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1.
Nurse Educ Pract ; 54: 103101, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1244798

ABSTRACT

International learning in undergraduate global nurse education is recognised for promoting essential cultural competence. This can be addressed both at university; through the increasing use of collaborative technology and in practice, where the impact of international placements has promoted cultural sensitivity and outward student mobility. The authors debate the barriers that impede students' desire to take up international placements and review initiatives to promote a greater investment in this experience. The complexity and lack of transcultural principles that govern an international placement exchange have been addressed by one initiative to produce a robust pan-European quality audit process for clinical learning environments. In conclusion, the authors call for a greater and evaluated effort to increase global understanding and learning in the context of the COVID-19 response.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate , Students, Nursing , Curriculum , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Nurse Educ Today ; 104: 104985, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1243137

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Previous studies suggest that increased learning satisfaction may encourage learning engagement in an online learning environment. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the level of learning engagement and its relationship with students' perceived learning satisfaction in an online clinical nursing elective course. DESIGN: A prospective interventional study. SETTINGS: A nursing course was converted to an online format because of the coronavirus disease COVID pandemic. PARTICIPANTS: Part-time post-registration nursing undergraduates enrolled in an elective online clinical course. METHODS: Related teaching and learning strategies were deployed in the course using the Community of Inquiry framework. All students who completed the course were invited to complete an online survey that included a validated Online Student Engagement questionnaire (OSE). Pearson's correlations were used to determine the association between perceived learning satisfaction and learning engagement. A logistic regression model was used to explore the associations of gender, age, working experience and perceived learning satisfaction with higher learning engagement. RESULTS: The questionnaires were completed by 56 of 68 students (82%). The Pearson's correlation coefficient between the mean perceived learning satisfaction and OSE scores was 0.75 (p < .001). Twenty-five students (45%) were identified as highly engaged, using a cut-off of ≥3.5 for the mean OSE score. The mean perceived learning satisfaction (SD) score differed significantly between highly engaged and not highly engaged students [4.02 (0.49) vs. 3.27 (0.62), p < .001]. The logistic regression model showed that a greater perceived learning satisfaction [adjusted odds ratio (OR): 17.2, 95% C.I.: 3.46-86.0, p = .001] was associated with an increased likelihood of higher learning engagement, and >1 year of working experience (adjusted OR: 0.11, 95% C.I.: 0.01-0.89, p = .0039) was associated with a decreased likelihood of higher learning engagement. CONCLUSIONS: The study findings suggest that perceived learning satisfaction predicts learning engagement among nursing students in this online learning course.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Students, Nursing , Humans , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
3.
JMIR Med Inform ; 9(3): e24497, 2021 Mar 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1158312

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Histology and Embryology and Pathology are two important basic medical morphology courses for studying human histological structures under healthy and pathological conditions, respectively. There is a natural succession between the two courses. At the beginning of 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic suddenly swept the world. During this unusual period, to ensure that medical students would understand and master basic medical knowledge and to lay a solid foundation for future medical bridge courses and professional courses, a web-based medical morphology teaching team, mainly including teachers of courses in Histology and Embryology and Pathology, was established. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to explore a new teaching mode of Histology and Embryology and Pathology courses during the COVID-19 pandemic and to illustrate its feasibility and acceptability. METHODS: From March to July 2020, our team selected clinical medicine undergraduate students who started their studies in 2018 and 2019 as recipients of web-based teaching. Meanwhile, nursing undergraduate students who started their studies in 2019 and 2020 were selected for traditional offline teaching as the control group. For the web-based teaching, our team used the Xuexi Tong platform as the major platform to realize a new "seven-in-one" teaching method (ie, videos, materials, chapter tests, interactions, homework, live broadcasts, and case analysis/discussion). This new teaching mode involved diverse web-based teaching methods and contents, including flipped classroom, screen-to-screen experimental teaching, a drawing competition, and a writing activity on the theme of "What I Know About COVID-19." When the teaching was about to end, a questionnaire was administered to obtain feedback regarding the teaching performance. In the meantime, the final written pathology examination results of the web-based teaching and traditional offline teaching groups were compared to examine the mastery of knowledge of the students. RESULTS: Using the Xuexi Tong platform as the major platform to conduct "seven-in-one" teaching is feasible and acceptable. With regard to the teaching performance of this new web-based teaching mode, students demonstrated a high degree of satisfaction, and the questionnaire showed that 71.3% or more of the students in different groups reported a greater degree of satisfaction or being very satisfied. In fact, more students achieved high scores (90-100) in the web-based learning group than in the offline learning control group (P=.02). Especially, the number of students with objective scores >60 in the web-based learning group was greater than that in the offline learning control group (P=.045). CONCLUSIONS: This study showed that the web-based teaching mode was not inferior to the traditional offline teaching mode for medical morphology courses, proving the feasibility and acceptability of web-based teaching during the COVID-19 pandemic. Our findings lay a solid theoretical foundation for follow-up studies of medical students.

4.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 17(19)2020 09 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1000273

ABSTRACT

Assessing healthy diet literacy and eating behaviors is critical for identifying appropriate public health responses to the COVID-19 pandemic. We examined the psychometric properties of digital healthy diet literacy (DDL) and its association with eating behavior changes during the COVID-19 pandemic among nursing and medical students. We conducted a cross-sectional study from 7 April to 31 May 2020 at 10 public universities in Vietnam, in which 7616 undergraduate students aged 19-27 completed an online survey to assess socio-demographics, clinical parameters, health literacy (HL), DDL, and health-related behaviors. Four items of the DDL scale loaded on one component explained 71.32%, 67.12%, and 72.47% of the scale variances for the overall sample, nursing, and medical students, respectively. The DDL scale was found to have satisfactory item-scale convergent validity and criterion validity, high internal consistency reliability, and no floor or ceiling effect. Of all, 42.8% of students reported healthier eating behavior during the pandemic. A 10-index score increment of DDL was associated with 18%, 23%, and 17% increased likelihood of healthier eating behavior during the pandemic for the overall sample (OR, 1.18; 95%CI, 1.13, 1.24; p < 0.001), nursing students (OR, 1.23; 95%CI, 1.10, 1.35; p < 0.001), and medical students (OR, 1.17; 95%CI, 1.11, 1.24; p < 0.001), respectively. The DDL scale is a valid and reliable tool for the quick assessment of digital healthy diet literacy. Students with higher DDL scores had a higher likelihood of healthier eating behavior during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Diet, Healthy , Feeding Behavior , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Students, Medical , Students, Nursing , Adult , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate , Humans , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Vietnam , Young Adult
5.
J Nurs Educ ; 59(12): 675-682, 2020 Dec 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-948859

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In March 2020, COVID-19 forced institutions of higher education, faculty, staff, and students to transition to emergency remote learning. This unprecedented time provided the opportunity to reenvision the delivery of nursing education and operation of the college of nursing, using the principles of the four Cs of interorganizational partnering as a guide supported by positive organizational scholarship. METHOD: The Villanova University Fitzpatrick College of Nursing designed and implemented strategies to provide seamless learning opportunities for students in undergraduate and graduate nursing programs, while providing necessary support and future planning for the upcoming academic year. RESULTS: Online and virtual learning platforms integrated into curricula assisted students to meet course objectives and program outcomes. Strategies for effective communication, collegiality, and collaboration within and among the college, university, and nursing community served as mechanism for innovation. CONCLUSION: Communication, cooperation, coordination, and collaboration, along with positive organizational strategizing and support contributed to a successful transition during the COVID-19 pandemic; many of the approaches implemented during the emergency transition will continue into the future.[J Nurs Educ. 2020;59(12):675-682.].


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Pandemics , Schools, Nursing/organization & administration , Communication , Curriculum , Humans , Patient Simulation , Pennsylvania/epidemiology , Telemedicine , Universities
6.
BMJ Open ; 10(10): e041671, 2020 10 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-883374

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The COVID-19 outbreak has caused enormous strain on healthcare systems, and healthcare trainees, which comprise the future healthcare workforce, may be a vulnerable group. It is essential to assess the psychological distress experienced by healthcare trainees during the COVID-19 outbreak. DESIGN, SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: A cross-sectional study with 4184 healthcare trainees at Sichuan University in China was implemented during 7-13 February 2020. Participants were grouped by training programmes (medicine, medical technology and nursing) and training stages (undergraduate, postgraduate and residency). MAIN OUTCOMES: COVID-19-related psychological distress and acute stress reaction (ASR) were assessed using the Kessler 6-item Psychological Distress Scale and the Impact of Event Scale-Revised, respectively. We estimated the ORs of distress by comparing trainees across programmes and training stages using multivariable logistic regression. RESULTS: Significant psychological distress was found in 1150 (30.90%) participants and probable ASR in 403 (10.74%). Compared with the nursing trainees, the medical trainees (OR 1.54, 95% CI 1.22 to 1.95) reported a higher burden of psychological distress during the outbreak, while the medical technology trainees (OR 1.25, 95% CI 0.97 to 1.62) reported similar symptom scores. Postgraduates (OR 1.55, 95% CI 1.16 to 2.08) in medicine had higher levels of distress than their undergraduate counterparts did, whereas the nursing residents (OR 0.38, 95% CI 0.20 to 0.71) reported a lower burden than did nursing undergraduates. A positive association was found between having active clinical duties during the outbreak and distress (OR 1.17, 95% CI 0.98 to 1.39), particularly among the medical trainees (OR 1.85, 95% CI 1.47 to 2.33) and undergraduates (OR 4.20, 95% CI 1.61 to 11.70). No clear risk patterns of ASR symptoms were observed. CONCLUSIONS: Medical trainees, particularly postgraduates and those with active clinical duties, were at risk for psychological distress during the COVID-19 outbreak. Stress management may be considered for high-risk healthcare trainees.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Psychological Distress , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Adult , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Incidence , Male , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/etiology , Young Adult
7.
Healthcare (Basel) ; 8(3)2020 Aug 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-724733

ABSTRACT

Simulated video consultations, a teaching tool based on high-fidelity simulations, were implemented in response to the necessary adaptation of high-fidelity clinical simulation sessions to the online or virtual modality during the university closure due to the COVID-19 confinement. The purpose of our study was to explore the undergraduate nursing students' satisfaction and perceptions about simulated video consultations using the high-fidelity simulation methodology. A mixed-method was utilized with 93 undergraduate nursing students using a validated satisfaction questionnaire (quantitative data), which included an observations section (qualitative data). Of the total sample, 97.8% of the students expressed a high overall satisfaction with simulated video consultations, highlighting their practical utility and positive learning outcomes. From the students' comments, two main themes and their related categories emerged: advantages (satisfaction and enjoyment, learning, and calmness during simulated scenarios), and disadvantages (technical issues and technical skills development). Simulated video consultations may be considered as one more high-fidelity simulation teaching option. Nursing students should be trained in this modality of healthcare to face the challenge brought on by its increased use in healthcare services, beyond the specific adaptation of clinical simulation sessions due to the closure of universities during this pandemic.

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