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1.
Crit Care Med ; 48(12): e1332-e1336, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1895840

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Clinical observation suggests that early acute respiratory distress syndrome induced by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 may be "atypical" due to a discrepancy between a relatively unaffected static respiratory system compliance and a significant hypoxemia. This would imply an "atypical" response to the positive end-expiratory pressure. DESIGN: Single-center, unblinded, crossover study. SETTING: ICU of Bari Policlinico Academic Hospital (Italy), dedicated to care patients with confirmed diagnosis of novel coronavirus disease 2019. PATIENTS: Eight patients with early severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 acute respiratory distress syndrome and static respiratory compliance higher than or equal to 50 mL/cm H2O. INTERVENTIONS: We compared a "lower" and a "higher" positive end-expiratory pressure approach, respectively, according to the intervention arms of the acute respiratory distress syndrome network and the positive end-expiratory pressure setting in adults with acute respiratory distress syndrome studies. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Patients were ventilated with the acute respiratory distress syndrome network and, subsequently, with the ExPress protocol. After 1 hour of ventilation, for each protocol, we recorded arterial blood gas, respiratory mechanics, alveolar recruitment, and hemodynamic variables. Comparisons were performed with analysis of variance for repeated measures or Friedman test as appropriate. Positive end-expiratory pressure was increased from 9 ± 3.5 to 17.7 ± 1.7 cm H2O (p < 0.01). Alveolar recruitment was 450 ± 111 mL. Static respiratory system compliance decreased from 58.3 ± 7.6 mL/cm H2O to 47.4 ± 14.5 mL/cm H2O (p = 0.018) and the "stress index" increased from 0.97 ± 0.03 to 1.22 ± 0.07 (p < 0.001). The PaO2/FIO2 ratio increased from 131 ± 22 to 207 ± 41 (p < 0.001), and the PaCO2 increased from 45.9 ± 12.7 to 49.8 ± 13.2 mm Hg (p < 0.001). The cardiac index went from 3.6 ± 0.4 to 2.9 ± 0.6 L/min/m (p = 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggest that the "higher" positive end-expiratory pressure approach in patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 acute respiratory distress syndrome and high compliance improves oxygenation and lung aeration but may result in alveolar hyperinflation and hemodynamic alterations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Positive-Pressure Respiration/methods , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Blood Gas Analysis , Cross-Over Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Respiratory Mechanics/physiology , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Curr Cardiol Rev ; 17(4): e230421189016, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1435702

ABSTRACT

In December 2019, a novel COVID-19 infection caused by SARS-CoV-2 has emerged as a global emergency. In a few months, the pathogen has infected millions of people in the world. Primarily SARS-CoV-2 infects the pulmonary system which ultimately leads to ARDS and lung failure. The majority of patients develop milder symptoms but the infection turns severe in a huge number of people, which ultimately results in enhanced mortality in COVID-19 patients. Co-morbid conditions, primarily cardiovascular complications and diabetes, have been reported to show a strong correlation with COVID-19 severity. Further, the onset of myocardial injury secondary to pulmonary damage has been observed in critically ill patients who have never reported heart-related ailments before. Due to drastic health risks associated with virus infection, the unprecedented disruption in normal business throughout the world has caused economic misery. Apparently, newer treatments are urgently needed to combat the virus particularly to reduce the severity burden. Therefore, understanding the crosstalk between lung and heart during COVID-19 might give us better clarity for early diagnosis followed by appropriate treatment in patients with the likelihood of developing severe symptoms. Accordingly, the present review highlights the potential mechanisms that may explain the crosstalk between lung and heart so that effective treatment/management strategies can be evolved swiftly in this direction.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Heart Diseases , Heart , Heart Diseases/virology , Humans , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Trials ; 22(1): 288, 2021 Apr 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1388815

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The primary objective is to demonstrate that, in patients with PCR-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 resulting in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS), administration of 120mg/kg of body weight of intravenous Prolastin®(plasma-purified alpha-1 antitrypsin) reduces circulating plasma levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6). Secondary objectives are to determine the effects of intravenous Prolastin® on important clinical outcomes including the incidence of adverse events (AEs) and serious adverse events (SAEs). TRIAL DESIGN: Phase 2, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, pilot trial. PARTICIPANTS: The study will be conducted in Intensive Care Units in hospitals across Ireland. Patients with a laboratory-confirmed diagnosis of SARS-CoV-2-infection, moderate to severe ARDS (meeting Berlin criteria for a diagnosis of ARDS with a PaO2/FiO2 ratio <200 mmHg), >18 years of age and requiring invasive or non-invasive mechanical ventilation. All individuals meeting any of the following exclusion criteria at baseline or during screening will be excluded from study participation: more than 96 hours has elapsed from onset of ARDS; age < 18 years; known to be pregnant or breastfeeding; participation in a clinical trial of an investigational medicinal product (other than antibiotics or antivirals) within 30 days; major trauma in the prior 5 days; presence of any active malignancy (other than nonmelanoma skin cancer) which required treatment within the last year; WHO Class III or IV pulmonary hypertension; pulmonary embolism prior to hospital admission within past 3 months; currently receiving extracorporeal life support (ECLS); chronic kidney disease receiving dialysis; severe chronic liver disease with Child-Pugh score > 12; DNAR (Do Not Attempt Resuscitation) order in place; treatment withdrawal imminent within 24 hours; Prisoners; non-English speaking patients or those who do not adequately understand verbal or written information unless an interpreter is available; IgA deficiency. INTERVENTION AND COMPARATOR: Intervention: Either a once weekly intravenous infusion of Prolastin® at 120mg/kg of body weight for 4 weeks or a single dose of Prolastin® at 120mg/kg of body weight intravenously followed by once weekly intravenous infusion of an equal volume of 0.9% sodium chloride for a further 3 weeks. Comparator (placebo): An equal volume of 0.9% sodium chloride intravenously once per week for four weeks. MAIN OUTCOMES: The primary effectiveness outcome measure is the change in plasma concentration of IL-6 at 7 days as measured by ELISA. Secondary outcomes include: safety and tolerability of Prolastin® in the respective groups (as defined by the number of SAEs and AEs); PaO2/FiO2 ratio; respiratory compliance; sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score; mortality; time on ventilator in days; plasma concentration of alpha-1 antitrypsin (AAT) as measured by nephelometry; plasma concentrations of interleukin-1ß (IL-1ß), interleukin-8 (IL-8), interleukin-10 (IL-10), soluble TNF receptor 1 (sTNFR1, a surrogate marker for TNF-α) as measured by ELISA; development of shock; acute kidney injury; need for renal replacement therapy; clinical relapse, as defined by the need for readmission to the ICU or a marked decline in PaO2/FiO2 or development of shock or mortality following a period of sustained clinical improvement; secondary bacterial pneumonia as defined by the combination of radiographic findings and sputum/airway secretion microscopy and culture. RANDOMISATION: Following informed consent/assent patients will be randomised. The randomisation lists will be prepared by the study statistician and given to the unblinded trial personnel. However, the statistician will not be exposed to how the planned treatment will be allocated to the treatment codes. Randomisation will be conducted in a 1:1:1 ratio, stratified by site and age. BLINDING (MASKING): The investigator, treating physician, other members of the site research team and patients will be blinded to treatment allocation. The clinical trial pharmacy personnel and research nurses will be unblinded to facilitate intervention and placebo preparation. The unblinded individuals will keep the treatment information confidential. The infusion bag will be masked at the time of preparation and will be administered via a masked infusion set to maintain blinding. NUMBERS TO BE RANDOMISED (SAMPLE SIZE): A total of 36 patients will be recruited and randomised in a 1:1:1 ratio to each of the trial arms. TRIAL STATUS: In March 2020, version 1.0 of the trial protocol was submitted to the local research ethics committee (REC), Health Research Consent Declaration Committee (HRCDC) and the Health Products regulatory Authority (HPRA). REC approval was granted on April 1st 2020, HPRA approval was granted on April 24th 2020 and the HRCDC provided a conditional declaration on April 17th 2020. In July 2020 a substantial amendment (version 2.0) was submitted to the REC, HRCDC and HPRA. Protocol changes in this amendment included: the addition of trial sites; extending the duration of the trial to 12 months from 3 months; removal of inclusion criteria requiring the need for vasopressors; amendment of randomisation schedule to stratify by age only and not BMI and sex; correction of grammatical error in relation to infusion duration; to allow for inclusion of subjects who may have been enrolled in a clinical trial involving either antibiotics or anti-virals in the past 30 days; to allow for inclusion of subjects who may be currently enrolled in a clinical trial involving either antibiotics or anti-virals; to remove the need for exclusion based on alpha-1 antitrypsin phenotype; removal of mandatory isoelectric focusing of plasma to confirm Pi*MM status at screening; removal of need for mandatory echocardiogram at screening; amendment on procedures around plasma analysis to reflect that this will be conducted at the central site laboratory (as trial is multi-site and no longer single site); wording amended to reflect that interim analysis of cytokine levels taken at 7 days may be conducted. HRCDC approved version 2.0 on September 14th 2020, and HPRA approved on October 22nd 2020. REC approved the substantial amendment on November 23rd. In November 2020, version 3.0 of the trial protocol was submitted to the REC and HPRA. The rationale for this amendment was to allow for patients with moderate to severe ARDS from SARS-CoV-2 with non-invasive ventilation. HPRA approved this amendment on December 1st 2020 and the REC approved the amendment on December 8th 2020. Patient recruitment commenced in April 2020 and the last patient will be recruited to the trial in April 2021. The last visit of the last patient is anticipated to occur in April 2021. At time of writing, patient recruitment is now complete, however follow-up patient visits and data collection are ongoing. TRIAL REGISTRATION: EudraCT 2020-001391-15 (Registered 31 Mar 2020). FULL PROTOCOL: The full protocol (version 3.0 23.11.2020) is attached as an additional file accessible from the Trials website (Additional file 1). In the interest in expediting dissemination of this material, the familiar formatting has been eliminated; this Letter serves as a summary of the key elements of the full protocol. The study protocol has been reported in accordance with the Standard Protocol Items: Recommendations for Clinical Interventional Trials (SPIRIT) guidelines (Additional file 2).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/drug therapy , alpha 1-Antitrypsin/therapeutic use , Double-Blind Method , Humans , Ireland , Pilot Projects , Plasma , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/chemically induced , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/diagnosis , alpha 1-Antitrypsin/administration & dosage
6.
BMJ Open Respir Res ; 7(1)2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1388517

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is the major cause of mortality in patients with SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia. It appears that development of 'cytokine storm' in patients with SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia precipitates progression to ARDS. However, severity scores on admission do not predict severity or mortality in patients with SARS-CoV-2 pneumonia. Our objective was to determine whether patients with SARS-CoV-2 ARDS are clinically distinct, therefore requiring alternative management strategies, compared with other patients with ARDS. We report a single-centre retrospective study comparing the characteristics and outcomes of patients with ARDS with and without SARS-CoV-2. METHODS: Two intensive care unit (ICU) cohorts of patients at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital Birmingham were analysed: SARS-CoV-2 patients admitted between 11 March and 21 April 2020 and all patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) from bacterial or viral infection who developed ARDS between 1 January 2017 and 1 November 2019. All data were routinely collected on the hospital's electronic patient records. RESULTS: A greater proportion of SARS-CoV-2 patients were from an Asian ethnic group (p=0.002). SARS-CoV-2 patients had lower circulating leucocytes, neutrophils and monocytes (p<0.0001), but higher CRP (p=0.016) on ICU admission. SARS-CoV-2 patients required a longer duration of mechanical ventilation (p=0.01), but had lower vasopressor requirements (p=0.016). DISCUSSION: The clinical syndromes and respiratory mechanics of SARS-CoV-2 and CAP-ARDS are broadly similar. However, SARS-CoV-2 patients initially have a lower requirement for vasopressor support, fewer circulating leukocytes and require prolonged ventilation support. Further studies are required to determine whether the dysregulated inflammation observed in SARS-CoV-2 ARDS may contribute to the increased duration of respiratory failure.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Critical Care/methods , Patient Outcome Assessment , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/blood , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , C-Reactive Protein/metabolism , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Leukocytes/metabolism , Male , Middle Aged , Monocytes/metabolism , Neutrophils/metabolism , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Respiratory Mechanics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Time , United Kingdom , Vasoconstrictor Agents/therapeutic use
7.
Clin Hemorheol Microcirc ; 78(2): 199-207, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1352794

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) is a new type of epidemic pneumonia caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The population is generally susceptible to COVID-19, which mainly causes lung injury. Some cases may develop severe acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Currently, ARDS treatment is mainly mechanical ventilation, but mechanical ventilation often causes ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) accompanied by hypercapnia in 14% of patients. Extracorporeal carbon dioxide removal (ECCO2R) can remove carbon dioxide from the blood of patients with ARDS, correct the respiratory acidosis, reduce the tidal volume and airway pressure, and reduce the incidence of VILI. CASE REPORT: Two patients with critical COVID-19 combined with multiple organ failure undertook mechanical ventilation and suffered from hypercapnia. ECCO2R, combined with continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT), was conducted concomitantly. In both cases (No. 1 and 2), the tidal volume and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) were down-regulated before the treatment and at 1.5 hours, one day, three days, five days, eight days, and ten days after the treatment, together with a noticeable decrease in PCO2 and clear increase in PO2, while FiO2 decreased to approximately 40%. In case No 2, compared with the condition before treatment, the PCO2 decreased significantly with down-regulation in the tidal volume and PEEP and improvement in the pulmonary edema and ARDS after the treatment. CONCLUSION: ECCO2R combined with continuous blood purification therapy in patients with COVID-19 who are criti-cally ill and have ARDS and hypercapnia might gain both time and opportunity in the treatment, down-regulate the ventilator parameters, reduce the incidence of VILI and achieve favorable therapeutic outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Carbon Dioxide/isolation & purification , Extracorporeal Circulation/methods , Hemofiltration/methods , Hypercapnia/therapy , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Aged , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Hypercapnia/physiopathology , Hypercapnia/virology , Male , Positive-Pressure Respiration , Respiration, Artificial , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/physiopathology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/virology
8.
Immunity ; 54(7): 1463-1477.e11, 2021 07 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1263294

ABSTRACT

Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), an inflammatory condition with high mortality rates, is common in severe COVID-19, whose risk is reduced by metformin rather than other anti-diabetic medications. Detecting of inflammasome assembly in post-mortem COVID-19 lungs, we asked whether and how metformin inhibits inflammasome activation while exerting its anti-inflammatory effect. We show that metformin inhibited NLRP3 inflammasome activation and interleukin (IL)-1ß production in cultured and alveolar macrophages along with inflammasome-independent IL-6 secretion, thus attenuating lipopolysaccharide (LPS)- and SARS-CoV-2-induced ARDS. By targeting electron transport chain complex 1 and independently of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) or NF-κB, metformin blocked LPS-induced and ATP-dependent mitochondrial (mt) DNA synthesis and generation of oxidized mtDNA, an NLRP3 ligand. Myeloid-specific ablation of LPS-induced cytidine monophosphate kinase 2 (CMPK2), which is rate limiting for mtDNA synthesis, reduced ARDS severity without a direct effect on IL-6. Thus, inhibition of ATP and mtDNA synthesis is sufficient for ARDS amelioration.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Triphosphate/metabolism , DNA, Mitochondrial/biosynthesis , Inflammasomes/drug effects , Metformin/pharmacology , NLR Family, Pyrin Domain-Containing 3 Protein/metabolism , Pneumonia/prevention & control , Animals , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cytokines/genetics , Cytokines/metabolism , DNA, Mitochondrial/metabolism , Humans , Inflammasomes/metabolism , Interleukin-1beta/genetics , Interleukin-1beta/metabolism , Lipopolysaccharides/toxicity , Metformin/therapeutic use , Mice , Nucleoside-Phosphate Kinase/metabolism , Pneumonia/metabolism , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/chemically induced , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
9.
J Investig Med High Impact Case Rep ; 9: 23247096211019557, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1262488

ABSTRACT

An outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2, initially in December 2019 at Wuhan, China, subsequently spread around the world. We describe a case series of COVID-19 patients treated at our academic medical center with focus on cytokine storm and potential therapeutic role of tocilizumab. A 59-year-old female admitted for shortness of breath (SOB), productive cough, fever, and nausea in the setting of COVID-19 pneumonia. Oxygen saturation was 81% necessitating supplemental oxygen. She was transferred to intensive care unit (ICU) for worsening hypoxia; intubated and received tocilizumab following which her oxygen requirements improved. A 52-year-old female admitted from an outside hospital with SOB, intubated for worsening hypoxia, in the setting of COVID-19 pneumonia. She received tocilizumab 400 mg intravenous for 2 doses on ICU admission, with clinical improvement. A 56-year-old female hospitalized with worsening SOB, fever, and cough for 8 days saturating 88% on room air in the setting of COVID-19 pneumonia. Worsening hypoxia necessitated high flow nasal cannula. She was transferred to the ICU where she received 2 doses of tocilizumab 400 mg intravenous. She did not require intubation and was transitioned to nasal cannula. A hyperinflammatory syndrome may cause a life-threatening acute respiratory distress syndrome in patients with COVID-19 pneumonia. Tocilizumab is the first marketed interleukin-6 blocking antibody, and through targeting interleukin-6 receptors likely has a role in treating cytokine storm. We noted clinical improvement of patients treated with tocilizumab.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , Cytokine Release Syndrome/drug therapy , Receptors, Interleukin-6/antagonists & inhibitors , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/drug therapy , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/drug therapy , Critical Care , Cytokine Release Syndrome/diagnostic imaging , Cytokine Release Syndrome/etiology , Female , Humans , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Middle Aged , Oxygen Inhalation Therapy , Pennsylvania , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/diagnostic imaging , SARS-CoV-2 , Trauma Centers
10.
Saudi Med J ; 42(6): 589-611, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1257242

ABSTRACT

Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is considered as a supportive treatment that provides circulatory and ventilatory support and can be thought off as a bridge to organ recovery. Since 2009, it has been applied as a rescue treatment for patients with severe adult respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) mainly due to viral causes. In December 2019, several patients presented with a constellation of symptoms of viral pneumonia in China. A new strain of the corona virus family, called COVID-19, has been discovered to be the cause of this severe mysterious illness that was named severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS­CoV­2). This new virus continued to spread across the globe leading to the World Health Organization announcing it as a pandemic in the early 2020. By the end of March 2021, the number of COVID-19 cases worldwide exceeded 126 million cases. In Saudi Arabia, the first confirmed case of COVID-19 was reported in the 2nd March 2020. By the end of March 2021, the total number of confirmed COVID-19 cases in Saudi Arabia is just above 360,000. In anticipation of the need of ECMO for the treatment of patients with SARS­CoV­2 based on the previous Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus pandemic experience, the Saudi Extra-Corporeal Life Support (ECLS) chapter that is under the umbrella of the Saudi Critical Care Society (SCCS) convened a working group of ECMO experts. The mission of this group was to formulate a guidance for the use of ECMO as a last resort for patients with severe ARDS, especially with COVID-19 based on available evidence. The ECLS-SCCS chapter wanted to generate a document that can be used to simple guide, with a focus on safety, to provide ECMO service for patients with severe ARDS with a special focus on SARS­CoV­2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Adult , Animals , COVID-19/virology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Saudi Arabia
11.
SAGE Open Med ; 9: 20503121211014073, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1247563

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus named severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), which is at the origin of the current pandemic, predominantly manifests with severe respiratory symptoms and a heightened immune response. One characteristic of SARS-CoV-2 is its capacity to induce cytokine storm leading to acute respiratory distress syndrome. Consequently, agents with the ability to regulate the immune response, such as vitamin D, could become tools either for the prevention or the attenuation of the most severe consequences of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Vitamin D has shown antimicrobial as well as anti-inflammatory properties. While SARS-CoV-2 promotes the release of proinflammatory cytokines, vitamin D attenuates the release of at least some of these same molecules. Inflammatory cytokines have been associated with the clinical phenomena of COVID-19 and in particular with its most dangerous complications. Therefore, the goals of this article are as follows: first, present the numerous roles vitamin D plays in modulating the immune response; second, gather data currently available on COVID-19 clinical presentation and its relation to cytokines and similar molecules; third, expose what it is known about how coronaviruses elicit an inflammatory reaction; and fourth, discuss the potential contribution of vitamin D in reducing the risk and severity of COVID-19.

12.
J Neurovirol ; 27(5): 802-805, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1245766

ABSTRACT

Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) is spreading around the world. Patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) typically present fever, cough, and respiratory illnesses. It has been revealed that the comorbidities can turn it into severe types, and the managements meet unpredicted complications. Here, we report a case of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) coincidence with confirmed acute Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). Ten days after admission and therapeutic process, the patient developed autonomic dysfunction. Despite respiratory support and receiving intravenous immunoglobulin, the patient died due to cardiac arrest. Albeit it is yet scientifically doubtful, there are raising concerns toward a possible association between GBS and SARS-CoV-2 infection, demonstrating potential neurological symptoms of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/virology , Aged , Fatal Outcome , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2
13.
J Infect Dis ; 223(9): 1503-1505, 2021 05 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1238202
14.
Microvasc Res ; 137: 104188, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1237818

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has been led to a pandemic emergency. So far, different pathological pathways for SARS-CoV-2 infection have been introduced in which the excess release of pro-inflammatory cytokines (such as interleukin 1 ß [IL-1ß], IL-6, and tumor necrosis factor α [TNFα]) has earned most of the attentions. However, recent studies have identified new pathways with at least the same level of importance as cytokine storm in which endothelial cell (EC) dysfunction is one of them. In COVID-19, two main pathologic phenomena have been seen as a result of EC dysfunction: hyper-coagulation state and pathologic angiogenesis. The EC dysfunction-induced hypercoagulation state seems to be caused by alteration in the levels of different factors such as plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1), von Willebrand factor (vWF) antigen, soluble thrombomodulin, and tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI). As data have shown, these thromboembolic events are associated with severity of disease severity or even death in COVID-19 patients. Other than thromboembolic events, pathologic angiogenesis is among the recent findings. Furthermore, over-expression/higher levels of different proangiogenic factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), hypoxia-inducible factor 1 α (HIF-1α), IL-6, TNF receptor super family 1A and 12, and angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) have been found in the lung biopsies/sera of both survived and non-survived COVID-19 patients. Also, there are some hypotheses regarding the role of nitric oxide in EC dysfunction and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in SARS-CoV-2 infection. It has been demonstrated that different pathways involved in inflammation are generally common with EC dysfunction and angiogenesis. Altogether, considering the common possible upstream pathways in cytokine storm, pathologic angiogenesis, and EC dysfunction, it seems that targeting these molecules (such as nuclear factor κB) could be more effective in the management of patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/physiopathology , Endothelial Cells/metabolism , Neovascularization, Pathologic , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Biomarkers/metabolism , Blood Coagulation , Cytokine Release Syndrome , Humans , Inflammation , Interleukin-1beta/metabolism , Interleukin-6/metabolism , Lipoproteins/metabolism , Nitric Oxide/metabolism , Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor 1/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/metabolism , von Willebrand Factor/metabolism
15.
JMIR Public Health Surveill ; 7(5): e27609, 2021 05 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1234631

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 is known to cause severe bilateral pneumonia and acute respiratory distress syndrome or COVID-19 in patients, which can be debilitating and even fatal. With no drugs or vaccines available yet, a wide range of treatment regimens used are being repurposed. The need of the hour is to analyze various currently available regimens and devise a treatment plan that is most effective for COVID-19. Here we describe the case of a 68-year-old man with hypertension and diabetes, exhibiting symptoms of cough and shortness of breath, who presented at the emergency department of our hospital. Chest computed tomography revealed bilateral ground glass opacities that were indicative of COVID-19, and a computed tomography score of 24 was indicative of severe pulmonary pneumonia. He tested positive for COVID-19. His treatment regimen included the use of convalescent plasma, oxygen therapy, steroids, high-dose antibiotics, broad-spectrum antiviral remdesivir, and anti-interleukin-6 monoclonal antibody (Tocilizumab) at various stages of the disease. Oxygen supplementation was required at the time of admission. The patient initially developed a cytokine release storm, and oxygen supplementation was initiated to manage his condition. Supportive care and multiple treatment regimens were used to successfully recover the patient's health. With a rapid increase in number of confirmed cases worldwide, COVID-19 has become a major challenge to our health care system. With no available vaccines currently, the establishment of a combination of therapeutic drugs that effectively reduce disease progression is of utmost importance.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Adenosine Monophosphate/therapeutic use , Aged , Alanine/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/virology , Cytokine Release Syndrome , Drug Therapy, Combination , Humans , Immunization, Passive , Male , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Med Hypotheses ; 146: 110421, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1233540

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Infection with SARS-CoV-2 is responsible for the COVID-19 crisis affecting the whole world. This virus can provoke acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) leading to overcrowed the intensive care unit (ICU). Over the last months, worldwide experience demonstrated that the ARDS in COVID-19 patients are in many ways "atypical". The mortality rate in ventilated patients is high despite the application of the gold standard treatment (protective ventilation, curare, prone position, inhaled NO). Several studies suggested that the SARS-CoV-2 could interact negatively on red blood cell homeostasis. Furthermore, SarsCov2 creates Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS), which are toxic and generate endothelial dysfunction. Hypothesis/objective(s) We hypothesis that HEMO2Life® administrated intravenously is safe and could help symptomatically the patient condition. It would increase arterial oxygen content despite lung failure and allow better tissue oxygenation control. The use of HEMO2Life® is also interesting due to its anti-oxidative effect preventing cytokine storm induced by the SARS-CoV-2. Evaluation of the hypothesis: Hemarina is based on the properties of the hemoglobin of the Arenicola marina sea-worm (HEMO2Life®). This extracellular hemoglobin has an oxygen capacity 40 times greater than the hemoglobin of vertebrates. Furthermore, the size of this molecule is 250 times smaller than a human red blood cell, allowing it to diffuse in all areas of the microcirculation, without diffusing outside the vascular sector. It possesses an antioxidative property du a Superoxide Dismutase Activity. This technology has been the subject of numerous publications and HEMO2Life® was found to be well-tolerated and did not induce toxicity. It was administered intravenously to hamsters and rats, and showed no acute effect on heart rate and blood pressure and did not cause microvascular vasoconstriction. In preclinical in vivo models (mice, rats, and dogs), HEMO2Life® has enabled better tissue oxygenation, especially in the brain. This molecule has already been used in humans in organ preservation solutions and the patients showed no abnormal clinical signs. CONSEQUENCES OF THE HYPOTHESIS: The expected benefits of HEMO2Life® for COVID-19 patients are improved survival, avoidance of tracheal intubation, shorter oxygen supplementation, and the possibility of treating a larger number of patients as molecular respirator without to use an invasive machine.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , Hemoglobins/therapeutic use , Hypoxia/etiology , Hypoxia/therapy , Models, Biological , Oxygen/administration & dosage , Animals , COVID-19/physiopathology , Cricetinae , Dogs , Hemoglobins/administration & dosage , Hemoglobins/metabolism , Humans , Hypoxia/physiopathology , Injections, Intravenous , Mice , Oxidative Stress/drug effects , Oxygen/metabolism , Pandemics , Rats , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Pathogens ; 10(5)2021 May 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1224096

ABSTRACT

The pathogenesis of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), is still not fully unraveled. Though preventive vaccines and treatment methods are out on the market, a specific cure for the disease has not been discovered. Recent investigations and research studies primarily focus on the immunopathology of the disease. A healthy immune system responds immediately after viral entry, causing immediate viral annihilation and recovery. However, an impaired immune system causes extensive systemic damage due to an unregulated immune response characterized by the hypersecretion of chemokines and cytokines. The elevated levels of cytokine or hypercytokinemia leads to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) along with multiple organ damage. Moreover, the immune response against SARS-CoV-2 has been linked with race, gender, and age; hence, this viral infection's outcome differs among the patients. Many therapeutic strategies focusing on immunomodulation have been tested out to assuage the cytokine storm in patients with severe COVID-19. A thorough understanding of the diverse signaling pathways triggered by the SARS-CoV-2 virus is essential before contemplating relief measures. This present review explains the interrelationships of hyperinflammatory response or cytokine storm with organ damage and the disease severity. Furthermore, we have thrown light on the diverse mechanisms and risk factors that influence pathogenesis and the molecular pathways that lead to severe SARS-CoV-2 infection and multiple organ damage. Recognition of altered pathways of a dysregulated immune system can be a loophole to identify potential target markers. Identifying biomarkers in the dysregulated pathway can aid in better clinical management for patients with severe COVID-19 disease. A special focus has also been given to potent inhibitors of proinflammatory cytokines, immunomodulatory and immunotherapeutic options to ameliorate cytokine storm and inflammatory responses in patients affected with COVID-19.

18.
Nutr Diet ; 77(4): 426-436, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1221530

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) results from severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). The clinical features and subsequent medical treatment, combined with the impact of a global pandemic, require specific nutritional therapy in hospitalised adults. This document aims to provide Australian and New Zealand clinicians with guidance on managing critically and acutely unwell adult patients hospitalised with COVID-19. These recommendations were developed using expert consensus, incorporating the documented clinical signs and metabolic processes associated with COVID-19, the literature from other respiratory illnesses, in particular acute respiratory distress syndrome, and published guidelines for medical management of COVID-19 and general nutrition and intensive care. Patients hospitalised with COVID-19 are likely to have preexisting comorbidities, and the ensuing inflammatory response may result in increased metabolic demands, protein catabolism, and poor glycaemic control. Common medical interventions, including deep sedation, early mechanical ventilation, fluid restriction, and management in the prone position, may exacerbate gastrointestinal dysfunction and affect nutritional intake. Nutrition care should be tailored to pandemic capacity, with early gastric feeding commenced using an algorithm to provide nutrition for the first 5-7 days in lower-nutritional-risk patients and individualised care for high-nutritional-risk patients where capacity allows. Indirect calorimetry should be avoided owing to potential aerosol exposure and therefore infection risk to healthcare providers. Use of a volume-controlled, higher-protein enteral formula and gastric residual volume monitoring should be initiated. Careful monitoring, particularly after intensive care unit stay, is required to ensure appropriate nutrition delivery to prevent muscle deconditioning and aid recovery. The infectious nature of SARS-CoV-2 and the expected high volume of patient admissions will require contingency planning to optimise staffing resources including upskilling, ensure adequate nutrition supplies, facilitate remote consultations, and optimise food service management. These guidelines provide recommendations on how to manage the aforementioned aspects when providing nutrition support to patients during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic.

19.
BMC Infect Dis ; 21(1): 412, 2021 May 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1216882

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since the outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 in December 2019, more than 8 million cases have occurred worldwide as of June 16, 2020. However, it is important to distinguish COVID-19 from other respiratory infectious diseases, such as influenza. Here, we comparatively described the clinical characteristics of children with COVID-19 and paediatric patients with influenza. METHODS: In this retrospective, single-centre study, we reviewed the electronic medical records of 585 paediatric patients with COVID-19 or influenza in Wuhan Children's Hospital, China. Clinical and epidemiological characteristics, laboratory findings, and clinical outcomes were comparatively analysed. RESULTS: The median ages were 6.96 years (IQR, 2-10.81) for children with confirmed COVID-19, 2.67 years (IQR, 1.03-15.25) for those with influenza A and 3.67 years (IQR, 1.62-5.54) for those with influenza B. Fever was a symptom in 84 (34.7%) COVID-19 cases, 132 (70.21%) influenza A cases and 111 (74.50%) influenza B cases. The median length of stay (LOS) was 11 (8-15) days for paediatric COVID-19 patients, 4 (3-6) days for influenza A patients and 5 (3-6) days for influenza B patients. Twenty-six (13.98%) influenza A patients and 18 (12.59%) influenza B patients presented with decreased white blood cell counts, while 13 (5.33%) COVID-19 patients presented with decreased white blood cell counts. Eight (3.28%) COVID-19 patients, 23 (12.71%) influenza A patients and 21 (14.79%) influenza B patients experienced lymphocytopenia. Acute cardiac injury occurred in 18 (7.29%) COVID-19 patients, while 37 (19.68%) influenza A and 27 (18.12%) influenza B patients had acute cardiac injury. CONCLUSION: In this study, the illnesses of children with COVID-19 were demonstrated to be less severe than those of paediatric patients with influenza, and COVID-19 patients had milder illness and fewer complications.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/etiology , Influenza, Human/drug therapy , Influenza, Human/etiology , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Child, Hospitalized , Child, Preschool , China/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Female , Fever/epidemiology , Hospitals, Pediatric , Humans , Infant , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , Length of Stay , Lymphopenia/epidemiology , Lymphopenia/virology , Male , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/drug therapy , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/epidemiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/etiology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/virology , Retrospective Studies
20.
J Pediatric Infect Dis Soc ; 10(4): 543-546, 2021 Apr 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1211412

ABSTRACT

Down syndrome (DS) predisposes to severe immunologic reaction secondary to infectious triggers. Here, we report a pediatric DS patient with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) who developed a hyperinflammatory syndrome, severe acute respiratory distress syndrome, and secondary hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis requiring pediatric intensive care unit admission and treatment with steroids, intravenous immunoglobulin, and remdesivir. Investigations into genetic susceptibilities for COVID-19 and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2)-associated complications warrant systematic clinical and scientific studies. We report a pediatric Down syndrome patient with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) who developed secondary hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis requiring treatment with steroids, intravenous immunoglobulin, and remdesivir. Investigations into genetic susceptibilities for COVID-19-associated complications warrant systematic clinical and scientific studies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Down Syndrome/complications , Lymphohistiocytosis, Hemophagocytic/virology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/virology , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine Monophosphate/therapeutic use , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Testing , Child, Preschool , Critical Care , Genetic Predisposition to Disease , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Humans , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/therapeutic use , Lymphohistiocytosis, Hemophagocytic/diagnosis , Lymphohistiocytosis, Hemophagocytic/drug therapy , Male , Prednisolone/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2 , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/diagnosis , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/drug therapy
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