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1.
PLoS One ; 16(4): e0250853, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1833535

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Infection by SARS-CoV-2 in domestic animals has been related to close contact with humans diagnosed with COVID-19. Objectives: To assess the exposure, infection, and persistence by SARS-CoV-2 of dogs and cats living in the same households of humans that tested positive for SARS-CoV-2, and to investigate clinical and laboratory alterations associated with animal infection. METHODS: Animals living with COVID-19 patients were longitudinally followed and had nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal and rectal swabs collected and tested for SARS-CoV-2. Additionally, blood samples were collected for laboratory analysis, and plaque reduction neutralization test (PRNT90) to investigate specific SARS-CoV-2 antibodies. RESULTS: Between May and October 2020, 39 pets (29 dogs and 10 cats) of 21 patients were investigated. Nine dogs (31%) and four cats (40%) from 10 (47.6%) households were infected with or seropositive for SARS-CoV-2. Animals tested positive from 11 to 51 days after the human index COVID-19 case onset of symptoms. Three dogs tested positive twice within 14, 30, and 31 days apart. SARS-CoV-2 neutralizing antibodies were detected in one dog (3.4%) and two cats (20%). In this study, six out of thirteen animals either infected with or seropositive for SARS-CoV-2 have developed mild but reversible signs of the disease. Using logistic regression analysis, neutering, and sharing bed with the ill owner were associated with pet infection. CONCLUSIONS: The presence and persistence of SARS-CoV-2 infection have been identified in dogs and cats from households with human COVID-19 cases in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. People with COVID-19 should avoid close contact with their pets during the time of their illness.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/veterinary , Pets/virology , Animals , Animals, Domestic/virology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Brazil/epidemiology , Cat Diseases , Cats , Dog Diseases , Dogs , Longitudinal Studies , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity
2.
PLoS One ; 16(4): e0250319, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1833525

ABSTRACT

Projections of the stage of the Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome-Coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic and local, regional and national public health policies to limit coronavirus spread as well as "reopen" cities and states, are best informed by serum neutralizing antibody titers measured by reproducible, high throughput, and statically credible antibody (Ab) assays. To date, a myriad of Ab tests, both available and FDA authorized for emergency, has led to confusion rather than insight per se. The present study reports the results of a rapid, point-in-time 1,000-person cohort study using serial blood donors in the New York City metropolitan area (NYC) using multiple serological tests, including enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) and high throughput serological assays (HTSAs). These were then tested and associated with assays for neutralizing Ab (NAb). Of the 1,000 NYC blood donor samples in late June and early July 2020, 12.1% and 10.9% were seropositive using the Ortho Total Ig and the Abbott IgG HTSA assays, respectively. These serological assays correlated with neutralization activity specific to SARS-CoV-2. The data reported herein suggest that seroconversion in this population occurred in approximately 1 in 8 blood donors from the beginning of the pandemic in NYC (considered March 1, 2020). These findings deviate with an earlier seroprevalence study in NYC showing 13.7% positivity. Collectively however, these data demonstrate that a low number of individuals have serologic evidence of infection during this "first wave" and suggest that the notion of "herd immunity" at rates of ~60% or higher are not near. Furthermore, the data presented herein show that the nature of the Ab-based immunity is not invariably associated with the development of NAb. While the blood donor population may not mimic precisely the NYC population as a whole, rapid assessment of seroprevalence in this cohort and serial reassessment could aid public health decision making.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Blood Donors , COVID-19/immunology , Cohort Studies , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay/methods , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Male , Middle Aged , New York City/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Sensitivity and Specificity , Seroconversion/physiology , Seroepidemiologic Studies , Serologic Tests/methods , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology
3.
Clin Infect Dis ; 74(4): 622-629, 2022 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1713621

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Serological assays detecting anti-severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) antibodies are being widely deployed in studies and clinical practice. However, the duration and effectiveness of the protection conferred by the immune response remains to be assessed in population-based samples. To estimate the incidence of newly acquired SARS-CoV-2 infections in seropositive individuals as compared to seronegative controls, we conducted a retrospective longitudinal matched study. METHODS: A seroprevalence survey including a representative sample of the population was conducted in Geneva, Switzerland, between April and June 2020, immediately after the first pandemic wave. Seropositive participants were matched one-to-two to seronegative controls, using a propensity-score including age, gender, immunodeficiency, body mass index (BMI), smoking status, and education level. Each individual was linked to a state-registry of SARS-CoV-2 infections. Our primary outcome was confirmed infections occurring from serological status assessment to the end of the second pandemic wave (January 2021). RESULTS: Among 8344 serosurvey participants, 498 seropositive individuals were selected and matched with 996 seronegative controls. After a mean follow-up of 35.6 (standard deviation [SD] 3.2) weeks, 7 out of 498 (1.4%) seropositive subjects had a positive SARS-CoV-2 test, of whom 5 (1.0%) were classified as reinfections. In contrast, the infection rate was higher in seronegative individuals (15.5%, 154/996) during a similar follow-up period (mean 34.7 [SD 3.2] weeks), corresponding to a 94% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 86%- 98%, P < .001) reduction in the hazard of having a positive SARS-CoV-2 test for seropositives. CONCLUSIONS: Seroconversion after SARS-CoV-2 infection confers protection against reinfection lasting at least 8 months. These findings could help global health authorities establishing priority for vaccine allocation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Antibodies, Viral , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Humans , Reinfection , Retrospective Studies , Seroconversion , Seroepidemiologic Studies
4.
Clin Infect Dis ; 74(4): 584-590, 2022 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1709326

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: With limited severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) testing capacity in the United States at the start of the epidemic (January-March 2020), testing was focused on symptomatic patients with a travel history throughout February, obscuring the picture of SARS-CoV-2 seeding and community transmission. We sought to identify individuals with SARS-CoV-2 antibodies in the early weeks of the US epidemic. METHODS: All of Us study participants in all 50 US states provided blood specimens during study visits from 2 January to 18 March 2020. Participants were considered seropositive if they tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies with the Abbott Architect SARS-CoV-2 IgG enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and the EUROIMMUN SARS-CoV-2 ELISA in a sequential testing algorithm. The sensitivity and specificity of these ELISAs and the net sensitivity and specificity of the sequential testing algorithm were estimated, along with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). RESULTS: The estimated sensitivities of the Abbott and EUROIMMUN assays were 100% (107 of 107 [95% CI: 96.6%-100%]) and 90.7% (97 of 107 [83.5%-95.4%]), respectively, and the estimated specificities were 99.5% (995 of 1000 [98.8%-99.8%]) and 99.7% (997 of 1000 [99.1%-99.9%]), respectively. The net sensitivity and specificity of our sequential testing algorithm were 90.7% (97 of 107 [95% CI: 83.5%-95.4%]) and 100.0% (1000 of 1000 [99.6%-100%]), respectively. Of the 24 079 study participants with blood specimens from 2 January to 18 March 2020, 9 were seropositive, 7 before the first confirmed case in the states of Illinois, Massachusetts, Wisconsin, Pennsylvania, and Mississippi. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings identified SARS-CoV-2 infections weeks before the first recognized cases in 5 US states.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Population Health , Antibodies, Viral , COVID-19/diagnosis , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Humans , Immunoglobulin G , SARS-CoV-2 , Sensitivity and Specificity
5.
J Am Soc Nephrol ; 32(9): 2147-2152, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1708655

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is associated with a high rate of mortality in patients with ESKD, and vaccination is hoped to prevent infection. METHODS: Between January 18 and February 24, 2021, 225 kidney transplant recipients (KTRs) and 45 patients on hemodialysis (HDPs) received two injections of mRNA BNT162b2 vaccine. The postvaccinal humoral and cellular response was explored in the first 45 KTRs and ten HDPs. RESULTS: After the second dose, eight HDPs (88.9%) and eight KTRs (17.8%) developed antispike SARS-CoV-2 antibodies (P<0.001). Median titers of antibodies in responders were 1052 AU/ml (IQR, 515-2689) in HDPs and 671 AU/ml (IQR, 172-1523) in KTRs (P=0.40). Nine HDPs (100%) and 26 KTRs (57.8%) showed a specific T cell response (P=0.06) after the second injection. In responders, median numbers of spike-reactive T cells were 305 SFCs per 106 CD3+ T cells (IQR, 95-947) in HDPs and 212 SFCs per 106 CD3+ T cells (IQR, 61-330) in KTRs (P=0.40). In KTRs, the immune response to BNT162b2 seemed influenced by the immunosuppressive regimen, particularly tacrolimus or belatacept. CONCLUSION: Immunization with BNT162b2 seems more efficient in HDPs, indicating that vaccination should be highly recommended in these patients awaiting a transplant. However, the current vaccinal strategy for KTRs may not provide effective protection against COVID-19 and will likely need to be improved.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/biosynthesis , COVID-19 Vaccines/pharmacology , COVID-19/immunology , Kidney Transplantation , Renal Dialysis , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Aged , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Immunocompromised Host , Immunosuppressive Agents/adverse effects , Kidney Failure, Chronic/complications , Kidney Failure, Chronic/immunology , Kidney Failure, Chronic/therapy , Kidney Transplantation/adverse effects , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , RNA, Messenger/genetics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Transplant Recipients
6.
J Infect Dis ; 2021 Mar 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1706826

ABSTRACT

Immunoglobulin (IG) lots (N=176) released since March 2020 were tested for SARS-CoV-2 neutralizing antibodies, with first positive results for September 2020 lots, mean = 1.7 IU/ml, 46% of lots positive. From there, values steadily increased, in correlation with the cumulative COVID-19 incidence, to reach a mean of 31.2 IU/ml and 93% of lots positive by January 2021. Extrapolating the correlation, IGs could reach an anti-SARS-CoV-2 potency of ~345 IU/ml by July 2021. At that stage, prophylactic IG treatment for primary/secondary immunodeficiency could contain similar doses of anti-SARS-CoV-2 as convalescent plasma which is used for treatment of COVID-19.

7.
Clin Infect Dis ; 74(5): 871-881, 2022 03 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1700735

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The Recipient Epidemiology and Donor Evaluation Study-IV-Pediatric (REDS-IV-P) Epidemiology, Surveillance and Preparedness of the Novel SARS-CoV-2 Epidemic (RESPONSE) seroprevalence study conducted monthly cross-sectional testing for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) antibodies in blood donors in 6 US metropolitan regions to estimate the extent of SARS-CoV-2 infections over time. METHODS: During March-August 2020, approximately ≥1000 serum specimens were collected monthly from each region and tested for SARS-CoV-2 antibodies using a well-validated algorithm. Regional seroprevalence estimates were weighted based on demographic differences compared with the general population. Seroprevalence was compared with reported coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) case rates over time. RESULTS: For all regions, seroprevalence was <1.0% in March 2020. New York, New York, experienced the biggest increase (peak seroprevalence, 15.8% in May). All other regions experienced modest increases in seroprevalence (1%-2% in May-June to 2%-4% in July-August). Seroprevalence was higher in younger, non-Hispanic black, and Hispanic donors. Temporal increases in donor seroprevalence correlated with reported case rates in each region. In August, 1.3-5.6 estimated cumulative infections (based on seroprevalence data) per COVID-19 case were reported to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. CONCLUSIONS: Increases in seroprevalence were found in all regions, with the largest increase in New York. Seroprevalence was higher in non-Hispanic black and Hispanic than in non-Hispanic white blood donors. SARS-CoV-2 antibody testing of blood donor samples can be used to estimate the seroprevalence in the general population by region and demographic group. The methods derived from the RESPONSE seroprevalence study served as the basis for expanding SARS-CoV-2 seroprevalence surveillance to all 50 states and Puerto Rico.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Antibodies, Viral , Blood Donors , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Seroepidemiologic Studies
8.
Vox Sang ; 117(2): 185-192, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1685455

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Passive immunization using investigational COVID-19 convalescent plasma (CCP) is a promising therapeutic strategy and could improve outcome if transfused early and contain high levels of anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies. We report the management of a national CCP collection and distribution program in Israel. MATERIALS AND METHODS: From 1 April 2020 to 15 January 2021, 4020 volunteer donors donated 5221 CCP units and 837 (20.8%) donors donated more than once. Anti-nucleocapsid IgG antibodies were determined using chemiluminescent immunoassay method (Abbott). A statistical model based on repeated IgG tests in sequential donations was created to predict the time of antibody decline below sample/cut-off (S/CO) level of 4.0. RESULTS: Ninety-six percent of CCP donors suffered a mild disease or were asymptomatic. Older donors had higher antibody levels. Higher antibody levels (S/CO ≥4) were detected in 35.2% of the donors. Low positive (S/CO ≥1.4-3.99) were found in 37%, and 27.8% had undetectable antibodies (S/CO ≤1.4). The model predicted decrease antibody thresholds of 0.55%/day since the first CCP donation, providing guidance for the effective timing of future collections from donors with high antibody levels. CONCLUSIONS: An efficient CCP collection and distribution program was achieved, based on performing initial and repeated plasma collections, preferably from donors with higher antibody levels, and only antibody-rich units were supplied for therapeutic use. The inventory met the quantity and quality standards of the authorities, enabled to respond to the growing demand of the medical system and provide a product that may contribute to improve prognosis in patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Blood Donors , COVID-19/therapy , Humans , Immunization, Passive , Israel , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Monatsschr Kinderheilkd ; 169(1): 39-45, 2021.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1680683

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In Germany over 80% of children and adolescents are in the ambulatory care of registered pediatricians. These have a specific perspective on the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: For this reason, this professional group initiated a central recording of case numbers, individual case descriptions and observations on infections and illnesses with SARS-CoV­2 (www.co-ki.de). RESULTS: So far 557 pediatricians have participated. Together they care for ca. 670,000 children. They reported 9803 children who presented as suspected cases. The pediatricians themselves had a clinical suspicion of SARS-CoV­2 infections in 3654 children. In 7707 children PCR tests were carried out using nose/throat swabs of which 198 (2.6%) were positive. In addition, 731 children were tested for SARS-CoV­2 antibodies with detection in 82 cases (11.2%). Despite initially positive PCR tests, 47 children had a negative antibody test at least 2 weeks later. Our query as to infections of adults by children yielded only one case, which a telephone enquiry revealed as unlikely. DISCUSSION: From an outpatient pediatric perspective COVID-19 is rare. There was no convincing evidence that children are a relevant source of infection for SARS-CoV­2 nor that they are relevantly at risk.

10.
J Infect Dis ; 225(3): 367-373, 2022 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1672201

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The prevalence of current or past coronavirus disease 2019 in skilled nursing facility (SNF) residents is unknown because of asymptomatic infection and constrained testing capacity early in the pandemic. We conducted a seroprevalence survey to determine a more comprehensive prevalence of past coronavirus disease 2019 in Los Angeles County SNF residents and staff members. METHODS: We recruited participants from 24 facilities; participants were requested to submit a nasopharyngeal swab sample for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing and a serum sample for detection of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies. All participants were cross-referenced with our surveillance database to identify persons with prior positive SARS-CoV-2 results. RESULTS: From 18 August to 24 September 2020, we enrolled 3305 participants (1340 residents and 1965 staff members). Among 856 residents providing serum samples, 362 (42%) had current or past SARS-CoV-2 infection. Of the 346 serology-positive residents, 199 (58%) did not have a documented prior positive SARS-CoV-2 PCR result. Among 1806 staff members providing serum, 454 (25%) had current or past SARS-CoV-2 infection. Of the 447 serology-positive staff members, 353 (79%) did not have a documented prior positive SARS-CoV-2 PCR result. CONCLUSIONS: Past testing practices and policies missed a substantial number of SARS-CoV-2 infections in SNF residents and staff members.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Health Personnel , Humans , Los Angeles/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Seroepidemiologic Studies , Skilled Nursing Facilities
11.
Lancet ; 397(10289): 2049-2059, 2021 May 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1671320

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Many patients with COVID-19 have been treated with plasma containing anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies. We aimed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of convalescent plasma therapy in patients admitted to hospital with COVID-19. METHODS: This randomised, controlled, open-label, platform trial (Randomised Evaluation of COVID-19 Therapy [RECOVERY]) is assessing several possible treatments in patients hospitalised with COVID-19 in the UK. The trial is underway at 177 NHS hospitals from across the UK. Eligible and consenting patients were randomly assigned (1:1) to receive either usual care alone (usual care group) or usual care plus high-titre convalescent plasma (convalescent plasma group). The primary outcome was 28-day mortality, analysed on an intention-to-treat basis. The trial is registered with ISRCTN, 50189673, and ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT04381936. FINDINGS: Between May 28, 2020, and Jan 15, 2021, 11558 (71%) of 16287 patients enrolled in RECOVERY were eligible to receive convalescent plasma and were assigned to either the convalescent plasma group or the usual care group. There was no significant difference in 28-day mortality between the two groups: 1399 (24%) of 5795 patients in the convalescent plasma group and 1408 (24%) of 5763 patients in the usual care group died within 28 days (rate ratio 1·00, 95% CI 0·93-1·07; p=0·95). The 28-day mortality rate ratio was similar in all prespecified subgroups of patients, including in those patients without detectable SARS-CoV-2 antibodies at randomisation. Allocation to convalescent plasma had no significant effect on the proportion of patients discharged from hospital within 28 days (3832 [66%] patients in the convalescent plasma group vs 3822 [66%] patients in the usual care group; rate ratio 0·99, 95% CI 0·94-1·03; p=0·57). Among those not on invasive mechanical ventilation at randomisation, there was no significant difference in the proportion of patients meeting the composite endpoint of progression to invasive mechanical ventilation or death (1568 [29%] of 5493 patients in the convalescent plasma group vs 1568 [29%] of 5448 patients in the usual care group; rate ratio 0·99, 95% CI 0·93-1·05; p=0·79). INTERPRETATION: In patients hospitalised with COVID-19, high-titre convalescent plasma did not improve survival or other prespecified clinical outcomes. FUNDING: UK Research and Innovation (Medical Research Council) and National Institute of Health Research.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Hospital Mortality , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antibodies, Viral , COVID-19/mortality , Female , Humans , Immunization, Passive/methods , Immunization, Passive/mortality , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Respiration, Artificial/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome , United Kingdom/epidemiology
13.
Clin Infect Dis ; 74(2): 343-346, 2022 01 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1662106

ABSTRACT

We report severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 antibody positivity among market and city bus depot workers in Lima, Peru. Among 1285 vendors from 8 markets, prevalence ranged from 27% to 73%. Among 488 workers from 3 city bus depots, prevalence ranged from 11% to 47%. Self-reported symptoms were infrequent.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Health Personnel , Humans , Peru/epidemiology , Prevalence
14.
Clin Infect Dis ; 74(2): 327-334, 2022 01 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1662105

ABSTRACT

Convalescent plasma (CP) have been used for treatment of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), but their effectiveness varies significantly. Moreover, the impact of CP treatment on the composition of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) antibodies in COVID-19 patients and antibody markers that differentiate between those who survive and those who succumb to the COVID-19 disease are not well understood. Herein, we performed longitudinal analysis of antibody profile on 115 sequential plasma samples from 16 hospitalized COVID-19 patients treated with either CP or standard of care, only half of them survived. Differential antibody kinetics was observed for antibody binding, immunoglobulin M/immunoglobulin G/immunoglobulin A (IgM/IgG/IgA) distribution, and affinity maturation in "survived" versus "fatal" COVID-19 patients. Surprisingly, CP treatment did not predict survival. Strikingly, marked decline in neutralization titers was observed in the fatal patients prior to death, and convalescent plasma treatment did not reverse this trend. Furthermore, irrespective of CP treatment, higher antibody affinity to the SARS-CoV-2 prefusion spike was associated with survival outcome. Additionally, sustained elevated IgA response was associated with fatal outcome in these COVID-19 patients. These findings propose that treatment of COVID-19 patients with convalescent plasma should be carefully targeted, and effectiveness of treatment may depend on the clinical and immunological status of COVID-19 patients, as well as the quality of the antibodies in the convalescent plasma.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Antibodies, Neutralizing , Antibodies, Viral , COVID-19/therapy , Humans , Immunization, Passive
15.
Biophys J ; 120(14): 2828-2837, 2021 07 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1606137

ABSTRACT

The cell surface receptor Neuropilin-1 (Nrp1) was recently identified as a host factor for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) entry. The Spike protein of SARS-CoV-2 is cleaved into two segments, the S1 (residues (res.) 1-685) and the S2 (res. 686-1273) domains by furin protease. Nrp1 predominantly binds to the C-terminal RRAR amino acid motif (res. 682-685) of the S1 domain. In this study, we firstly modeled the association of an Nrp1 protein (consisting of domains a2-b1-b2) with the Spike protein. Next, we studied the separation of S2 from the S1 domain, with and without Nrp1 bound, by utilizing molecular dynamics pulling simulations. During the separation, Nrp1 stabilizes the S1 C-terminal region (res. 640-685) and thereby assists the detachment of S2 N-terminal region (res. 686-700). Without Nrp1 bound, S1 tends to become stretched, whereas the bound Nrp1 stimulates an earlier separation of S2 from the S1 domain. The liberated S2 domain is known to mediate the fusion of virus and host membranes; thus, Nrp1 likely increases virus infectivity by facilitating the S1 and S2 separation. We further analyzed the possible topological structure of the SARS-CoV-2 Spike protein when bound with Nrp1 and angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). Understanding of such an Nrp1-assisted viral infection opens the gate for the generation of protein-protein inhibitors, such as antibodies, which could attenuate the infection mechanism and protect certain cells in a future Nrp1-ACE2 targeted combination therapy.

16.
PLoS One ; 16(3): e0247797, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1605332

ABSTRACT

Since the initial identification of the novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 in December of 2019, researchers have raced to understand its pathogenesis and begun devising vaccine and treatment strategies. An accurate understanding of the body's temporal immune response against SARS-CoV-2 is paramount to successful vaccine development and disease progression monitoring. To provide insight into the antibody response against SARS-CoV-2, plasma samples from 181 PCR-confirmed COVID-19 patients collected at various timepoints post-symptom onset (PSO) were tested for the presence of anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgM and IgG antibodies via lateral flow. Additionally, 21 donors were tracked over time to elucidate patient-specific immune responses. We found sustained levels of anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies past 130 days PSO, with 99% positivity observed at 31-60 days PSO. By 61-90 days PSO, the percentage of IgM-/IgG+ results were nearly equal to that of IgM+/IgG+ results, demonstrating a shift in the immune response with a decrease in IgM antibody levels. Results from this study not only provide evidence that the antibody response to COVID-19 can persist for over 4 months, but also demonstrates the ability of Easy Check™ to monitor seroconversion and antibody response of patients. Easy Check was sufficiently sensitive to detect antibodies in patient samples as early as 1-4 days PSO with 86% positivity observed at 5-7 days PSO. Further studies are required to determine the longevity and efficacy of anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies, and whether they are protective against re-infection.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/blood , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin M/blood , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19 Serological Testing/instrumentation , COVID-19 Serological Testing/methods , Equipment Design , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Immunoglobulin M/immunology , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Young Adult
17.
Clin Infect Dis ; 73(12): 2155-2162, 2021 12 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1592795

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Assessing the duration of immunity following infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is a first priority to gauge the degree of protection following infection. Such knowledge is lacking, especially in the general population. Here, we studied changes in immunoglobulin isotype seropositivity and immunoglobulin G (IgG) binding strength of SARS-CoV-2-specific serum antibodies up to 7 months following onset of symptoms in a nationwide sample. METHODS: Participants from a prospective representative serological study in the Netherlands were included based on IgG seroconversion to the spike S1 protein of SARS-CoV-2 (N = 353), with up to 3 consecutive serum samples per seroconverted participant (N = 738). Immunoglobulin M (IgM), immunoglobulin A (IgA), and IgG antibody concentrations to S1, and increase in IgG avidity in relation to time since onset of disease symptoms, were determined. RESULTS: While SARS-CoV-2-specific IgM and IgA antibodies declined rapidly after the first month after disease onset, specific IgG was still present in 92% (95% confidence interval [CI], 89%-95%) of the participants after 7 months. The estimated 2-fold decrease of IgG antibodies was 158 days (95% CI, 136-189 days). Concentrations were sustained better in persons reporting significant symptoms compared to asymptomatic persons or those with mild upper respiratory complaints only. Similarly, avidity of IgG antibodies for symptomatic persons showed a steeper increase over time compared with persons with mild or no symptoms (P = .022). CONCLUSIONS: SARS-CoV-2-specific IgG antibodies persist and show increasing avidity over time, indicative of underlying immune maturation. These data support development of immune memory against SARS-CoV-2, providing insight into protection of the general unvaccinated part of the population. CLINICAL TRIALS REGISTRATION: NL8473 (the Dutch trial registry).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Humans , Netherlands/epidemiology , Prospective Studies
18.
Biomicrofluidics ; 14(6): 061507, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574498

ABSTRACT

In December 2019, coronavirus disease 2019 became a pandemic affecting more than 200 countries and territories. Millions of lives are still affected because of mandatory quarantines, which hamstring economies and induce panic. Immunology plays a major role in the modern field of medicine, especially against virulent infectious diseases. In this field, neutralizing antibodies are heavily studied because they reflect the level of infection and individuals' immune status, which are essential when considering resumption of work, flight travel, and border entry control. More importantly, it also allows evaluating the antiviral vaccine efficacy as vaccines are still known for being the ultimate intervention method to inhibit the rapid spread of virulent infectious diseases. In this Review, we first introduce the host immune response after the infection of SARS-CoV-2 and discuss the latest results using conventional immunoassays. Next, as an enabling platform for detection with sufficient sensitivity while saving analysis time and sample size, the progress of microfluidic-based immunoassays is discussed and compared based on surface modification, microfluidic kinetics, signal output, signal amplification, sample matrix, and the detection of anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies. Based on the overall comparison, this Review concludes by proposing the future integration of visual quantitative signals on microfluidic devices as a more suitable approach for general use and large-scale surveillance.

19.
Pan Afr Med J ; 38: 93, 2021.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1547720

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: SARS-CoV-2 serology tests could play a crucial role in estimating the prevalence of COVID-19. The purpose of this study was to estimate the prevalence of COVID-19 among travellers and workers in Bukavu, a city in eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo. METHODS: between May and August 2020, the Cellex qSARS-CoV-2 IgG/IgM Rapid Test (Cellex, Inc., USA), lateral flow immunoassay was used to rapidly detect and differentiate antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 among travellers and workers seeking medical certification. RESULTS: among the 684 residents of the city of Bukavu screened for COVID-19 (4.2% Hispanic, 2.8% other African, 0.9% Asian), the seroprevalence anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies was 40.8% (IgG+/IgM+: 34.6%; IgG+/IgM-: 0.5%; IgG-/IgM+: 5.4%). Cumulative seroprevalence of anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG antibodies increased from 24.5% to 35.2% from May to August 2020. Independent predictors of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies were age > 60 years [adjusted OR = 2.07(1.26-3.38)] and non-membership of the medical staff [adjusted OR = 2.28 (1.22-4.26)]. Thirteen point nine percent of patients seropositive for SARS-CoV-2 antibodies were symptomatic and hospitalized. CONCLUSION: this study shows a very high seroprevalence of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies among travellers and workers in Bukavu, a city in eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo, which may positively affect community immunity in the study population. Thus, the management of COVID-19 should be contextualized according to local realities.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Travel , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , COVID-19/diagnosis , Democratic Republic of the Congo/epidemiology , Female , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Immunoassay , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Seroepidemiologic Studies
20.
Pan Afr Med J ; 38: 55, 2021.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1547713

ABSTRACT

The first outbreak of epidemic respiratory disease due to unknown etiology was reported in the Chinese city of Wuhan December 2019. The World Health Organization (WHO) firstly used the term "new coronavirus 2019" on December 29, 2019. This pandemic, which is currently called severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), is a disease caused by SARS-CoV-2. It was subsequently called coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) by the WHO. The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 in all employees of the Nouakchott National Hospital Center (CHN). The study was conducted during the week 20/05/2020 to 27/05/2020. It involved 853 employees of all ranks (doctors, pharmacists, nurses, secretaries, security personnel, administrators...) of whom 504 were male and 331 were female, with a sex ratio of 1,52 with an average age of 39 years, ranging from 20 to 60 years. The screening for IgG and IgM antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 was performed using Biotime (Xiamen Biotime Biotechnology Co., Ltd.) immunochromatographic technique. Out of 835 employees included in our study, 14 were positive (1.67%) of whom 12 had IgM and IgG anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies and 2 had isolated IgM. Nasopharyngeal swab polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was performed in these 14 patients and was positive in six. While PCR is the gold standard for the diagnosis of SARS-CoV-2, serological tests for SARS-CoV-2 antibodies, in particular rapid tests (RDTs) are a diagnostic complement to COVID-19. They have the advantage of being easy to realize, of being safe both in the laboratories and outside the laboratories. RDTs enabled us to detect asymptomatic SARS-CoV-2 carriers within CHN employees. This allowed for patients management and isolation to protect patients and their environments.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Testing , COVID-19/diagnosis , Health Personnel , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Adult , Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Immunoglobulin M/immunology , Male , Mauritania/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Serologic Tests/methods , Young Adult
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