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1.
J Hum Hypertens ; 35(10): 828-836, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575511

ABSTRACT

Concern has arisen about the role played in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection by angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and angiotensin II receptor blockers (ARBs). This study was designed to assess the practice behaviors of physicians toward hypertension treatment with ACE-i or ARBs during the COVID-19 pandemic. A self-administered survey questionnaire consisting of 26 questions about current hypertension treatment with ACE-i/ ARBs was applied to cardiologists, internists, and family physicians in central and western Turkey, between 01 and 19 May 2020. A total of 460 physicians were approached, and 220 (47.8%) participated in the study. Of the total respondents, 78.7% reported that they had not changed their antihypertensive medication prescribing pattern, 8.6% of clinicians had changed ACE-i/ ARBs medicine of patients during the COVID-19 pandemic and 12.7% of them were undecided. The median (±interquartile range) score indicating general reliance level of physicians in ACE-i/ARBs therapy was 8 ± 4 (range, 1-10). In multiple comparison analyses, the general reliance level in ACE-i/ARBs, reliance level when starting a new ACEi/ARBs and changing behavior in heart failure patients were significantly different with regard to the specialties (p:0.02, p:0.009, p:0.005 respectively). Although most of the physicians found the publications about ACE-i/ ARBs during the COVID-19 pandemic untrustworthy, there were variable levels of knowledge and reliance among different physicians and specialty groups. In general, the ACE-i/ ARBs prescribing habits were not affected by safety concerns during the COVID-19 pandemic in Turkey.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hypertension , Angiotensin Receptor Antagonists , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Attitude , Humans , Hypertension/drug therapy , Hypertension/epidemiology , Pandemics , Renin-Angiotensin System , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Int J Ment Health Addict ; 19(6): 2470-2483, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1188160

ABSTRACT

This study intended to observe mental symptoms among physicians in Turkey during the COVID-19 pandemic and to investigate the factors leading to such symptoms. The study participants were contacted via their smartphones between April 23 and 27, 2020, and invited to fill out an online questionnaire which included questions from the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) and the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI). The mean age of the 406 physicians who participated in the study was 42.9 ± 10.1 years, and 53.4% were men (n: 217). During the pandemic, 66.7% had decreased working hours. Lack of COVID-related training, difficulty obtaining personal protective equipment (PPE), working in a COVID unit, and current psychiatric disease were found to be among the predictors of emotional burnout. Female gender, lack of COVID training, difficulty obtaining PPE, working in a COVID unit, and current psychiatric disease predicted desensitization. Facilitating continuous and comprehensive support mechanisms aimed at protecting physicians' mental health is of great importance during epidemics.

3.
Korean J Pain ; 34(2): 137-138, 2021 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1159898
4.
EClinicalMedicine ; 34: 100793, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1144586

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Consecutive negative SARS-CoV-2 PCR test results are being considered to estimate viral clearance in COVID-19 patients. However, there are anecdotal reports of hospitalization from protracted COVID-19 complications despite such confirmed viral clearance, presenting a clinical conundrum. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective analysis of 222 hospitalized COVID-19 patients to compare those that were readmitted post-viral clearance (hospitalized post-clearance cohort, n = 49) with those that were not re-admitted post-viral clearance (non-hospitalized post-clearance cohort, n = 173) between February and October 2020. In order to differentiate these two cohorts, we used neural network models for the 'augmented curation' of comorbidities and complications with positive sentiment in the Electronic Hosptial Records physician notes. FINDINGS: In the year preceding COVID-19 onset, anemia (n = 13 [26.5%], p-value: 0.007), cardiac arrhythmias (n = 14 [28.6%], p-value: 0.015), and acute kidney injury (n = 7 [14.3%], p-value: 0.030) were significantly enriched in the physician notes of the hospitalized post-clearance cohort. INTERPRETATION: Overall, this retrospective study highlights specific pre-existing conditions that are associated with higher hospitalization rates in COVID-19 patients despite viral clearance and motivates follow-up prospective research into the associated risk factors. FUNDING: This work was supported by Nference, inc.

5.
Front Pharmacol ; 11: 583260, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1024517

ABSTRACT

The effect of immunosuppressant treatments on the incidence of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) remains largely unknown. We studied the association between the pre-exposure to disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) that decrease immunological responses and the incidence of COVID-19 to explore the possible effects of these treatments in early manifestations of the disease. For this purpose, we performed a cross-sectional study including 2,494 patients with immunomediated inflammatory diseases (IMIDs) recruited at the outpatient Rheumatology, Dermatology and Gastroenterology services of Hospital del Mar. The primary outcome was the clinical diagnosis of COVID-19 performed by a physician at the hospital or at the primary care center, from the March 1-29, 2020. Multivariable Poisson regression models were fitted to estimate COVID-19 relative risk (RR) adjusted by comorbidities. We revealed that biological (RR = 0.46, CI 95% = 0.31-0.67) and synthetic (RR = 0.62, CI 95% = 0.43-0.91) DMARDs used in IMIDs diminished the incidence of COVID-19. Striking sex differences were revealed with anti-TNFα compounds (RR = 0.50, CI 95% = 0.33-0.75) with higher effects in women (RR = 0.33, CI 95% = 0.17-0.647). Treatment with low glucocorticoid doses also revealed sex differences decreasing the incidence of COVID-19 predominantly in women (RR = 0.72, CI 95% = 0.42-1.22). Our results report a decreased incidence of COVID-19 in patients receiving specific DMARDs with different immunodepressor mechanisms with striking sex differences. These results underline the interest of repurposing specific DMARDs for the possibility of minimizing the severity of disease progression in the early stages of COVID-19.

6.
Postgrad Med ; 133(2): 223-230, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1015071

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Health-care workers exposed to coronavirus19 disease could be psychologically stressed. The objective of this study is to assess the anxiety, depression levels, and psychological resilience of physicians working during the Covid-19 outbreak and to evaluate the related factors that are associated with their psychological resilience. METHODS: The sample of this descriptive study was composed of medical doctors and dentists. The data were obtained online between April 13-23, 2020 through a survey prepared by the researchers. In addition, a questionnaire about the participants' sociodemographic characteristics, the Psychological Resilience Scale and Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale (HAD-A/HAD-D) was given. RESULTS: The average age of the 671 participants was 44.0 ± 9.0 years. Psychological resilience scores were significantly higher in those who had children, who had worked for 15 years or more, and who had received training about COVID-19 (p < 0.05). Depression scores were higher among women and in those who reported having a chronic disease, whose workload increased after the outbreak, and who had physical contact with COVID-positive patients. The anxiety scores were also higher among women and in those whose workload had increased and who had contact with COVID-positive patients (p < 0.05). The physicians with scores below the cutoff point on the HAD-D/HAD-A had significantly higher scores on the Psychological Resilience Scale (p < 0.05). DISCUSSION: Depression and anxiety levels were found to be significantly lower in physicians with greater psychological resilience. Psychological and social support of all health-care workers, especially physicians, is important in the struggle with the pandemic. It is thought that determining the variables related to psychological resilience in health-care workers will be a guide for psychosocial services.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Mental Health , Pandemics , Physicians/psychology , Stress, Psychological/diagnosis , Adult , COVID-19/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/etiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires
7.
Am J Emerg Med ; 39: 253.e1-253.e2, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-614439

ABSTRACT

Recent reports have described a secondary Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children (MIS-C) after a prior COVID-19 infection that often has features of Kawasaki disease (KD). Here, we report the case of a 36-year-old woman who presented to the emergency department hypotensive and tachycardic after 1 week of fevers, abdominal pain, vomiting and diarrhea, and was found to have the classic phenotype of complete Kawasaki's Disease including nonexudative conjunctivitis, cracked lips, edema of the hands and feet, palmar erythema, a diffuse maculopapular rash, and cervical lymphadenopathy. Initial laboratory studies were significant for hyponatremia, elevated liver function tests including direct hyperbilirubinemia, and leukocytosis with neutrophilia. Imaging revealed mild gallbladder wall edema, a small area of colitis, and small pleural effusion. She was treated for Kawasaki Disease Shock Syndrome (KDSS) with pulse dose solumedrol, IVIG, and aspirin with near resolution of symptoms and normalization of vital signs within 1 day and subsequent improvement in her laboratory abnormalities. She was later found to be COVID-19 IgG positive, suggesting past exposure. This case represents an early report of a KD-like illness in an adult with serologic evidence of a previous COVID-19 infection, similar to MIS-C. It suggests that the virulent strain of SARS-CoV-2 appears to cause a post-infectious inflammatory syndrome similar to KD in adults, as well as children. Our understanding of the myriad of COVID-19 symptoms and sequelae is rapidly evolving. We recommend physicians remain vigilant for inflammatory syndromes that mimic KD/KDSS which may warrant prompt treatment with IVIG and steroids.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/virology , Adult , COVID-19/complications , Diagnosis, Differential , Female , Humans , Mucocutaneous Lymph Node Syndrome
8.
J Am Soc Echocardiogr ; 33(8): 1040-1047, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-342809

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has placed an extraordinary strain on healthcare systems across North America. Defining the optimal approach for managing a critically ill COVID-19 patient is rapidly changing. Goal-directed transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) is frequently used by physicians caring for intubated critically ill patients as a reliable imaging modality that is well suited to answer questions at bedside. METHODS: A multidisciplinary (intensive care, critical care cardiology, and emergency medicine) group of experts in point-of-care echocardiography and TEE from the United States and Canada convened to review the available evidence, share experiences, and produce a consensus statement aiming to provide clinicians with a framework to maximize the safety of patients and healthcare providers when considering focused point-of-care TEE in critically ill patients during the COVID-19 pandemic. RESULTS: Although transthoracic echocardiography can provide the information needed in most patients, there are specific scenarios in which TEE represents the modality of choice. TEE provides acute care clinicians with a goal-directed framework to guide clinical care and represents an ideal modality to evaluate hemodynamic instability during prone ventilation, perform serial evaluations of the lungs, support cardiac arrest resuscitation, and guide veno-venous ECMO cannulation. To aid other clinicians in performing TEE during the COVID-19 pandemic, we describe a set of principles and practical aspects for performing examinations with a focus on the logistics, personnel, and equipment required before, during, and after an examination. CONCLUSIONS: In the right clinical scenario, TEE is a tool that can provide the information needed to deliver the best and safest possible care for the critically ill patients.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Critical Care/organization & administration , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Echocardiography, Transesophageal/methods , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Canada/epidemiology , Consensus , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Female , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Male , North America/epidemiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Patient Positioning , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Point-of-Care Systems , Risk Assessment , Safety Management
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