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1.
Br J Nutr ; 127(1): 123-132, 2022 01 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1603433

ABSTRACT

Only a few studies have investigated the association between psychological stress and the healthfulness of plant-based diets while accounting for variances in age groups and regions. In light of this, this study aimed to identify the food groups that contribute the most to the relationship between the healthfulness of plant-based diets and psychological stress in female students in Saudi Arabia. This cross-sectional study, which included 401 female college students aged 19-35 years, collected data on blood, anthropometric indices, the perceived stress scale-10 (PSS-10) and diet using the Saudi food frequency questionnaire. An overall plant-based diet index (PDI), healthy PDI, and an unhealthy PDI (uPDI) were defined. Multiple linear regression analyses were applied to examine the associations between PSS-10 and PDI and hPDI and uPDI. No associations between the PSS-10 score and the overall PDI or uPDI scores were found; however, a six-point higher hPDI score was associated with a 0·16-point lower PSS-10 score (95 % CI, -0·24, -0·08) after controlling for lifestyle factors. Moreover, adjustments for healthy food groups, including vegetables and fruits, attenuated the association between the hPDI and PSS-10. In conclusion, healthy plant-based diets are associated with lower psychological stress in young Saudi women. This finding highlights the importance, especially for female students, of following diets that are not only plant-based but are also healthy and rich in fruits and vegetables.


Subject(s)
Diet, Vegetarian , Diet , Cross-Sectional Studies , Diet, Healthy , Female , Humans , Students , Vegetables
2.
J Affect Disord ; 292: 270-275, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1525833

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has brought about tremendous social and economic turmoil, which has been associated with increased levels of depression and anxiety. METHODS: We analyzed data from the Healthy Minds Study (Fall Semester Cohort 2020), a non-probability sample of students across multiple colleges who completed an online survey between September - December 2020. Using multivariable logistic regression, we examined the associations between COVID-19 dimensions (concern, racial/ethnic discrimination, financial distress, infection, illness of loved one, death of loved one, caregiving) and mental health outcomes (depression, anxiety), adjusting for age, gender, race/ethnicity, and international student status. RESULTS: Nearly a fifth of the sample reported moderately severe or severe depression, and nearly a third reported moderately severe or severe anxiety over the past two weeks. When accounting for all COVID-19 dimensions in the same model, COVID-19 concern, racial/ethnic discrimination, financial distress, and infection were significantly associated with moderately severe or severe depression; COVID-19 concern, financial distress, and infection were significantly associated with moderately severe or severe anxiety. CONCLUSIONS: This study showed that the COVID-19 pandemic may have shaped mental health through a range of potential social and environmental dimensions. Interventions are required that consider multiple dimensions of COVID-19 to improve mental health during and after the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Anxiety/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Students
3.
J Affect Disord ; 292: 242-254, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1525832

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The global pandemic of COVID-19 has brought huge changes to people's lifestyles, college students have also been affected seriously. Evidence about these significant changes indicated that college students were more prone to feel anxious and depressed. To derive a precise assessment of the prevalence of anxiety symptom and depressive symptom among college students worldwide, we conducted this meta-analysis. METHODS: Based on the guidance of PRISMA, literature was searched in Pubmed, Web of Science, Embase, and PsycArticles (last search November 6, 2020). These articles after the screening were analyzed by a random-effects model to estimate the pooled prevalence of anxiety symptom and depressive symptom. Also, subgroup analysis, sensitivity analysis, and publication bias were performed in this meta-analysis. RESULTS: The results showed that the pooled anxiety symptom prevalence was 31% (95% CI: 23-39%), pooled depressive symptom prevalence was 34% (95% CI: 27-41%). Subgroup analysis showed that the prevalence of anxiety symptom and depressive symptom among different countries' college students were different, and the pooled depressive symptom prevalence of females was higher compared with males. LIMITATIONS: The prevalence of anxiety symptom and depressive symptom in worldwide college students could be better assessed by a standard and reliable questionnaire. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that the prevalence of anxiety symptom and depressive symptom during the COVID-19 pandemic is relatively high. Except for interventions that should be taken to control the pandemic urgently, mental health services are also needed to decrease the risk of anxiety and depression among college students.


Subject(s)
Anxiety , COVID-19 , Depression , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2 , Students
4.
Math Biosci Eng ; 18(3): 2775-2788, 2021 03 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1289075

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To identify the internal mechanism of the relationship between physical activity and mental health in home exercises. METHODS: Participants were 2233 college students with an average age of 19.34 (SD = 1.07) recruited from southern China using analysis of variance (ANOVA) and hierarchical multiple regression. They completed the college student physical activity questionnaire, regulatory emotional self-efficacy scale (RES) and Symptom Checklist (SCL-90) to explore the internal mechanism of the relationship between home exercises and mental health in the context of fitness campaign. RESULTS: Statistical analysis based on ANOVA and hierarchical multiple regression, and the results showed that gender differences is a critical factor influencing the effectiveness of home exercise on mental health in college students. Furthermore, individuals with regulatory emotional self-efficacy are more likely to keep exercising, which may stimulate the positive effect on enhancing mental health. CONCLUSION: Variable of emotion regulation efficacy play an important role in promoting college students positive emotions, stimulating potential, and improving physical and mental health. Further to advocate sports interventions for home-stay groups to improve their control of emotions, thereby reducing their anxiety and depression in the face of unexpected events.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Medical Informatics , Adult , China , Emotions , Humans , Mental Health , Self Efficacy , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
5.
J Microbiol Biol Educ ; 22(1)2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1273142

ABSTRACT

Undergraduates phenotyping Arabidopsis knockouts (unPAK) is a biology research network that has provided undergraduate research experiences (URE) since 2010. In 2019, unPAK expanded to include a summer URE that engaged undergraduate researchers from across the network in an intensive collaborative program. In response to the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020, unPAK rapidly shifted to provide the summer URE program remotely. This article describes (i) the instructional and communication processes of unPAK in the remote URE; and (ii) a summative assessment of the outcomes associated with the remote summer program as compared with the 2019 in-person program. We conclude by offering timely recommendations for educators in biology that emerged from the 2020 remote summer research experience, which may be applicable to other remote UREs and course-based research experiences (CUREs).

6.
Public Health Nutr ; 24(10): 2788-2797, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1270646

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Food security status is a continuum ranging from high to very low food security. While marginal food security falls next to high food security on the spectrum, new quantitative research indicates marginal food security status is associated with negative health outcomes and poor academic performance among college students. Qualitative research focusing on college students experiencing marginal food security has not been conducted. The current study aims to qualitatively explore experiences of college students with marginal food security and to identify themes to better understand and provide context regarding how marginal food security impacts students. DESIGN: Students were recruited for semi-structured interviews with questions designed to study the challenges associated with students' food situations. All interviews were recorded and transcribed with themes identified via an inductive approach. SETTING: A large public university on the US west coast. PARTICIPANTS: Thirty college students. RESULTS: Key themes that emerged: purchasing cheap unhealthy foods, insufficient time to prepare and eat meals on a regular basis, stress and anxiety around the inability to eat healthy food and future health issues, self-perception of health when eating poorly along with physical symptoms and low academic motivation by not fully participating in their courses due to few healthy food options or missing meals. CONCLUSION: Marginal food security can potentially diminish students' health and their capacity to learn and succeed in their coursework. The results emphasise that students experiencing marginal food security should not be grouped with students experiencing high food security.


Subject(s)
Food Security , Universities , Anxiety , Food Supply , Humans , Students
7.
Front Psychiatry ; 12: 619128, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1268308

ABSTRACT

Mindfulness has been found to have many positive effects on life outcomes, including mental health and educational achievement. However, less is known about the antecedents of mindfulness, particularly in Chinese college students. This study examines the effect of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) on mindfulness among Chinese college students in September 2020, during the COVID-19 pandemic. We hypothesized that ACEs negatively affected students' mindfulness. The data were collected from 1,871 college students from 12 colleges across China. The results aligned with our hypothesis that ACEs was negatively associated with mindfulness. In particular, emotional abuse and neglect in childhood appear to have the most negative effects on mindfulness compared to other dimensions of ACEs such as physical abuse and household challenges.

8.
Front Psychol ; 12: 671553, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1268297

ABSTRACT

Psychological well-being is an important indicator of well-being and has been found to be associated with a multitude of positive life outcomes. Using data collected from 1,871 Chinese college students from September 23 to October 5, 2020, this study examined students' psychological well-being during the COVID-19 pandemic and investigated how resilience and pandemic-related environmental stress may affect psychological well-being. Results showed that resilience had strong positive effects on psychological well-being during the pandemic. Meanwhile, environmental stress had a moderate effect and marginally reduced psychological well-being. The magnitudes of the estimates suggested that increasing resilience can effectively buffer the negative effect of environmental stress on psychological well-being.

9.
Front Psychol ; 12: 665525, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1268296

ABSTRACT

Due to the pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), taking online courses has become a "new normality" for college students. This study paid particular attention to the role of college students' attitude toward online courses (ATOC) in shaping their psychological distress during the COVID-19 epidemic in China. Participants were from a national panel survey that has been administered before and during the COVID-19 epidemic. Besides bivariate analysis, a multivariate regression model while adjusting for a lagged dependent variable (i.e., pre-COVID distress) was estimated to show the association between ATOC and during-COVID distress. We found that respondents from a disadvantaged family background (i.e., below-college parental education, below-average family economic condition, and rural residence) were more likely to have an "unsupportive" ATOC. Moreover, both bivariate and multivariate analyses confirmed that respondents with a "neutral" or "unsupportive" ATOC had greater during-COVID psychological distress, compared to their counterparts with a "supportive" ATOC. Given the persistent spread of the COVID-19 worldwide and the profound onsite-online transition in course delivery in higher education, students' perceptions and evaluations of the massive online courses should be carefully considered and integrated into curriculum reforms in both present and post COVID-19 situations.

10.
CBE Life Sci Educ ; 20(3): ar36, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1266517

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic caused nearly all colleges and universities to transition in-person courses to an online format. In this study, we explored how the rapid transition to online instruction during the COVID-19 pandemic affected students with disabilities. We interviewed 66 science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) undergraduates with disabilities at seven large-enrollment institutions during Spring 2020. We probed to what extent students were able to access their existing accommodations, to what extent the online environment required novel accommodations, and what factors prevented students from being properly accommodated in STEM courses. Using inductive coding, we identified that students were unable to access previously established accommodations, such as reduced-distraction testing and note-takers. We also found that the online learning environment presented novel challenges for students with disabilities that may have been lessened with the implementation of accommodations. Finally, we found that instructors making decisions about what accommodations were appropriate for students and disability resource centers neglecting to contact students after the transition to online instruction prevented students from receiving the accommodations that they required in STEM courses during the COVID-19 pandemic. This study illuminates current gaps in the support of students with disabilities and pinpoints ways to make online STEM learning environments more inclusive for students with disabilities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disabled Persons , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Students , Technology
11.
J Technol Behav Sci ; 6(4): 589-598, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1258286

ABSTRACT

Social media use and texting among college students often coincide with drinking. The present study investigated the associations between monthly alcohol use, social media habits, sharing alcohol references, and drunk texting among Hispanic college students. Participants (n = 620, 71.6% female; Mage = 21.07 years, SD = 3.60) completed an online survey containing: demographics, drug use frequency, Sharing of Alcohol-Related Content on Social Media Sites Scale (SARC), Texting Under the Influence Scale, Strategic Self Presentation Scale, Bergen Social Media Addiction Scale, and iPhone Screen Time. Bivariate correlations assessed relationships between all variables. Six logistic regressions assessed subscales of the SARC, and a linear regression assessed the Texting Under the Influence Scale. Almost 15% of participants met criteria for social media addiction, almost 40% reported ever sharing alcohol posts, and approximately 20% reported drunk texting at least once per month. Participants with iPhones averaged 16.84 weekly hours on social media (based on "screen time"). Frequently posting references of drinking alone was associated with more time on social media, higher social media addiction, and greater public sharing of alcohol content. Conversely, posting references of drinking at social gatherings was associated with privately sharing alcohol references and increased social media addiction. Drunk texting was related to increased age, greater Instagram use, decreased Facebook use, and privately sharing alcohol posts. Findings suggest patterns of drinking and sharing alcohol-related content to inform health promotion efforts, especially while many during COVID-19 are heightening use of alcohol and social media.

12.
J Med Internet Res ; 23(5): e25600, 2021 05 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1256246

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the COVID-19 pandemic, the internet has significantly spread information, providing people with knowledge and advice about health protection regarding COVID-19. While a previous study demonstrated that health and eHealth literacy are related to COVID-19 prevention behaviors, few studies have focused on the relationship between health literacy, eHealth literacy, and COVID-19-related health behaviors. The latter includes not only preventative behaviors but also conventional health behaviors. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to develop and verify a COVID-19-related health behavior questionnaire, explore its status and structure, and examine the associations between these behaviors and participants' health literacy and eHealth literacy. METHODS: A snowball sampling method was adopted to recruit participants to complete anonymous cross-sectional questionnaire surveys online that assessed sociodemographic information, self-reported coronavirus knowledge, health literacy, eHealth literacy, and COVID-19-related health behaviors. RESULTS: Of 1873 college students who were recruited, 781 (41.7%) had adequate health literacy; the mean eHealth literacy score was 30.16 (SD 6.31). The COVID-19-related health behavior questionnaire presented a two-factor structure-COVID-19-specific precautionary behaviors and conventional health behaviors-with satisfactory fit indices and internal consistency (Cronbach α=.79). The mean score of COVID-19-related health behaviors was 53.77 (SD 8.03), and scores differed significantly (P<.05) with respect to residence, college year, academic major, family economic level, self-reported health status, having a family member or friend infected with coronavirus, and health literacy level. Linear regression analysis showed that health literacy and eHealth literacy were positively associated with COVID-19-specific precautionary behaviors (ßhealth literacy=.149, ßeHealth literacy=.368; P<.001) and conventional health behaviors (ßhealth literacy=.219, ßeHealth literacy=.277; P<.001). CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19-related health behavior questionnaire was a valid and reliable measure for assessing health behaviors during the pandemic. College students with higher health literacy and eHealth literacy can more actively adopt COVID-19-related health behaviors. Additionally, compared to health literacy, eHealth literacy is more closely related to COVID-19-related health behaviors. Public intervention measures based on health and eHealth literacy are required to promote COVID-19-related health behaviors during the pandemic, which may be helpful to reduce the risk of COVID-19 infection among college students.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Behavior , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Health Literacy/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/methods , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Internet , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Social Factors , Students , Surveys and Questionnaires , Universities , Young Adult
13.
Eur J Psychotraumatol ; 12(1): 1920203, 2021 May 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1254246

ABSTRACT

Background: Various studies have examined the psychological 'typhoon eye' and 'ripple' effects in mental disorders following COVID-19. However, these studies only considered the disorders as entities and assessed severity, and overlooked the differences in specific symptoms of disorders. Objectives: This aim of the study is to assess the psychological typhoon eye and ripple effects at the symptom-level in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), which is considered as a common psychopathology following the COVID-19 epidemic. Method: In total, 1150 undergraduates, including 271 students from the Hubei province (e.g. epidemic centre) and 879 students from other provinces, completed the self-report questionnaire. The networks were estimated and compared using the R packages. Results: Although the PTSD networks of Hubei and non-Hubei undergraduates were similarly connected and shared some symptoms with high centrality (e.g. flashbacks, irritability and anger), there were differences across the networks. Distorted cognition and no positive emotion only exhibited high centrality in the Hubei network. Physiological responses and exaggerated startle only exhibited high centrality in the non-Hubei network. Conclusion: These findings suggested that the psychological typhoon eye and ripple effects may co-exist at the symptom level. Targeted and distinct psychological services for college students in Hubei and non-Hubei provinces should be emphasized following COVID-19.


Antecedentes: Varios estudios han examinado los efectos psicológicos del 'ojo del huracán' y del 'efecto dominó' en los trastornos mentales posteriores al COVID-19. Sin embargo, estos estudios solo consideraron los trastornos como entidades y evaluaron la gravedad, pasando por alto las diferencias en los síntomas específicos de los trastornos.Objetivos: El objetivo del estudio es evaluar los efectos psicológicos del ojo del huracán y el efecto dominó a nivel de los síntomas en el trastorno de estrés postraumático (TEPT), que se considera una psicopatología común después de la epidemia de COVID-19.Método: En total, 1150 estudiantes de pregrado, incluyendo 271 estudiantes de la provincia de Hubei (por ejemplo, centro de la epidemia) y 879 estudiantes de otras provincias, completaron el cuestionario de autoinforme. Las redes se estimaron y compararon utilizando los paquetes R.Resultados: Aunque las redes de TEPT de estudiantes universitarios de Hubei y que no eran de Hubei estaban conectadas de manera similar y compartían algunos síntomas con alta centralidad (por ejemplo, flashbacks, irritabilidad e ira), hubo diferencias entre las redes. La cognición distorsionada y sin emoción positiva solo mostraron una alta centralidad en la red de Hubei. Las respuestas fisiológicas y el sobresalto exagerado solo exhibieron una alta centralidad en la red que no era de Hubei.Conclusión: Estos hallazgos sugirieron que los efectos psicológicos del ojo del huracán y el efecto dominó pueden coexistir al nivel de los síntomas. Se deben enfatizar los servicios psicológicos específicos y distintos para los estudiantes universitarios en las provincias de Hubei y que no eran de Hubei después de COVID-19.

14.
JMIR Form Res ; 5(5): e26186, 2021 May 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1249618

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The year 2020 has been challenging for many, particularly for young adults who have been adversely affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. Emerging adulthood is a developmental phase with significant changes in the patterns of daily living; it is a risky phase for the onset of major mental illness. College students during the pandemic face significant risk, potentially losing several protective factors (eg, housing, routine, social support, job, and financial security) that are stabilizing for mental health and physical well-being. Individualized multiple assessments of mental health, referred to as multimodal personal chronicles, present an opportunity to examine indicators of health in an ongoing and personalized way using mobile sensing devices and wearable internet of things. OBJECTIVE: To assess the feasibility and provide an in-depth examination of the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on college students through multimodal personal chronicles, we present a case study of an individual monitored using a longitudinal subjective and objective assessment approach over a 9-month period throughout 2020, spanning the prepandemic period of January through September. METHODS: The individual, referred to as Lee, completed psychological assessments measuring depression, anxiety, and loneliness across 4 time points in January, April, June, and September. We used the data emerging from the multimodal personal chronicles (ie, heart rate, sleep, physical activity, affect, behaviors) in relation to psychological assessments to understand patterns that help to explicate changes in the individual's psychological well-being across the pandemic. RESULTS: Over the course of the pandemic, Lee's depression severity was highest in April, shortly after shelter-in-place orders were mandated. His depression severity remained mildly severe throughout the rest of the months. Associations in positive and negative affect, physiology, sleep, and physical activity patterns varied across time periods. Lee's positive affect and negative affect were positively correlated in April (r=0.53, P=.04) whereas they were negatively correlated in September (r=-0.57, P=.03). Only in the month of January was sleep negatively associated with negative affect (r=-0.58, P=.03) and diurnal beats per minute (r=-0.54, P=.04), and then positively associated with heart rate variability (resting root mean square of successive differences between normal heartbeats) (r=0.54, P=.04). When looking at his available contextual data, Lee noted certain situations as supportive coping factors and other situations as potential stressors. CONCLUSIONS: We observed more pandemic concerns in April and noticed other contextual events relating to this individual's well-being, reflecting how college students continue to experience life events during the pandemic. The rich monitoring data alongside contextual data may be beneficial for clinicians to understand client experiences and offer personalized treatment plans. We discuss benefits as well as future directions of this system, and the conclusions we can draw regarding the links between the COVID-19 pandemic and college student mental health.

15.
Trends Psychiatry Psychother ; 43(2): 141-150, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1248610

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Cognitive-behavioral interventions can be effective for relieving anxiety associated with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), but complications such as social distancing, quarantine, a shortage of experts, and delayed care provisions have made it difficult to access face-to-face therapeutic interventions. The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of a video-based cognitive-behavioral intervention for reducing COVID-19 anxiety. METHOD: In the present randomized controlled trial, 150 college students with severe COVID-19 anxiety were randomly assigned to either an intervention (n = 75) or a waiting list control (n = 75) group. The intervention group participated in a video-based cognitive-behavioral program consisting of nine 15-20-minute sessions (three days a week for three weeks). Dependent measures included the COVID-19 Anxiety Questionnaire, Short Health Anxiety Inventory, Anxiety Sensitivity Index-3, Somatosensory Amplification Scale, Experience of Parasocial Interaction Scale, and Source Credibility Scale. RESULTS: Participants who were randomly assigned to the cognitive-behavioral program reported high parasocial interaction, source credibility, and satisfaction with the intervention. Eighty percent reported that the video-based intervention was a beneficial alternative to traditional face-to-face therapeutic intervention. At post-treatment evaluation, the video-based cognitive-behavioral intervention group showed a significant reduction in COVID-19 anxiety, health anxiety, anxiety sensitivity, and somatosensory amplification when compared to the wait-listed control group. CONCLUSIONS: This study suggests that video-based cognitive-behavioral interventions can be an affordable, feasible, and effective method to reduce anxiety during a large-scale pandemic.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/etiology , COVID-19/psychology , Cognitive Behavioral Therapy/methods , Video Recording , Anxiety/therapy , COVID-19/complications , Female , Humans , Male , Psychiatric Status Rating Scales , Surveys and Questionnaires , Video Recording/methods , Young Adult
16.
Front Public Health ; 9: 598302, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1247933

ABSTRACT

This study attempts to compare the impacts of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic on college students' lifestyles and mental health conditions in South Korea and Taiwan. As the COVID-19 outbreak has spread across the globe, it has brought significant changes to college campuses worldwide. College students have been heavily affected by the closure, as online learning has become increasingly common in higher education institutions. Using data collected from college students in South Korea and Taiwan in the spring of 2020, this study examines the effects of pandemic-related lifestyle changes on mental health conditions for college students in the two countries. The results were 3-fold. First, compared to college students in Taiwan, college students in South Korea reported greater decreases in time spent traveling, being with friends, eating at restaurants, and engaging in part-time employment, and greater increases in online shopping and ordering food for delivery. Second, college students in South Korea reported a higher level of worry, a greater possibility of contact with a person with COVID-19, and a lower level of happiness than did college students in Taiwan. Third, our findings indicate that social activities, including spending time with friends, were positively correlated with mental health conditions in South Korea and Taiwan. Comparing Korean and Taiwanese students' lifestyle changes and mental health conditions amid the pandemic, the study argues that the decrease in socialization and interaction under these new circumstances may be a significant factor that explains an increase in mental health issues in Korean college students compared to Taiwanese students, given the increase in confirmed COVID-19 cases in South Korea and the corresponding greater use of online teaching platforms there than in Taiwan.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Humans , Republic of Korea/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Students , Taiwan/epidemiology
17.
Front Psychiatry ; 12: 658388, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1247926

ABSTRACT

Background: The psychology of university and college students is immature, they are thus more likely to suffer from depression due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The present study aims to investigate the self-reported depression status of Chinese university and college students and explore its influencing factors. Methods: We conducted a network-based online survey, and a total of 17,876 participants completed the questionnaire. Depression was measured by the Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS). Univariate analysis and multivariate logistic analysis were performed to explore the influencing factors of self-reported depression symptoms. Results: The proportion of self-reported depression symptoms, mild self-reported depression symptoms, and moderate to severe (M/S) self-reported depression symptoms was 65.2, 53.7, and 11.5%, respectively. The mean score of self-reported depression was 54.8 ± 9.0. Female, personality type of partial introversion, junior college educational level, "moderate" or "high" self-perceived risk of infection, "moderately" or "highly" impacted by the outbreak, and being eager to go back to school were risk factors for M/S self-reported depression symptoms (p < 0.05). While, "moderate" or "high" concern about the outbreak, "moderate" or "high" satisfaction with pandemic prevention and control measures, and having health literacy on communicable diseases were protective factors for M/S self-reported depression symptoms (p < 0.05). Conclusion: The status of self-reported depression symptoms among university and college students was severer than expected, and the influencing factors were multifaceted. Government and school administrators should strengthen the dissemination of knowledge on disease prevention and control. Moreover, much attention should be paid to female and junior college students.

18.
Front Psychol ; 12: 647606, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1247908

ABSTRACT

Serious mental health disorders are increasing among college students and university counseling services are often overburdened. Mobile applications for mental health have been growing exponentially in the last decade and they are emerging in university settings as a promising tool to promote and intervene in college students' mental health. Additionally, considering the recent covid-19 pandemic, mHealth interventions, due to its nature and possibilities, may play an important role in these institutions. Our main objectives are to explore mhealth interventions in universities, regarding its conceptual framework, acceptability and efficacy outcomes and understand its impact and contributions to address treatment delivery and psychological difficulties resulting from covid-19 pandemic. The literature search was conducted in scientific databases, namely, Web of Science, Pubmed, and Scopus. A search in app stores was not conducted, thus regarding commercially available apps, only those found in our database search were included in our review. We selected studies with mobile applications addressing psychological interventions for college students. A total of 2,158 participants were included in the 8 selected studies and most interventions were delivered through mobile apps only and based in cognitive behavioral therapy. Results suggested that college students accept and adhere to these interventions and preliminary evidence of efficacy was demonstrated in different disorders, such as stress, anxiety, depression and risky behaviors such as alcohol and tobacco abuse and sexual knowledge. We conclude that universities, particularly college counseling services, may benefit from mhealth interventions, not only to address college students' mental health but to decrease some of its difficulties related to lack of human resources. Specifically in covid-19 pandemic context, these interventions may contribute significantly by promoting and delivering psychological interventions at a safe distance.

19.
Nurse Educ Pract ; 54: 103101, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1244798

ABSTRACT

International learning in undergraduate global nurse education is recognised for promoting essential cultural competence. This can be addressed both at university; through the increasing use of collaborative technology and in practice, where the impact of international placements has promoted cultural sensitivity and outward student mobility. The authors debate the barriers that impede students' desire to take up international placements and review initiatives to promote a greater investment in this experience. The complexity and lack of transcultural principles that govern an international placement exchange have been addressed by one initiative to produce a robust pan-European quality audit process for clinical learning environments. In conclusion, the authors call for a greater and evaluated effort to increase global understanding and learning in the context of the COVID-19 response.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate , Students, Nursing , Curriculum , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Transl Behav Med ; 11(7): 1348-1353, 2021 07 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1243510

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic is a public health crisis. College student alcohol use is highly prevalent and primarily occurs in social settings where risk for COVID-19 transmission is heightened. This study explored the associations between alcohol use frequency, quantity, motives, and context with: (i) quarantine due to COVID-19 exposure and (ii) a positive diagnosis for COVID-19. A sample of n = 409 college student drinkers completed an online survey about their health and behaviors during the Fall 2020 semester. Since the start of the semester, 36% of students quarantined and 13% of students received a COVID-19 diagnosis. More frequent alcohol use was associated with increased odds of both quarantine and COVID-19 diagnosis. More frequent drinking for social motives was associated with increased likelihood of quarantine, and more frequent drinking for conformity motives was associated with increased likelihood of COVID-19 diagnosis. Participants who often drank alone or with a small group of friends were about half as likely to have quarantined, while those who often drank with a large group of friends were almost twice as likely to have quarantined. Participants who often drank in a bar or nightclub had almost three times the odds of a COVID-19 diagnosis. Frequent alcohol use and drinking for social and conformity motives and in certain contexts are linked to increased likelihood of COVID-19 exposure and diagnosis. Alcohol use prevention efforts, coupled with messaging to discourage large social gatherings in public places, might help to mitigate the spread of COVID-19 among college students.


Subject(s)
Alcohol Drinking in College , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Health Behavior , Humans , Motivation , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Students , Universities
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