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Anxiety/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Intensive Care Units , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Biol Psychiatry Cogn Neurosci Neuroimaging ; 7(2): 192-200, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1272321

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has created increased stress and anxiety for many; however, some individuals are particularly prone to heightened anxiety. It is unclear if and how prestress neurocognitive factors moderate risk for anxiety during high-stress situations. Enhanced error monitoring and a cognitive control strategy of more instantaneous (reactive) control have both been independently related to anxiety. We examined if a specific neurocognitive profile characterized by heightened error monitoring and a more reactive cognitive control strategy in adolescence predicts young adults' anxiety trajectories across 3 early months of the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: As part of a longitudinal study (N = 291), data were acquired in adolescence (13 years) on error monitoring (n = 124) and cognitive control strategy (n = 119). In young adulthood (18 years), anxiety was assessed three times during the COVID-19 pandemic (n = 162). RESULTS: On average, participants experienced greater anxiety in the first COVID-19 pandemic assessment, then anxiety decreased in the following months. Error monitoring and cognitive control strategy interacted to predict anxiety trajectories, such that among adolescents with an increased reliance on reactive control, error monitoring predicted greater anxiety in the first assessment but greater decreases the following months as stay-at-home orders were lifted and families adapted to the restrictions. CONCLUSIONS: Results suggest that neurocognitive profiles in adolescence predict young adults' anxiety responses during a highly stressful period, such as the initial months of the COVID-19 pandemic. Our findings have implications for the early identification of individuals at greater risk for anxiety.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adolescent , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , Depression , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
10.
Front Psychiatry ; 12: 622366, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1268309

ABSTRACT

The current study aimed at increasing our understanding of the psychological impact of the COVID-19 lockdown on undergraduate students, particularly with respect to the association between personality traits; defense mechanisms (DMs); depression, anxiety, and stress symptoms (DASSs); and compliance with the government recommended health measures. A sample of 1,427 Italian undergraduate students were administered the Personality Inventory for the DSM-5-Brief Form; the Defense Style Questionnaire-40; and the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale-21. Compliance with the COVID-19 behavioral recommendations was measured through a 10-item survey measure. Results showed that immature DMs and internalizing personality traits (i.e., detachment, negative affect, psychoticism) were risk factors of DASSs. Furthermore, subjects with higher levels of DASSs appeared less compliant with the health measures recommended by the Italian government. Experts may use these results to identify and subsequently support (via the Internet) young subjects at greater risk of mental health problems as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.

11.
Psychol Health Med ; 27(2): 421-427, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1263610

ABSTRACT

The aim of the study was to determine the rate and related factors of prenatal general anxiety disorder in the second peak of the COVID-19 pandemic in Iran. A cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted on 2336 pregnant women who referred to health centers of Zanjan province in Iran from June to September 2020. The samples were selected using a multi-stage sampling method. Data were collected by telephone using a General Anxiety Disorder questionnaire (GAD) and analyzed with descriptive statistics and the logistic regression model at a 95% confidence level. Results show that, during the pandemic of COVID-19 more than 78% of Iranian pregnant women had severe anxiety. The odds of having general anxiety disorder in urban residency was 1.80 times more than the rural residence and getting information about preventive and self-care guidelines of COVID-19 were 1.24 times more than the other information (P < 0.05). Our findings show a higher level of anxiety disorder in pregnant women during the COVID-19 pandemic, and also the place of residence and type of information received about COVID-19 are the main predictors of anxiety level. Therefore, the continuous monitoring of pregnant women for evaluating anxiety disorder during the outbreaks is recommended as a routine schedule.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/prevention & control , Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Iran/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pregnancy , Pregnant Women , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
12.
Mult Scler Relat Disord ; 53: 103070, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1253409

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the current COVID-19 pandemic there are studies that have suggested a negative impact of the pandemic on the mental health of patients with multiple sclerosis (PwMS). In this sense, several factors may be related to the increase in experiences of anxiety and depression in PwMS during the current pandemic. OBJECTIVE: In this study we first explored the reactions of anxiety, depression and fear to COVID-19 in a group of PwMS that belong to the Ibero-American region. Besides, we explored whether having been positive to COVID-19, fear of COVID-19, the obstacles to attend medical appointments during the outbreak and subjective experience of MS progression, could predict the anxiety and depression reactions in our PwMS sample. MATERIALS AND METHODS: An online cross-sectional survey was conducted on 202 MS patients from six countries (Argentina, Mexico, Spain, Dominican Republic, Venezuela and Cuba). For comparisons between variables an independent-samples t-test and one-way analysis of variance were used. Multiple linear regression was used to evaluate the effects of potential predictor variables over emotional reactions. RESULTS: Our results showed that PwMS who were positive for COVID-19 reported higher levels of fear of COVID-19 (p<.001) and also higher levels of anxiety (p<.001) compared to non-positive patients. Those patients who had difficulties attending their medical appointments during the outbreak showed higher levels of depression (p=.03) and anxiety (p=.019). Levels of anxiety (p<.001) and depression (p=.006) were also higher among patients with the subjective experience of MS disease progression. The reactions of fear of COVID-19, having been positive to COVID-19, problems attending medical appointments, and subjective experience of MS disease progression showed a high association with the negative impact of the pandemic on mental health of PwMS. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that the situation generated by the COVID-19 pandemic has had a negative impact on the mental health of PwMS in our sample. Our results also alert to the importance of offering psychological care to patients with multiple sclerosis during the current outbreak, regardless of whether they have been positive for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Multiple Sclerosis , Anxiety/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Disease Progression , Fear , Humans , Multiple Sclerosis/complications , Multiple Sclerosis/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
13.
BMJ Open ; 11(5): e050084, 2021 05 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1236465

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The outbreak of COVID-19 has major impacts on the psychological health of the public. This study aimed to investigate the anxiety and depression levels of the general population during the rapid progressing stage of COVID-19 pandemic in China and to explore the associated factors. DESIGN AND SETTING: A cross-sectional online survey. PARTICIPANTS: 2651 Chinese people. MEASURES: The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale was used to measure their psychological health. A structured questionnaire collected possible associated factors, including sociodemographic characteristics, health information, contact history-related information, experience and perceptions, knowledge and education and adopted precautions. Multiple linear regression was conducted to explore the factors associated with anxiety and depression. RESULTS: The mean score of anxiety and depression was 4.35 and 4.38, respectively. The rates of people with anxiety and depressive symptoms (with >7 score in the subscale) were 14.15% and 17.35%, respectively. Participants without political party membership, with contact history of COVID-19, going out or gathering, taking Chinese medicine herbs, being unsatisfied with current precautions, perceiving higher risks of infection, lower knowledge and poorer health presented higher anxiety and depression levels. Moreover, those who were females, married, lived alone and wore mask were more anxious; whereas people who were younger, experienced public health crisis, did not take precautions (regular work-rest, exercise) had higher depression level. CONCLUSIONS: During the rapid progressing stage of COVID-19 pandemic in China, one-seventh and one-sixth respondents presented anxiety and depression symptoms, respectively. The risk factors for anxiety and depression included the following: without political party membership, with contact history of COVID-19, going out or gathering, wearing masks, taking Chinese medicine herbs, being unsatisfied with current precautions, perceiving higher susceptibility, lower knowledge and poorer health status. Extensive information and psychological support should be provided to improve the mental health of the general population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Anxiety/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Female , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
14.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(10)2021 05 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1224024

ABSTRACT

Despite older adults' extremely high vulnerability to COVID-19 complications and death, few studies have examined how personal characteristics and the COVID-19 pandemic have impacted the mental health of older adults at the global level. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationships among demographics, COVID-19 life impacts, and depression and anxiety in adults aged 60 and older from 33 countries. A sample of 823 older adults aged 60-94 and residing in 33 countries completed a 10-min online survey following recruitment from mailing lists and social media. Being separated from and having conflicts with loved ones predicted both anxiety and depression, as did residing in a country with higher income. Getting medical treatment for severe symptoms of COVID-19 and having decreased work responsibilities predicted depression, but adjustment to working from home and younger age predicted both depression and anxiety. Participants from Europe and Central Asia reported higher depression than those from all other regions and higher anxiety than those from Latin America and the Caribbean. The COVID-19 pandemic has had serious deleterious effects on the mental health of older adults worldwide. The current findings have direct implications for mental health services that may be delivered to older adults to help facilitate healthy psychological adjustment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Aged , Anxiety/epidemiology , Caribbean Region , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Europe , Humans , Mental Health , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Ann Palliat Med ; 10(4): 4601-4611, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1222338

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) epidemic, tumor patients and their families might suffer from greater psychological stress as a result of anxiety or other psychological disorders. We conducted an online study during the epidemic to explore the mental state of tumor patients and their families during this extraordinary time. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey was carried out. Questionnaires were distributed through the WeChat "Questionnaire Star" network. The snowball sampling technique was adopted and further promoted by subjects who had completed the questionnaire. RESULTS: A total of 1,030 valid questionnaires were collected. There were 609 (59.13%) tumor patients and 421 (40.87%) family members. One hundred and fifty-six (15.15%) subjects had anxiety, among which 65 (6.31%) had moderate to severe anxiety. Single-factor analysis indicated that age (>60 years old), the farmer occupation, and a high sleep disorder assessment score were risk factors for anxiety, while the latter two might also be independent risk factors, as suggested by multi-factor analysis. Infrequent contact with doctors was an independent risk factor for cancer patients, while uninterrupted anti-tumor therapy was an independent protective factor. 40.19% of the subjects expressed a need for psychosocial support during the COVID-19 period. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 outbreak resulted in tumor patients and their relatives experiencing greater psychological pressure than usual, and patients were more worried about anti-tumor treatment and disease progression impacted by the epidemic. Both groups had a significant need for psychosocial help.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Anxiety/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression , Humans , Mental Health , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
16.
Front Psychol ; 12: 646368, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1220257

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has dramatically changed the patterns of lifestyle and posed psychological stress on pregnant women. However, the association of sleep duration and screen time with anxiety among pregnant women under the backdrop of the COVID-19 pandemic scenario has been poorly addressed. We conducted one large-scale, multicenter cross-sectional study which recruited 1794 pregnant women across middle and west China. Self-reported demographic characteristics, lifestyle, and mental health status were collected from 6th February to 8th May 2020. We investigated the association of sleep duration and screen time with the risk of anxiety by multivariable logistic regression analysis and linear regression analysis after adjusting potential confounders. The dose-response relationship of sleep duration and screen time with anxiety was visualized using a cubic spline plot. Our data revealed that almost 35% of pregnant women suffered from anxiety during the COVID-19 pandemic. Sleep duration was dose-dependently associated with a lower risk of anxiety among pregnant women (OR = 0.41, 95% CI: 0.27-0.63), while screen time exhibited a conversed effect (OR = 2.01, 95% CI:1.00-4.39). Notably, sleep duration (≥8 h/day) synergistically combined with screen time (3-7 h/day) to diminish the risk of anxiety (OR = 0.70, 95% CI: 0.50-0.99). Taken together, sleep duration and screen time were independently and jointly associated with anxiety (P < 0.05). Therefore, promoting a more active lifestyle and maintaining higher sleep quality could improve the mental health of pregnant women, especially under public health emergency.

17.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(9)2021 May 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1219923

ABSTRACT

Healthcare workers (HCW) are exposed to health-related anxiety in times of pandemic as they are considered to have a high risk of being infected whilst being the vital workforce to manage the outbreak. This study determined the factors that influence health anxiety and its extent in correlations with perceived risk, knowledge, attitude, and practice of HCW. A cross-sectional online survey was conducted on a total of 709 HCW from both public and private healthcare facilities who completed a set of questionnaires on sociodemographic data, knowledge, attitude, and practice of HCW on COVID-19, and health anxiety traits assessed using the short version Health Anxiety Inventory (HAI). Multiple linear regression (adjusted R2 = 0.06) revealed respondents with higher perceived risk for COVID-19 significantly predicted higher HAI scores (beta 1.281, p < 0.001, 95%, CI: 0.64, 1.92), and those with a higher cautious attitude towards COVID-19 significantly predicted higher HAI scores (beta 0.686, p < 0.001, 95%CI: 0.35, 1.02). Healthcare workers' perceived risk and cautious attitude towards COVID-19 might be potentially influenced by management of the sources and approaches to the dissemination of information of the pandemic. The implementation of certain measures that minimize the infection risk and its related anxiety is important to preserve both their physical and psychological wellbeing.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Anxiety/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Health Personnel , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
18.
Front Psychiatry ; 12: 580067, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1211865

ABSTRACT

Background: The outbreak of the novel coronavirus disease COVID-19 caused panic and psychological stress throughout the World. We investigated the extent of adverse psychological reactions in two medical staff groups in China, and explored the importance of online psychological assistance for them. Methods: A cross-sectional online survey including Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and Insomnia Severity Index (ISI) was utilized to assess anxiety, depression, and insomnia. Propensity score matching (PSM) was applied to match sex and age between the two groups. Differences in the prevalence of adverse psychological reactions between the two groups were compared by a Chi-square test. A multivariate logistic regression analysis was utilized to search for associated adverse psychological reaction factors of two groups. Results: A total of 2,920 medical staff took part in the survey, including 470 frontline and 2,450 non-frontline medical staff. The risk of the frontline group experiencing anxiety, depression, insomnia-early, insomnia-middle, and insomnia-late were 1.16, 1.28, 1.26, 1.22, 1.28 times those of the non-frontline group after PSM. For frontline medical staff, the spinsterhood state (OR = 1.23, 95% CI: 1.00-1.51; P = 0.05) was a risk factor for anxiety. Bachelor or college degree (OR = 2.23, 95% CI: 1.24-4.02, P = 0.01) and a contact history with COVID-19 patients (OR = 1.62, 95% CI: 1.10-2.40; P = 0.02) were risk factors for insomnia. For non-frontline medical staff, being a woman (OR = 1.49, 95% CI: 1.08-2.06, P = 0.01) was a risk factor for anxiety, whilst being in a middle age group was a protective factor for anxiety (OR = 0.70, 95% CI: 0.50-0.99, P = 0.04) and depression (OR = 0.65, 95% CI: 0.45-0.93, P = 0.02). Being a woman (OR = 1.47, 95% CI: 1.14-1.89, P = 0.003) and working in a COVID-19 unit (OR = 1.31, 95% CI: 1.11-1.54, P = 0.001) were risk factors for insomnia, whilst the spinsterhood state (OR = 0.80, 95% CI: 0.67-0.95; P = 0.01) was a protective factor for insomnia. Online forms of psychological aid were all popular with medical staff. Conclusions: The prevalence of anxiety, depression, and insomnia in frontline medical staff was significantly higher than in the non-frontline group. Appropriate intervention methods should be adopted according to the different influencing factors of the two groups. Online psychological aid was the preferred mechanism for relieving psychological problems.

19.
Front Psychiatry ; 12: 652296, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1202086

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has significantly caused socioeconomic impacts. However, little is known about the psychological effect of COVID-19 on home-quarantined nursing students. The present study aimed to identify the prevalence and major determinants of anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) in Chinese nursing students during the COVID-19 pandemic quarantine period. An online survey was conducted on a sample of 6,348 home-quarantined nursing students. Mental health status was assessed by the Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7-Item Scale (GAD-7), the Patient Health Questionnaire 9-Item Scale (PHQ-9) and the Post Traumatic Stress Disorder Check List-Civilian version (PCL-C), respectively. Logistic regression analyses were performed to identify risk factors of anxiety, depression and PTSS. The overall prevalence of anxiety was 34.97%, and the rates of "mild," "moderate," and "severe" anxiety were 26.24, 7.04, and 1.69%, respectively. Depression was detected in 40.22% of the nursing students, and the prevalence of "mild," "moderate," "moderately severe," and "severe" depression was 27.87, 7.18, 4.08, and 1.09%, respectively. The overall prevalence of PTSS was 14.97%, with the prevalence of "mild" and "moderate-to-severe" PTSS reported at 7.04 and 7.93%, respectively. Male gender and insufficient social support were common risk factors for anxiety, depression and PTSS. In conclusion, about one-third, two-fifths, and one-seventh of Chinese nursing students had anxiety, depression and PTSS during the period of home quarantine, respectively. Timely and appropriate psychological interventions for nursing students should be implemented to reduce the psychological harm caused by COVID-19 pandemic.

20.
Am J Psychiatry ; 178(6): 530-540, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1201589

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Increased anxiety in response to the COVID-19 pandemic has been widely noted. The purpose of this study was to test whether the prepandemic functional connectome predicted individual anxiety induced by the pandemic. METHODS: Anxiety scores from healthy undergraduate students were collected during the severe and remission periods of the pandemic (first survey, February 22-28, 2020, N=589; second survey, April 24 to May 1, 2020, N=486). Brain imaging data and baseline (daily) anxiety ratings were acquired before the pandemic. The predictive performance of the functional connectome on individual anxiety was examined using machine learning and was validated in two external undergraduate student samples (N=149 and N=474). The clinical relevance of the findings was further explored by applying the connectome-based neuromarkers of pandemic-related anxiety to distinguish between individuals with specific mental disorders and matched healthy control subjects (generalized anxiety disorder, N=43; major depression, N=536; schizophrenia, N=72). RESULTS: Anxiety scores increased from the prepandemic baseline to the severe stage of the pandemic and remained high in the remission stage. The prepandemic functional connectome predicted pandemic-related anxiety and generalized to the external sample but showed poor performance for predicting daily anxiety. The connectome-based neuromarkers of pandemic-related anxiety further distinguished between participants with generalized anxiety and healthy control subjects but were not useful for diagnostic classification in major depression and schizophrenia. CONCLUSIONS: These findings demonstrate the feasibility of using the functional connectome to predict individual anxiety induced by major stressful events (e.g., the current global health crisis), which advances our understanding of the neurobiological basis of anxiety susceptibility and may have implications for developing targeted psychological and clinical interventions that promote the reduction of stress and anxiety.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/etiology , COVID-19/psychology , Connectome , Adult , Anxiety/diagnosis , Biomarkers , Cohort Studies , Feasibility Studies , Female , Functional Neuroimaging , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Pandemics , Predictive Value of Tests , Young Adult
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