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1.
Lancet ; 397(10279): 1116-1126, 2021 03 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1525995

ABSTRACT

Men who have sex with men (MSM) in the USA were the first population to be identified with AIDS and continue to be at very high risk of HIV acquisition. We did a systematic literature search to identify the factors that explain the reasons for the ongoing epidemic in this population, using a social-ecological perspective. Common features of the HIV epidemic in American MSM include role versatility and biological, individual, and social and structural factors. The high-prevalence networks of some racial and ethnic minority men are further concentrated because of assortative mixing, adverse life experiences (including high rates of incarceration), and avoidant behaviour because of negative interactions with the health-care system. Young MSM have additional risks for HIV because their impulse control is less developed and they are less familiar with serostatus and other risk mitigation discussions. They might benefit from prevention efforts that use digital technologies, which they often use to meet partners and obtain health-related information. Older MSM remain at risk of HIV and are the largest population of US residents with chronic HIV, requiring culturally responsive programmes that address longer-term comorbidities. Transgender MSM are an understudied population, but emerging data suggest that some are at great risk of HIV and require specifically tailored information on HIV prevention. In the current era of pre-exposure prophylaxis and the undetectable equals untransmittable campaign, training of health-care providers to create culturally competent programmes for all MSM is crucial, since the use of antiretrovirals is foundational to optimising HIV care and prevention. Effective control of the HIV epidemic among all American MSM will require scaling up programmes that address their common vulnerabilities, but are sufficiently nuanced to address the specific sociocultural, structural, and behavioural issues of diverse subgroups.


Subject(s)
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome/epidemiology , HIV Infections/epidemiology , HIV Infections/prevention & control , Homosexuality, Male/statistics & numerical data , Sexual and Gender Minorities/psychology , Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome/drug therapy , Adolescent , Adult , Anti-Retroviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19/virology , Comorbidity , HIV Infections/transmission , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , Minority Groups/psychology , Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis/methods , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Sexual Behavior/psychology , Sexual Partners/psychology , Transgender Persons/psychology , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
2.
CNS Neurol Disord Drug Targets ; 20(5): 473-477, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526730

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Catatonia is a psychomotor syndrome that presents with severe symptoms which can lead to dangerous and lethal conditions if not diagnosed and treated properly. SARS-- CoV-2 is a positive-sense single-stranded RNA virus that can occur in severe cases with acute pneumonia, ARDS, sepsis and septic shock. In these cases, ICU admission is necessary. CASE SUMMARY: A 59-year-old Caucasian man with septic shock and bilateral interstitial pneumonia from SARS-CoV-2 and schizotypal personality disorder presented with catatonic behaviour manifested by soporous state, response to intense painful stimuli with the opening of the eyes, execution of simple verbal commands, maintenance of the same position, catalepsy, immobility, rigidity and mutism. At the same time, there were symptoms of septic shock and catatonic symptoms, causing greater difficulty in the correct formulation of the diagnosis. During the course of his hospitalization, he was treated with asenapine 20 mg/day. The catatonia responded rapidly and significantly to the asenapine. DISCUSSION: To date, the pathophysiology of catatonia is unclear, and few guidelines are available for the treatment of catatonia. In the literature, studies have reported the efficacy of benzodiazepines such as lorazepam and diazepam, GABAA agonists such as zolpidem, NMDA receptor antagonists such as memantine, antidepressant SSRIs such as fluoxetine and paroxetine, and antipsychotics such as olanzapine, clozapine and aripiprazole. We demonstrate that the antipsychotic asenapine is also effective in treating catatonic symptoms in psychiatric disorders. CONCLUSION: Asenapine produced a rapid and significant reduction in catatonic symptoms in our patient with schizotypal personality disorder.


Subject(s)
Antipsychotic Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , Catatonia/drug therapy , Catatonia/etiology , Depressive Disorder, Major/complications , Dibenzocycloheptenes/therapeutic use , Schizotypal Personality Disorder/complications , Shock, Septic/complications , Shock, Septic/etiology , Catatonia/psychology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pain/etiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/complications
3.
Clin Med Insights Case Rep ; 14: 11795476211020593, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526581

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is a new global pandemic. It can affect multiple body systems and functions. However, the relationship between COVID-19 and male sexual activity did not yet get much consideration. Herein, we report the impact of COVID-19 on sexual function in 3 men who recovered from the disease. Compared with their condition before catching the infection, the men showed, in different degrees, a decline in all aspects of sexual function as assessed by the international index of erectile function. They started to develop premature ejaculation or exacerbate an already existing condition according to the premature ejaculation diagnostic tool scoring. Beck's depression inventory revealed deterioration of the men's moods up to severe depression. The sex-related hormones (testosterone-total and free, luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone, prolactin, and estradiol) of these men were within normal levels. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report documenting deleterious changes in mood and several aspects of sexual functioning in males after recovery from the COVID-19 using validated measurement tools. Follow-up and psychological support of the recovered men may help mend their moods and consequently upgrade their sexual functioning.

4.
Sex Transm Dis ; 48(12): 939-944, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1511100

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Reported cases of Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) and Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG) infections are increasing among Canadian men. Estimates of community-based CT/NG prevalence are lacking among gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men (GBM). METHODS: Respondent driven sampling was used to recruit GBM in Montréal, Canada between February 2017 and June 2018. Specimens provided from urogenital, rectal, and pharyngeal sites were analyzed using nucleic acid amplification test to detect CT/NG. Prevalence estimates of CT/NG, overall and by anatomical site were calculated. All estimates are respondent-driven sampling-adjusted. RESULTS: Among 1177 GBM, the prevalence of rectal, urogenital, pharyngeal and overall were respectively 2.4%, 0.4%, 0.4%, and 2.8% for CT infections, and 3.1%, 0.4%, 3.5%, and 5.6% for NG infections. If testing had been limited to the urogenital site, 80% and 94% of CT and NG infections, respectively, would have been missed. CONCLUSIONS: This community-based study among GBM shows that the CT prevalence was about half of that observed for NG. A large part of CT/NG infections involves only the extragenital sites, highlighting the need for systematic multisite screening regardless of symptoms. In the mist of the COVID-19 pandemic and the limited CT/NG screening capacity due to test kits shortage, it might be considered to prioritize rectal and pharyngeal CT/NG testing over urogenital testing in asymptomatic GBM.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Chlamydia Infections , Gonorrhea , Sexual and Gender Minorities , Canada/epidemiology , Chlamydia Infections/epidemiology , Chlamydia trachomatis/genetics , Gonorrhea/epidemiology , Homosexuality, Male , Humans , Male , Neisseria gonorrhoeae/genetics , Pandemics , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Lancet Infect Dis ; 21(5): 657-667, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1510463

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Bacterial sexually transmitted infections (STIs) are highly prevalent among men who have sex with men who use HIV pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP), which leads to antimicrobial consumption linked to the emergence of antimicrobial resistance. We aimed to assess use of an antiseptic mouthwash as an antibiotic sparing approach to prevent STIs. METHODS: We invited people using PrEP who had an STI in the past 24 months to participate in this single-centre, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, AB/BA crossover superiority trial at the Institute of Tropical Medicine in Antwerp, Belgium. Using block randomisation (block size eight), participants were assigned (1:1) to first receive Listerine Cool Mint or a placebo mouthwash. They were required to use the study mouthwashes daily and before and after sex for 3 months each and to ask their sexual partners to use the mouthwash before and after sex. Participants were screened every 3 months for syphilis, chlamydia, and gonorrhoea at the oropharynx, anorectum, and urethra. The primary outcome was combined incidence of these STIs during each 3-month period, assessed in the intention-to-treat population, which included all participants who completed at least the first 3-month period. Safety was assessed as a secondary outcome. This trial is registered with Clinicaltrials.gov, NCT03881007. FINDINGS: Between April 2, 2019, and March 13, 2020, 343 participants were enrolled: 172 in the Listerine followed by placebo (Listerine-placebo) group and 171 in the placebo followed by Listerine (placebo-Listerine) group. The trial was terminated prematurely because of the COVID-19 pandemic. 151 participants completed the entire study, and 89 completed only the first 3-month period. 31 participants withdrew consent, ten were lost to follow-up, and one acquired HIV. In the Listerine-placebo group, the STI incidence rate was 140·4 per 100 person-years during the Listerine period, and 102·6 per 100 person-years during the placebo period. In the placebo-Listerine arm, the STI incidence rate was 133·9 per 100 person-years during the placebo period, and 147·5 per 100 person-years during the Listerine period. We did not find that Listerine significantly reduced STI incidence (IRR 1·17, 95% CI 0·84-1·64). Numbers of adverse events were not significantly higher than at baseline and were similar while using Listerine and placebo. Four serious adverse events (one HIV-infection, one severe depression, one Ludwig's angina, and one testicular carcinoma) were not considered to be related to use of mouthwash. INTERPRETATION: Our findings do not support the use of Listerine Cool Mint as a way to prevent STI acquisition among high-risk populations. FUNDING: Belgian Research Foundation - Flanders (FWO 121·00).


Subject(s)
Anti-Bacterial Agents/administration & dosage , HIV Infections/prevention & control , Homosexuality, Male , Mouthwashes , Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/prevention & control , Adult , Cross-Over Studies , Double-Blind Method , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/epidemiology
6.
BMC Public Health ; 20(1): 1571, 2020 Oct 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1511736

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has emerged as a major global public health challenge. This study aimed to investigate on how people perceive the COVID-19 outbreak using the components of the Extended Parallel Process Model (EPPM) and to find out how this might contribute to possible behavioral responses to the prevention and control of the disease. METHODS: This cross-sectional study was conducted in Iran during March and April 2020. Participants were recruited via online applications using a number of platforms such as Telegram, WhatsApp, and Instagram asking people to take part in the study. To collect data an electronic self-designed questionnaire based on the EPPM was used in order to measure the risk perception (efficacy, defensive responses, perceived treat) related to the COVID-19. Descriptive statistics, chi-square, t-test and analysis of variance (ANOVA), were used to explore the data. RESULTS: A total of 3727 individuals with a mean age (SD) of 37.0 (11.1) years participated in the study. The results revealed significant differences in efficacy, defensive responses and perceived treat among different population groups particularly among those aged 60 and over. Women had significantly higher scores than men on some aspects such as self-efficacy, reactance, and avoidance but men had higher perceived susceptibility scores compared to women. Overall 56.4% of participants were engaged in danger control (preventive behavior) while the remaining 43.6% were engaged in fear control (non-preventive behavior) process. CONCLUSION: More than half of all participants motivated by danger control. This indicated that more than half of participants had high perceived efficacy (i.e., self-efficacy and response efficacy). Self-efficacy scores were significantly higher among participants who were older, female, single, lived in rural areas, and had good economic status. The results suggest that socioeconomic and demographic factors are the main determinants of the COVID-19 risk perception. Indeed, targeted interventions are essential for controlling the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Models, Psychological , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Risk Assessment , Adult , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Iran , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Socioeconomic Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
7.
Clin Nucl Med ; 46(12): 1016-1017, 2021 Dec 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1504452

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: A 70-year-old man with newly diagnosed prostate cancer underwent 18F-PSMA-1007 PET/CT for staging. PSMA-avid primary prostatic malignancy was identified. Incidental intense patchy peripheral lung uptake was also noted. The patient tested positive for COVID-19 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Prostatic Neoplasms , Aged , Edetic Acid , Humans , Lung/pathology , Male , Neoplasm Staging , Niacinamide/analogs & derivatives , Oligopeptides , Positron Emission Tomography Computed Tomography , Prostatic Neoplasms/diagnostic imaging , Prostatic Neoplasms/pathology , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Rev Fr Allergol (2009) ; 61(6): 425-431, 2021 Oct.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1492567

ABSTRACT

Objectives of the study: During the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, the media has often mentioned the presence of quinine in tonic water. Media accounts of quinine's antiviral effect in vitro, as well as press reports about quinine-based compounds, such as hydroxychloroquine, have sparked renewed public interest in drinking tonic water, which could perhaps result in an increase in allergic phenomena. On the 200th anniversary of the discovery of quinine, our main objective was to analyze hypersensitivity reactions, related to the consumption of beverages containing quinine, described in the literature. Patients and methods: We analyzed case reports indexed on Pubmed, Scopus, and Google Scholar. A quinine causality score was calculated for each of the observations. A quinine assay was performed on several beverages for which the quinine content had not been published. Results: In parallel with related pharmacokinetic studies, these case reports consist of 26 observations. The case reports mainly related to young men, with symptoms of varying severity, mainly dermatological, with fixed drug eruption, generalized rashes, hives; hematological, with thrombocytopenia, hemorrhagic syndrome, thrombotic microangiopathy; more rarely ocular, cardiac or auditory. The level of causality of quinine is certain for three cases, probable for twenty-two, possible for two. The levels of quinine, all conforming to the standards, were lower in the spirits and the cooked wine than those of tonic water. Discussion: Possibly under-diagnosed, the main mechanism of these reactions is immuno-allergic, without any cross-reaction with other quinolines having been shown. In these patients and breastfeeding women of G6PD deficient newborns, any medicines, phytotherapy, homeopathy, or even cosmetics containing quinine, on the basis of a proposed list, should be avoided.

9.
Int J Rehabil Res ; 43(3): 285-286, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1483689

ABSTRACT

We report, to the best of our knowledge, the first case of a probable COVID-19 infection in a 28-year-old man with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. The diagnosis was established through a remote interaction with the patient after early discharge from outpatient therapy due to upcoming traveling restrictions. The COVID-19 disease appeared mild, without major respiratory problems, and no obvious neuromuscular deterioration was reported or observed. Telerehabilitation provided an opportunity to continue with hand rehabilitation after tendon transfer surgery, perform an ad-hoc online evaluation, and advise the patient how to prevent the spread of infection and cope with restrictions limiting outpatient visits. This experience seems valuable for further development of telerehabilitation in anticipation of future pandemics or adversarial events since it allows reaching out to patients unable to travel and overcomes the need for regular outpatient visits.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease/surgery , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Telerehabilitation , Adult , COVID-19 , Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease/complications , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
10.
BMJ Case Rep ; 14(5)2021 May 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1457886

ABSTRACT

Although prednisolone, granulocyte/monocyte apheresis, calcineurin inhibitor and anti-tumour necrosis factor (TNF) therapy are generally used, no treatment strategy for inflammatory bowel disease complicated with pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) has been established yet. Herein, we present the case of a 29-year-old man with ulcerative colitis (UC) complicated with primary sclerosing cholangitis. When UC relapsed and PG developed, prednisolone and granulocyte/monocyte apheresis were used; however, their therapeutic effects were deemed insufficient. After 2 weeks, adalimumab (ADA) induced remission; however, his UC and PG relapsed 20 weeks later. As a result of switching to infliximab, since a loss of response to ADA was deemed to have occurred, remission was reintroduced and subsequently maintained for 40 weeks. We conclude that anti-TNF-α antibodies might be selected as the first choice when PG and UC are refractory to treatment, and a switch to anti-TNFs should be considered when the effect is still insufficient.


Subject(s)
Biological Products , Cholangitis, Sclerosing , Colitis, Ulcerative , Pyoderma Gangrenosum , Adalimumab/therapeutic use , Adult , Cholangitis, Sclerosing/complications , Cholangitis, Sclerosing/drug therapy , Colitis, Ulcerative/complications , Colitis, Ulcerative/drug therapy , Humans , Infliximab/therapeutic use , Male , Pyoderma Gangrenosum/complications , Pyoderma Gangrenosum/drug therapy , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
11.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(13): e25265, 2021 Apr 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1455403

ABSTRACT

RATIONALE: Complement deficiency are known to be predisposed to disseminated gonococcal infection (DGI). We herein present a case of DGI involving a Japanese man who latently had a complement 7 deficiency with compound heterozygous variants. PATIENT CONCERNS: A previously healthy 51-year-old Japanese man complained of sudden-onset high fever. Physical examination revealed various skin lesions including red papules on his trunk and extremities, an impetigo-like pustule on left forearm, and tendinitis of his right forefinger. DIAGNOSIS: Blood culture testing detected gram-negative cocci, which was confirmed to be Neisseria gonorrhoeae based on mass spectrometry and a pathogen-specific PCR test. INTERVENTIONS: Screening tests for underlying immunocompromised factors uncovered that complement activities (CH50) was undetectable. With a suspicion of a congenital complement deficiency, genetic analysis revealed rare single nucleotide variants in complement 7 (C7), including c.281-1G>T and a novel variant c.1454C>T (p.A485V). CH50 was normally recovered by adding purified human C7 to the patient's serum, supporting that the patient has C7 deficiency with compound heterozygous variants. OUTCOMES: Under a diagnosis of DGI, the patient underwent an antibiotic treatment with cefotaxime for a week and was discharged without any sequela. LESSONS: DGI is a rare sexually-transmitted infection that potentially induces systemic complications. Complement immunity usually defeats N. gonorrhoeae and prevents the organism from causing DGI. This case highlighted the importance of suspecting a complement deficiency when a person develops DGI.


Subject(s)
Complement C7/deficiency , Genetic Variation/genetics , Gonorrhea/genetics , Hereditary Complement Deficiency Diseases/genetics , Hereditary Complement Deficiency Diseases/microbiology , Neisseria gonorrhoeae , Complement C7/genetics , Female , Gonorrhea/microbiology , Humans , Japan , Male , Middle Aged
12.
J Vasc Interv Radiol ; 32(1): 33-38, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1454337

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To determine effect of body mass index (BMI) on safety and cancer-related outcomes of thermal ablation for renal cell carcinoma (RRC). MATERIALS AND METHODS: This retrospective study evaluated 427 patients (287 men and 140 women; mean [SD] age, 72 [12] y) who were treated with thermal ablation for RCC between October 2006 and December 2017. Patients were stratified by BMI into 3 categories: normal weight (18.5-24.9 kg/m2), overweight (25-29.9 kg/m2), and obese (≥ 30 kg/m2). Of 427 patients, 71 (16%) were normal weight, 157 (37%) were overweight, and 199 (47%) were obese. Complication rates, local recurrence, and residual disease were compared in the 3 cohorts. RESULTS: No differences in technical success between normal-weight, overweight, and obese patients were identified (P = .72). Primary technique efficacy rates for normal-weight, overweight, and obese patients were 91%, 94%, and 93% (P = .71). There was no significant difference in RCC specific-free survival, disease-free survival, and metastasis-free survival between obese, overweight, and normal-weight groups (P = .72, P = .43, P = .99). Complication rates between the 3 cohorts were similar (normal weight 4%, overweight 2%, obese 3%; P = .71). CONCLUSIONS: CT-guided renal ablation is safe, feasible, and effective regardless of BMI.


Subject(s)
Body Mass Index , Carcinoma, Renal Cell/surgery , Cryosurgery , Kidney Neoplasms/surgery , Microwaves/therapeutic use , Obesity/diagnosis , Radiofrequency Ablation , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Carcinoma, Renal Cell/mortality , Carcinoma, Renal Cell/secondary , Cryosurgery/adverse effects , Cryosurgery/mortality , Disease Progression , Disease-Free Survival , Female , Humans , Kidney Neoplasms/mortality , Kidney Neoplasms/pathology , Male , Microwaves/adverse effects , Middle Aged , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local , Obesity/mortality , Patient Safety , Radiofrequency Ablation/adverse effects , Radiofrequency Ablation/mortality , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome
13.
Int J Infect Dis ; 104: 510-525, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1454176

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) are substantial public health threats in the region of Central Asia and the Caucasus, where the prevalence of these infections is currently rising. METHODS: A systematic review of MEDLINE, Embase and PsycINFO was conducted with no publication date or language restrictions through October 2019. Additional data were also harvested from national surveillance reports, references found in discovered sources, and other "grey" literature. It included studies conducted on high-risk populations (people who inject drugs (PWID), female sex workers (FSW), men who have sex with men (MSM), prisoners, and migrants) in Central Asia: Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan; and the Caucasus: Armenia, Azerbaijan, Georgia, and Northern Caucasus region of the Russian Federation. RESULTS: Wide ranges were noted for HIV prevalence: PWID 0-30.1%, MSM 0-25.1%, prisoners 0-22.8%, FSW 0-10.0%, and migrants 0.06-1.5%, with the highest prevalence of these high-risk groups reported in Kazakhstan (for PWID), Georgia (for MSM and prisoners) and Uzbekistan (for migrants). HCV prevalence also had a wide range: PWID 0.3-92.1%, MSM 0-18.9%, prisoners 23.8-49.7%, FSW 3.3-17.8%, and migrants 0.5-26.5%, with the highest prevalence reported in Georgia (92.1%), Kyrgyzstan (49.7%), and migrants from Tajikistan and Uzbekistan (26.5%). Similarly, HBV prevalence had a wide range: PWID 2.8-79.7%, MSM 0-22.2%, prisoners 2.7-6.2%, FSW 18.4% (one study), and migrants 0.3-15.7%. CONCLUSION: In Central Asia and the Caucasus, prevalence of HIV, HCV and HBV remains exceedingly high among selected populations, notably PWID and MSM.


Subject(s)
HIV Infections/epidemiology , Hepatitis B/epidemiology , Hepatitis C/epidemiology , Asia, Central/epidemiology , Female , Homosexuality, Male , Humans , Male , Prevalence , Prisoners , Risk Factors , Russia/epidemiology , Sex Workers , Sexual and Gender Minorities , Substance-Related Disorders/complications , Transcaucasia/epidemiology
14.
Cochrane Database Syst Rev ; 4: CD000479, 2021 04 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1453523

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Varicoceles are associated with male subfertility; however, the mechanisms by which varicoceles affect fertility have yet to be satisfactorily explained. Several treatment options exist, including surgical or radiological treatment, however the safest and most efficient treatment remains unclear.  OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of surgical and radiological treatment of varicoceles on live birth rate, adverse events, pregnancy rate, varicocele recurrence, and quality of life amongst couples where the adult male has a varicocele, and the female partner of childbearing age has no fertility problems. SEARCH METHODS: We searched the following databases on 4 April 2020: the Cochrane Gynaecology and Fertility Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, PsycINFO, and CINAHL. We also searched the trial registries and reference lists of articles. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) if they were relevant to the clinical question posed and compared different forms of surgical ligation, different forms of radiological treatments, surgical treatment compared to radiological treatment, or one of these aforementioned treatment forms compared to non-surgical methods, delayed treatment, or no treatment. We extracted data if the studies reported on live birth, adverse events, pregnancy, varicocele recurrence, and quality of life. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Screening of abstracts and full-text publications, alongside data extraction and 'Risk of bias' assessment, were done dually using the Covidence software. When we had sufficient data, we calculated random-effects (Mantel-Haenszel) meta-analyses; otherwise, we reported results narratively. We used the I2 statistic to analyse statistical heterogeneity. We planned to use funnel plots to assess publication bias in meta-analyses with at least 10 included studies. We dually rated the risk of bias of studies using the Cochrane 'Risk of bias' tool, and the certainty of evidence for each outcome using the GRADE approach. MAIN RESULTS: We identified 1897 citations after de-duplicating the search results. We excluded 1773 during title and abstract screening. From the 113 new full texts assessed in addition to the 10 studies (11 references) included in the previous version of this review, we included 38 new studies, resulting in a total of 48 studies (59 references) in the review providing data for 5384 participants. Two studies (three references) are ongoing studies and two studies are awaiting classification. Treatment versus non-surgical, non-radiological, delayed, or no treatment Two studies comparing surgical or radiological treatment versus no treatment reported on live birth with differing directions of effect. As a result, we are uncertain whether surgical or radiological treatment improves live birth rates when compared to no treatment (risk ratio (RR) 2.27, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.19 to 26.93; 2 RCTs, N = 204; I2 = 74%, very low-certainty evidence). Treatment may improve pregnancy rates compared to delayed or no treatment (RR 1.55, 95% CI 1.06 to 2.26; 13 RCTs, N = 1193; I2 = 65%, low-certainty evidence). This suggests that couples with no or delayed treatment have a 21% chance of pregnancy, whilst the pregnancy rate after surgical or radiological treatment is between 22% and 48%. We identified no evidence on adverse events, varicocele recurrence, or quality of life for this comparison. Surgical versus radiological treatment We are uncertain about the effect of surgical versus radiological treatment on live birth and on the following adverse events: hydrocele formation, pain, epididymitis, haematoma, and suture granuloma. We are uncertain about the effect of surgical versus radiological treatment on pregnancy rate (RR 1.13, 95% CI 0.75 to 1.70; 5 RCTs, N = 456, low-certainty evidence) and varicocele recurrence (RR 1.31, 95% CI 0.82 to 2.08; 3 RCTs, N = 380, low-certainty evidence). We identified no evidence on quality of life for this comparison. Surgery versus other surgical treatment We identified 19 studies comparing microscopic subinguinal surgical treatment to any other surgical treatment. Microscopic subinguinal surgical treatment probably improves pregnancy rates slightly compared to other surgical treatments (RR 1.18, 95% CI 1.02 to 1.36; 12 RCTs, N = 1473, moderate-certainty evidence). This suggests that couples with microscopic subinguinal surgical treatment have a 10% to 14% chance of pregnancy after treatment, whilst the pregnancy rate in couples after other surgical treatments is 10%. This procedure also probably reduces the risk of varicocele recurrence (RR 0.48, 95% CI 0.29, 0.79; 14 RCTs, N = 1565, moderate-certainty evidence). This suggests that 0.4% to 1.1% of men undergoing microscopic subinguinal surgical treatment experience recurrent varicocele, whilst 1.4% of men undergoing other surgical treatments do. Results for the following adverse events were inconclusive: hydrocele formation, haematoma, abdominal distension, testicular atrophy, wound infection, scrotal pain, and oedema. We identified no evidence on live birth or quality of life for this comparison. Nine studies compared open inguinal surgical treatment to retroperitoneal surgical treatment. Due to small sample sizes and methodological limitations, we identified neither treatment type as superior or inferior to the other regarding adverse events, pregnancy rates, or varicocele recurrence. We identified no evidence on live birth or quality of life for this comparison. Radiological versus other radiological treatment One study compared two types of radiological treatment (sclerotherapy versus embolisation) and reported 13% varicocele recurrence in both groups. Due to the broad confidence interval, no valid conclusion could be drawn (RR 1.00, 95% CI 0.16 to 6.20; 1 RCT, N = 30, very low-certainty evidence). We identified no evidence on live birth, adverse events, pregnancy, or quality of life for this comparison. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Based on the limited evidence, it remains uncertain whether any treatment (surgical or radiological) compared to no treatment in subfertile men may be of benefit on live birth rates; however, treatment may improve the chances for pregnancy. The evidence was also insufficient to determine whether surgical treatment was superior to radiological treatment. However, microscopic subinguinal surgical treatment probably improves pregnancy rates and reduces the risk of varicocele recurrence compared to other surgical treatments. High-quality, head-to-head comparative RCTs focusing on live birth rate and also assessing adverse events and quality of life are warranted.


Subject(s)
Embolization, Therapeutic , Infertility, Male/therapy , Sclerotherapy/methods , Varicocele/therapy , Bias , Confidence Intervals , Embolization, Therapeutic/adverse effects , Female , Humans , Infertility, Male/etiology , Infertility, Male/surgery , Live Birth , Male , Outcome Assessment, Health Care , Postoperative Complications/etiology , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Rate , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Recurrence , Sclerotherapy/adverse effects , Sperm Count , Testicular Hydrocele/etiology , Varicocele/complications , Varicocele/surgery
15.
J Artif Organs ; 23(3): 292-295, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1453765

ABSTRACT

A 71-year-old man undergoing hemodialysis (HD) was admitted to our hospital with congestive heart failure (CHF) and pneumonia. After admission, ultrafiltration with HD was urgently performed because of a lack of respiratory improvement despite the use of noninvasive positive pressure ventilation. During HD, cerebral regional saturation of oxygen (rSO2) was monitored by INVOS 5100c oxygen saturation monitor (Covidien Japan, Japan) to evaluate changes in tissue oxygenation. At HD initiation, cerebral rSO2 was very low at 34% under the fraction of inspiratory oxygen (FiO2) of 0.4. Ultrafiltration was performed at the rate of 0.5 L/h thereafter, cerebral rSO2 gradually improved even as inhaling oxygen concentration decreased. At the end of HD, cerebral rSO2 improved at 40% under a FiO2 of 0.28 as excess body fluid was removed. After pneumonia and CHF improved, he was discharged. Reports of the association between cerebral oxygenation and acute CHF status in patients undergoing HD are limited; therefore, in our experience with this case, cerebral oxygenation deteriorated with the CHF status but was improved by adequate body-fluid management during HD.


Subject(s)
Brain/metabolism , Heart Failure/complications , Oxygen Consumption/physiology , Renal Dialysis , Renal Insufficiency/therapy , Aged , Heart Failure/metabolism , Heart Failure/physiopathology , Humans , Male , Monitoring, Physiologic , Renal Insufficiency/complications , Renal Insufficiency/metabolism
16.
Trials ; 22(1): 39, 2021 Jan 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1440947

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: In this cluster-randomised controlled study (CoV-Surv Study), four different "active" SARS-CoV-2 testing strategies for general population surveillance are evaluated for their effectiveness in determining and predicting the prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 infections in a given population. In addition, the costs and cost-effectiveness of the four surveillance strategies will be assessed. Further, this trial is supplemented by a qualitative component to determine the acceptability of each strategy. Findings will inform the choice of the most effective, acceptable and affordable strategy for SARS-CoV-2 surveillance, with the most effective and cost-effective strategy becoming part of the local public health department's current routine health surveillance activities. Investigating its everyday performance will allow us to examine the strategy's applicability to real time prevalence prediction and the usefulness of the resulting information for local policy makers to implement countermeasures that effectively prevent future nationwide lockdowns. The authors would like to emphasize the importance and relevance of this study and its expected findings in the context of population-based disease surveillance, especially in respect to the current SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. In Germany, but also in many other countries, COVID-19 surveillance has so far largely relied on passive surveillance strategies that identify individuals with clinical symptoms, monitor those cases who then tested positive for the virus, followed by tracing of individuals in close contact to those positive cases. To achieve higher effectiveness in population surveillance and to reliably predict the course of an outbreak, screening and monitoring of infected individuals without major symptoms (about 40% of the population) will be necessary. While current testing capacities are also used to identify such asymptomatic cases, this rather passive approach is not suitable in generating reliable population-based estimates of the prevalence of asymptomatic carriers to allow any dependable predictions on the course of the pandemic. To better control and manage the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic, current strategies therefore need to be complemented by an active surveillance of the wider population, i.e. routinely conducted testing and monitoring activities to identify and isolate infected individuals regardless of their clinical symptoms. Such active surveillance strategies will enable more effective prevention of the spread of the virus as they can generate more precise population-based parameters during a pandemic. This essential information will be required in order to determine the best strategic and targeted short-term countermeasures to limit infection spread locally. TRIAL DESIGN: This trial implements a cluster-randomised, two-factorial controlled, prospective, interventional, single-blinded design with four study arms, each representing a different SARS-CoV-2 testing and surveillance strategy. PARTICIPANTS: Eligible are individuals age 7 years or older living in Germany's Rhein-Neckar Region who consent to provide a saliva sample (all four arms) after completion of a brief questionnaire (two arms only). For the qualitative component, different samples of study participants and non-participants (i.e. eligible for study, but refuse to participate) will be identified for additional interviews. For these interviews, only individuals age 18 years or older are eligible. INTERVENTION AND COMPARATOR: Of the four surveillance strategies to be assessed and compared, Strategy A1 is considered the gold standard for prevalence estimation and used to determine bias in other arms. To determine the cost-effectiveness, each strategy is compared to status quo, defined as the currently practiced passive surveillance approach. Strategy A1: Individuals (one per household) receive information and study material by mail with instructions on how to produce a saliva sample and how to return the sample by mail. Once received by the laboratory, the sample is tested for SARS-CoV-2 using Reverse Transcription Loop-mediated Isothermal Amplification (RT-LAMP). Strategy A2: Individuals (one per household) receive information and study material by mail with instructions on how to produce their own as well as saliva samples from each household member and how to return these samples by mail. Once received by the laboratory, the samples are tested for SARS-CoV-2 using RT-LAMP. Strategy B1: Individuals (one per household) receive information by mail on how to complete a brief pre-screening questionnaire which asks about COVID-19 related clinical symptoms and risk exposures. Only individuals whose pre-screening score crosses a defined threshold, will then receive additional study material by mail with instructions on how to produce a saliva sample and how to return the sample by mail. Once received by the laboratory, the saliva sample is tested for SARS-CoV-2 using RT-LAMP. Strategy B2: Individuals (one per household) receive information by mail on how to complete a brief pre-screening questionnaire which asks about COVID-19 related clinical symptoms. Only individuals whose pre-screening score crosses a defined threshold, will then receive additional study material by mail with instructions how to produce their own as well as saliva samples from each household member and how to return these samples by mail. Once received by the laboratory, the samples are tested for SARS-CoV-2 using RT-LAMP. In each strategy, RT-LAMP positive samples are additionally analyzed with qPCR in order to minimize the number of false positives. MAIN OUTCOMES: The identification of the one best strategy will be determined by a set of parameters. Primary outcomes include costs per correctly screened person, costs per positive case, positive detection rate, and precision of positive detection rate. Secondary outcomes include participation rate, costs per asymptomatic case, prevalence estimates, number of asymptomatic cases per study arm, ratio of symptomatic to asymptomatic cases per study arm, participant satisfaction. Additional study components (not part of the trial) include cost effectiveness of each of the four surveillance strategies compared to passive monitoring (i.e. status quo), development of a prognostic model to predict hospital utilization caused by SARS-CoV-2, time from test shipment to test application and time from test shipment to test result, and perception and preferences of the persons to be tested with regard to test strategies. RANDOMISATION: Samples are drawn in three batches of three continuous weeks. Randomisation follows a two-stage process. First, a total of 220 sampling points have been allocated to the three different batches. To obtain an integer solution, the Cox-algorithm for controlled rounding has been used. Afterwards, sample points have been drawn separately per batch, following a probability proportional to size (PPS) random sample. Second, for each cluster the same number of residential addresses is randomly sampled from the municipal registries (self-weighted sample of individuals). The 28,125 addresses drawn per municipality are then randomly allocated to the four study arms A1, A2, B1, and B2 in the ratio 5 to 2.5 to 14 to 7 based on the expected response rates in each arm and the sensitivity and specificity of the pre-screening tool as applied in strategy B1 and B2. Based on the assumptions, this allocation should yield 2500 saliva samples in each strategy. Although a municipality can be sampled by multiple batches and the overall number of addresses per municipality might vary, the number of addresses contacted in each arm is kept constant. BLINDING (MASKING): The design is single-blinded, meaning the staff conducting the SARS-CoV-2 tests are unaware of the study arm assignment of each single participant and test sample. SAMPLE SIZES: Total sample size for the trial is 10,000 saliva samples equally allocated to the four study arms (i.e. 2,500 participants per arm). For the qualitative component, up to 60 in-depth interviews will be conducted with about 30 study participants (up to 15 in each arm A and B) and 30 participation refusers (up to 15 in each arm A and B) purposefully selected from the quantitative study sample to represent a variety of gender and ages to explore experiences with admission or rejection of study participation. Up to 25 asymptomatic SARS-CoV-2 positive study participants will be purposefully selected to explore the way in which asymptomatic men and women diagnosed with SARS-CoV-2 give meaning to their diagnosis and to the dialectic between feeling concurrently healthy and yet also being at risk for transmitting COVID-19. In addition, 100 randomly selected study participants will be included to explore participants' perspective on testing processes and implementation. TRIAL STATUS: Final protocol version is "Surveillance_Studienprotokoll_03Nov2020_v1_2" from November 3, 2020. Recruitment started November 18, 2020 and is expected to end by or before December 31, 2020. TRIAL REGISTRATION: The trial is currently being registered with the German Clinical Trials Register (Deutsches Register Klinischer Studien), DRKS00023271 ( https://www.drks.de/drks_web/navigate.do?navigationId=trial . HTML&TRIAL_ID=DRKS00023271). Retrospectively registered 30 November 2020. FULL PROTOCOL: The full protocol is attached as an additional file, accessible from the Trials website (Additional file 1). In the interest in expediting dissemination of this material, the familiar formatting has been eliminated; this Letter serves as a summary of the key elements of the full protocol.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing/economics , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/economics , Health Care Costs , Molecular Diagnostic Techniques/economics , Nucleic Acid Amplification Techniques/economics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Saliva/virology , Surveys and Questionnaires/economics , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Cost-Benefit Analysis , Female , Germany/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Population Surveillance , Predictive Value of Tests , Prevalence , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Reproducibility of Results , Single-Blind Method
17.
Ghana Med J ; 54(4 Suppl): 117-120, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1436205

ABSTRACT

This is a case report of a 55-year-old man with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus who presented with progressive breathlessness, chest pain and hyperglycaemia. An initial impression of a chest infection was made. Management was initiated with antibiotics, but this was unsuccessful, and he continued to desaturate. A screen for Coronavirus Disease of 2019 (COVID-19) returned positive. There was no prodrome of fever or flu-like illness or known contact with a patient known to have COVID-19. This case is instructive as he didn't fit the typical case definition for suspected COVID-19. There is significant community spread in Ghana, therefore COVID-19 should be a differential diagnosis in patients who present with hyperglycaemia and respiratory symptoms in the absence of a febrile illness. Primary care doctors must have a high index of suspicion in cases of significant hyperglycaemia and inability to maintain oxygen saturation. Patients known to have diabetes and those not known to have diabetes may develop hyperglycaemia subsequent to COVID-19. A high index of suspicion is crucial for early identification, notification for testing, isolation, treatment, contact tracing and possible referral or coordination of care with other specialists. Early identification will protect healthcare workers and patients alike from cross-infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Testing , COVID-19/diagnosis , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/virology , Chest Pain/diagnosis , Chest Pain/virology , Diagnosis, Differential , Dyspnea/diagnosis , Dyspnea/virology , Ghana , Humans , Hyperglycemia/diagnosis , Hyperglycemia/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Primary Health Care , Urban Health Services
18.
Urology ; 155: 179-185, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1411044

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To determine the attitudes and education regarding surgical castration in men receiving androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) for metastatic prostate cancer (mCaP). METHODS: We identified 142 patients receiving ADT for mCaP at our institution without prior orchiectomy who were then sent 2 surveys via mail: (1) A questionnaire to assess knowledge and understanding of ADT treatment alternatives and (2) the functional assessment of cancer therapy - prostate (FACT-P) questionnaire which determines health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Two cohorts were created based on the answer to "would you be interested in surgical orchiectomy?" and demographic, CaP and HRQOL were compared between the surgical castration yes (SC+) and surgical castration no (SC-) cohorts. A second analysis identified predictors of worse HRQOL. RESULTS: Of 68 (47.9%) patients that responded to the survey, only 39 (59.1%) recalled a discussion regarding treatment alternatives to ADT and only 22 (33.3%) recalled a discussion regarding orchiectomy. There were 24 (40.0%) patients that stated interest in undergoing orchiectomy (SC+) as an alternative to ADT with the only independent risk factor being "…bother from the number of clinical appointments required for ADT…" Patients most bothered by side effects and cosmetic changes associated with ADT reported lower HRQOL scores on the FACT-P. CONCLUSIONS: Few men on ADT knew about surgical alternatives, implying that educational deficits may be a significant factor in the decline in the utilization of orchiectomy. Changes in healthcare economics, utilization and delivery brought on by a global pandemic should warrant a fresh look at the use of surgical castration.

19.
Int J Infect Dis ; 108: 45-52, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1409643

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The overall death toll from COVID-19 in Africa is reported to be low but there is little individual-level evidence on the severity of the disease. This study examined the clinical spectrum and outcome of patients monitored in COVID-19 care centres (CCCs) in two West-African countries. METHODS: Burkina Faso and Guinea set up referral CCCs to hospitalise all symptomatic SARS-CoV-2 carriers, regardless of the severity of their symptoms. Data collected from hospitalised patients by November 2020 are presented. RESULT: A total of 1,805 patients (64% men, median age 41 years) were admitted with COVID-19. Symptoms lasted for a median of 7 days (IQR 4-11). During hospitalisation, 443 (25%) had a SpO2 < 94% at least once, 237 (13%) received oxygen and 266 (15%) took corticosteroids. Mortality was 5% overall, and 1%, 5% and 14% in patients aged <40, 40-59 and ≥60 years, respectively. In multivariable analysis, the risk of death was higher in men (aOR 2.0, 95% CI 1.1; 3.6), people aged ≥60 years (aOR 2.9, 95% CI 1.7; 4.8) and those with chronic hypertension (aOR 2.1, 95% CI 1.2; 3.4). CONCLUSION: COVID-19 is as severe in Africa as elsewhere, and there must be more vigilance for common risk factors such as older age and hypertension.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Aged , Burkina Faso/epidemiology , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Prospective Studies , Referral and Consultation , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Eur J Endocrinol ; 185(2): 299-311, 2021 Jul 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1398974

ABSTRACT

Objective: Male sex is one of the determinants of severe coronavirus diseas-e-2019 (COVID-19). We aimed to characterize sex differences in severe outcomes in adults with diabetes hospitalized for COVID-19. Methods: We performed a sex-stratified analysis of clinical and biological features and outcomes (i.e. invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV), death, intensive care unit (ICU) admission and home discharge at day 7 (D7) or day 28 (D28)) in 2380 patients with diabetes hospitalized for COVID-19 and included in the nationwide CORONADO observational study (NCT04324736). Results: The study population was predominantly male (63.5%). After multiple adjustments, female sex was negatively associated with the primary outcome (IMV and/or death, OR: 0.66 (0.49-0.88)), death (OR: 0.49 (0.30-0.79)) and ICU admission (OR: 0.57 (0.43-0.77)) at D7 but only with ICU admission (OR: 0.58 (0.43-0.77)) at D28. Older age and a history of microvascular complications were predictors of death at D28 in both sexes, while chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) was predictive of death in women only. At admission, C-reactive protein (CRP), aspartate amino transferase (AST) and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), according to the CKD-EPI formula predicted death in both sexes. Lymphocytopenia was an independent predictor of death in women only, while thrombocytopenia and elevated plasma glucose concentration were predictors of death in men only. Conclusions: In patients with diabetes admitted for COVID-19, female sex was associated with lower incidence of early severe outcomes, but did not influence the overall in-hospital mortality, suggesting that diabetes mitigates the female protection from COVID-19 severity. Sex-associated biological determinants may be useful to optimize COVID-19 prevention and management in women and men.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/diagnosis , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Sex Characteristics , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , Diabetes Complications/diagnosis , Diabetes Complications/epidemiology , Female , France/epidemiology , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Incidence , Inpatients , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Severity of Illness Index
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