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1.
Crit Care Explor ; 2(6): e0139, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1795099

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 pandemic has stretched ICU resources in an unprecedented fashion and outstripped personal protective equipment supplies. The combination of a novel disease, resource limitations, and risks to medical personnel health have created new barriers to implementing the ICU Liberation ("A" for Assessment, Prevention, and Manage pain; "B" for Both Spontaneous Awakening Trials and Spontaneous Breathing Trials; "C" for Choice of Analgesia and Sedation; "D" for Delirium Assess, Prevent, and Manage; "E" for Early Mobility and Exercise; and "F" for Family Engagement and Empowerment [ABCDEF]) Bundle, a proven ICU care approach that reduces delirium, shortens mechanical ventilation duration, prevents post-ICU syndrome, and reduces healthcare costs. This narrative review acknowledges barriers and offers strategies to optimize Bundle performance in coronavirus disease 2019 patients requiring mechanical ventilation. DATA SOURCES STUDY SELECTION AND DATA EXTRACTION: The most relevant literature, media reports, and author experiences were assessed for inclusion in this narrative review including PubMed, national newspapers, and critical care/pharmacology textbooks. DATA SYNTHESIS: Uncertainty regarding coronavirus disease 2019 clinical course, shifts in attitude, and changes in routine behavior have hindered Bundle use. A domino effect results from: 1) changes to critical care hierarchy, priorities, and ICU team composition; 2) significant personal protective equipment shortages cause; 3) reduced/restricted physical bedside presence favoring; 4) increased depth of sedation and use of neuromuscular blockade; 5) which exacerbate drug shortages; and 6) which require prolonged use of limited ventilator resources. Other identified barriers include manageable knowledge deficits among non-ICU clinicians unfamiliar with the Bundle or among PICU specialists deploying pediatric-based Bundle approaches who are unfamiliar with adult medicine. Both groups have been enlisted to augment the adult ICU work force to meet demand. Strategies were identified to facilitate Bundle performance to liberate patients from the ICU. CONCLUSIONS: We acknowledge current challenges that interfere with comprehensive management of critically ill patients during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic. Rapid response to new circumstances precisely requires established safety mechanisms and protocols like the ABCDEF Bundle to increase ICU and ventilator capacity and help survivors maximize recovery from coronavirus disease 2019 as early as possible.

2.
Acta Otorhinolaryngol Ital ; 41(4): 289-295, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1481230

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The changing trends in medical practice, uncertainties and monetary apprehensions due to the COVID-19 pandemic may influence the sense of well-being among otorhinolaryngologists. The present study was conducted to evaluate quality of life (QOL) and perceived financial implications in otorhinolaryngologists during the COVID-19 pandemic across India. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was carried out among otorhinolaryngology specialists across India using WHOQOL-BREF and Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) Financial Well-Being Scale questionnaires on Google Forms, which was kept open for the latter half of July 2020. RESULTS: A total of 358 responses were obtained; the response rate was 26.64%. Twenty-four percent of respondents worked exclusively in academic settings; 40.22% of specialists had over 10 years of work experience. Average monthly income in 2019 was between 1-3 lakhs Indian Rupees (INR) in 43.85%, while in 2020, 62.57% of the specialists had an average monthly income of below one lakh INR; this difference was statistically significant (p < 0.001). Mean WHOQOL-BREF scores for physical, psychological, social and environmental domains were 68.8 ± 1, 62.3 ± 0.75, 68.9 ± 1.17 and 65.8 ± 1.01, respectively; mean CFPB financial well-being scale score was 55.5 ± 0.66. QOL and financial well-being were better in otolaryngologists older than 60 years, male specialists and private consultants. CONCLUSIONS: There has been a tremendous impact on quality of life and financial well-being among otorhinolaryngologists in India during the COVID-19 pandemic. The study outcome may help otolaryngologists comprehend and perceive the extent to which it has affected their professional and personal lives, and explore ways to face and overcome the situation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Quality of Life , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , India , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
4.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(6)2021 03 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389361

ABSTRACT

This study aims to identify factors related with SARS-CoV-2 infection in physicians and internal residents during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic at a tertiary hospital in Spain, through a cross- sectional descriptive perception study with analytical components through two questionnaires directed at professionals working at the Ramon y Cajal University Hospital between February and April 2020. In total, 167 professionals formed the study group, and 156 professionals comprised the comparison group. Seventy percent of the professionals perceived a shortage of personal protective equipment (PPE), while 40% perceived a shortage of hand sanitiser, although more than 70% said they used it properly. Soap was more available and had a higher percentage of correct use (73.6-79.5%) (p > 0.05). Hand hygiene was optimal in >70% of professionals according to all five WHO measurements. In the adjusted model (OR; CI95%), belonging to a high-risk specialty (4.45; 1.66-11.91) and the use of public transportation (3.27; 1.87-5.73) remained risk factors. Protective factors were changes of uniform (0.53; 0.32-0.90), sanitation of personal objects before the workday (0.55; 0.31-0.97), and the disinfection of shared material (0.34; 0.19-0.58). We cannot confirm that a shortage or misuse of PPE is a factor in the spread of SARS-CoV-2. Fears and assessments are similar in both groups, but we cannot causally relate them to the spread of infection. The perception of the area of risk is different in both groups, suggesting that more information and education for healthcare workers is needed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Health Personnel , Humans , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment , Spain/epidemiology , Specialization
5.
J Headache Pain ; 22(1): 53, 2021 Jun 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1346198

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To assess the impacts of social situation changes due to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on headache-related disability and other symptoms in patients with migraine in Japan. METHODS: We conducted a multicentre, cross-sectional study including 659 outpatients with migraine diagnosed by headache specialists. The participants were asked about the impacts of the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic on headache-related disability, headache days, headache intensity, stress, physical activity, hospital access and their work and home lives. For headache-related disability, the total Migraine Disability Assessment (MIDAS) score and part A and B scores were analysed. Multivariate stepwise linear regression analysis was performed to identify the clinical predictors of changes in the total MIDAS score before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the factors related to new-onset headache during the COVID-19 pandemic. RESULTS: Finally, 606 migraine patients (73 M/533 F; age, 45.2 ± 12.0 years) were included in the study, excluding those with incomplete data. Increased stress, substantial concern about COVID-19 and negative impacts of the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic on daily life were reported in 56.8 %, 55.1 and 45.0 % of the participants, respectively. The total MIDAS and A and B scores did not significantly change after the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. New-onset headache, which was observed in 95 patients (15.7 %), was associated with younger age and worsened mood and sleep in the logistic regression analysis. The multivariate stepwise linear regression analysis of changes in the total MIDAS score before and during the first wave of COVID-19 pandemic identified worsened sleep, increased acute medication use, increased stress, medication shortages, comorbidities, the absence of an aura and new-onset headache were determinants of an increased total MIDAS score during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: In this multicentre study, clinical factors relevant to headache-related disability, such as new-onset headache, stress and sleep disturbances, were identified, highlighting the importance of symptom management in migraine patients during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Migraine Disorders , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Disability Evaluation , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Migraine Disorders/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Int J Ment Health Syst ; 15(1): 52, 2021 May 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1280598

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: While depression is a leading contributor to burden of disease in Vietnam, there is a critical gap in depression care due to the shortage of mental health specialists and extremely limited mental health services in general health care settings. We have previously reported the effectiveness of a supported self-management (SSM) task-sharing intervention for depression, delivered by social collaborators (lay social workers). The purpose of this study was to identify factors influencing the effectiveness of delivery of SSM by social collaborators and delineate areas for further attention that are relevant for scale-up. METHODS: A hundred and ten (110) key informant interviews were conducted with three stakeholder groups (patients, social collaborators, experts) from eight provinces in Vietnam. Participants were identified through records from a recently completed randomized trial that showed the effectiveness of SSM in community-based settings in Vietnam. Qualitative descriptive methods and thematic analysis were used to examine the interviews. A coding framework and corresponding themes were developed deductively, based on the findings from the randomized trial and the literature, and through inductive analysis, to describe the contextual factors that impacted the social collaborators' role in successfully implementing the SSM intervention. RESULTS: Our analysis identified the following benefits of working with social collaborators: (1) increased awareness of mental health in the family and community; (2) reduced stigma; (3) a better understanding that depression is treatable; (4) increased help-seeking; and (5) improved access to care. There were also significant challenges, including social collaborator characteristics (age, education, pre-existing training and skills) and contextual factors influencing their work (roles and responsibilities, training, compensation, support from government). CONCLUSIONS: Engaging social collaborators in the delivery of SSM in the community can help fill a critical gap in depression care in Vietnam. However, several contextual challenges that are an impediment to increased engagement and sustainable integration into health and social systems need to be resolved through policy change to regulate their practice, define their scope of work, and provide adequate remuneration.

7.
Front Public Health ; 9: 560405, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1247929

ABSTRACT

Ethics are considered a basic aptitude in healthcare, and the capacity to handle ethical dilemmas in tough times calls for an adequate, responsible, and blame-free environment. While do-not-resuscitate (DNR) decisions are made in advance in certain medical situations, in particular in the setting of poor prognosis like in advanced oncology, the discussion of DNR in relation to acute medical conditions, the COVID-19 pandemic in this example, might impose ethical dilemmas to the patient and family, healthcare providers (HCPs) including physicians and nurses, and to the institution. The literature on DNR decisions in the more recent pandemics and outbreaks is scarce. DNR was only discussed amid the H1N1 influenza pandemic in 2009, with clear global recommendations. The unprecedented condition of the COVID-19 pandemic leaves healthcare systems worldwide confronting tough decisions. DNR has been implemented in some countries where the healthcare system is limited in capacity to admit, and thus intubating and resuscitating patients when needed is jeopardized. Some countries were forced to adopt a unilateral DNR policy for certain patient groups. Younger age was used as a discriminator in some, while general medical condition with anticipated good outcome was used in others. The ethical challenge of how to balance patient autonomy vs. beneficence, equality vs. equity, is a pressing concern. In the current difficult situation, when cases top 100 million globally and the death toll surges past 2.7 million, difficult decisions are to be made. Societal rather than individual benefits might prevail. Pre-hospital triaging of cases, engagement of other sectors including mental health specialists and religious scholars to support patients, families, and HCPs in the frontline might help in addressing the psychological stress these groups might encounter in addressing DNR in the current situation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype , Humans , Pandemics , Resuscitation Orders , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Front Pediatr ; 9: 631547, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1247887

ABSTRACT

Objectives: The aim of this study is to identify the epidemiological, clinical, and laboratory features of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in children. Methods: A retrospective study was conducted by pediatric infectious disease specialists from 32 different hospitals from all over Turkey by case record forms. Pediatric cases who were diagnosed as COVID-19 between March 16, 2020, and June 15, 2020 were included. Case characteristics including age, sex, dates of disease onset and diagnosis, family, and contact information were recorded. Clinical data, including the duration and severity of symptoms, were also collected. Laboratory parameters like biochemical tests and complete blood count, chest X-ray, and chest computed tomography (CT) were determined. Results: There were 1,156 confirmed pediatric COVID-19 cases. In total, male cases constituted 50.3% (n = 582) and females constituted 49.7% (n = 574). The median age of the confirmed cases was 10.75 years (4.5-14.6). Of the total cases, 90 were younger than 1 year of age (7.8%), 108 were 1-3 years of age (9.3%), 148 were 3-6 years of age (12.8%), 298 were 6-12 years of age (25.8%), 233 were 12-15 years of age (20.2%), and 268 cases were older than 15 years of age (23.2%). The most common symptom of the patients at the first visit was fever (50.4%) (n = 583) for a median of 2 days (IQR: 1-3 days). Fever was median at 38.4°C (38.0-38.7°C). The second most common symptom was cough (n = 543, 46.9%). The other common symptoms were sore throat (n = 143, 12.4%), myalgia (n = 141, 12.2%), dyspnea (n = 118, 10.2%), diarrhea (n = 112, 9.7%), stomachache (n = 71, 6.1%), and nasal discharge (n = 63, 5.4%). When patients were classified according to disease severity, 263 (22.7%) patients were asymptomatic, 668 (57.7%) patients had mild disease, 209 (18.1%) had moderate disease, and 16 (1.5%) cases had severe disease. One hundred and forty-nine (12.9%) cases had underlying diseases among the total cases; 56% of the patients who had severe disease had an underlying condition (p < 0.01). The need for hospitalization did not differ between patients who had an underlying condition and those who do not have (p = 0.38), but the need for intensive care was higher in patients who had an underlying condition (p < 0.01). Forty-seven (31.5%) of the cases having underlying conditions had asthma or lung disease (38 of them had asthma). Conclusions: To the best of our knowledge, this is one of the largest pediatric data about confirmed COVID-19 cases. Children from all ages appear to be susceptible to COVID-19, and there is a significant difference in symptomatology and laboratory findings by means of age distribution.

9.
Headache ; 61(5): 734-739, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1238428

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: We sought to investigate the patient experience of telemedicine for headache care during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. BACKGROUND: The use of telemedicine has rapidly expanded and evolved since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic. Telemedicine eliminates the physical and geographic barriers to health care, preserves personal protective equipment, and prevents the spread of COVID-19 by allowing encounters to happen in a socially distanced way. However, few studies have assessed the patient perspective of telemedicine for headache care. METHODS: The American Migraine Foundation (AMF) designed a standardized electronic questionnaire to assess the patient experience of telemedicine for headache care between March and September 2020 to help inform future quality improvement as part of its patient advocacy initiative. The date parameters were identified as the emergence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 disease and the declaration of a national emergency in the United States. The questionnaire was distributed electronically to more than 100,000 members of the AMF community through social media platforms and the AMF email database. RESULTS: A total of 1172 patients responded to our electronic questionnaire, with 1098 complete responses. The majority, 1081/1153 (93.8%) patients, had a previous headache diagnosis prior to the telemedicine encounter. A total of 648/1127 (57.5%) patients reported that they had used telemedicine for headache care during the study period. Among those who participated in telehealth visits, 553/647 (85.5%) patients used it for follow-up visits; 94/647 (14.5%) patients used it for new patient visits. During the telemedicine encounters, 282/645 (43.7%) patients were evaluated by headache specialists, 222/645 (34.4%) patients by general neurologists, 198/645 (30.7%) patients by primary care providers, 73/645 (11.3%) patients by headache nurse practitioners, and 21/645 (3.2%) patients by headache nurses. Only 47/633 (7.4%) patients received a new headache diagnosis from telemedicine evaluation, whereas the other 586/633 (92.6%) patients did not have a change in their diagnoses. During these visits, a new treatment was prescribed for 358/636 (52.3%) patients, whereas 278/636 (43.7%) patients did not have changes made to their treatment plan. The number (%) of patients who rated the telemedicine headache care experience as "very good," "good," "fair," "poor," and "other" were 396/638 (62.1%), 132/638 (20.7%), 67/638 (10.5%), 23/638 (3.6%), and 20/638 (3.1%), respectively. Detailed reasons for "other" are listed in the manuscript. Most patients, 573/638 (89.8%), indicated that they would prefer to continue to use telemedicine for their headache care, 45/638 (7.1%) patients would not, and 20/638 (3.1%) patients were unsure. CONCLUSIONS: Our study evaluating the patient perspective demonstrated that telemedicine facilitated headache care for many patients during the COVID-19 pandemic, resulting in high patient satisfaction rates, and a desire to continue to use telemedicine for future headache care among those who completed the online survey.


Subject(s)
Aftercare/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19 , Headache Disorders/therapy , Patient Satisfaction/statistics & numerical data , Process Assessment, Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Foundations , Headache Disorders/diagnosis , Health Care Surveys , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Young Adult
10.
Hum Vaccin Immunother ; 17(10): 3457-3462, 2021 Oct 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1236182

ABSTRACT

Vaccination is the most effective and cost-efficient approach to protect both individual and community health. Decreased vaccination rates have been reported in many countries during the COVID-19 pandemic. In this study, we compared the vaccination rates of the current year with those of the same period of 2019 in Ankara and presented the physicians' thoughts about effects of COVID-19 pandemic on vaccinations in Turkey. An online survey was sent to family practitioners, pediatricians, and pediatric infectious disease specialists to ascertain their thoughts on vaccination during the pandemic. A majority of family practitioners stated that, despite hesitations, families brought their children for vaccination. They noted that vaccination should be emphasized, physicians should be supported by health authorities, and all related media and social media channels should be used to promote maintaining vaccinations. In contrast, pediatricians and pediatric infectious disease specialists were of the opinion that families were expressing greater hesitation and would not bring their children for vaccination. Vaccination rates in Ankara have decreased 2-5% during the pandemic, and the greatest decrease was observed for vaccines administered after 18 months of age. Outbreaks of vaccine-preventable diseases can threaten community health worldwide. Thus, vaccinations must continue, and effective regulations and recommendations need to be implemented by healthcare authorities to promote it.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Child , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pediatricians , Perception , SARS-CoV-2 , Turkey/epidemiology , Vaccination
11.
Clin Interv Aging ; 16: 731-738, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1218451

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has disproportionately impacted frail older adults, especially residents of long-term care (LTC) facilities. This has appropriately led to prioritization of frail older adults and LTC residents, and those who care for them, in the vaccination effort against COVID-19. Older adults have distinct immunological, clinical, and practical complexity, which can be understood through a lens of frailty. Even so, frailty has not been considered in studies of COVID-19 vaccines to date, leading to concerns that the vaccines have not been optimally tailored for and evaluated in this population even as vaccination programs are being implemented. This is an example of how vaccines are often not tested in Phase 1/2/3 clinical trials in the people most in need of protection. We argue that geriatricians, as frailty specialists, have much to contribute to the development, testing and implementation of COVID-19 vaccines in older adults. We discuss roles for geriatricians in ten stages of the vaccine development process, covering vaccine design, trial design, trial recruitment, establishment and interpretation of illness definitions, safety monitoring, consideration of relevant health measures such as frailty and function, analysis methods to account for frailty and differential vulnerability, contributions in regulatory and advisory roles, post-marketing surveillance, and program implementation and public health messaging. In presenting key recommendations pertinent to each stage, we hope to contribute to a dialogue on how to push the field of vaccinology to embrace the complexity of frailty. Making vaccines that can benefit frail older adults will benefit everyone in the fight against COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research/organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , Frailty/epidemiology , Geriatricians/organization & administration , Physician's Role , Aged , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Frail Elderly/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Public Health , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Cureus ; 13(4): e14270, 2021 Apr 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1212079

ABSTRACT

Objective The social and behavioral changes brought about by the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic have led to adverse consequences on the psychosocial functioning of peripartum women. Therefore, we developed and validated a tool to assess the psychosocial effect of the pandemic among these women. Methods The questionnaire was developed using a scientifically accepted systematic methodology comprising literature search, focus-group discussion (FGD), expert evaluation, pretesting, and validation. Results The final questionnaire consists of 38 questions, and it has a Cronbach's α value of 0.90 and a Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin (KMO) value of 0.773. Conclusion The questionnaire has good reliability and face, content, and construct validity. It can be used to assess the psychosocial functioning of peripartum women in low middle-income countries and help perinatal mental health specialists to devise strategies to cope with the psychological impact of COVID-19-like pandemics on peripartum women.

13.
Br J Ophthalmol ; 2021 Apr 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1208983

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/AIM: The aim of the study was to examine the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on glaucoma surgical practices within the UK. METHODS: A cross-sectional online survey was distributed to all consultant glaucoma specialists who are on the UK and Eire Glaucoma Society contact list. Participants were asked specific questions regarding preferences in glaucoma surgical practices and whether these had changed subsequent to the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. RESULTS: Trabeculectomy was the procedure of choice for 61 (87%) glaucoma specialists. A total of 51 (73%) respondents reported performing minimally invasive glaucoma surgery (MIGS) procedures before the COVID-19 pandemic. The most commonly performed MIGS procedure was the iStent inject (51%), followed by XEN 45 (36%) and Preserflo (17%). Forty-three (61%) respondents reported modifying their glaucoma surgery practice subsequent to the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic. Of the glaucoma specialists who modified their surgical practices, 21 (43%) specifically reduced the number of trabeculectomies performed. In combination, diode laser (both micropulse and conventional trans-scleral cyclodiode) was the most common alternative procedure. Glaucoma drainage devices, deep sclerectomy and Preserflo were also commonly chosen alternatives. CONCLUSION: Although trabeculectomy remains the most commonly performed established glaucoma surgery, it is being performed with reduced frequency during the COVID-19 pandemic due to the number of postoperative visits and procedures required. Alternatives such as conventional and micropulse diode laser, glaucoma drainage devices, deep sclerectomy and Preserflo appear to be the favoured alternative procedures.

14.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(8)2021 04 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1194645

ABSTRACT

Health professionals are among the most vulnerable to work stress and emotional exhaustion problems. These health professionals include tutors and resident intern specialists, due to the growing demand for the former and the high work overload of the latter. Mindfulness training programs can support these professionals during times of crisis, such as the current global pandemic caused by the coronavirus-19 disease. The objective of this study was to compare the effectiveness of an abbreviated Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) and Mindful Self-Compassion (MSC) training program in relation to a standard training program on the levels of mindfulness, self-compassion, and self-perceived empathy in tutors and resident intern specialists of Family and Community Medicine and Nursing. A total of 112 professionals attached to six Spanish National Health System teaching units (TUs) participated in this randomized and controlled clinical trial. Experimental Group (GE) participants were included in the standard or abbreviated MBSR programs. The Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire (FFMQ), the Self-Compassion Scale short form (SCS-SF), and the Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy (JSPE) were administered three times during the study: before, immediately after, and 3 months after the intervention. Adjusted covariance analysis (ANCOVA), using pretest scores as the covariate, showed a significant increase in mindfulness (F(2,91) = 3.271; p = 0.042; η2 = 0.067) and self-compassion (F(2,91) = 6.046; p = 0.003; η2 = 0.117) in the post-test visit, and in self-compassion (F(2,79) = 3.880; p = 0.025; η2 = 0.089) in the follow-up visit, attributable to the implementation of the standard training program. The standard MBSR and MSC training program improves levels of mindfulness and self-compassion, and promotes long-lasting effects in tutors and resident intern specialists. New studies are needed to demonstrate the effectiveness of abbreviated training programs.


Subject(s)
Empathy , Mindfulness , Community Medicine , Humans , Reference Standards , Spain , Specialization
15.
J Addict Med ; 16(2): e70-e72, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1192089

ABSTRACT

Outpatient parenteral antibiotic therapy (OPAT) refers to the monitored provision of intravenous antibiotics for complicated infections outside of a hospital setting, typically in a rehabilitation facility, an infusion center, or the home. Home-based OPAT allows for safe completion of prolonged courses of therapy while decreasing costs to the healthcare system, minimizing the risk of hospital-related infectious exposures for patients, and permitting patients to recover in a familiar environment. Amidst the COVID-19 pandemic, during which nursing facilities have been at the center of many outbreaks of the SARS-CoV-2 virus, completion of antimicrobial therapy in the home is an even more appealing option. Persons who inject drugs (PWID) frequently present with infectious complications of their injection drug use which require long courses of parenteral therapy. However, these individuals are frequently excluded from home-based OPAT on the basis of their addiction history. This commentary describes perceived challenges to establishing home-based OPAT for PWID, discusses ways in which this is discriminatory and unsupported by available data, highlights ways in which the COVID-19 pandemic has accentuated inequities in care, and proposes a multidisciplinary approach championed by Addiction specialists to increasing implementation of OPAT for appropriate patients with substance use disorders.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Drug Users , Substance Abuse, Intravenous , Ambulatory Care , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Humans , Outpatients , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Substance Abuse, Intravenous/complications , Substance Abuse, Intravenous/drug therapy
16.
Mult Scler Relat Disord ; 51: 102913, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1176873

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 crisis has created unanticipated changes in health care delivery for people living with multiple sclerosis (MS). The pandemic's rapid evolution has resulted in a knowledge gap in how COVID-19 has affected MS clinical practice. Our objective was to understand how the COVID-19 pandemic has affected clinical practice patterns in a nationwide cohort of MS clinicians across the United States. METHODS: In collaboration with the National Multiple Sclerosis Society (NMSS), we developed a 28-item SurveyMonkeyTM electronic questionnaire exploring MS specialists' perceptions of how COVID-19 has altered how they prescribe MS disease-modifying therapies (DMTs), provide telehealth and other services, and view issues affecting their own well-being including re-deployment to the front lines of COVID-19 care and availability of personal protective equipment (PPE). NMSS staff sent a recruitment email containing the electronic survey link to 188 clinicians who serve on regional NMSS Healthcare Provider Councils across the US, 86 (45.7%) of whom were MS specialist physicians. RESULTS: Eighty-six of 188 potential respondents (45.7%) from 32 US states completed the survey including 45 physicians (41 neurologists, 3 physiatrists and 1 family physician), 18 rehabilitation therapists, 7 psychologists, 6 nurse practitioners, 4 social workers, 2 physician assistants, 2 nurses and 2 health professionals from other disciplines. More than 80% of all respondents working on-site in a health care setting believed they had adequate PPE. More than 41% were able to distance safely from others at work. Nearly 10% of respondents reported they had been re-deployed to the front lines of COVID-19 patient care, and an additional 16.9% anticipated being re-deployed. Among the MS specialist physician subgroup, nearly one-third reported using telemedicine to provide over 75% of their clinical care. Only 16.7% believed COVID-19 had not changed how they prescribe DMTs. Therapies prescribed more often during the pandemic included ß-IFNs (28.6% of prescribers), natalizumab (23.8%), glatiramer acetate (21.4%) and teriflunomide (19%). DMTs prescribed less often included alemtuzumab (64.3% of prescribers), cladribine (54.8%), ocrelizumab and rituximab (50%), and fingolimod and siponimod (40.5%). For at least some of their patients during the pandemic, some MS specialists reported suspending certain DMTs including alemtuzumab (21.4% of prescribers), ocrelizumab and rituximab (16.7%) and cladribine (11.9%). Others reported extending DMT dosing intervals for natalizumab (38.1%), fingolimod and siponimod (11.9%). CONCLUSIONS: In this nationwide survey, MS specialist physicians and other clinicians serving on regional NMSS Healthcare Provider Councils across the US reported profound changes in how they are delivering MS care during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Multiple Sclerosis , Humans , Multiple Sclerosis/epidemiology , Multiple Sclerosis/therapy , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States/epidemiology
17.
Viruses ; 13(3)2021 03 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1167757

ABSTRACT

Over the last months, as oncology specialists, we have frequently been contacted for estimating prognosis for cancer patients affected by COVID-19 infection. Until now, there have been no clear markers to guide decision making regarding the appropriateness of invasive ventilation in cancer patients affected by COVID-19 infection. We developed a practical tool encompassing a prognostic score, "The Milano Policlinico ONCOVID-ICU score." The score is composed of three groups of variables: patient's characteristics such as sex, age, BMI, and comorbidities; oncological variables (treatment intent, life expectancy, on or off-treatment status); and clinical parameters in association with laboratory values (the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score and D-dimer). The SOFA score includes six different clinical parameters and during the first few days of ICU admissions has an important prognostic role. The oncological history should never represent, per se, a contraindication to intensive care and must be considered together with other variables, such as laboratory values, clinical parameters, and patient characteristics, in order to make the hardest but best possible choice. To our knowledge, "The Milano Policlinico ONCOVID-ICU score" is the first prognostic score proposed in this setting of patients and requires further validation. This tool may be useful to assess the prognosis of cancer patients in critical conditions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Noninvasive Ventilation , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/mortality , Fibrin Fibrinogen Degradation Products/metabolism , Hospitalization , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis
18.
Reg Anesth Pain Med ; 46(6): 478-481, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1148173

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The role of telemedicine in the evaluation and treatment of patients with spinal disorders is rapidly expanding, brought on largely by the COVID-19 pandemic. Within this context, the ability of pain specialists to accurately diagnose and plan appropriate interventional spine procedures based entirely on telemedicine visits, without an in-person evaluation, remains to be established. In this study, our primary objective was to assess the relevance of telemedicine to interventional spine procedure planning by determining whether procedure plans established solely from virtual visits changed following in-person evaluation. METHODS: We reviewed virtual and in-person clinical encounters from our academic health system's 10 interventional spine specialists. We included patients who were seen exclusively via telemedicine encounters and indicated for an interventional procedure with documented procedural plans. Virtual plans were then compared with the actual procedures performed following in-person evaluation. Demographic data as well as the type and extent of physical examination performed by the interventional spine specialist were also recorded. RESULTS: Of the 87 new patients included, the mean age was 60 years (SE 1.4 years) and the preprocedural plan established by telemedicine, primarily videoconferencing, did not change for 76 individuals (87%; 95% CI 0.79 to 0.94) following in-person evaluation. Based on the size of our sample, interventional procedures indicated solely during telemedicine encounters may be accurate in 79%-94% of cases in the broader population. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that telemedicine evaluations are a generally accurate means of preprocedural assessment and development of interventional spine procedure plans. These findings clearly demonstrate the capabilities of telemedicine for evaluating spine patients and planning interventional spine procedures.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Preoperative Care/methods , Spinal Diseases/surgery , Spine/surgery , Telemedicine , Humans , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Semin Ophthalmol ; 36(4): 296-303, 2021 May 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1147415

ABSTRACT

Spurred by the coronavirus disease pandemic and shortage of eye care providers, telemedicine is transforming the way ophthalmologists care for their patients. Video conferencing, ophthalmic imaging, hybrid visits, intraocular inflammation quantification, and portable technology are evolving areas that may allow more uveitis patients to be evaluated via telemedicine. Despite these promising disruptive technologies, there remain significant technological limitations, legal barriers, variable insurance coverage for virtual visits, and lack of clinical trials for uveitis specialists to embrace telemedicine.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Ophthalmology/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , Specialization/trends , Telemedicine/methods , Uveitis/diagnosis , Uveitis/therapy , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Delivery of Health Care/trends , Humans
20.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(6)2021 03 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1125872

ABSTRACT

This study aims to identify factors related with SARS-CoV-2 infection in physicians and internal residents during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic at a tertiary hospital in Spain, through a cross- sectional descriptive perception study with analytical components through two questionnaires directed at professionals working at the Ramon y Cajal University Hospital between February and April 2020. In total, 167 professionals formed the study group, and 156 professionals comprised the comparison group. Seventy percent of the professionals perceived a shortage of personal protective equipment (PPE), while 40% perceived a shortage of hand sanitiser, although more than 70% said they used it properly. Soap was more available and had a higher percentage of correct use (73.6-79.5%) (p > 0.05). Hand hygiene was optimal in >70% of professionals according to all five WHO measurements. In the adjusted model (OR; CI95%), belonging to a high-risk specialty (4.45; 1.66-11.91) and the use of public transportation (3.27; 1.87-5.73) remained risk factors. Protective factors were changes of uniform (0.53; 0.32-0.90), sanitation of personal objects before the workday (0.55; 0.31-0.97), and the disinfection of shared material (0.34; 0.19-0.58). We cannot confirm that a shortage or misuse of PPE is a factor in the spread of SARS-CoV-2. Fears and assessments are similar in both groups, but we cannot causally relate them to the spread of infection. The perception of the area of risk is different in both groups, suggesting that more information and education for healthcare workers is needed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Health Personnel , Humans , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment , Spain/epidemiology , Specialization
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