Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 7 de 7
Filter
1.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(3): e216315, 2021 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1384067

ABSTRACT

Importance: Nursing home residents account for approximately 40% of deaths from SARS-CoV-2. Objective: To identify risk factors for SARS-CoV-2 incidence, hospitalization, and mortality among nursing home residents in the US. Design, Setting, and Participants: This retrospective longitudinal cohort study was conducted in long-stay residents aged 65 years or older with fee-for-service Medicare residing in 15 038 US nursing homes from April 1, 2020, to September 30, 2020. Data were analyzed from November 22, 2020, to February 10, 2021. Main Outcomes and Measures: The main outcome was risk of diagnosis with SARS-CoV-2 (per International Statistical Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision, Clinical Modification [ICD-10-CM] codes) by September 30 and hospitalization or death within 30 days after diagnosis. Three-level (resident, facility, and county) logistic regression models and competing risk models conditioned on nursing home facility were used to determine association of patient characteristics with outcomes. Results: Among 482 323 long-stay residents included, the mean (SD) age was 82.7 (9.2) years, with 326 861 (67.8%) women, and 383 838 residents (79.6%) identifying as White. Among 137 119 residents (28.4%) diagnosed with SARS-CoV-2 during follow up, 29 204 residents (21.3%) were hospitalized, and 26 384 residents (19.2%) died within 30 days. Nursing homes explained 37.2% of the variation in risk of infection, while county explained 23.4%. Risk of infection increased with increasing body mass index (BMI; calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared) (eg, BMI>45 vs BMI 18.5-25: adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 1.19; 95% CI, 1.15-1.24) but varied little by other resident characteristics. Risk of hospitalization after SARS-CoV-2 increased with increasing BMI (eg, BMI>45 vs BMI 18.5-25: aHR, 1.40; 95% CI, 1.28-1.52); male sex (aHR, 1.32; 95% CI, 1.29-1.35); Black (aHR, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.24-1.32), Hispanic (aHR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.15-1.26), or Asian (aHR, 1.46; 95% CI, 1.36-1.57) race/ethnicity; impaired functional status (eg, severely impaired vs not impaired: aHR, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.10-1.22); and increasing comorbidities, such as renal disease (aHR, 1.21; 95% CI, 1.18-1.24) and diabetes (aHR, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.13-1.18). Risk of mortality increased with age (eg, age >90 years vs 65-70 years: aHR, 2.55; 95% CI, 2.44-2.67), impaired cognition (eg, severely impaired vs not impaired: aHR, 1.79; 95% CI, 1.71-1.86), and functional impairment (eg, severely impaired vs not impaired: aHR, 1.94; 1.83-2.05). Conclusions and Relevance: These findings suggest that among long-stay nursing home residents, risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection was associated with county and facility of residence, while risk of hospitalization and death after SARS-CoV-2 infection was associated with facility and individual resident characteristics. For many resident characteristics, there were substantial differences in risk of hospitalization vs mortality. This may represent resident preferences, triaging decisions, or inadequate recognition of risk of death.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Homes for the Aged , Hospitalization , Nursing Homes , Pandemics , Severity of Illness Index , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Body Mass Index , COVID-19/mortality , Comorbidity , Female , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Physical Functional Performance , Residence Characteristics , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Sex Factors , United States
2.
Clin Infect Dis ; 73(Suppl 1): S58-S64, 2021 07 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1315676

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) testing remains essential for early identification and clinical management of cases. We compared the diagnostic performance of 3 specimen types for characterizing SARS-CoV-2 in infected nursing home residents. METHODS: A convenience sample of 17 residents were enrolled within 15 days of first positive SARS-CoV-2 result by real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and prospectively followed for 42 days. Anterior nasal swabs (AN), oropharyngeal swabs (OP), and saliva specimens (SA) were collected on the day of enrollment, every 3 days for the first 21 days, and then weekly for 21 days. Specimens were tested for presence of SARS-CoV-2 RNA using RT-PCR and replication-competent virus by viral culture. RESULTS: Comparing the 3 specimen types collected from each participant at each time point, the concordance of paired RT-PCR results ranged from 80% to 88%. After the first positive result, SA and OP were RT-PCR-positive for ≤48 days; AN were RT-PCR-positive for ≤33 days. AN had the highest percentage of RT-PCR-positive results (21/26 [81%]) when collected ≤10 days of participants' first positive result. Eleven specimens were positive by viral culture: 9 AN collected ≤19 days following first positive result and 2 OP collected ≤5 days following first positive result. CONCLUSIONS: AN, OP, and SA were effective methods for repeated testing in this population. More AN than OP were positive by viral culture. SA and OP remained RT-PCR-positive longer than AN, which could lead to unnecessary interventions if RT-PCR detection occurred after viral shedding has likely ceased.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Arkansas , Humans , Nursing Homes , RNA, Viral/genetics
3.
Age Ageing ; 50(3): 641-648, 2021 05 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1217804

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Frail older persons may have an atypical presentation of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The value of real-time reverse-transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) testing for identifying severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) nursing homes (NHs) residents is not known. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether (i) atypical symptoms may predict rRT-PCR results and (ii) rRT-PCR results may predict immunisation against SARS-CoV-2 in NH residents. DESIGN: A retrospective longitudinal study. SETTING: Eight NHs with at least 10 rRT-PCR-positive residents. SUBJECTS: A total of 456 residents. METHODS: Typical and atypical symptoms recorded in residents' files during the 14 days before and after rRT-PCR testing were analysed. Residents underwent blood testing for IgG-SARS-CoV-2 nucleocapsid protein 6 to 8 weeks after testing. Univariate and multivariate analyses compared symptoms and immunisation rates in rRT-PCR-positive and negative residents. RESULTS: A total of 161 residents had a positive rRT-PCR (35.3%), 17.4% of whom were asymptomatic before testing. Temperature >37.8°C, oxygen saturation <90%, unexplained anorexia, behavioural change, exhaustion, malaise and falls before testing were independent predictors of a further positive rRT-PCR. Among the rRT-PCR-positive residents, 95.2% developed SARS-CoV-2 antibodies vs 7.6% in the rRT-PCR-negative residents. Among the residents with a negative rRT-PCR, those who developed SARS-CoV-2 antibodies more often had typical or atypical symptoms (P = 0.02 and <0.01, respectively). CONCLUSION: This study supports a strategy based on (i) testing residents with typical or unexplained atypical symptoms for an early identification of the first SARS-CoV-2 cases, (ii) rT-PCR testing for identifying COVID-19 residents, (iii) repeated wide-facility testing (including asymptomatic cases) as soon as a resident is tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 and (iv) implementing SARS-CoV-2 infection control measures in rRT-PCR-negative residents when they have unexplained typical or atypical symptoms.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control , Immunization , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Accidental Falls , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anorexia , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing , False Negative Reactions , False Positive Reactions , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Nursing Homes , Pandemics , Polymerase Chain Reaction , Retrospective Studies , Sensitivity and Specificity , Serologic Tests/methods
4.
Open Forum Infect Dis ; 8(3): ofab048, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1135878

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To estimate the infectious period of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) in older adults with underlying conditions, we assessed duration of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) symptoms, reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) positivity, and culture positivity among nursing home residents. METHODS: We enrolled residents within 15 days of their first positive SARS-CoV-2 test (diagnosis) at an Arkansas facility from July 7 to 15, 2020 and instead them for 42 days. Every 3 days for 21 days and then weekly, we assessed COVID-19 symptoms, collected specimens (oropharyngeal, anterior nares, and saliva), and reviewed medical charts. Blood for serology was collected on days 0, 6, 12, 21, and 42. Infectivity was defined by positive culture. Duration of culture positivity was compared with duration of COVID-19 symptoms and RT-PCR positivity. Data were summarized using measures of central tendency, frequencies, and proportions. RESULTS: We enrolled 17 of 39 (44%) eligible residents. Median participant age was 82 years (range, 58-97 years). All had ≥3 underlying conditions. Median duration of RT-PCR positivity was 22 days (interquartile range [IQR], 8-31 days) from diagnosis; median duration of symptoms was 42 days (IQR, 28-49 days). Of 9 (53%) participants with any culture-positive specimens, 1 (11%) severely immunocompromised participant remained culture-positive 19 days from diagnosis; 8 of 9 (89%) were culture-positive ≤8 days from diagnosis. Seroconversion occurred in 12 of 12 (100%) surviving participants with ≥1 blood specimen; all participants were culture-negative before seroconversion. CONCLUSIONS: Duration of infectivity was considerably shorter than duration of symptoms and RT-PCR positivity. Severe immunocompromise may prolong SARS-CoV-2 infectivity. Seroconversion indicated noninfectivity in this cohort.

5.
JAMA Intern Med ; 181(4): 439-448, 2021 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1006405

ABSTRACT

Importance: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has severely affected nursing homes. Vulnerable nursing home residents are at high risk for adverse outcomes, but improved understanding is needed to identify risk factors for mortality among nursing home residents. Objective: To identify risk factors for 30-day all-cause mortality among US nursing home residents with COVID-19. Design, Setting, and Participants: This cohort study was conducted at 351 US nursing homes among 5256 nursing home residents with COVID-19-related symptoms who had severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection confirmed by polymerase chain reaction testing between March 16 and September 15, 2020. Exposures: Resident-level characteristics, including age, sex, race/ethnicity, symptoms, chronic conditions, and physical and cognitive function. Main Outcomes and Measures: Death due to any cause within 30 days of the first positive SARS-CoV-2 test result. Results: The study included 5256 nursing home residents (3185 women [61%]; median age, 79 years [interquartile range, 69-88 years]; and 3741 White residents [71%], 909 Black residents [17%], and 586 individuals of other races/ethnicities [11%]) with COVID-19. Compared with residents aged 75 to 79 years, the odds of death were 1.46 (95% CI, 1.14-1.86) times higher for residents aged 80 to 84 years, 1.59 (95% CI, 1.25-2.03) times higher for residents aged 85 to 89 years, and 2.14 (95% CI, 1.70-2.69) times higher for residents aged 90 years or older. Women had lower risk for 30-day mortality than men (odds ratio [OR], 0.69 [95% CI, 0.60-0.80]). Two comorbidities were associated with mortality: diabetes (OR, 1.21 [95% CI, 1.05-1.40]) and chronic kidney disease (OR, 1.33 [95%, 1.11-1.61]). Fever (OR, 1.66 [95% CI, 1.41-1.96]), shortness of breath (OR, 2.52 [95% CI, 2.00-3.16]), tachycardia (OR, 1.31 [95% CI, 1.04-1.64]), and hypoxia (OR, 2.05 [95% CI, 1.68-2.50]) were also associated with increased risk of 30-day mortality. Compared with cognitively intact residents, the odds of death among residents with moderate cognitive impairment were 2.09 (95% CI, 1.68-2.59) times higher, and the odds of death among residents with severe cognitive impairment were 2.79 (95% CI, 2.14-3.66) times higher. Compared with residents with no or limited impairment in physical function, the odds of death among residents with moderate impairment were 1.49 (95% CI, 1.18-1.88) times higher, and the odds of death among residents with severe impairment were 1.64 (95% CI, 1.30-2.08) times higher. Conclusions and Relevance: In this cohort study of US nursing home residents with COVID-19, increased age, male sex, and impaired cognitive and physical function were independently associated with mortality. Understanding these risk factors can aid in the development of clinical prediction models of mortality in this population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Nursing Homes , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , Cohort Studies , Female , Health Status , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Risk Factors , Sensitivity and Specificity , Sex Factors , Survival Rate , United States
6.
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen ; 140(11)2020 08 18.
Article in English, Norwegian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-724817

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Nursing home residents are generally old and frail, and at high risk that COVID-19 will take a serious course. Outbreaks of COVID-19 have not previously been described in Norway, and it is important to identify mechanisms for spread of the infection and course of disease for nursing home residents with this pandemic disease. MATERIAL AND METHOD: We included residents from three nursing homes with outbreaks of COVID-19 in a retrospective observational study, and we retrieved information on the number of staff for whom SARS-CoV-2 was confirmed or who were placed in quarantine. We present resident characteristics, course of disease and mortality associated with COVID-19 in the nursing homes, as well as providing a brief description of the outbreaks. RESULTS: Forty residents were included, 26 of whom were women. The average age was 86.2 years. Thirty-seven of the residents had atypical symptoms, nine of them were asymptomatic at the time of diagnosis, and 21 died during the coronavirus infection. Contact tracing indicated that the outbreaks may have originated from staff in the pre-symptomatic or early and mild phase of the disease. SARS-CoV-2 was detected in forty-two staff members, and a further 115 were placed in quarantine. INTERPRETATION: Many residents had atypical disease presentation, and the mortality from COVID-19 was high. Spread of infection may have originated from staff, also before they displayed obvious symptoms, and contributed to extensive spread of SARS-CoV-2 in the three nursing homes.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Homes for the Aged/statistics & numerical data , Nursing Homes/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Aged, 80 and over , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Disease Outbreaks , Female , Humans , Male , Norway/epidemiology , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
7.
J Am Med Dir Assoc ; 21(7): 895-899.e1, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-591519

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Many nursing home residents infected with SARS-CoV-2 fail to be identified with standard screening for the associated COVID-19 syndrome. Current nursing home COVID-19 screening guidance includes assessment for fever, defined as a temperature of at least 38.0°C. The objective of this study was to describe the temperature changes before and after universal testing for SARS-CoV-2 in nursing home residents. DESIGN: Cohort study. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: The Veterans Administration (VA) operates 134 Community Living Centers (CLC), similar to nursing homes, that house residents who cannot live independently. VA guidance to CLCs directed daily clinical screening for COVID-19 that included temperature assessment. MEASURES: All CLC residents (n = 7325) underwent SARS-CoV-2 testing. We report the temperature in the window of 14 days before and after universal SARS-CoV-2 testing among CLC residents. Baseline temperature was calculated for 5 days before the study window. RESULTS: SARS-CoV-2 was identified in 443 (6.0%) residents. The average maximum temperature in SARS-CoV-2-positive residents was 37.66 (0.69) compared with 37.11 (0.36) (P = .001) in SARS-CoV-2-negative residents. Temperatures in those with SARS-CoV-2 began rising 7 days before testing and remained elevated during the 14-day follow-up. Among SARS-CoV-2-positive residents, only 26.6% (n = 118) met the fever threshold of 38.0°C during the survey period. Most residents (62.5%, n = 277) with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 did experience 2 or more 0.5°C elevations above their baseline values. One cohort of SARS-CoV-2 residents' (20.3%, n = 90) temperatures never deviated >0.5°C from baseline. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS: A single screening for temperature is unlikely to detect nursing home residents with SARS-CoV-2. Repeated temperature measurement with a patient-derived baseline can increase sensitivity. The current fever threshold as a screening criteria for SARS-CoV-2 infection should be reconsidered.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Fever/diagnosis , Mass Screening/methods , Nursing Homes/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Skilled Nursing Facilities/organization & administration , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Body Temperature/physiology , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/methods , Cohort Studies , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control , Early Diagnosis , Female , Fever/epidemiology , Humans , Infection Control , Male , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Thermometers/statistics & numerical data , United States , Veterans
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL