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1.
Curr Med Imaging ; 17(11): 1316-1323, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574962

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Though imaging manifestations of COVID-19 and other types of viral pneumonia are similar, their clinical treatment methods differ. Accurate, non-invasive diagnostic methods using CT imaging can help develop an optimal therapeutic regimen for both conditions. OBJECTIVE: To compare the initial CT imaging features in COVID-19 with those in other types of viral pneumonia. METHODS: Clinical and imaging data of 51 patients with COVID-19 and 69 with other types of viral pneumonia were retrospectively studied. All significant imaging features (Youden index >0.3) were included for constituting the combined criteria for COVID-19 diagnosis, composed of two or more imaging features with a parallel model. McNemar's chi-square test or Fisher's exact test was used to compare the validity indices (sensitivity and specificity) among various criteria. RESULTS: Ground glass opacities (GGO) dominated density, peripheral distribution, unilateral lung, clear margin of lesion, rounded morphology, long axis parallel to the pleura, vascular thickening, and crazy-paving pattern were more common in COVID-19 (p <0.05). Consolidation-dominated density, both central and peripheral distributions, bilateral lung, indistinct margin of lesion, tree-inbud pattern, mediastinal or hilar lymphadenectasis, pleural effusion, and pleural thickening were more common in other types of viral pneumonia (p < 0.05). GGO-dominated density or long axis parallel to the pleura (with the highest sensitivity), and GGO-dominated density or long axis parallel to the pleura or vascular thickening (with the highest specificity) are well combined criteria of COVID-19. CONCLUSION: The initial CT imaging features are helpful for the differential diagnosis of COVID-19 and other types of viral pneumonia.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Humans , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
2.
Neurocrit Care ; 35(2): 577-589, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1516917

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Multiple studies demonstrate that fever/elevated temperature is associated with poor outcomes in patients with vascular brain injury; however, there are no conclusive studies that demonstrate that fever prevention/controlled normothermia is associated with better outcomes. The primary objective of the INTREPID (Impact of Fever Prevention in Brain-Injured Patients) trial is to test the hypothesis that fever prevention is superior to standard temperature management in patients with acute vascular brain injury. METHODS: INTREPID is a prospective randomized open blinded endpoint study of fever prevention versus usual care in patients with ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke. The fever prevention intervention utilizes the Arctic Sun System and will be compared to standard care patients in whom fever may spontaneously develop. Ischemic stroke, intracerebral hemorrhage or subarachnoid hemorrhage patients will be included within disease-specific time-windows. Both awake and sedated patients will be included, and treatment is initiated immediately upon enrollment. Eligible patients are expected to require intensive care for at least 72 h post-injury, will not be deemed unlikely to survive without severe disability, and will be treated for up to 14 days, or until deemed ready for discharge from the ICU, whichever comes first. Fifty sites in the USA and worldwide will participate, with a target enrollment of 1176 patients (1000 evaluable). The target temperature is 37.0 °C. The primary efficacy outcome is the total fever burden by °C-h, defined as the area under the temperature curve above 37.9 °C. The primary secondary outcome, on which the sample size is based, is the modified Rankin Scale Score at 3 months. All efficacy analyses including the primary and key secondary endpoints will be primarily based on an intention-to-treat population. Analysis of the as-treated and per protocol populations will also be performed on the primary and key secondary endpoints as sensitivity analyses. DISCUSSION: The INTREPID trial will provide the first results of the impact of a pivotal fever prevention intervention in patients with acute stroke ( www.clinicaltrials.gov ; NCT02996266; registered prospectively 05DEC2016).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Brain , Critical Care , Humans , Prospective Studies , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , SARS-CoV-2
3.
J Comput Assist Tomogr ; 44(5): 627-632, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1501243

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To determine the predictive computed tomography (CT) and clinical features for diagnosis of COVID-19 pneumonia. METHODS: The CT and clinical data including were analyzed using univariate analysis and multinomial logistic regression, followed by receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. RESULTS: The factors including size of ground grass opacity (GGO), GGO with reticular and/or interlobular septal thickening, vascular enlargement, "tree-in-bud" opacity, centrilobular nodules, and stuffy or runny nose were associated with the 2 groups of viral pneumonia, as determined by univariate analysis (P < 0.05). Only GGO with reticular and/or interlobular septal thickening, centrilobular nodules, and stuffy or runny nose remained independent risk factors in multinomial logistic regression analysis. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed that the area under curve of the obtained logistic regression model was 0.893. CONCLUSION: Computed tomography and clinical features including GGO with reticular and/or interlobular septal thickening, absence of centrilobular nodules, and absence of stuffy or runny nose are potential patients with COVID-19 pneumonia.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/methods , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Tomography, X-Ray Computed/methods , Adult , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Diagnosis, Differential , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Predictive Value of Tests , Reproducibility of Results , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 99(26): e20991, 2020 Jun 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1455401

ABSTRACT

RATIONALE: Pial arteriovenous fistula (PAVF) occurs when intracranial arteries communicate directly with veins. PAVFs are very rare congenital vascular lesions that are commonly seen in infants and children. Arachnoid cysts are congenital cavitation often filled with cerebrospinal fluid. We present a very rare associated occurrence of bilateral pediatric PAVF and a giant arachnoid cyst presenting as torticollis in a child. So far, this is the first case. PATIENT CONCERNS: A 6-year-old male child was referred to our facility from a local hospital due to severe torticollis. DIAGNOSES: An enhanced computed tomography scan revealed 2 slightly high-density masses at the anterior pontine cistern, right circumferential cistern, as well as left posterior occipital region. The same computed tomography scan revealed a giant arachnoid cyst in the left occipital as well as the temporal region with a thin cerebral cortex adjacent to the cyst. INTERVENTIONS: Digital subtraction angiography confirmed that the 2 high-flow lesions were PAVFs. The patient was treated with a combination of detachable coils and Onyx Liquid Embolic System (Onyx HD-500) (Covidien/ev3 Neurovascular) via the transarterial endovascular route while the giant arachnoid cyst was managed conservatively. OUTCOMES: The torticollis resolved 2 days after the procedure. He is currently well with no neurologic deficit. LESSONS: We advocate that in cases of PAVF with accompanying cyst, the cyst should be managed conservatively if it is not associated with intracranial hemorrhage or focal neurologic deficit.


Subject(s)
Arteriovenous Fistula/diagnosis , Cerebral Veins/abnormalities , Arachnoid Cysts , Arteriovenous Malformations/complications , Arteriovenous Malformations/surgery , Child , Computed Tomography Angiography/methods , Humans , Male , Torticollis/etiology
5.
Infect Disord Drug Targets ; 21(4): 480-483, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1435869

ABSTRACT

Ocular tissues can serve as a reservoir for the SARS-CoV-2 virus which can not only cause conjunctivitis but also serve as a source of infection transmission to others. Additionally, the eye and its tear drainage apparatus can track the SARS-CoV-2 from the eye into the respiratory tract of the patient. The potential ocular presence of the SARS-CoV-2 in the eye of a patient can target ACE2 receptors in the endothelium of the conjunctival vessels and use the lacrimal sac a potential space to evade immune detection and clinical isolation. The recently reported case of COVID-19 after the acquisition of SARS-CoV-2 from a COVID-19 patient should alert the healthcare professionals dealing with COVID-19 patients that wearing masks alone cannot guarantee protection against infection transmission. Further studies, like isolation of SARS-CoV-2 from the eyes of patients with COVID-19, are needed to identify the eyes as a potential source of SARS-CoV-2 infection transmission.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Conjunctiva , Humans , Masks , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Invest Ophthalmol Vis Sci ; 62(7): 6, 2021 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1388618

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To investigate the expression of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), the receptor for SARS-CoV-2 in human retina. Methods: Human post-mortem eyes from 13 non-diabetic control cases and 11 diabetic retinopathy cases were analyzed for the expression of ACE2. To compare the vascular ACE2 expression between different organs that involve in diabetes, the expression of ACE2 was investigated in renal specimens from nondiabetic and diabetic nephropathy patients. Expression of TMPRSS2, a cell-surface protease that facilitates SARS-CoV-2 entry, was also investigated in human nondiabetic retinas. Primary human retinal endothelial cells (HRECs) and primary human retinal pericytes (HRPCs) were further used to confirm the vascular ACE2 expression in human retina. Results: We found that ACE2 was expressed in multiple nonvascular neuroretinal cells, including the retinal ganglion cell layer, inner plexiform layer, inner nuclear layer, and photoreceptor outer segments in both nondiabetic and diabetic retinopathy specimens. Strikingly, we observed significantly more ACE2 positive vessels in the diabetic retinopathy specimens. By contrast, in another end-stage organ affected by diabetes, the kidney, ACE2 in nondiabetic and diabetic nephropathy showed apical expression of ACE2 tubular epithelial cells, but no endothelial expression in glomerular or peritubular capillaries. Western blot analysis of protein lysates from HRECs and HRPCs confirmed expression of ACE2. TMPRSS2 expression was present in multiple retinal neuronal cells, vascular and perivascular cells, and Müller glia. Conclusions: Together, these results indicate that retina expresses ACE2 and TMPRSS2. Moreover, there are increased vascular ACE2 expression in diabetic retinopathy retinas.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Diabetic Retinopathy/enzymology , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , Retina/enzymology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Binding Sites , Blotting, Western , Cells, Cultured , Diabetic Nephropathies/enzymology , Diabetic Nephropathies/pathology , Diabetic Nephropathies/virology , Diabetic Retinopathy/pathology , Diabetic Retinopathy/virology , Endothelium, Vascular/enzymology , Endothelium, Vascular/virology , Female , Fluorescent Antibody Technique, Indirect , Humans , Immunohistochemistry , Male , Middle Aged , Pericytes/enzymology , Pericytes/virology , Retinal Vessels/enzymology , Retinal Vessels/pathology , Retinal Vessels/virology , Serine Endopeptidases/metabolism
7.
Sci Adv ; 6(48)2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1388431

ABSTRACT

Acute respiratory distress syndrome is associated with a robust inflammatory response that damages the vascular endothelium, impairing gas exchange. While restoration of microcapillaries is critical to avoid mortality, therapeutic targeting of this process requires a greater understanding of endothelial repair mechanisms. Here, we demonstrate that lung endothelium possesses substantial regenerative capacity and lineage tracing reveals that native endothelium is the source of vascular repair after influenza injury. Ablation of chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter-transcription factor 2 (COUP-TF2) (Nr2f2), a transcription factor implicated in developmental angiogenesis, reduced endothelial proliferation, exacerbating viral lung injury in vivo. In vitro, COUP-TF2 regulates proliferation and migration through activation of cyclin D1 and neuropilin 1. Upon influenza injury, nuclear factor κB suppresses COUP-TF2, but surviving endothelial cells ultimately reestablish vascular homeostasis dependent on restoration of COUP-TF2. Therefore, stabilization of COUP-TF2 may represent a therapeutic strategy to enhance recovery from pathogens, including H1N1 influenza and SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
COUP Transcription Factor II/metabolism , Endothelial Cells/metabolism , Endothelium, Vascular/metabolism , Influenza A Virus, H1N1 Subtype , Lung/cytology , Lung/physiology , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/metabolism , Regeneration/genetics , Animals , COUP Transcription Factor II/genetics , Cell Movement/genetics , Cell Proliferation/genetics , Disease Models, Animal , Female , Gene Knockout Techniques , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Male , Mice , Mice, Transgenic , Orthomyxoviridae Infections/virology , Transfection
8.
Elife ; 92020 04 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1344522

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 patients can present with pulmonary edema early in disease. We propose that this is due to a local vascular problem because of activation of bradykinin 1 receptor (B1R) and B2R on endothelial cells in the lungs. SARS-CoV-2 enters the cell via ACE2 that next to its role in RAAS is needed to inactivate des-Arg9 bradykinin, the potent ligand of the B1R. Without ACE2 acting as a guardian to inactivate the ligands of B1R, the lung environment is prone for local vascular leakage leading to angioedema. Here, we hypothesize that a kinin-dependent local lung angioedema via B1R and eventually B2R is an important feature of COVID-19. We propose that blocking the B2R and inhibiting plasma kallikrein activity might have an ameliorating effect on early disease caused by COVID-19 and might prevent acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). In addition, this pathway might indirectly be responsive to anti-inflammatory agents.


The COVID-19 pandemic represents an unprecedented threat to global health. Millions of cases have been confirmed around the world, and hundreds of thousands of people have lost their lives. Common symptoms include a fever and persistent cough and COVID-19 patients also often experience an excess of fluid in the lungs, which makes it difficult to breathe. In some cases, this develops into a life-threatening condition whereby the lungs cannot provide the body's vital organs with enough oxygen. The SARS-CoV-2 virus, which causes COVID-19, enters the lining of the lungs via an enzyme called the ACE2 receptor, which is present on the outer surface of the lungs' cells. The related coronavirus that was responsible for the SARS outbreak in the early 2000s also needs the ACE2 receptor to enter the cells of the lungs. In SARS, the levels of ACE2 in the lung decline during the infection. Studies with mice have previously revealed that a shortage of ACE2 leads to increased levels of a hormone called angiotensin II, which regulates blood pressure. As a result, much attention has turned to the potential link between this hormone system in relation to COVID-19. However, other mouse studies have shown that ACE2 protects against a build-up of fluid in the lungs caused by a different molecule made by the body. This molecule, which is actually a small fragment of a protein, lowers blood pressure and causes fluid to leak out of blood vessels. It belongs to a family of molecules known as kinins, and ACE2 is known to inactivate certain kinins. This led van de Veerdonk et al. to propose that the excess of fluid in the lungs seen in COVID-19 patients may be because kinins are not being neutralized due to the shortage of the ACE2 receptor. This had not been hypothesized before, even though the mechanism could be the same in SARS which has been researched for the past 17 years. If this hypothesis is correct, it would mean that directly inhibiting the receptor for the kinins (or the proteins that they come from) may be the only way to stop fluid leaking into the lungs of COVID-19 patients in the early stage of disease. This hypothesis is unproven, and more work is needed to see if it is clinically relevant. If that work provides a proof of concept, it means that existing treatments and registered drugs could potentially help patients with COVID-19, by preventing the need for mechanical ventilation and saving many lives.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Drug Development , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Angioedema/drug therapy , Angioedema/metabolism , Angioedema/pathology , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus/physiology , Bradykinin Receptor Antagonists/therapeutic use , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Endothelial Cells/metabolism , Endothelial Cells/pathology , Humans , Inflammation/immunology , Inflammation/pathology , Kallikreins/metabolism , Kinins/metabolism , Lung/metabolism , Lung/pathology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/metabolism , Receptor, Bradykinin B1/metabolism , Receptor, Bradykinin B2/metabolism , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/drug therapy , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/pathology , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Signal Transduction
9.
Int J Mol Sci ; 21(21)2020 Nov 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1344351

ABSTRACT

Progressive respiratory failure is seen as a major cause of death in severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-Cov-2)-induced infection. Relatively little is known about the associated morphologic and molecular changes in the circulation of these patients. In particular, platelet and erythrocyte pathology might result in severe vascular issues, and the manifestations may include thrombotic complications. These thrombotic pathologies may be both extrapulmonary and intrapulmonary and may be central to respiratory failure. Previously, we reported the presence of amyloid microclots in the circulation of patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Here, we investigate the presence of related circulating biomarkers, including C-reactive protein (CRP), serum ferritin, and P-selectin. These biomarkers are well-known to interact with, and cause pathology to, platelets and erythrocytes. We also study the structure of platelets and erythrocytes using fluorescence microscopy (using the markers PAC-1 and CD62PE) and scanning electron microscopy. Thromboelastography and viscometry were also used to study coagulation parameters and plasma viscosity. We conclude that structural pathologies found in platelets and erythrocytes, together with spontaneously formed amyloid microclots, may be central to vascular changes observed during COVID-19 progression, including thrombotic microangiopathy, diffuse intravascular coagulation, and large-vessel thrombosis, as well as ground-glass opacities in the lungs. Consequently, this clinical snapshot of COVID-19 strongly suggests that it is also a true vascular disease and considering it as such should form an essential part of a clinical treatment regime.


Subject(s)
Blood Platelets/pathology , Cardiovascular Diseases/virology , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Erythrocytes/pathology , Ferritins/blood , P-Selectin/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Blood Coagulation/physiology , Blood Platelets/virology , COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases/blood , Cardiovascular Diseases/pathology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Erythrocytes/virology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombosis/pathology , Thrombosis/virology
10.
Biomolecules ; 11(5)2021 04 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1334991

ABSTRACT

The vascular endothelium acts as a selective barrier to regulate macromolecule exchange between the blood and tissues. However, the integrity of the endothelium barrier is compromised in an array of pathological settings, including ischemic disease and cancer, which are the leading causes of death worldwide. The resulting vascular hyperpermeability to plasma molecules as well as leukocytes then leads to tissue damaging edema formation and inflammation. The vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGFA) is a potent permeability factor, and therefore a desirable target for impeding vascular hyperpermeability. However, VEGFA also promotes angiogenesis, the growth of new blood vessels, which is required for reperfusion of ischemic tissues. Moreover, edema increases interstitial pressure in poorly perfused tumors, thereby affecting the delivery of therapeutics, which could be counteracted by stimulating the growth of new functional blood vessels. Thus, targets must be identified to accurately modulate the barrier function of blood vessels without affecting angiogenesis, as well as to develop more effective pro- or anti-angiogenic therapies. Recent studies have shown that the VEGFA co-receptor neuropilin 1 (NRP1) could be playing a fundamental role in steering VEGFA-induced responses of vascular endothelial cells towards angiogenesis or vascular permeability. Moreover, NRP1 is involved in mediating permeability signals induced by ligands other than VEGFA. This review therefore focuses on current knowledge on the role of NRP1 in the regulation of vascular permeability signaling in the endothelium to provide an up-to-date landscape of the current knowledge in this field.


Subject(s)
Capillary Permeability , Endothelium, Vascular/metabolism , Neuropilin-1/metabolism , Animals , Gene Expression Regulation , Humans , Signal Transduction , Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A/metabolism
11.
Sci Rep ; 10(1): 11548, 2020 07 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1309456

ABSTRACT

The objective of this study is to expound the CT features of COVID-19 patients whose throat swab samples were negative for two consecutive nucleic acid tests after treatment. We retrospectively reviewed 46 COVID-19 patients with two consecutive negative RT-PCR tests after treatment. The cases were divided into moderate group and severe/critical group according to disease severity. Clinical and CT scanning data were collected. CT signs of pulmonary lesions and the score of lung involvement were expounded. Thirty-nine moderate cases and seven severe/critical cases were included. Residual pulmonary lesions were visible in CT images. Moderate patients showed peripheral lesions while severe/critical cases exhibited both central and peripheral lesions with all lobes involvement. Mixed ground glass opacity (GGO) and pulmonary consolidation were noted. A larger proportion of severe patients showed reticular pulmonary interstitium thickening. Air bronchogram, pleural effusion, vascular enlargement, bronchial wall thickening, bronchiectasis, pleural thickening and pleural adhesion were more frequently observed in severe/critical group. The severe/critical group showed higher CT score. Pulmonary lesions persisted even after twice consecutive negative nucleic acid tests. We strongly recommended regular follow-up of CT scans after nucleic acid tests conversion. Evaluation of complete remission should base on chest CT.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/diagnostic imaging , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Adult , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Disease Progression , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Remission Induction , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome
12.
Diabetes Metab Syndr ; 15(3): 1039-1045, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1303499

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Initially, novel severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) was considered primarily a respiratory pathogen. However, with time it has behaved as a virus with the potential to cause multi-system involvement, including neurological manifestations. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVT) has increasingly been reported in association with coronavirus infectious disease of 2019 (COVID-19). Here, we have shed light upon CVT and its possible mechanisms in the backdrop of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: In this review, data were collected from PubMed, EMBASE and Web of Science, until March 30, 2021, using pre-specified searching strategies. The search strategy consisted of a variation of keywords of relevant medical subject headings and keywords, including "COVID-19", "SARS-CoV-2", "coronavirus", and "cerebral venous sinus thrombosis". RESULTS: COVID-19 has a causal association with a plethora of neurological, neuropsychiatric and psychological effects. CVT has gained particular importance in this regard. The known hypercoagulable state in SARS-CoV-2 infection is thought to be the main mechanism in COVID-19 related CVT. Other plausible mechanisms may include vascular endothelial dysfunction and altered flow dynamics. CONCLUSIONS: Although there are no specific clinical characteristics, insidious or acute onset headache, seizures, stroke-like, or encephalopathy symptoms in a patient with, or who has suffered COVID-19, should prompt the attending physician to investigate for CVT. The treatment of COVID-19 associated CVT does not differ radically from the therapy of CVT without the infection, i.e. urgent initiation of parenteral unfractionated heparin or low molecular weight heparin followed by conventional or mostly newer oral anticoagulants.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , Intracranial Thrombosis/etiology , Intracranial Thrombosis/therapy , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , COVID-19/epidemiology , Emergency Medical Services/methods , Heparin/therapeutic use , Humans , Intracranial Thrombosis/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
13.
Am J Trop Med Hyg ; 104(5): 1655-1658, 2021 Mar 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1302665

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has caused serious health and social concerns worldwide. Although the primary target of SARS-CoV-2 is the respiratory tract, SARS-CoV-2 infection also causes extrapulmonary symptoms. Previous articles have reported ischemic colitis in COVID-19 patients; however, information regarding its clinical manifestations and pathophysiology is limited. In this case report, we present two cases of ischemic enterocolitis in COVID-19 patients and review past case reports. Our literature review has shown that computed tomography rather than endoscopy was used for the diagnosis, and any region of the intestine was affected. Because the elevation of the D-dimer, which suggested a hypercoagulable state, was reported in most cases, we assumed that thrombosis at any level in the artery and vein was involved in the pathophysiology of COVID-19-associated enterocolitis. SARS-CoV-2-induced endotheliitis can cause both coarctation of the vessels and thrombosis; therefore, both patterns of ischemic colitis, occlusive and nonocclusive, may be involved in COVID-19-associated enterocolitis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Colitis, Ischemic/etiology , Enterocolitis/etiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Aged , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged
14.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(10): e24708, 2021 Mar 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1284920

ABSTRACT

RATIONALE: Pathogeny of thrombosis in COVID-19 is related to interaction of SARS-Cov-2 with vascular wall through the angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptor. This induces 2 pathways with immunothrombosis from activated endothelium (cytokine storm, leukocyte and platelet recruitment, and activation of coagulation extrinsic pathway), and rise of angiotensin II levels promoting inflammation. While thrombosis is widely described in COVID-19 patients admitted in intensive care unit, cerebrovascular diseases remains rare, in particular cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT). PATIENT CONCERNS: We describe 2 cases of women admitted during the spring of 2020 for intracranial hypertension signs, in stroke units in Great-east, a French area particularly affected by COVID-19 pandemia. DIAGNOSES: Cerebral imaging revealed extended CVT in both cases. The first case described was more serious due to right supratentorial venous infarction with hemorrhagic transformation leading to herniation. Both patients presented typical pneumonia due to SARS-Cov-2 infection, confirmed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction on a nasopharyngeal swab in only one. INTERVENTIONS: The first patient had to undergo decompressive craniectomy, and both patients were treated with anticoagulation therapy. OUTCOMES: Favorable outcome was observed for 1 patient. Persistent coma, due to bi thalamic infarction, remained for the other with more serious presentation. LESSONS: CVT, as a serious complication of COVID-19, has to be searched in all patients with intracranial hypertension syndrome. Data about anticoagulation therapy to prevent such serious thrombosis in SARS-Cov-2 infection are lacking, in particular in patients with mild and moderate COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Intracranial Thrombosis/etiology , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , COVID-19/immunology , Decompressive Craniectomy/methods , Female , Humans , Intracranial Thrombosis/immunology , Intracranial Thrombosis/therapy , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
15.
Open Heart ; 8(1)2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1269804

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Prior diagnosis of heart failure (HF) is associated with increased length of hospital stay (LOS) and mortality from COVID-19. Associations between substance use, venous thromboembolism (VTE) or peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and its effects on LOS or mortality in patients with HF hospitalised with COVID-19 remain unknown. OBJECTIVE: This study identified risk factors associated with poor in-hospital outcomes among patients with HF hospitalised with COVID-19. METHODS: Case-control study was conducted of patients with prior diagnosis of HF hospitalised with COVID-19 at an academic tertiary care centre from 1 January 2020 to 28 February 2021. Patients with HF hospitalised with COVID-19 with risk factors were compared with those without risk factors for clinical characteristics, LOS and mortality. Multivariate regression was conducted to identify multiple predictors of increased LOS and in-hospital mortality in patients with HF hospitalised with COVID-19. RESULTS: Total of 211 patients with HF were hospitalised with COVID-19. Women had longer LOS than men (9 days vs 7 days; p<0.001). Compared with patients without PAD or ischaemic stroke, patients with PAD or ischaemic stroke had longer LOS (7 days vs 9 days; p=0.012 and 7 days vs 11 days, p<0.001, respectively). Older patients (aged 65 and above) had increased in-hospital mortality compared with younger patients (adjusted OR: 1.04; 95% CI 1.00 to 1.07; p=0.036). Prior diagnosis of VTE increased mortality more than threefold in patients with HF hospitalised with COVID-19 (adjusted OR: 3.33; 95% CI 1.29 to 8.43; p=0.011). CONCLUSION: Vascular diseases increase LOS and mortality in patients with HF hospitalised with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Comorbidity/trends , Heart Failure/mortality , Vascular Diseases/complications , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/virology , Case-Control Studies , Female , Heart Failure/diagnosis , Heart Failure/drug therapy , Heart Failure/virology , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Ischemic Stroke/complications , Ischemic Stroke/epidemiology , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Peripheral Arterial Disease/complications , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Substance-Related Disorders/complications , Venous Thromboembolism/complications
16.
Abdom Radiol (NY) ; 46(7): 3490-3500, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1265491

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To assess the spectrum of computed tomography angiogram (CTA) abdominal and pelvic findings in critically ill COVID-19 patients and investigate correlation with CT chest scores. METHODS: An IRB approved retrospective study of CTA of the chest, abdomen and pelvis between dates March 1st to September 15th, 2020 was performed in the hospitalized COVID-19 positive patients. CTA studies of solely the chest were excluded. Medical record review was performed to note patient demographics, CTA scan details and coagulation profile. CTA findings were reviewed to record vascular and non-vascular findings. CT chest was reviewed to calculate CT chest score. Logistic regression analyses were performed to correlate CT chest scores with odds of vascular and other abdomen-pelvis findings. A p < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. RESULTS: A total of 45 consecutive hospitalized COVID-19 positive patients with 61 years mean age and M:F (2:1) gender ratio were evaluated, out of which majority 68.9% (n = 31) had CTA chest, abdomen and pelvis. The most common vascular findings were hematoma 46.7% (n = 21), active extravasation 24.4% (n = 11) and vascular occlusion 17.8% (n = 8). Higher CT chest scores were significantly associated with hematoma/extravasation (OR 1.19, 95% CI 1.07-1.34, p < 0.01). The most common non-vascular abdomen-pelvis findings were seen in organs gallbladder 20% (n = 9), liver 20% (n = 9) followed by kidney 15.6% (n = 7). Higher CT chest scores were significantly associated with bowel findings (OR 1.28, 95% CI 1.01-1.63, p < 0.05) and cholestasis (OR 13.3, 95% CI 1.28-138.9, p < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Patients with moderate to severe COVID-19 pneumonia have significantly higher rate of vascular complications in the abdomen and pelvis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Abdomen/diagnostic imaging , Computed Tomography Angiography , Critical Illness , Humans , Pelvis/diagnostic imaging , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Tomography, X-Ray Computed
17.
Front Immunol ; 12: 660179, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1264332

ABSTRACT

The complex interplay between the gut microbiota, the intestinal barrier, the immune system and the liver is strongly influenced by environmental and genetic factors that can disrupt the homeostasis leading to disease. Among the modulable factors, diet has been identified as a key regulator of microbiota composition in patients with metabolic syndrome and related diseases, including the metabolic dysfunction-associated fatty liver disease (MAFLD). The altered microbiota disrupts the intestinal barrier at different levels inducing functional and structural changes at the mucus lining, the intercellular junctions on the epithelial layer, or at the recently characterized vascular barrier. Barrier disruption leads to an increased gut permeability to bacteria and derived products which challenge the immune system and promote inflammation. All these alterations contribute to the pathogenesis of MAFLD, and thus, therapeutic approaches targeting the gut-liver-axis are increasingly being explored. In addition, the specific changes induced in the intestinal flora may allow to characterize distinctive microbial signatures for non-invasive diagnosis, severity stratification and disease monitoring.


Subject(s)
Gastrointestinal Microbiome/immunology , Intestinal Mucosa/immunology , Liver/immunology , Metabolic Syndrome/immunology , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/immunology , Animals , CCR5 Receptor Antagonists/therapeutic use , Dysbiosis/immunology , Dysbiosis/microbiology , Humans , Imidazoles/therapeutic use , Intestinal Mucosa/metabolism , Intestinal Mucosa/microbiology , Liver/metabolism , Liver/pathology , Metabolic Syndrome/drug therapy , Metabolic Syndrome/metabolism , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/drug therapy , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/metabolism , Sulfoxides/therapeutic use
18.
Biomed Res Int ; 2021: 5554500, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1263956

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: We aimed to evaluate the advantages of preoperative digital design of skin flaps to repair fingertip defects during the COVID-19 pandemic. We combined digital design with a 3D-printed model of the affected finger for preoperative communication with fingertip defect patients under observation in a buffer ward. METHODS: From December 2019 to January 2021, we obtained data from 25 cases of 30 fingertip defects in 15 males and 10 females, aged 20-65 years old (mean 35 ± 5 years). All cases were treated by digitally designing preoperative fingertip defect flaps combined with a 3D-printed model. Preoperative 3D Systems Sense scanning was routinely performed, 3-matic 12.0 was used to measure the fingertip defect area ranging from 1.5 cm × 3.5 cm to 2.0 cm × 5.0 cm, and the skin flap was designed. The flap area was 1.6 cm × 3.6 cm to 2.1 cm × 5.1 cm. CURA 15.02.1 was used to set parameters, and the 3D model of the affected finger was printed prior to the operation. Full-thickness skin grafts were taken from donor areas for repair. RESULTS: No vascular crises occurred in any of the 25 cases, and all flaps survived. The postoperative follow-up occurred over 3-12 months. All patients were evaluated 3 months after operation according to the trial standard of hand function evaluation of the Chinese Hand Surgery Society. The results showed that 20 cases had excellent outcomes (80%), four cases had good outcomes (16%), and one case had a fair outcome (4%). The excellent and good rate was 96%. CONCLUSIONS: During the COVID-19 epidemic, fingertip defects were treated with preoperative digital design of fingertip defect flaps combined with 3D printing. Precision design saves surgery time and improves the success rate of surgery and the survival rates of skin flaps. In addition, 3D model simulations improve preoperative communication efficiency, and the personalized design improves patient satisfaction.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Finger Injuries/surgery , Fingers/surgery , Pandemics , Preoperative Care/methods , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/methods , Skin Transplantation/methods , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/psychology , China/epidemiology , Female , Graft Survival , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Models, Anatomic , Printing, Three-Dimensional/instrumentation , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/psychology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Skin Transplantation/psychology , Surgical Flaps/blood supply , Surgical Flaps/innervation , Treatment Outcome , Wound Healing/physiology
19.
Nat Med ; 27(7): 1290-1297, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1263501

ABSTRACT

Reports of ChAdOx1 vaccine-associated thrombocytopenia and vascular adverse events have led to some countries restricting its use. Using a national prospective cohort, we estimated associations between exposure to first-dose ChAdOx1 or BNT162b2 vaccination and hematological and vascular adverse events using a nested incident-matched case-control study and a confirmatory self-controlled case series (SCCS) analysis. An association was found between ChAdOx1 vaccination and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) (0-27 d after vaccination; adjusted rate ratio (aRR) = 5.77, 95% confidence interval (CI), 2.41-13.83), with an estimated incidence of 1.13 (0.62-1.63) cases per 100,000 doses. An SCCS analysis confirmed that this was unlikely due to bias (RR = 1.98 (1.29-3.02)). There was also an increased risk for arterial thromboembolic events (aRR = 1.22, 1.12-1.34) 0-27 d after vaccination, with an SCCS RR of 0.97 (0.93-1.02). For hemorrhagic events 0-27 d after vaccination, the aRR was 1.48 (1.12-1.96), with an SCCS RR of 0.95 (0.82-1.11). A first dose of ChAdOx1 was found to be associated with small increased risks of ITP, with suggestive evidence of an increased risk of arterial thromboembolic and hemorrhagic events. The attenuation of effect found in the SCCS analysis means that there is the potential for overestimation of the reported results, which might indicate the presence of some residual confounding or confounding by indication. Public health authorities should inform their jurisdictions of these relatively small increased risks associated with ChAdOx1. No positive associations were seen between BNT162b2 and thrombocytopenic, thromboembolic and hemorrhagic events.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , COVID-19/prevention & control , Hemorrhage/epidemiology , Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic/epidemiology , Thrombocytopenia/epidemiology , Thromboembolism/epidemiology , Venous Thromboembolism/epidemiology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Case-Control Studies , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Scotland/epidemiology , Sinus Thrombosis, Intracranial/epidemiology , Young Adult
20.
Med Clin (Engl Ed) ; 156(11): 541-546, 2021 Jun 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1261937

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To describe macular vessel density and perfusion in COVID-19 patients using coherence tomography angiography (OCTA) and to investigate whether there is a correlation between retinal vascular abnormalities and clinical and laboratory parameters. METHODS: Cross-sectional analysis conducted at the Hospital Clinico San Carlos in Madrid, Spain. Patients with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 that were attended in the Emergency Department (ED) from March 23 to March 29, 2020 were included. Fundus examination and OCTA were performed 4 weeks after being attended in ED. Macular OCTA parameters were analyzed and correlated with clinical (severity and hypoxemia- oxygen saturation < 92%) and laboratory parameters during hospital stay (D-Dimer-DD, lactate dehydrogenase-LDH and C-reactive protein-CRP). RESULTS: 80 patients were included, mean age 55(SD9) years old; 46.3% male. We reported macular vessel density and perfusion measurements in COVID-19 patients. Those patients with D-Dimer ≥ 500 ng/ml during SARS-CoV-2 infection had a decrease of central vessel density (mean difference 2.2; 95%CI 0.4-3.9) and perfusion density (mean difference 4.9; 95%CI 0.9-8.9) after the acute phase of COVID-19. These variations of vessel density and perfusion density were not documented in patients with LDH ≥ 500 U/L, CRP ≥ 10 mg/L and hypoxemia. CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 patients showed short-term retinal vasculature abnormalities which may be related to a prothrombotic state associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection. Since the retinal microvasculature shares many morphological and physiological properties with the vasculature of other vital organs, further research is needed to establish whether patients with increased D-Dimer levels require more careful assessment and follow-up after COVID-19.


OBJETIVO: Evaluar la densidad vascular (DV) y la perfusión vascular (PV) retiniana en pacientes con COVID-19 mediante una angiografía por tomografía de coherencia óptica (OCTA), e investigar si existe una correlación entre las anomalías vasculares de la retina y los parámetros clínicos y de laboratorio. MÉTODOS: Análisis transversal realizado en el Hospital Clínico San Carlos, Madrid. Se incluyeron pacientes con diagnóstico confirmado de COVID-19 atendidos en el Servicio de Urgencias (SU) del 23 al 29 de marzo del 2020. Se realizó una exploración oftalmológica y OCTA cuatro semanas después de acudir al SU. Se analizaron los parámetros maculares de OCTA y se correlacionaron con parámetros clínicos (gravedad e hipoxemia-saturación de oxígeno < 92%) y de laboratorio durante la estancia hospitalaria (dímero D [DD], lactato deshidrogenasa [LDH] y proteína C reactiva [CRP]. RESULTADOS: Se incluyeron 80 pacientes, edad media 55 (DE nueve) años; 46,3% hombres. Las personas con DD > 500 ng/mL durante la infección por SARS-CoV-2 tuvieron una disminución de la DV central (diferencia de medias 2,2; IC 95% 0,4 a 3,9) y PV central (diferencia de medias 4,9; IC 95% 0,9 a 8,9) después de la fase aguda de COVID-19. Estas variaciones no se documentaron en los pacientes con LDH > = 500 U/L, CRP > = 10 mg/L y con hipoxemia. CONCLUSIONES: Los pacientes con COVID-19 mostraron anomalías de la vasculatura retiniana a corto plazo que pueden estar relacionadas con un estado protrombótico asociado con la infección por SARS-CoV-2. Dado que la microvasculatura de la retina comparte muchas propiedades morfológicas y fisiológicas con la vasculatura de otros órganos vitales, es necesario seguir investigando para determinar si los pacientes con niveles elevados de DD requieren una evaluación y un seguimiento más cuidadoso.

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