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1.
J Pharm Drug Res ; 3(2): 341-361, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1989782

ABSTRACT

A novel coronavirus designated as SARS-CoV-2 in February 2020 by World Health organization (WHO) was identified as main cause of SARS like pneumonia cases in Wuhan city in Hubei Province of China at the end of 2019. This been recently declared as Global Pandemic by WHO. There is a global emergency to identify potential drugs to treat the SARS-CoV-2. Currently, there is no specific treatment against the new virus. There is a urgency to identifying potential antiviral agents to combat the disease is urgently needed. An effective and quick approach is to test existing antiviral drugs against. Whole genome analysis and alignment carried out using BLASTn, SMART BLAST and WebDSV 2.0 had shown more than 238 ORF's coding for proteins mostly origin from Bat SARS coronavirus and root genomic origin from Archaea. Molecular docking results against protein targets Furin, papain like proteases, RdRp and Spike glycoprotein had shown paritaprevir, ritonavir, entecavir and chloroquine derivatives are the best drugs to inhibit multi targets of coronavirus infection including natural compounds corosolic acid, baicalin and glycyrrhizic acid with minimal inhibitory concentrations. Thus we propose use of paritaprevir, entecavir, ritonavir and chloroquine derivatives as best drug combination along with niacinamide, folic acid and zinc supplements to treat novel coronavirus infection. We also propose use of plant protease inhibitors (PI's) and Anti-IL8, IL-6, IL-2 as future drug models against coronavirus.

2.
Crit Care Explor ; 2(9): e0218, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1795068

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To describe three coronavirus disease 2019 patients suffering from acute respiratory distress syndrome under venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation therapy and tight anticoagulation monitoring presenting a novel pattern of multifocal brain hemorrhage in various degrees in all cerebral and cerebellar lobes. DESIGN: Clinical observation of three patients. Post mortem examinations. SETTING: Two ICUs at the University Hospital Erlangen. PATIENTS: Three patients (medium age 56.6 yr, two male with hypertension and diabetes, one female with no medical history) developed severe acute respiratory distress syndrome on the basis of a severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 infection. All required mechanical ventilation and venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support. INTERVENTIONS: Clinical observation, CT, data extraction from electronic medical records, and post mortem examinations. MAIN RESULTS: We report on an unusual multifocal bleeding pattern in the white matter in three cases with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome due to coronavirus disease 2019 undergoing venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation therapy. Bleeding pattern with consecutive herniation was found in CT scans as well as in neuropathologic post mortem examinations. Frequency for this unusual brain hemorrhage in coronavirus disease 2019 patients with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation therapy at our hospital is currently 50%, whereas bleeding events in extracorporeal membrane oxygenation patients generally occur at 10-15%. CONCLUSIONS: Multifocality and high frequency of the unusual white matter hemorrhage pattern suggest a coherence to coronavirus disease 2019. Neuropathological analyses showed circumscribed thrombotic cerebrovascular occlusions, which eventually led to microvascular and later on macrovascular disseminated bleeding events. However, signs of cerebrovascular inflammation could not be detected. Polymerase chain reaction analyses of brain tissue or cerebrospinal fluid remained negative. Increased susceptibility for fatal bleeding events should be taken into consideration in terms of systemic anticoagulation strategies in coronavirus disease 2019.

3.
Viruses ; 12(5)2020 04 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1726007

ABSTRACT

In January 2020, Chinese health agencies reported an outbreak of a novel coronavirus-2 (CoV-2) which can lead to severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS). The virus, which belongs to the coronavirus family (SARS-CoV-2), was named coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and declared a pandemic by the World Health Organization (WHO). Full-length genome sequences of SARS-CoV-2 showed 79.6% sequence identity to SARS-CoV, with 96% identity to a bat coronavirus at the whole-genome level. COVID-19 has caused over 133,000 deaths and there are over 2 million total confirmed cases as of April 15th, 2020. Current treatment plans are still under investigation due to a lack of understanding of COVID-19. One potential mechanism to slow disease progression is the use of antiviral drugs to either block the entry of the virus or interfere with viral replication and maturation. Currently, antiviral drugs, including chloroquine/hydroxychloroquine, remdesivir, and lopinavir/ritonavir, have shown effective inhibition of SARS-CoV-2 in vitro. Due to the high dose needed and narrow therapeutic window, many patients are experiencing severe side effects with the above drugs. Hence, repurposing these drugs with a proper formulation is needed to improve the safety and efficacy for COVID-19 treatment. Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are a family of natural carriers in the human body. They play a critical role in cell-to-cell communications. EVs can be used as unique drug carriers to deliver protease inhibitors to treat COVID-19. EVs may provide targeted delivery of protease inhibitors, with fewer systemic side effects. More importantly, EVs are eligible for major aseptic processing and can be upscaled for mass production. Currently, the FDA is facilitating applications to treat COVID-19, which provides a very good chance to use EVs to contribute in this combat.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Drug Repositioning , Extracellular Vesicles/chemistry , HIV Protease Inhibitors/administration & dosage , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Betacoronavirus/metabolism , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Drug Approval , Drug Delivery Systems , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2
4.
SN Compr Clin Med ; 2(9): 1436-1443, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1700862

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of a large plaque, novel coronavirus pneumonia (NCP), which also named Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) by the WHO, has detrimentally affected the livelihood and health of people in China. During the spread of COVID-19, colleagues who have been working at the frontline have had to face many new challenges in the treatment and prevention of NCP. Therefore, we have provided suggestions for the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of the novel coronavirus pneumonia in the current epidemic situation based on the latest reports and the experience of doctors treating COVID-19 in our hospital. We recommend lopinavir/ritonavir as the effective drugs for antiviral treatment according to our experience in administering lopinavir/ritonavir to COVID-19 patients and the successful cases of these drugs in treating MERS and SARS, but need more clinical data to prove their efficacy in treating COVID-19.

6.
Curr Pharmacol Rep ; 6(5): 228-240, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1682288

ABSTRACT

The emergence of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2), responsible for causing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), marked the third time in the twenty-first century when a new, highly pathogenic human coronavirus outbreak has led to an epidemic. The COVID-19 epidemic has emerged in late December 2019 in Wuhan city of China and spread rapidly to other parts of the world. This quick spread of SARS-CoV-2 infection to many states across the globe affecting many people has led WHO to declare it a pandemic on March 12, 2020. As of July 4, 2020, more than 523,011 people lost their lives worldwide because of this deadly SARS-CoV-2. The current situation becomes more frightening as no FDA-approved drugs or vaccines are available to treat or prevent SARS-CoV-2 infection. The current therapeutic options for COVID-19 are limited only to supportive measures and non-specific interventions. So, the need of the hour is to search for SARS-CoV-2-specific antiviral treatments and to develop vaccines for SARS-CoV-2. Also, it is equally important to maintain our immunity, and natural products and Ayurvedic medicines are indispensable in this regard. In this review, we discuss recent updates regarding various therapeutic approaches to combat COVID-19 pandemic and enlist the major pipeline drugs and traditional medicines that are under trial for COVID-19. Also, possible mechanisms involved in viral pathogenesis are discussed, which further allow us to understand various drug targets and helps in discovering novel therapeutic approaches for COVID-19. Altogether, the information provided in this review will work as an intellectual groundwork and provides an insight into the ongoing development of various therapeutic agents.

7.
Computation (Basel) ; 8(2)2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1648681

ABSTRACT

Since the outbreak of the 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19), the medical research community is vigorously seeking a treatment to control the infection and save the lives of severely infected patients. The main potential candidates for the control of viruses are virally targeted agents. In this short letter, we report our calculations on the inhibitors for the SARS-CoV-2 3CL protease and the spike protein for the potential treatment of COVID-19. The results show that the most potent inhibitors of the SARS-CoV-2 3CL protease include saquinavir, tadalafil, rivaroxaban, sildenafil, dasatinib, etc. Ergotamine, amphotericin b, and vancomycin are most promising to block the interaction of the SARS-CoV-2 S-protein with human ACE-2.

8.
Eur J Neurol ; 28(10): 3461-3466, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1606253

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Outcomes of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in patients with neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorders (NMOSD) or myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein antibody-associated disease (MOGAD), often treated with immunosuppressive therapies, are still unknown. METHODS: We conducted a multicenter, retrospective, observational cohort study among all French expert centers for neuromyelitis optica and related disorders. Patients with NMOSD or MOGAD included in the study received a confirmed or highly suspected diagnosis of COVID-19 between 1 March 2020 and 30 June 2020. Main outcome was COVID-19 severity score assessed on a seven-point ordinal scale ranging from 1 (not hospitalized with no limitations on activities) to 7 (death). RESULTS: Fifteen cases (mean [SD] age: 39.3 [14.3] years, 11 female) were included. Five patients (33.3%) were hospitalized, all receiving rituximab. A 24-year-old patient with positive aquaporine-4 antibody, with obesity as comorbidity, needed mechanical ventilation. Outpatients were receiving anti-CD20 (5), mycophenolate mofetil (3) or azathioprine (3). They were younger (mean [SD] age: 37.0 [13.4] years), with a longer disease duration (mean [SD]: 8.3 [6.3] years) and had a lower expanded disability severity score (EDSS) score (median [range] EDSS: 2.5 [0-4]) relative to patients requiring hospitalization (mean [SD] age: 44.0 [16.4] years, mean [SD] disease duration: 5.8 [5.5] years, median [range] EDSS: 4 [0-6.5]). CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 outcome was overall favorable in this cohort. Larger international studies are needed to identify risk factors of severe COVID-19; however, we recommend personal protective measures to reduce risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection in this immunocompromised population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neuromyelitis Optica , Adult , Aquaporin 4 , Female , Humans , Neuromyelitis Optica/drug therapy , Neuromyelitis Optica/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Rituximab , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
9.
Lancet Respir Med ; 9(5): 487-497, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1537196

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Lung transplantation is a life-saving treatment for patients with end-stage lung disease; however, it is infrequently considered for patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) attributable to infectious causes. We aimed to describe the course of disease and early post-transplantation outcomes in critically ill patients with COVID-19 who failed to show lung recovery despite optimal medical management and were deemed to be at imminent risk of dying due to pulmonary complications. METHODS: We established a multi-institutional case series that included the first consecutive transplants for severe COVID-19-associated ARDS known to us in the USA, Italy, Austria, and India. De-identified data from participating centres-including information relating to patient demographics and pre-COVID-19 characteristics, pretransplantation disease course, perioperative challenges, pathology of explanted lungs, and post-transplantation outcomes-were collected by Northwestern University (Chicago, IL, USA) and analysed. FINDINGS: Between May 1 and Sept 30, 2020, 12 patients with COVID-19-associated ARDS underwent bilateral lung transplantation at six high-volume transplant centres in the USA (eight recipients at three centres), Italy (two recipients at one centre), Austria (one recipient), and India (one recipient). The median age of recipients was 48 years (IQR 41-51); three of the 12 patients were female. Chest imaging before transplantation showed severe lung damage that did not improve despite prolonged mechanical ventilation and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. The lung transplant procedure was technically challenging, with severe pleural adhesions, hilar lymphadenopathy, and increased intraoperative transfusion requirements. Pathology of the explanted lungs showed extensive, ongoing acute lung injury with features of lung fibrosis. There was no recurrence of SARS-CoV-2 in the allografts. All patients with COVID-19 could be weaned off extracorporeal support and showed short-term survival similar to that of transplant recipients without COVID-19. INTERPRETATION: The findings from our report show that lung transplantation is the only option for survival in some patients with severe, unresolving COVID-19-associated ARDS, and that the procedure can be done successfully, with good early post-transplantation outcomes, in carefully selected patients. FUNDING: National Institutes of Health. VIDEO ABSTRACT.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Critical Illness/therapy , Lung Transplantation/methods , Lung , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Blood Transfusion/methods , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/surgery , Critical Care/methods , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation/methods , Female , Humans , Intraoperative Care/methods , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Lung/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Outcome and Process Assessment, Health Care , Pulmonary Fibrosis/etiology , Pulmonary Fibrosis/pathology , Respiration, Artificial/methods , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/surgery , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
10.
Clin Transl Sci ; 14(6): 2146-2151, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526353

ABSTRACT

Tocilizumab is an IL-6 receptor antagonist with the ability to suppress the cytokine storm in critically ill patients infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). We evaluated patients treated with tocilizumab for a SARS-CoV-2 infection who were admitted between March 13, 2020, and April 16, 2020. This was a multicenter study with data collected by chart review both retrospectively and concurrently. Parameters evaluated included age, sex, race, use of mechanical ventilation (MV), usage of steroids and vasopressors, inflammatory markers, and comorbidities. Early dosing was defined as a tocilizumab dose administered prior to or within 1 day of intubation. Late dosing was defined as a dose administered > 1 day after intubation. In the absence of MV, the timing of the dose was related to the patient's date of admission only. We evaluated 145 patients. The average age was 58.1 years, 64% were men, 68.3% had comorbidities, and 60% received steroid therapy. Disposition of patients was 48.3% discharged and 29.3% died, of which 43.9% were African American. MV was required in 55.9%, of which 34.5% died. Avoidance of MV (P = 0.002) and increased survival (P < 0.001) was statistically associated with early dosing. Tocilizumab therapy was effective at decreasing mortality and should be instituted early in the management of critically ill patients with coronavirus disease 2019) COVID-19).


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/therapy , Cytokine Release Syndrome/therapy , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/virology , Critical Illness/mortality , Critical Illness/therapy , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/mortality , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Severity of Illness Index , Time Factors , Time-to-Treatment , Treatment Outcome
11.
Perfusion ; 36(4): 374-381, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1453006

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome supported with veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation benefit from higher positive end-expiratory pressure combined with conventional ventilation during the early extracorporeal membrane oxygenation period. The role of incremental positive end-expiratory pressure titration in patients with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome supported with veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation remains unclear. This study aimed to determine the preferred method for setting positive end-expiratory pressure in patients with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome on veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed all subjects supported with veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation for severe acute respiratory distress syndrome from 2009 to 2019 in the intensive care units in Tianjin Third Central Hospital. Subjects were divided into two groups according to the positive end-expiratory pressure titration method used: P-V curve (quasi-static pressure-volume curve-guided positive end-expiratory pressure setting) group or Crs (respiratory system compliance-guided positive end-expiratory pressure setting) group. RESULTS: Forty-three subjects were included in the clinical outcome analysis: 20 in the P-V curve group and 23 in the Crs group. Initial positive end-expiratory pressure levels during veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation were similar in both groups. Incidence rates of barotrauma and hemodynamic events were significantly lower in the Crs group (all p < 0.05). Mechanical ventilation duration, intensive care unit length of stay, and hospital length of stay were significantly shorter in the Crs group than the P-V curve group (all p < 0.05). Subjects in the Crs group showed non-significant improvements in the duration of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support and 28-day mortality (p > 0.05). CONCLUSION: Respiratory system compliance-guided positive end-expiratory pressure setting may lead to more optimal clinical outcomes for patients with severe acute respiratory distress syndrome supported by veno-venous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. Moreover, the operation is simple, safe, and convenient in clinical practice.


Subject(s)
Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Humans , Positive-Pressure Respiration , Respiration, Artificial , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Retrospective Studies
12.
Rev Esp Anestesiol Reanim ; 69(1): 48-53, 2022 Jan.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1437566

ABSTRACT

Patients with COVID-19 who are admitted to intensive care unit (ICU) are at high risk of developing secondary infections, including invasive fungal infections such as invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA). The main purpose was to analyse the putative COVID-19 Associated Pulmonary Aspergillosis (CAPA) patients in our setting. In these patients, we performed mycological culture in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) for isolation of Aspergillus sp. We followed the AspICU algorithm to diagnose putative IPA. Moreover, we considered relevant the positivity of galactomannan in BAL. We diagnosed putative IPA in 3 patients. The common features of these 3 patients were: more than 21 days of stay in ICU, severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and treatment with steroids (1 mg/kg per day). Therefore, CAPA has to be systematically considered although a new algorithm to diagnose it is needed to treat patients in early stages in order to avoid catastrophic outcomes.

13.
J Biomol Struct Dyn ; 39(15): 5804-5818, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1390287

ABSTRACT

The sharp spurt in positive cases of novel coronavirus-19 (SARS-CoV-2) worldwide has created a big threat to human. In view to expedite new drug leads for COVID-19, Main Proteases (Mpro) of novel Coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) has emerged as a crucial target for this virus. Nitric oxide (NO) inhibits the replication cycle of SARS-CoV. Inhalation of nitric oxide is used in the treatment of severe acute respiratory syndrome. Herein, we evaluated the phenyl furoxan, a well-known exogenous NO donor to identify the possible potent inhibitors through in silico studies such as molecular docking as per target analysis for candidates bound to substrate binding pocket of SARS-COV-2 Mpro. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of most stable docked complexes (Mpro-22 and Mpro-26) helped to confirm the notable conformational stability of these docked complexes under dynamic state. Furthermore, Molecular mechanics Poisson-Boltzmann surface area (MM-PBSA) calculations revealed energetic contributions of key residues of Mpro in binding with potent furoxan derivatives 22, 26. In the present study to validate the molecular docking, MD simulation and MM-PBSA results, crystal structure of Mpro bound to experimentally known inhibitor X77 was used as control and the obtained results are presented herein. We envisaged that spiro-isoquinolino-piperidine-furoxan moieties can be used as effective ligand for SARS-CoV-2 Mpro inhibition due to the presence of key isoquinolino-piperidine skeleton with additional NO effect.Communicated by Ramaswamy H. Sarma.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Humans , Molecular Docking Simulation , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Nitric Oxide Donors , Oxadiazoles , Peptide Hydrolases , Protease Inhibitors/pharmacology
14.
J Med Virol ; 93(2): 755-759, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1384219

ABSTRACT

Hydroxychloroquine sulfate (HCQ) is being scrutinized for repositioning in the treatment and prevention of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. This antimalarial drug is also chronically used to treat patients with autoimmune diseases. By analyzing the Portuguese anonymized data on private and public based medical prescriptions we have identified all cases chronically receiving HCQ for the management of diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and other autoimmune diseases. Additionally, we have detected all laboratory confirmed cases of SARS-CoV-2 infection and all laboratory confirmed negative cases in the Portuguese population (mandatorily registered in a centrally managed database). Cross linking the two sets of data has allowed us to compare the proportion of HCQ chronic treatment (at least 2 grams per month) in laboratory confirmed cases of SARS-CoV-2 infection with laboratory confirmed negative cases. Out of 26 815 SARS-CoV-2 positive patients, 77 (0.29%) were chronically treated with HCQ, while 1215 (0.36%) out of 333 489 negative patients were receiving it chronically (P = .04). After adjustment for age, sex, and chronic treatment with corticosteroids and/or immunosuppressants, the odds ratio of SARS-CoV-2 infection for chronic treatment with HCQ has been 0.51 (0.37-0.70). Our data suggest that chronic treatment with HCQ confer protection against SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/drug therapy , COVID-19/prevention & control , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/drug therapy , Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis , Adult , Aged , Antimalarials/therapeutic use , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/immunology , Arthritis, Rheumatoid/pathology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Drug Administration Schedule , Drug Repositioning , Female , Humans , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/immunology , Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/pathology , Male , Middle Aged , Odds Ratio , Portugal , Registries , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/immunology
15.
Front Physiol ; 11: 802, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389234

ABSTRACT

We dissect the mechanism of SARS-CoV-2 in human lung host from the initial phase of receptor binding to viral replication machinery. Two independent lung protein interactome were constructed to reveal the signaling process on receptor activation and host protein hijacking machinery in the pathogenesis of virus. Further, we test the functional role of the hubs derived from the interactome. Most hubs proteins were differentially regulated on SARS-CoV-2 infection. Also, the proteins in viral replication hubs were related with cardiovascular disease, diabetes and hypertension confirming the vulnerability and severity of infection in the risk individual. Additionally, the hub proteins were closely linked with other viral infection, including MERS and HCoVs which suggest similar infection pattern in SARS-CoV-2. We identified five hubs that interconnect both networks that show the preparation of optimal environment in the host for viral replication process upon receptor attachment. Interestingly, we propose that seven potential miRNAs, targeting the intermediate phase that connects receptor and viral replication process a better choice as a drug for SARS-CoV-2.

16.
Trials ; 21(1): 828, 2020 Oct 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1388814

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Primary objectives • To assess the time from randomisation until an improvement within 84 days defined as two points on a seven point ordinal scale or live discharge from the hospital in high-risk patients (group 1 to group 4) with SARS-CoV-2 infection requiring hospital admission by infusion of plasma from subjects after convalescence of SARS-CoV-2 infection or standard of care. Secondary objectives • To assess overall survival, and the overall survival rate at 28 56 and 84 days. • To assess SARS-CoV-2 viral clearance and load as well as antibody titres. • To assess the percentage of patients that required mechanical ventilation. • To assess time from randomisation until discharge. TRIAL DESIGN: Randomised, open-label, multicenter phase II trial, designed to assess the clinical outcome of SARS-CoV-2 disease in high-risk patients (group 1 to group 4) following treatment with anti-SARS-CoV-2 convalescent plasma or standard of care. PARTICIPANTS: High-risk patients >18 years of age hospitalized with SARS-CoV-2 infection in 10-15 university medical centres will be included. High-risk is defined as SARS-CoV-2 positive infection with Oxygen saturation at ≤ 94% at ambient air with additional risk features as categorised in 4 groups: • Group 1, pre-existing or concurrent hematological malignancy and/or active cancer therapy (incl. chemotherapy, radiotherapy, surgery) within the last 24 months or less. • Group 2, chronic immunosuppression not meeting the criteria of group 1. • Group 3, age ≥ 50 - 75 years meeting neither the criteria of group 1 nor group 2 and at least one of these criteria: Lymphopenia < 0.8 x G/l and/or D-dimer > 1µg/mL. • Group 4, age ≥ 75 years meeting neither the criteria of group 1 nor group 2. Observation time for all patients is expected to be at least 3 months after entry into the study. Patients receive convalescent plasma for two days (day 1 and day 2) or standard of care. For patients in the standard arm, cross over is allowed from day 10 in case of not improving or worsening clinical condition. Nose/throat swabs for determination of viral load are collected at day 0 and day 1 (before first CP administration) and subsequently at day 2, 3, 5, 7, 10, 14, 28 or until discharge. Serum for SARS-Cov-2 diagnostic is collected at baseline and subsequently at day 3, 7, 14 and once during the follow-up period (between day 35 and day 84). There is a regular follow-up of 3 months. All discharged patients are followed by regular phone calls. All visits, time points and study assessments are summarized in the Trial Schedule (see full protocol Table 1). All participating trial sites will be supplied with study specific visit worksheets that list all assessments and procedures to be completed at each visit. All findings including clinical and laboratory data are documented by the investigator or an authorized member of the study team in the patient's medical record and in the electronic case report forms (eCRFs). INTERVENTION AND COMPARATOR: This trial will analyze the effects of convalescent plasma from recovered subjects with SARS-CoV-2 antibodies in high-risk patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection. Patients at high risk for a poor outcome due to underlying disease, age or condition as listed above are eligible for enrollment. In addition, eligible patients have a confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection and O2 saturation ≤ 94% while breathing ambient air. Patients are randomised to receive (experimental arm) or not receive (standard arm) convalescent plasma in two bags (238 - 337 ml plasma each) from different donors (day 1, day 2). A cross over from the standard arm into the experimental arm is possible after day 10 in case of not improving or worsening clinical condition. MAIN OUTCOMES: Primary endpoints: The main purpose of the study is to assess the time from randomisation until an improvement within 84 days defined as two points on a seven-point ordinal scale or live discharge from the hospital in high-risk patients (group 1 to group 4) with SARS-CoV-2 infection requiring hospital admission by infusion of plasma from subjects after convalescence of a SARS-CoV-2 infection or standard of care. Secondary endpoints: • Overall survival, defined as the time from randomisation until death from any cause 28-day, 56-day and 84-day overall survival rates. • SARS-CoV-2 viral clearance and load as well as antibody titres. • Requirement mechanical ventilation at any time during hospital stay (yes/no). • Time until discharge from randomisation. • Viral load, changes in antibody titers and cytokine profiles are analysed in an exploratory manner using paired non-parametric tests (before - after treatment). RANDOMISATION: Upon confirmation of eligibility (patients must meet all inclusion criteria and must not meet exclusion criteria described in section 5.3 and 5.4 of the full protocol), the clinical site must contact a centralized internet randomization system ( https://randomizer.at/ ). Patients are randomized using block randomisation to one of the two arms, experimental arm or standard arm, in a 1:1 ratio considering a stratification according to the 4 risk groups (see Participants). BLINDING (MASKING): The study is open-label, no blinding will be performed. NUMBERS TO BE RANDOMISED (SAMPLE SIZE): A total number of 174 patients is required for the entire trial, n=87 per group. TRIAL STATUS: Protocol version 1.2 dated 09/07/2020. A recruitment period of approximately 9 months and an overall study duration of approximately 12 months is anticipated. Recruitment of patients starts in the third quarter of 2020. The study duration of an individual patient is planned to be 3 months. After finishing all study-relevant procedures, therapy, and follow-up period, the patient is followed in terms of routine care and treated if necessary. Total trial duration: 18 months Duration of the clinical phase: 12 months First patient first visit (FPFV): 3rd Quarter 2020 Last patient first visit (LPFV): 2nd Quarter 2021 Last patient last visit (LPLV): 3rd Quarter 2021 Trial Report completed: 4th Quarter 2021 TRIAL REGISTRATION: EudraCT Number: 2020-001632-10, https://www.clinicaltrialsregister.eu/ctr-search/trial/2020-001632-10/DE , registered on 04/04/2020. FULL PROTOCOL: The full protocol is attached as an additional file, accessible from the Trials website (Additional file 1). In the interest in expediting dissemination of this material, the familiar formatting has been eliminated; this Letter serves as a summary of the key elements of the full protocol. The study protocol has been reported in accordance with the Standard Protocol Items: Recommendations for Clinical Interventional Trials (SPIRIT) guidelines (Additional file 2). The eCRF is attached (Additional file 3).


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Plasma/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral , Aged , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , Clinical Trials, Phase II as Topic , Convalescence , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Female , Humans , Immunization, Passive/methods , Male , Middle Aged , Monitoring, Physiologic/methods , Multicenter Studies as Topic , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Risk Adjustment , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index
19.
FASEB J ; 34(8): 9832-9842, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1388029

ABSTRACT

To date, the recently discovered SARS-CoV-2 virus has afflicted >6.9 million people worldwide and disrupted the global economy. Development of effective vaccines or treatments for SARS-CoV-2 infection will be aided by a molecular-level understanding of SARS-CoV-2 proteins and their interactions with host cell proteins. The SARS-CoV-2 nucleocapsid (N) protein is highly homologous to the N protein of SARS-CoV, which is essential for viral RNA replication and packaging into new virions. Emerging models indicate that nucleocapsid proteins of other viruses can form biomolecular condensates to spatiotemporally regulate N protein localization and function. Our bioinformatic analyses, in combination with pre-existing experimental evidence, suggest that the SARS-CoV-2 N protein is capable of forming or regulating biomolecular condensates in vivo by interaction with RNA and key host cell proteins. We discuss multiple models, whereby the N protein of SARS-CoV-2 may harness this activity to regulate viral life cycle and host cell response to viral infection.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Nucleocapsid Proteins/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , Binding Sites , Computational Biology , Cytoplasmic Granules/chemistry , Humans , Phosphoproteins/chemistry , Protein Binding , Protein Domains , Protein Kinases/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Virus Assembly , Virus Replication
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