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1.
Anesth Analg ; 131(4): e200-e202, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1383711
4.
BMC Res Notes ; 14(1): 20, 2021 Jan 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1388819

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: We aimed to characterize the effects of prone positioning on respiratory mechanics and oxygenation in invasively ventilated patients with SARS-CoV-2 ARDS. RESULTS: This was a prospective cohort study in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of a tertiary referral centre. We included 20 consecutive, invasively ventilated patients with laboratory confirmed SARS-CoV-2 related ARDS who underwent prone positioning in ICU as part of their management. The main outcome was the effect of prone positioning on gas exchange and respiratory mechanics. There was a median improvement in the PaO2/FiO2 ratio of 132 in the prone position compared to the supine position (IQR 67-228). We observed lower PaO2/FiO2 ratios in those with low (< median) baseline respiratory system static compliance, compared to those with higher (> median) static compliance (P < 0.05). There was no significant difference in respiratory system static compliance with prone positioning. Prone positioning was effective in improving oxygenation in SARS-CoV-2 ARDS. Furthermore, poor respiratory system static compliance was common and was associated with disease severity. Improvements in oxygenation were partly due to lung recruitment. Prone positioning should be considered in patients with SARS-CoV-2 ARDS.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Lung/metabolism , Prone Position , COVID-19/metabolism , Cohort Studies , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Oxygen/metabolism , Prospective Studies , Respiration, Artificial
5.
Crit Care Med ; 49(7): 1026-1037, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1307563

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Therapies for patients with respiratory failure from coronavirus disease 2019 are urgently needed. Early implementation of prone positioning ventilation improves survival in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome, but studies examining the effect of proning on survival in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 are lacking. Our objective was to estimate the effect of early proning initiation on survival in patients with coronavirus disease 2019-associated respiratory failure. DESIGN: Data were derived from the Study of the Treatment and Outcomes in Critically Ill Patients with coronavirus disease 2019, a multicenter cohort study of critically ill adults with coronavirus disease 2019 admitted to 68 U.S. hospitals. Using these data, we emulated a target trial of prone positioning ventilation by categorizing mechanically ventilated hypoxemic (ratio of Pao2 over the corresponding Fio2 ≤ 200 mm Hg) patients as having been initiated on proning or not within 2 days of ICU admission. We fit an inverse probability-weighted Cox model to estimate the mortality hazard ratio for early proning versus no early proning. Patients were followed until death, hospital discharge, or end of follow-up. SETTING: ICUs at 68 U.S. sites. PATIENTS: Critically ill adults with laboratory-confirmed coronavirus disease 2019 receiving invasive mechanical ventilation with ratio of Pao2 over the corresponding Fio2 less than or equal to 200 mm Hg. INTERVENTIONS: None. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Among 2,338 eligible patients, 702 (30.0%) were proned within the first 2 days of ICU admission. After inverse probability weighting, baseline and severity of illness characteristics were well-balanced between groups. A total of 1,017 (43.5%) of the 2,338 patients were discharged alive, 1,101 (47.1%) died, and 220 (9.4%) were still hospitalized at last follow-up. Patients proned within the first 2 days of ICU admission had a lower adjusted risk of death compared with nonproned patients (hazard ratio, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.73-0.97). CONCLUSIONS: In-hospital mortality was lower in mechanically ventilated hypoxemic patients with coronavirus disease 2019 treated with early proning compared with patients whose treatment did not include early proning.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Hypoxia/therapy , Patient Positioning , Prone Position , Respiration, Artificial , Respiratory Insufficiency/etiology , Aged , Cohort Studies , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Survival Analysis , Time-to-Treatment , United States/epidemiology
6.
Acute Crit Care ; 36(2): 143-150, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1289166

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Evidence prior to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic suggested that, compared with conventional ventilation strategies, airway pressure release ventilation (APRV) can improve oxygenation and reduce mortality in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. We aimed to assess the association between APRV use and clinical outcomes among adult patients receiving mechanical ventilation for COVID-19 and hypothesized that APRV use would be associated with improved survival compared with conventional ventilation. METHODS: A total of 25 patients with COVID-19 pneumonitis was admitted to intensive care units (ICUs) for invasive ventilation in Perth, Western Australia, between February and May 2020. Eleven of these patients received APRV. The primary outcome was survival to day 90. Secondary outcomes were ventilation-free survival days to day 90, mechanical complications from ventilation, and number of days ventilated. RESULTS: Patients who received APRV had a lower probability of survival than did those on other forms of ventilation (hazard ratio, 0.17; 95% confidence interval, 0.03-0.89; P=0.036). This finding was independent of indices of severity of illness to predict the use of APRV. Patients who received APRV also had fewer ventilator-free survival days up to 90 days after initiation of ventilation compared to patients who did not receive APRV, and survivors who received APRV had fewer ventilator-free days than survivors who received other forms of ventilation. There were no differences in mechanical complications according to mode of ventilation. CONCLUSIONS: Based on the findings of this study, we urge caution with the use of APRV in COVID-19.

7.
Clinics (Sao Paulo) ; 76: e2659, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1270465

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to compare the effectiveness of 0.12% chlorhexidine alone and 0.12% chlorhexidine in combination with toothbrushing to prevent ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) in mechanically ventilated patients. The Embase, Latin American and Caribbean Health Science Literature, PubMed, Scientific Electronic Library Online, Scopus, LIVIVO, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, OpenThesis, and Open Access Thesis and Dissertations databases were used. Only randomized controlled trials without restrictions on the year or language of publication were included. Two reviewers assessed the risk of bias using the Joanna Briggs Institute Critical Appraisal Tool. A meta-analysis using a random-effects model estimated the combined relative risk (RR). The Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluations approach was used to assess the certainty of the evidence. Initially, 2,337 studies were identified, of which 4 were considered in the systematic review and 3 in the meta-analysis (total sample: 796 patients). The studies were published between 2009 and 2017. All eligible studies had a low risk of bias. The meta-analysis revealed that the risk of VAP was 24% lower in patients receiving chlorhexidine combined with toothbrushing than in those receiving chlorhexidine alone (RR: 0.76; 95% confidence interval: 0.55-1.06), with moderate certainty of evidence and without statistical significance. In conclusion, considering the limitations of this study, a standard protocol for the prevention of VAP is not yet recommended. More studies with larger sample sizes are needed to draw strong conclusions. However, considering that toothbrushing is a simple intervention, it should be a common practice in mechanically ventilated patients, especially among patients with coronavirus disease.


Subject(s)
Pneumonia, Ventilator-Associated , Chlorhexidine , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Pneumonia, Ventilator-Associated/prevention & control , Respiration, Artificial , Toothbrushing
8.
Minerva Anestesiol ; 87(8): 891-902, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1262728

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 is associated with elevated levels of inflammatory cytokines. We present the characteristics and outcomes of patients treated in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) with immunosuppressive drugs, either tocilizumab or anakinra compared with controls. METHODS: A single-center observational prospective study on ICU invasively ventilated COVID-19 patients. The primary outcome was the clinical improvement at day 28. A Bayesian framework was employed, and all analyses were adjusted for confounders. RESULTS: Sixty-one consecutive invasively ventilated patients were included, nine (14.7%) received tocilizumab and 15 (24.6%) received anakinra. Over the first seven days, tocilizumab was associated with a greater decrease in C-reactive protein (P<0.001). After adjusting for confounders, the probability of clinical improvement at day 28 compared to control was 7∙6% (OR=0.36 [95% CrI: 0.09-1.46]) for tocilizumab and 40.9% (OR=0.89 [95% CrI: 0.32-2.43]) for anakinra. At day 28, the probability of being in a better clinical category was 2.5% (OR=2.98 [95% CrI: 1.00-8.88]) for tocilizumab, and 49.5% (OR=1.00 [95% CrI: 0.42-2.42]) for anakinra. CONCLUSIONS: In invasively ventilated COVID-19 patients, treatment with anakinra was associated with a higher probability of clinical improvement compared to tocilizumab; however, treatment with either drug did not result in clinically meaningful improvements compared with controls.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Bayes Theorem , Humans , Prospective Studies , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
9.
Am J Otolaryngol ; 42(6): 103102, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1260644

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Tracheostomy is one of the most common surgical procedures performed on ventilated COVID-19 patients, yet the appropriate timing for operating is controversial. OBJECTIVES: Assessing the effect of early tracheostomy on mortality and decannulation; elucidating changes in ventilation parameters, vasopressors and sedatives dosages immediately following the procedure. METHODS: A retrospective cohort of 38 ventilated COVID-19 patients, 19 of them (50%) underwent tracheostomy within 7 days of intubation (early tracheostomy group) and the rest underwent tracheostomy after 8 days or more (late tracheostomy group). RESULTS: Decannulation rates were significantly higher while mortality rates were non-significantly lower in the early tracheostomy group compared with the late tracheostomy group (58% vs 21% p < 0.05; 42% vs 74% p = 0.1, respectively). Tidal volume increased (446 ml vs 483 ml; p = 0.02) while PEEP (13 cmH20 vs 11.6 cmH2O, p = 0.04) decreased at the immediate time following the procedure. No staff member participating in the procedures was infected with SARS-CoV-2 virus. CONCLUSION: Early tracheostomy might offer improved outcomes with higher decannulation rates and lower mortality rates in ventilated COVID-19 patients, yet larger scale studies are needed. Most likely, early exposure to COVID-19 patients with appropriate personal protective equipment during open tracheostomy does not put the surgical team at risk.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/surgery , Respiration, Artificial , Tracheostomy/methods , Aged , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/therapy , Device Removal/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Intubation, Intratracheal/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Tidal Volume , Time Factors , Tracheostomy/statistics & numerical data
10.
BMJ Open ; 11(5): e045041, 2021 05 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1259009

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: International guidelines include early nutritional support (≤48 hour after admission), 20-25 kcal/kg/day, and 1.2-2 g/kg/day protein at the acute phase of critical illness. Recent data challenge the appropriateness of providing standard amounts of calories and protein during acute critical illness. Restricting calorie and protein intakes seemed beneficial, suggesting a role for metabolic pathways such as autophagy, a potential key mechanism in safeguarding cellular integrity, notably in the muscle, during critical illness. However, the optimal calorie and protein supply at the acute phase of severe critical illness remains unknown. NUTRIREA-3 will be the first trial to compare standard calorie and protein feeding complying with guidelines to low-calorie low-protein feeding. We hypothesised that nutritional support with calorie and protein restriction during acute critical illness decreased day 90 mortality and/or dependency on intensive care unit (ICU) management in mechanically ventilated patients receiving vasoactive amine therapy for shock, compared with standard calorie and protein targets. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: NUTRIREA-3 is a randomised, controlled, multicentre, open-label trial comparing two parallel groups of patients receiving invasive mechanical ventilation and vasoactive amine therapy for shock and given early nutritional support according to one of two strategies: early calorie-protein restriction (6 kcal/kg/day-0.2-0.4 g/kg/day) or standard calorie-protein targets (25 kcal/kg/day, 1.0-1.3 g/kg/day) at the acute phase defined as the first 7 days in the ICU. We will include 3044 patients in 61 French ICUs. Two primary end-points will be evaluated: day 90 mortality and time to ICU discharge readiness. The trial will be considered positive if significant between-group differences are found for one or both alternative primary endpoints. Secondary outcomes include hospital-acquired infections and nutritional, clinical and functional outcomes. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: The NUTRIREA-3 study has been approved by the appropriate ethics committee. Patients are included after informed consent. Results will be submitted for publication in peer-reviewed journals. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: NCT03573739.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diet, Protein-Restricted , Adult , Critical Illness , Humans , Respiration, Artificial , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Thromb J ; 19(1): 35, 2021 May 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1249557

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The incidence of pulmonary thromboembolism is high in SARS-CoV-2 patients admitted to the Intensive Care. Elevated biomarkers of coagulation (fibrinogen and D-dimer) and inflammation (c-reactive protein (CRP) and ferritin) are associated with poor outcome in SARS-CoV-2. Whether the time-course of fibrinogen, D-dimer, CRP and ferritin is associated with the occurrence of pulmonary thromboembolism in SARS-CoV-2 patients is unknown. We hypothesise that patients on mechanical ventilation with SARS-CoV-2 infection and clinical pulmonary thromboembolism have lower concentrations of fibrinogen and higher D-dimer, CRP, and ferritin concentrations over time compared to patients without a clinical pulmonary thromboembolism. METHODS: In a prospective study, fibrinogen, D-dimer, CRP and ferritin were measured daily. Clinical suspected pulmonary thromboembolism was either confirmed or excluded based on computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) or by transthoracic ultrasound (TTU) (i.e., right-sided cardiac thrombus). In addition, patients who received therapy with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator were included when clinical instability in suspected pulmonary thromboembolism did not allow CTPA. Serial data were analysed using a mixed-effects linear regression model, and models were adjusted for known risk factors (age, sex, APACHE-II score, body mass index), biomarkers of coagulation and inflammation, and anticoagulants. RESULTS: Thirty-one patients were considered to suffer from pulmonary thromboembolism ((positive CTPA (n = 27), TTU positive (n = 1), therapy with recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (n = 3)), and eight patients with negative CTPA were included. After adjustment for known risk factors and anticoagulants, patients with, compared to those without, clinical pulmonary thromboembolism had lower average fibrinogen concentration of - 0.9 g/L (95% CI: - 1.6 - - 0.1) and lower average ferritin concentration of - 1045 µg/L (95% CI: - 1983 - - 106) over time. D-dimer and CRP average concentration did not significantly differ, 561 µg/L (- 6212-7334) and 27 mg/L (- 32-86) respectively. Ferritin lost statistical significance, both in sensitivity analysis and after adjustment for fibrinogen and D-dimer. CONCLUSION: Lower average concentrations of fibrinogen over time were associated with the presence of clinical pulmonary thromboembolism in patients at the Intensive Care, whereas D-dimer, CRP and ferritin were not. Lower concentrations over time may indicate the consumption of fibrinogen related to thrombus formation in the pulmonary vessels.

12.
Front Robot AI ; 8: 611866, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1236782

ABSTRACT

In this paper, we design and develop a novel robotic bronchoscope for sampling of the distal lung in mechanically-ventilated (MV) patients in critical care units. Despite the high cost and attributable morbidity and mortality of MV patients with pneumonia which approaches 40%, sampling of the distal lung in MV patients suffering from range of lung diseases such as Covid-19 is not standardised, lacks reproducibility and requires expert operators. We propose a robotic bronchoscope that enables repeatable sampling and guidance to distal lung pathologies by overcoming significant challenges that are encountered whilst performing bronchoscopy in MV patients, namely, limited dexterity, large size of the bronchoscope obstructing ventilation, and poor anatomical registration. We have developed a robotic bronchoscope with 7 Degrees of Freedom (DoFs), an outer diameter of 4.5 mm and inner working channel of 2 mm. The prototype is a push/pull actuated continuum robot capable of dexterous manipulation inside the lung and visualisation/sampling of the distal airways. A prototype of the robot is engineered and a mechanics-based model of the robotic bronchoscope is developed. Furthermore, we develop a novel numerical solver that improves the computational efficiency of the model and facilitates the deployment of the robot. Experiments are performed to verify the design and evaluate accuracy and computational cost of the model. Results demonstrate that the model can predict the shape of the robot in <0.011s with a mean error of 1.76 cm, enabling the future deployment of a robotic bronchoscope in MV patients.

13.
Acute Crit Care ; 36(2): 143-150, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1215557

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Evidence prior to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic suggested that, compared with conventional ventilation strategies, airway pressure release ventilation (APRV) can improve oxygenation and reduce mortality in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome. We aimed to assess the association between APRV use and clinical outcomes among adult patients receiving mechanical ventilation for COVID-19 and hypothesized that APRV use would be associated with improved survival compared with conventional ventilation. METHODS: A total of 25 patients with COVID-19 pneumonitis was admitted to intensive care units (ICUs) for invasive ventilation in Perth, Western Australia, between February and May 2020. Eleven of these patients received APRV. The primary outcome was survival to day 90. Secondary outcomes were ventilation-free survival days to day 90, mechanical complications from ventilation, and number of days ventilated. RESULTS: Patients who received APRV had a lower probability of survival than did those on other forms of ventilation (hazard ratio, 0.17; 95% confidence interval, 0.03-0.89; P=0.036). This finding was independent of indices of severity of illness to predict the use of APRV. Patients who received APRV also had fewer ventilator-free survival days up to 90 days after initiation of ventilation compared to patients who did not receive APRV, and survivors who received APRV had fewer ventilator-free days than survivors who received other forms of ventilation. There were no differences in mechanical complications according to mode of ventilation. CONCLUSIONS: Based on the findings of this study, we urge caution with the use of APRV in COVID-19.

14.
Ann Intensive Care ; 11(1): 63, 2021 Apr 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1202278

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Prone positioning (PP) has been used to improve oxygenation in patients affected by the SARS-CoV-2 disease (COVID-19). Several mechanisms, including lung recruitment and better lung ventilation/perfusion matching, make a relevant rational for using PP. However, not all patients maintain the oxygenation improvement after returning to supine position. Nevertheless, no evidence exists that a sustained oxygenation response after PP is associated to outcome in mechanically ventilated COVID-19 patients. We analyzed data from 191 patients affected by COVID-19-related acute respiratory distress syndrome undergoing PP for clinical reasons. Clinical history, severity scores and respiratory mechanics were analyzed. Patients were classified as responders (≥ median PaO2/FiO2 variation) or non-responders (< median PaO2/FiO2 variation) based on the PaO2/FiO2 percentage change between pre-proning and 1 to 3 h after re-supination in the first prone positioning session. Differences among the groups in physiological variables, complication rates and outcome were evaluated. A competing risk regression analysis was conducted to evaluate if PaO2/FiO2 response after the first pronation cycle was associated to liberation from mechanical ventilation. RESULTS: The median PaO2/FiO2 variation after the first PP cycle was 49 [19-100%] and no differences were found in demographics, comorbidities, ventilatory treatment and PaO2/FiO2 before PP between responders (96/191) and non-responders (95/191). Despite no differences in ICU length of stay, non-responders had a higher rate of tracheostomy (70.5% vs 47.9, P = 0.008) and mortality (53.7% vs 33.3%, P = 0.006), as compared to responders. Moreover, oxygenation response after the first PP was independently associated to liberation from mechanical ventilation at 28 days and was increasingly higher being higher the oxygenation response to PP. CONCLUSIONS: Sustained oxygenation improvement after first PP session is independently associated to improved survival and reduced duration of mechanical ventilation in critically ill COVID-19 patients.

15.
Lancet Respir Med ; 9(2): 139-148, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1199179

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Little is known about the practice of ventilation management in patients with COVID-19. We aimed to describe the practice of ventilation management and to establish outcomes in invasively ventilated patients with COVID-19 in a single country during the first month of the outbreak. METHODS: PRoVENT-COVID is a national, multicentre, retrospective observational study done at 18 intensive care units (ICUs) in the Netherlands. Consecutive patients aged at least 18 years were eligible for participation if they had received invasive ventilation for COVID-19 at a participating ICU during the first month of the national outbreak in the Netherlands. The primary outcome was a combination of ventilator variables and parameters over the first 4 calendar days of ventilation: tidal volume, positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP), respiratory system compliance, and driving pressure. Secondary outcomes included the use of adjunctive treatments for refractory hypoxaemia and ICU complications. Patient-centred outcomes were ventilator-free days at day 28, duration of ventilation, duration of ICU and hospital stay, and mortality. PRoVENT-COVID is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT04346342). FINDINGS: Between March 1 and April 1, 2020, 553 patients were included in the study. Median tidal volume was 6·3 mL/kg predicted bodyweight (IQR 5·7-7·1), PEEP was 14·0 cm H2O (IQR 11·0-15·0), and driving pressure was 14·0 cm H2O (11·2-16·0). Median respiratory system compliance was 31·9 mL/cm H2O (26·0-39·9). Of the adjunctive treatments for refractory hypoxaemia, prone positioning was most often used in the first 4 days of ventilation (283 [53%] of 530 patients). The median number of ventilator-free days at day 28 was 0 (IQR 0-15); 186 (35%) of 530 patients had died by day 28. Predictors of 28-day mortality were gender, age, tidal volume, respiratory system compliance, arterial pH, and heart rate on the first day of invasive ventilation. INTERPRETATION: In patients with COVID-19 who were invasively ventilated during the first month of the outbreak in the Netherlands, lung-protective ventilation with low tidal volume and low driving pressure was broadly applied and prone positioning was often used. The applied PEEP varied widely, despite an invariably low respiratory system compliance. The findings of this national study provide a basis for new hypotheses and sample size calculations for future trials of invasive ventilation for COVID-19. These data could also help in the interpretation of findings from other studies of ventilation practice and outcomes in invasively ventilated patients with COVID-19. FUNDING: Amsterdam University Medical Centers, location Academic Medical Center.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Respiration, Artificial , Aged , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Netherlands , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome
16.
Neurosci Lett ; 749: 135692, 2021 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1196745

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: India has the second largest COVID-19 epidemic in the world as per current estimates. Central and peripheral nervous system involvement in COVID-19 (Neuro COVID-19) has been increasingly identified and reported. This letter is the first report of the spectrum of neurological disorders observed in patients with severe COVID-19 from a resource limited setting like India. Till October 30th 2020, Noble hospital and research center, Pune, India has admitted 2631 patients of COVID-19. Out of these, 423 patients had severe COVID-19. NEUROLOGIC COMPLICATIONS IN SEVERE COVID-19 IN PUNE, INDIA: Of the 423 patients with severe COVID-19, 20 (4.7%) had pre-existing neurologic co-morbidities, with cerebrovascular disease (8 patients) being the most common. Poliomyelitis (4 patients) was also an important co-morbidity associated with severe COVID-19. Bodyache or myalgia (207/423, 49 %) and headache (59/423, 13.9 %) were the most common neurologic symptoms observed in patients. Encephalopathy (22/423, 5.2 %) and new onset large vessel ischemic stroke secondary to cerebral artery thrombosis (5/423, 1.1%) were the most common secondary neurologic complications noted in our cohort. Two cases of COVID-19/central nervous system tuberculosis co-infection were also identified. CHALLENGES IN MANAGEMENT OF NEURO COVID-19 IN INDIA: Various challenges like an overwhelmed health care system, inadequate workforce, lack of exhaustive reporting of symptoms and poor availability of neuroimaging in ventilated COVID-19 patients leads to underestimation of Neuro COVID-19 in resource limited settings like India.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Nervous System Diseases/diagnostic imaging , Severity of Illness Index , Tertiary Care Centers/trends , Tuberculosis, Central Nervous System/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Humans , India/epidemiology , Nervous System Diseases/epidemiology , Tuberculosis, Central Nervous System/epidemiology , Tuberculosis, Central Nervous System/therapy
17.
Crit Care Explor ; 3(3): e0370, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1159674

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To describe sedative and analgesic drug utilization in a cohort of critically ill patients with coronavirus disease 2019 and compare standard sedation with an alternative approach using inhaled isoflurane. DESIGN: This was a retrospective cohort study designed to compare doses of sedatives between ICU patients receiving standard IV sedation and patients receiving mixed sedation including inhaled isoflurane. Data were obtained from electronic medical records. SETTING: ICU at large academic medical center where mechanical ventilation was delivered with Draeger Apollo (Draeger Medical, Telford, PA) anesthesia machines. PATIENTS: Consecutive adult patients (≥ 18 yr) with confirmed coronavirus disease 2019 admitted to ICU between April 2, 2020, and May 4, 2020. INTERVENTIONS: None. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Thirty-five mechanically ventilated patients were included in the study, with a mean (sd) age of 59.4 (12.8) years. Twenty-three patients (65.7%) were men. Seventeen patients (48.6%) received standard IV sedation, whereas 18 (51.4%) also received isoflurane. The mean duration of mechanical ventilation (sd) was 23.3 (11.6) days in the standard sedation group and 23.8 (12.5) days in the isoflurane group. Mean (sd) duration of isoflurane exposure was 5.61 (2.99) days, representing 29.1% of total sedation time (sd, 20.4). Cumulative opioid exposure did not differ between the standard sedation and isoflurane sedation groups (mean morphine milligram equivalent 6668 [sd, 1,346] vs 6678 [sd, 2,000] mg). However, the initiation of isoflurane in patients was associated with decreased utilization of propofol (mean daily amount 3,656 [sd, 1,635] before vs 950 [sd, 1,804] mg during isoflurane) and hydromorphone (mean daily amount 48 [sd, 30] before vs 23 [sd, 27] mg). CONCLUSIONS: In the subjects that received isoflurane, its use was associated with significant decreases in propofol and hydromorphone infusions.

19.
Crit Care Explor ; 3(3): e0372, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1158029

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: About 15% of hospitalized coronavirus disease 2019 patients require ICU admission, and most (80%) of these require invasive mechanical ventilation. Lung-protective ventilation in coronavirus disease 2019 acute respiratory failure may result in severe respiratory acidosis without significant hypoxemia. Low-flow extracorporeal Co2 removal can facilitate lung-protective ventilation and avoid the adverse effects of severe respiratory acidosis. The objective was to evaluate the efficacy of extracorporeal Co2 removal using the Hemolung Respiratory Assist System in correcting severe respiratory acidosis in mechanically ventilated coronavirus disease 2019 patients with severe acute respiratory failure. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort analysis of patients with coronavirus disease 2019 mechanically ventilated with severe hypercapnia and respiratory acidosis and treated with low-flow extracorporeal Co2 removal. SETTING: Eight tertiary ICUs in the United States. PATIENTS: Adult patients supported with the Hemolung Respiratory Assist System from March 1, to September 30, 2020. INTERVENTIONS: Extracorporeal Co2 removal with Hemolung Respiratory Assist System under a Food and Drug Administration emergency use authorization for coronavirus disease 2019. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: The primary outcome was improvement in pH and Paco2 from baseline. Secondary outcomes included survival to decannulation, mortality, time on ventilator, and adverse events. Thirty-one patients were treated with Hemolung Respiratory Assist System with significant improvement in pH and Pco2 in this cohort. Two patients experienced complications that prevented treatment. Of the 29 treated patients, 58% survived to 48 hours post treatment and 38% to hospital discharge. No difference in age or comorbidities were noted between survivors and nonsurvivors. There was significant improvement in pH (7.24 ± 0.12 to 7.35 ± 0.07; p < 0.0001) and Paco2 (79 ± 23 to 58 ± 14; p < 0.0001) from baseline to 24 hours. CONCLUSIONS: In this retrospective case series of 29 patients, we have demonstrated efficacy of extracorporeal Co2 removal using the Hemolung Respiratory Assist System to improve respiratory acidosis in patients with severe hypercapnic respiratory failure due to coronavirus disease 2019.

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