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1.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 69(47): 1762-1766, 2020 Nov 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389859

ABSTRACT

Most persons infected with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), develop virus-specific antibodies within several weeks, but antibody titers might decline over time. Understanding the timeline of antibody decline is important for interpreting SARS-CoV-2 serology results. Serum specimens were collected from a convenience sample of frontline health care personnel at 13 hospitals and tested for antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 during April 3-June 19, 2020, and again approximately 60 days later to assess this timeline. The percentage of participants who experienced seroreversion, defined as an antibody signal-to-threshold ratio >1.0 at baseline and <1.0 at the follow-up visit, was assessed. Overall, 194 (6.0%) of 3,248 participants had detectable antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 at baseline (1). Upon repeat testing approximately 60 days later (range = 50-91 days), 146 (93.6%) of 156 participants experienced a decline in antibody response indicated by a lower signal-to-threshold ratio at the follow-up visit, compared with the baseline visit, and 44 (28.2%) experienced seroreversion. Participants with higher initial antibody responses were more likely to have antibodies detected at the follow-up test than were those who had a lower initial antibody response. Whether decay in these antibodies increases risk for reinfection and disease remains unanswered. However, these results suggest that serology testing at a single time point is likely to underestimate the number of persons with previous SARS-CoV-2 infection, and a negative serologic test result might not reliably exclude prior infection.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Personnel, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Adult , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology
2.
Front Immunol ; 11: 618685, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389172

ABSTRACT

Understanding humoral immune responses to SARS-CoV-2 infection will play a critical role in the development of vaccines and antibody-based interventions. We report systemic and mucosal antibody responses in convalescent individuals who experienced varying severity of disease. Whereas assessment of neutralization and antibody-mediated effector functions revealed polyfunctional antibody responses in serum, only robust neutralization and phagocytosis were apparent in nasal wash samples. Serum neutralization and effector functions correlated with systemic SARS-CoV-2-specific IgG response magnitude, while mucosal neutralization was associated with nasal SARS-CoV-2-specific IgA. Antibody depletion experiments support the mechanistic relevance of these correlations. Associations between nasal IgA responses, virus neutralization at the mucosa, and less severe disease suggest the importance of assessing mucosal immunity in larger natural infection cohorts. Further characterization of antibody responses at the portal of entry may define their ability to contribute to protection from infection or reduced risk of hospitalization, informing public health assessment strategies and vaccine development efforts.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Immunity, Humoral/immunology , Immunity, Mucosal/immunology , Nasal Mucosa/immunology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibody-Dependent Cell Cytotoxicity/immunology , Convalescence , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin A/immunology , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Young Adult
3.
Virol Sin ; 35(6): 820-829, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1217486

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), has spread rapidly around the world, posing a major threat to human health and the economy. Currently, long-term data on viral shedding and the serum antibody responses in COVID-19 patients are still limited. Herein, we report the clinical features, viral RNA loads, and serum antibody levels in a cohort of 112 COVID-19 patients admitted to the Honghu People's Hospital, Hubei Province, China. Overall, 5.36% (6/112) of patients showed persistent viral RNA shedding (> 45 days). The peak viral load was higher in the severe disease group than in the mild group (median cycle threshold value, 36.4 versus 31.5; P = 0.002). For most patients the disappearance of IgM antibodies occurred approximately 4-6 weeks after symptoms onset, while IgG persisted for over 194 days after the onset of symptoms, although patients showed a 46% reduction in antibodies titres against SARS-CoV-2 nucleocapsid protein compared with the acute phase. We also studied 18 asymptomatic individuals with RT-qPCR confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection together with 17 symptomatic patients, and the asymptomatic individuals were the close contacts of these symptomatic cases. Delayed IgG seroconversion and lower IgM seropositive rates were observed in asymptomatic individuals. These data indicate that higher viral loads and stronger antibody responses are related to more severe disease status in patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection, and the antibodies persisted in the recovered patient for more than 6 months so that the vaccine may provide protection against SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adult , Aged , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Antibody Formation , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Serological Testing/methods , China/epidemiology , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Immunoglobulin M/blood , Immunoglobulin M/immunology , Kinetics , Male , Middle Aged , RNA, Viral/blood , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Severity of Illness Index , Viral Load , Virus Shedding
4.
Virol Sin ; 35(6): 752-757, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1217477

ABSTRACT

The immense patient number caused by coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) global pandemic brings the urge for more knowledge about its immunological features, including the profile of basic immune parameters. In this study, eighty-eight reported COVID-19 patients in Wuhan were recruited from January to February, 2020, including 32 severe/critical cases and 56 mild/moderate cases. Their mean age was 56.43 years (range 17-83) and gender ratio (male/female) was 43:45. We tested SARS-CoV-2 RNA with commercial kits, investigated the level of serologic IgM and IgG antibodies against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) using magnetic particle chemiluminescence immunoassays, and compared the results of serologic tests and nucleic acid test (NAT). Among 88 patients, 95.45% were confirmed as positive by the combination of NAT and antibody test, which was significantly higher (P < 0.001) than by single nucleic acid test (73.86%) or serologic test (65.91%). Then the correlation between temporal profile and the level of antibody response was analyzed. It showed that seroconversion started on day 5 after disease onset and IgG level was rose earlier than IgM. Comparison between patients with different disease severity suggested early seroconversion and high antibody titer were linked with less severe clinical symptoms. These results supported the combination of serologic testing and NAT in routine COVID-19 diagnosis and provided evidence on the temporal profile of antibody response in patients with different disease severity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Serological Testing/methods , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Antibody Formation , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing/methods , China/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin G/immunology , Immunoglobulin M/blood , Immunoglobulin M/immunology , Luminescent Measurements/methods , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction/methods , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Young Adult
5.
Open Forum Infect Dis ; 7(9): ofaa387, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1205747

ABSTRACT

Background: Testing for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)-specific antibodies has become an important tool, complementing nucleic acid tests (NATs) for diagnosis and for determining the prevalence of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in population serosurveys. The magnitude and persistence of antibody responses are critical for assessing the duration of immunity. Methods: A SARS-CoV-2-specific immunofluorescent antibody (IFA) assay for immunoglobulin G (IgG), immunoglobulin A (IgA), and immunoglobulin M (IgM) was developed and prospectively evaluated by comparison to the reference standard of NAT on respiratory tract samples from individuals with suspected COVID-19. Neutralizing antibody responses were measured in a subset of samples using a standard microneutralization assay. Results: A total of 2753 individuals were eligible for the study (126 NAT-positive; prevalence, 4.6%). The median "window period" from illness onset to appearance of antibodies (range) was 10.2 (5.8-14.4) days. The sensitivity and specificity of either SARS-CoV-2 IgG, IgA, or IgM when collected ≥14 days after symptom onset were 91.3% (95% CI, 84.9%-95.6%) and 98.9% (95% CI, 98.4%-99.3%), respectively. The negative predictive value was 99.6% (95% CI, 99.3%-99.8%). The positive predictive value of detecting any antibody class was 79.9% (95% CI, 73.3%-85.1%); this increased to 96.8% (95% CI, 90.7%-99.0%) for the combination of IgG and IgA. Conclusions: Measurement of SARS-CoV-2-specific antibody by IFA is an accurate method to diagnose COVID-19. Serological testing should be incorporated into diagnostic algorithms for SARS-CoV-2 infection to identify additional cases where NAT was not performed and resolve cases where false-negative and false-positive NATs are suspected. The majority of individuals develop robust antibody responses following infection, but the duration of these responses and implications for immunity remain to be established.

6.
Clin Infect Dis ; 71(16): 2255-2258, 2020 11 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1153151

ABSTRACT

We profiled the serological responses to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) nucleocapsid (N) protein and spike (S) glycoprotein. The majority of the patients developed robust antibody responses between 17 and 23 days after illness onset. Delayed, but stronger, antibody responses were observed in critical patients.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/immunology , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin M/blood , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19 Testing , China , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Immunity, Humoral , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Clin Infect Dis ; 71(16): 2027-2034, 2020 11 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1153138

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The novel coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 is a newly emerging virus. The antibody response in infected patients remains largely unknown, and the clinical value of antibody testing has not been fully demonstrated. METHODS: 173 patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection were enrolled. Their serial plasma samples (n = 535) collected during hospitalization were tested for total antibodies (Ab), IgM, and IgG against SARS-CoV-2. The dynamics of antibodies with disease progress were analyzed. RESULTS: Among 173 patients, the seroconversion rates for Ab, IgM, and IgG were 93.1%, 82.7%, and 64.7%, respectively. The reason for the negative antibody findings in 12 patients might be due to the lack of blood samples at the later stage of illness. The median seroconversion times for Ab, IgM, and then IgG were days 11, 12, and 4, respectively. The presence of antibodies was <40% among patients within 1 week of onset, and rapidly increased to 100.0% (Ab), 94.3% (IgM), and 79.8% (IgG) by day 15 after onset. In contrast, RNA detectability decreased from 66.7% (58/87) in samples collected before day 7 to 45.5% (25/55) during days 15-39. Combining RNA and antibody detection significantly improved the sensitivity of pathogenic diagnosis for COVID-19 (P < .001), even in the early phase of 1 week from onset (P = .007). Moreover, a higher titer of Ab was independently associated with a worse clinical classification (P = .006). CONCLUSIONS: Antibody detection offers vital clinical information during the course of SARS-CoV-2 infection. The findings provide strong empirical support for the routine application of serological testing in the diagnosis and management of COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Adult , Aged , Antibodies, Viral/metabolism , Antibody Formation/physiology , Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay , Female , Humans , Immunoglobulin G/metabolism , Immunoglobulin M/metabolism , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Serologic Tests
8.
J Infect Dis ; 222(12): 1974-1984, 2020 11 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1059701

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Convalescent plasma therapy is a leading treatment for conferring temporary immunity to COVID-19-susceptible individuals or for use as post-exposure prophylaxis. However, not all recovered patients develop adequate antibody titers for donation and the relationship between avidity and neutralizing titers is currently not well understood. METHODS: SARS-CoV-2 anti-spike and anti-nucleocapsid IgG titers and avidity were measured in a longitudinal cohort of COVID-19 hospitalized patients (n = 16 individuals) and a cross-sectional sample of convalescent plasma donors (n = 130). Epidemiologic correlates of avidity were examined in donors by linear regression. The association of avidity and a high neutralizing titer (NT) were also assessed in donors using modified Poisson regression. RESULTS: Antibody avidity increased over duration of infection and remained elevated. In convalescent plasma donors, higher levels of anti-spike avidity were associated with older age, male sex, and hospitalization. Higher NTs had a stronger positive correlation with anti-spike IgG avidity (Spearman ρ = 0.386; P < .001) than with anti-nucleocapsid IgG avidity (Spearman ρ = 0.211; P = .026). Increasing levels of anti-spike IgG avidity were associated with high NT (≥160) (adjusted prevalence ratio = 1.58 [95% confidence interval = 1.19-2.12]), independent of age, sex, and hospitalization. CONCLUSIONS: SARS-CoV-2 antibody avidity correlated with duration of infection and higher neutralizing titers, suggesting a potential alternative screening parameter for identifying optimal convalescent plasma donors.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Neutralizing/administration & dosage , Antibodies, Viral/administration & dosage , Antibody Affinity , COVID-19/therapy , Immunoglobulin G/administration & dosage , SARS-CoV-2 , Adolescent , Adult , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Blood Donors , Cohort Studies , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Immunization, Passive , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Linear Models , Male , Middle Aged , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Young Adult
9.
Genomics Inform ; 18(4): e45, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1055241

ABSTRACT

With the ongoing rise of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic across the globe, interests in COVID-19 antibody testing, also known as a serology test has grown, as a way to measure how far the infection has spread in the population and to identify individuals who may be immune. Recently, many countries reported their population based antibody titer study results. South Korea recently reported their third antibody formation rate, where it divided the study between the general population and the young male youths in their early twenties. As previously stated, these simple point estimates may be misinterpreted without proper estimation of standard error and confidence intervals. In this article, we provide an updated 95% confidence intervals for COVID-19 antibody formation rate for the Korean population using asymptotic, exact and Bayesian statistical estimation methods. As before, we found that the Wald method gives the narrowest interval among all asymptotic methods whereas mid p-value gives the narrowest among all exact methods and Jeffrey's method gives the narrowest from Bayesian method. The most conservative 95% confidence interval estimation shows that as of 00:00 November 23, 2020, at least 69,524 people were infected but not confirmed. It also shows that more positive cases were found among the young male in their twenties (0.22%), three times that of the general public (0.051%). This thereby calls for the quarantine authorities' need to strengthen quarantine managements for the early twenties in order to find the hidden infected people in the population.

10.
Front Immunol ; 11: 618402, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1045518

ABSTRACT

Prolonged shedding of viral RNA occurs in some individuals following SARS-CoV-2 infection. We perform comprehensive immunologic evaluation of one individual with prolonged shedding. The case subject recovered from severe COVID-19 and tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 viral RNA repeatedly as many as 87 days after the first positive test, 97 days after symptom onset. The subject did not have any associated rise in anti-Spike protein antibody titers or plasma neutralization activity, arguing against re-infection. This index subject exhibited a profoundly diminished circulating CD8+ T cell population and correspondingly low SARS-CoV-2-specific CD8+ T cell responses when compared with a cohort of other recovering COVID-19 subjects. CD4+ T cell responses and neutralizing antibody responses developed as expected in this individual. Our results demonstrate that detectable viral RNA shedding in the upper airway can occur more than 3 months following infection in some individuals with COVID-19 and suggest that impaired CD8+ T cells may play a role in prolonged viral RNA shedding.


Subject(s)
CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/virology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , RNA, Viral/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Virus Shedding/immunology , Aged, 80 and over , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/virology , Humans , Male , Prospective Studies , Viral Load/methods
11.
Microorganisms ; 8(12)2020 Dec 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1024611

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) can cause serious illness in older adults and people with chronic underlying medical conditions; however, children and young people are often asymptomatic or with mild symptoms. We evaluated the presence of specific antibodies (Abs) response against Human coronavirus NL63 (HCoV-NL63) S protein epitopes (NL63-RBM1, NL63-RBM2_1, NL63-RBM2_2, NL63-RBM3, NL63-SPIKE541-554, and NL63-DISC-like) and SARS-CoV-2 epitopes (COV2-SPIKE421-434 and COV2-SPIKE742-759) in plasma samples of pre-pandemic, mid-pandemic, and COVID-19 cohorts by indirect ELISA. Moreover, a competitive assay was performed to check for cross reactivity response between COV2-SPIKE421-434 and NL63-RBM3 among patients with a definitive diagnosis of SARS-CoV-2. Immune reaction against all SARS-CoV-2 and HCoV-NL63 epitopes showed a significantly higher response in pre-pandemic patients compared to mid-pandemic patients. The results indicate that probably antibodies against HCoV-NL63 may be able to cross react with SARS-CoV-2 epitopes and the higher incidence in pre-pandemic was probably due to the timing of collection when a high incidence of HCoV-NL63 is reported. In addition, the competitive assay showed cross-reactivity between antibodies directed against COV2-SPIKE421-434 and NL63-RBM3 peptides. Pre-existing HCoV-NL63 antibody response cross reacting with SARS-CoV-2 has been detected in both pre- and mid-pandemic individual, suggesting that previous exposure to HCoV-NL63 epitopes may produce antibodies which could confer a protective immunity against SARS-CoV-2 and probably reduce the severity of the disease.

12.
J Clin Virol ; 133: 104663, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1014606

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Antibody testing has recently emerged as an option to assist with determining exposure to SARS-CoV-2, the causative agent of COVID-19. Elucidation of the kinetics and duration of the humoral response is important for clinical management and interpreting results from serological surveys. OBJECTIVES: Here we evaluated the clinical performance of Abbott SARS-CoV-2 IgM and IgG assays, as well as the longitudinal dynamics of the antibody response in symptomatic COVID-19 patients. STUDY DESIGN AND RESULTS: The diagnostic specificity was 100 % for IgM and 99.67 % for IgG using 300 pre-COVID-19 serum specimens. Using 1349 sequential serum samples collected up to 168 days post symptom onset from 427 PCR-confirmed individuals, clinical test sensitivity of the SARS-CoV-2 IgM assay was 24.6 % at ≤7 days, 75.3 % at 8-14 days, 95.0 % at 15-21 days, and 96.0 % at 4-5 weeks (peak test sensitivity). The median duration of time for IgM seroconversion was 10 days. IgM levels declined steadily 4-5 weeks after symptom onset, and the positive rate dropped to 30.8 % at >3 months. The diagnostic sensitivity for the SARS-CoV-2 IgG assay post symptom onset was 23.2 % at ≤7 days, 69.5 % at 8-14 days, 93.6 % at 15-21 days, and 99.6 % at 4-5 weeks (peak test sensitivity). The median duration of time for IgG seroconversion was 11.5 days. During the convalescent phase of the infection, a decline in the IgG level was observed in patients who were followed for >100 days. Despite that decline, 92.3 % of the patient cohort remained IgG positive 3-6 months following symptom onset. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates the Abbott IgM assay against SARS-CoV-2 is detected slightly earlier compared to IgG, with both tests exhibiting excellent overall sensitivity and specificity. In symptomatic patients who test negative by PCR for a SARS-CoV-2 infection, assessing IgM and IgG antibodies can aid in supporting a diagnosis of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19 Serological Testing , COVID-19/diagnosis , Immunity, Humoral , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Immunoglobulin M/blood , COVID-19/immunology , Cohort Studies , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Reproducibility of Results , Sensitivity and Specificity
13.
J Clin Invest ; 130(12): 6588-6599, 2020 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1013100

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUNDMarked progress is achieved in understanding the physiopathology of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), which caused a global pandemic. However, the CD4+ T cell population critical for antibody response in COVID-19 is poorly understood.METHODSIn this study, we provided a comprehensive analysis of peripheral CD4+ T cells from 13 COVID-19 convalescent patients, defined as confirmed free of SARS-CoV-2 for 2 to 4 weeks, using flow cytometry and magnetic chemiluminescence enzyme antibody immunoassay. The data were correlated with clinical characteristics.RESULTSWe observed that, relative to healthy individuals, convalescent patients displayed an altered peripheral CD4+ T cell spectrum. Specifically, consistent with other viral infections, cTfh1 cells associated with SARS-CoV-2-targeting antibodies were found in COVID-19 covalescent patients. Individuals with severe disease showed higher frequencies of Tem and Tfh-em cells but lower frequencies of Tcm, Tfh-cm, Tfr, and Tnaive cells, compared with healthy individuals and patients with mild and moderate disease. Interestingly, a higher frequency of cTfh-em cells correlated with a lower blood oxygen level, recorded at the time of admission, in convalescent patients. These observations might constitute residual effects by which COVID-19 can impact the homeostasis of CD4+ T cells in the long-term and explain the highest ratio of class-switched virus-specific antibody producing individuals found in our severe COVID-19 cohort.CONCLUSIONOur study demonstrated a close connection between CD4+ T cells and antibody production in COVID-19 convalescent patients.FUNDINGSix Talent Peaks Project in Jiangsu Province and the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC).


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Antibody Formation , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , Convalescence , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , T-Lymphocyte Subsets/immunology , Adult , Aged , Antibodies, Viral/blood , CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/metabolism , COVID-19/blood , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , T-Lymphocyte Subsets/metabolism
14.
J Biomed Res ; 34(6): 410-415, 2020 Sep 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1005061

ABSTRACT

Measuring virus-specific antibody responses to emerging pathogens is a well-established and highly useful tool to diagnose such infections, understand interactions between the immune system and pathogens, and provide potential clues for the development of vaccines or therapeutic agents against such pathogens. Since the beginning of 2020, the discovery of SARS-CoV-2 as the emerging virus responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic has provided new insight into the complexity of antibody responses to this dangerous virus. The current review aims to sort out diverse and sometimes seemingly confusing findings to put together a cohesive understanding on the profile of antibody responses elicited in COVID-19 patients.

15.
J Clin Med ; 9(12)2020 Nov 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1000300

ABSTRACT

Humoral immunity is critically important to control COVID-19. Long-term antibody responses remain to be fully characterized in hospitalized patients who have a high risk of death. We compared specific Immunoglobulin responses against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) between two groups, intensive care unit (ICU) and non-ICU hospitalized patients over several weeks. Plasma specific IgG, IgM, and IgA levels were assessed using a commercial ELISA and compared to an in-house cell-based ELISA. Among the patients analyzed (mean (SD) of age, 64.4 (15.9) years, 19.2% female), 12 (46.2%) were hospitalized in ICU. IgG levels increased in non-ICU cases from the second to the eighth week after symptom onset. By contrast, IgG response was blunted in ICU patients over the same period. ICU patients with hematological malignancies had very weak or even undetectable IgG levels. While both groups had comparable levels of specific IgM antibodies, we found much lower levels of specific IgA in ICU versus non-ICU patients. In conclusion, COVID-19 ICU patients may be at risk of reinfection as their specific IgG response is declining in a matter of weeks. Antibody neutralizing assays and studies on specific cellular immunity will have to be performed.

16.
Sci China Life Sci ; 63(12): 1833-1849, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-996429

ABSTRACT

The newly emerged severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has infected millions of people and caused tremendous morbidity and mortality worldwide. Effective treatment for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) due to SARS-CoV-2 infection is lacking, and different therapeutic strategies are under testing. Host humoral and cellular immunity to SARS-CoV-2 infection is a critical determinant for patients' outcomes. SARS-CoV-2 infection results in seroconversion and production of anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies. The antibodies may suppress viral replication through neutralization but might also participate in COVID-19 pathogenesis through a process termed antibody-dependent enhancement. Rapid progress has been made in the research of antibody response and therapy in COVID-19 patients, including characterization of the clinical features of antibody responses in different populations infected by SARS-CoV-2, treatment of COVID-19 patients with convalescent plasma and intravenous immunoglobin products, isolation and characterization of a large panel of monoclonal neutralizing antibodies and early clinical testing, as well as clinical results from several COVID-19 vaccine candidates. In this review, we summarize the recent progress and discuss the implications of these findings in vaccine development.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/biosynthesis , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/therapy , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Antibodies, Monoclonal/therapeutic use , Antibodies, Neutralizing/biosynthesis , Antibodies, Neutralizing/therapeutic use , Asymptomatic Infections , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/isolation & purification , China , Drug Development/trends , Host Microbial Interactions/immunology , Humans , Immunity, Humoral , Immunization, Passive , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/therapeutic use , Models, Immunological , Pandemics , Reinfection/immunology , Reinfection/prevention & control , Seroconversion
17.
Viruses ; 12(12)2020 12 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-966996

ABSTRACT

The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by SARS-CoV-2, continues to spread globally with significantly high morbidity and mortality rates. Antigen-specific responses are of unquestionable value for clinical management of COVID-19 patients. Here, we investigated the kinetics of IgM, IgG against the spike (S) and nucleoproteins (N) proteins and their neutralizing capabilities in hospitalized COVID-19 patients with different disease presentations (i.e., mild, moderate or severe), need for intensive care units (ICU) admission or outcomes (i.e., survival vs death). We show that SARS-CoV-2 specific IgG, IgM and neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) were readily detectable in almost all COVID-19 patients with various clinical presentations. Interestingly, significantly higher levels of nAbs as well as anti-S1 and -N IgG and IgM antibodies were found in patients with more severe symptoms, patients requiring admission to ICU or those with fatal outcomes. More importantly, early after symptoms onset, we found that the levels of anti-N antibodies correlated strongly with disease severity. Collectively, these findings provide new insights into the kinetics of antibody responses in COVID-19 patients with different disease severity.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/immunology , Immunity, Humoral , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , Hospitalization , Humans , Immunoglobulin M/blood , Kinetics , Longitudinal Studies , Neutralization Tests , Nucleocapsid Proteins/immunology , Severity of Illness Index , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology
18.
J Clin Invest ; 130(10): 5235-5244, 2020 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-969923

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is the causative agent for coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pneumonia. Little is known about the kinetics, tissue distribution, cross-reactivity, and neutralization antibody response in patients with COVID-19. Two groups of patients with RT-PCR-confirmed COVID-19 were enrolled in this study: 12 severely ill patients in intensive care units who needed mechanical ventilation and 11 mildly ill patients in isolation wards. Serial clinical samples were collected for laboratory detection. Results showed that most of the severely ill patients had viral shedding in a variety of tissues for 20-40 days after onset of disease (8/12, 66.7%), while the majority of mildly ill patients had viral shedding restricted to the respiratory tract and had no detectable virus RNA 10 days after onset (9/11, 81.8%). Mildly ill patients showed significantly lower IgM response compared with that of the severe group. IgG responses were detected in most patients in both the severe and mild groups at 9 days after onset, and remained at a high level throughout the study. Antibodies cross-reactive to SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2 were detected in patients with COVID-19 but not in patients with MERS. High levels of neutralizing antibodies were induced after about 10 days after onset in both severely and mildly ill patients which were higher in the severe group. SARS-CoV-2 pseudotype neutralization test and focus reduction neutralization test with authentic virus showed consistent results. Sera from patients with COVID-19 inhibited SARS-CoV-2 entry. Sera from convalescent patients with SARS or Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) did not. Anti-SARS-CoV-2 S and N IgG levels exhibited a moderate correlation with neutralization titers in patients' plasma. This study improves our understanding of immune response in humans after SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , Betacoronavirus/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Viral Load , Virus Shedding , Adult , Aged , Antibody Specificity , COVID-19 , Cross Reactions , Female , Humans , Kinetics , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index
19.
Front Med (Lausanne) ; 7: 592629, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-954056

ABSTRACT

Disease caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) ranges from mild illness to severe respiratory disease and death. In this study, we determined the kinetics of viral loads, antibody responses (IgM, IgG, neutralization) and SARS-CoV-2-specific CD4 T cells by quantifying these parameters in 435 serial respiratory and blood samples collected from a cohort of 29 COVID-19 patients with either moderate or severe disease during the whole period of hospitalization or until death. Remarkably, there was no significant difference in the kinetics and plateau levels of neutralizing antibodies among the groups with different disease severity. In contrast, the dynamics of specific CD4 T cell responses differed considerably, but all patients with moderate or severe disease developed robust SARS-CoV-2-specific responses. Of note, none of the patients had detectable cross-reactive CD4 T cells in the first week after symptom onset, which have been described in 20-50% of unexposed individuals. Our data thus provide novel insights into the kinetics of antibody and CD4 T cell responses as well as viral loads that are key to understanding the role of adaptive immunity in combating the virus during acute infection and provide leads for the timing of immune therapies for COVID-19.

20.
Microorganisms ; 8(12)2020 Nov 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-948911

ABSTRACT

We evaluated the antibody responses in 259 potential convalescent plasma donors for Covid-19 patients. Different assays were used: a commercial ELISA detecting antibodies against the recombinant spike protein (S1); a multiplex assay detecting total and specific antibody isotypes against three SARS-CoV-2 antigens (S1, basic nucleocapsid (N) protein and receptor-binding domain (RBD)); and an in-house ELISA detecting antibodies to complete spike, RBD and N in 60 of these donors. Neutralizing antibodies (NAb) were also evaluated in these 60 donors. Analyzed samples were collected at a median time of 62 (14-104) days from the day of first symptoms or positive PCR (for asymptomatic patients). Anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies were detected in 88% and 87.8% of donors using the ELISA and the multiplex assay, respectively. The multivariate analysis showed that age ≥50 years (p < 0.001) and need for hospitalization (p < 0.001) correlated with higher antibody titers, while asymptomatic status (p < 0.001) and testing >60 days after symptom onset (p = 0.001) correlated with lower titers. Interestingly, pseudotype virus-neutralizing antibodies (PsNAbs) significantly correlated with spike and with RBD antibodies by ELISA. Sera with high PsNAb also showed a strong ability to neutralize active SARS-CoV-2 virus, with hospitalized patients showing higher titers. Therefore, convalescent plasma donors can be selected based on the presence of high RBD antibody titers.

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