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1.
Orphanet J Rare Dis ; 16(1): 204, 2021 05 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1219017

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The global spread of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection causing the ongoing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has raised serious concern for patients with chronic disease. A correlation has been identified between the severity of COVID-19 and a patient's preexisting comorbidities. Although COVID-19 primarily involves the respiratory system, dysfunction in multiple organ systems is common, particularly in the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, immune, renal, and nervous systems. Patients with amyloid transthyretin (ATTR) amyloidosis represent a population particularly vulnerable to COVID-19 morbidity due to the multisystem nature of ATTR amyloidosis. MAIN BODY: ATTR amyloidosis is a clinically heterogeneous progressive disease, resulting from the accumulation of amyloid fibrils in various organs and tissues. Amyloid deposition causes multisystem clinical manifestations, including cardiomyopathy and polyneuropathy, along with gastrointestinal symptoms and renal dysfunction. Given the potential for exacerbation of organ dysfunction, physicians note possible unique challenges in the management of patients with ATTR amyloidosis who develop multiorgan complications from COVID-19. While the interplay between COVID-19 and ATTR amyloidosis is still being evaluated, physicians should consider that the heightened susceptibility of patients with ATTR amyloidosis to multiorgan complications might increase their risk for poor outcomes with COVID-19. CONCLUSION: Patients with ATTR amyloidosis are suspected to have a higher risk of morbidity and mortality due to age and underlying ATTR amyloidosis-related organ dysfunction. While further research is needed to characterize this risk and management implications, ATTR amyloidosis patients might require specialized management if they develop COVID-19. The risks of delaying diagnosis or interrupting treatment for patients with ATTR amyloidosis should be balanced with the risk of exposure in the health care setting. Both physicians and patients must adapt to a new construct for care during and possibly after the pandemic to ensure optimal health for patients with ATTR amyloidosis, minimizing treatment interruptions.


Subject(s)
Amyloid Neuropathies, Familial , COVID-19 , Amyloid , Humans , Pandemics , Prealbumin , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(8)2021 Apr 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1196033

ABSTRACT

Amyloidoses are a group of diseases associated with the formation of pathological protein fibrils with cross-ß structures. Approximately 5-10% of the cases of these diseases are determined by amyloidogenic mutations, as well as by transmission of infectious amyloids (prions) between organisms. The most common group of so-called sporadic amyloidoses is associated with abnormal aggregation of wild-type proteins. Some sporadic amyloidoses are known to be induced only against the background of certain pathologies, but in some cases the cause of amyloidosis is unclear. It is assumed that these diseases often occur by accident. Here we present facts and hypotheses about the association of sporadic amyloidoses with vascular pathologies, trauma, oxidative stress, cancer, metabolic diseases, chronic infections and COVID-19. Generalization of current data shows that all sporadic amyloidoses can be regarded as a secondary event occurring against the background of diseases provoking a cellular stress response. Various factors causing the stress response provoke protein overproduction, a local increase in the concentration or modifications, which contributes to amyloidogenesis. Progress in the treatment of vascular, metabolic and infectious diseases, as well as cancers, should lead to a significant reduction in the risk of sporadic amyloidoses.


Subject(s)
Amyloidosis/etiology , Stress, Physiological , Brain Injuries/complications , Communicable Diseases/complications , Humans , Metabolic Diseases/complications , Neoplasms/complications , Oxidative Stress , Vascular Diseases/complications
3.
Prion ; 15(1): 53-55, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1193688

ABSTRACT

The severe course of COVID-19 causes systemic chronic inflammation and thrombosis in a wide variety of organs and tissues. The nature of these inflammations remains a mystery, although they are known to occur against the background of a high level of cytokine production. The high level of cytokines provokes overproduction of the Serum amyloid A (SAA) protein. Moreover, the number of studies has shown that the severe COVID-19 causes SAA overproduction. The authors of these works regard a high level of SAA exclusively as a biomarker of COVID-19. However, it should be borne in mind that overproduction of SAA can cause systemic AA amyloidosis. SAA forms cytotoxic amyloid deposits in various organs and induces inflammation and thrombosis. The consequences of COVID-19 infection are surprisingly similar to the clinical picture that is observed in AA amyloidosis. Here I present the hypothesis that AA amyloidosis is a factor causing systemic complications after coronavirus disease.


Subject(s)
Amyloidosis , COVID-19 , Serum Amyloid A Protein , Amyloidosis/blood , Amyloidosis/physiopathology , Amyloidosis/virology , Biomarkers , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/physiopathology , Humans , Inflammation
4.
Malar J ; 20(1): 88, 2021 Feb 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1090664

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Malaria remains a serious health threat in the Amazonas Region of Peru and approximately 95% of the cases, mainly Plasmodium vivax, are found in native communities of The Rio Santiago District, Condorcanqui Province. In 2019, more than one thousand malaria cases were reported, with an unusual number of Plasmodium falciparum autochthonous cases. The present study aims to report this P. falciparum outbreak while describing the epidemiology of malaria and the risk factors associated in the native communities of Amazonas, Peru. METHODS: The DIRESA-Amazonas in collaboration with the Condorcanqui Health Network and the Institute of Tropical Diseases of the UNTRM carried out a malaria Active Case Detection (ACD III) between January 31st and February 10th of 2020. A total of 2718 (47.4%) individuals from 21 native communities grouped in eight sanitary districts, were screened for malaria infections. Each participant was screened for malaria using microscopy. Follow-up surveys were conducted for all malaria positive individuals to collect socio-demographic data. Spatial clustering of infection risk was calculated using a generalized linear model (GLM). Analysis of risk considered factors such as gender, age, type of infection, symptomatology, and parasitaemia. RESULTS: The study suggests that the P. falciparum index case was imported from Loreto and later spread to other communities of Rio Santiago during 2019. The ACD III reported 220 (8.1%) malaria cases, 46 P. falciparum, 168 P. vivax and 6 mixed infections. SaTScan analysis detected a cluster of high infection risk in Middle Rio Santiago and a particular high P. falciparum infection risk cluster in Upper Rio Santiago. Interestingly, the evaluation of different risk factors showed significant associations between low parasitaemia and P. falciparum asymptomatic cases. CONCLUSION: This is the first report of a P. falciparum outbreak in native communities of Condorcanqui, Amazonas. Timely identification and treatment of symptomatic and asymptomatic cases are critical to achieve malaria control and possible elimination in this area. However, the current malaria situation in Condorcanqui is uncertain, given that malaria ACD activities have been postponed due to COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Disease Outbreaks , Malaria, Falciparum/epidemiology , Adolescent , Adult , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Peru/epidemiology , Rural Population , Young Adult
5.
Malar J ; 20(1): 88, 2021 Feb 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1083011

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Malaria remains a serious health threat in the Amazonas Region of Peru and approximately 95% of the cases, mainly Plasmodium vivax, are found in native communities of The Rio Santiago District, Condorcanqui Province. In 2019, more than one thousand malaria cases were reported, with an unusual number of Plasmodium falciparum autochthonous cases. The present study aims to report this P. falciparum outbreak while describing the epidemiology of malaria and the risk factors associated in the native communities of Amazonas, Peru. METHODS: The DIRESA-Amazonas in collaboration with the Condorcanqui Health Network and the Institute of Tropical Diseases of the UNTRM carried out a malaria Active Case Detection (ACD III) between January 31st and February 10th of 2020. A total of 2718 (47.4%) individuals from 21 native communities grouped in eight sanitary districts, were screened for malaria infections. Each participant was screened for malaria using microscopy. Follow-up surveys were conducted for all malaria positive individuals to collect socio-demographic data. Spatial clustering of infection risk was calculated using a generalized linear model (GLM). Analysis of risk considered factors such as gender, age, type of infection, symptomatology, and parasitaemia. RESULTS: The study suggests that the P. falciparum index case was imported from Loreto and later spread to other communities of Rio Santiago during 2019. The ACD III reported 220 (8.1%) malaria cases, 46 P. falciparum, 168 P. vivax and 6 mixed infections. SaTScan analysis detected a cluster of high infection risk in Middle Rio Santiago and a particular high P. falciparum infection risk cluster in Upper Rio Santiago. Interestingly, the evaluation of different risk factors showed significant associations between low parasitaemia and P. falciparum asymptomatic cases. CONCLUSION: This is the first report of a P. falciparum outbreak in native communities of Condorcanqui, Amazonas. Timely identification and treatment of symptomatic and asymptomatic cases are critical to achieve malaria control and possible elimination in this area. However, the current malaria situation in Condorcanqui is uncertain, given that malaria ACD activities have been postponed due to COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Disease Outbreaks , Malaria, Falciparum/epidemiology , Adolescent , Adult , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Peru/epidemiology , Rural Population , Young Adult
6.
Circulation ; 143(3): 230-243, 2021 01 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1039948

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and its resultant clinical presentation, coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), is an emergent cause of mortality worldwide. Cardiac complications secondary to this infection are common; however, the underlying mechanisms of such remain unclear. A detailed cardiac evaluation of a series of individuals with COVID-19 undergoing postmortem evaluation is provided, with 4 aims: (1) describe the pathological spectrum of the myocardium; (2) compare with an alternate viral illness; (3) investigate angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 expression; and (4) provide the first description of the cardiac findings in patients with cleared infection. METHODS: Study cases were identified from institutional files and included COVID-19 (n=15: 12 active, 3 cleared), influenza A/B (n=6), and nonvirally mediated deaths (n=6). Salient information was abstracted from the medical record. Light microscopic findings were recorded. An angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 immunohistochemical H-score was compared across cases. Viral detection encompassed SARS-CoV-2 immunohistochemistry, ultrastructural examination, and droplet digital polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: Male sex was more common in the COVID-19 group (P=0.05). Nonocclusive fibrin microthrombi (without ischemic injury) were identified in 16 cases (12 COVID-19, 2 influenza, and 2 controls) and were more common in the active COVID-19 cohort (P=0.006). Four active COVID-19 cases showed focal myocarditis, whereas 1 case of cleared COVID-19 showed extensive disease. Arteriolar angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 endothelial expression was lower in COVID-19 cases than in controls (P=0.004). Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 myocardial expression did not differ by disease category, sex, age, or number of patient comorbidities (P=0.69, P=1.00, P=0.46, P=0.65, respectively). SARS-CoV-2 immunohistochemistry showed nonspecific staining, whereas ultrastructural examination and droplet digital polymerase chain reaction were negative for viral presence. Four patients (26.7%) with COVID-19 had underlying cardiac amyloidosis. Cases with cleared infection had variable presentations. CONCLUSIONS: This detailed histopathologic, immunohistochemical, ultrastructural, and molecular cardiac series showed no definitive evidence of direct myocardial infection. COVID-19 cases frequently have cardiac fibrin microthrombi, without universal acute ischemic injury. Moreover, myocarditis is present in 33.3% of patients with active and cleared COVID-19 but is usually limited in extent. Histological features of resolved infection are variable. Cardiac amyloidosis may be an additional risk factor for severe disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Coronary Thrombosis , Fibrin/metabolism , Myocardium , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/biosynthesis , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/pathology , Child , Child, Preschool , Coronary Thrombosis/metabolism , Coronary Thrombosis/mortality , Coronary Thrombosis/pathology , Female , Gene Expression Regulation, Enzymologic , Humans , Immunohistochemistry , Infant , Male , Middle Aged , Myocardium/metabolism , Myocardium/pathology
7.
Amyloid ; 27(4): 217-222, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-889371

ABSTRACT

The ISA Nomenclature Committee met electronically before and directly after the XVII ISA International Symposium on Amyloidosis, which, unfortunately, had to be virtual in September 2020 due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic instead of a planned meeting in Tarragona in March. In addition to confirmation of basic nomenclature, several additional concepts were discussed, which are used in scientific amyloid literature. Among such concepts are cytotoxic oligomers, protofibrils, primary and secondary nucleation, seeding and cross-seeding, amyloid signature proteins, and amyloid plaques. Recommendations for their use are given. Definitions of amyloid and amyloidosis are confirmed. Possible novel human amyloid fibril proteins, appearing as 'classical' in vivo amyloid, were discussed. It was decided to include fibulin-like extracellular matrix protein 1 (amyloid protein: AEFEMP1), which appears as localised amyloid in portal veins. There are several possible amyloid proteins under investigation, and these are included in a new Table.


Subject(s)
Amyloid/classification , Amyloidogenic Proteins/classification , Amyloidosis/classification , Terminology as Topic , Amyloid/genetics , Amyloid/metabolism , Amyloidogenic Proteins/genetics , Amyloidogenic Proteins/metabolism , Amyloidosis/diagnosis , Amyloidosis/genetics , Amyloidosis/pathology , COVID-19 , Congresses as Topic , Coronavirus Infections , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Gene Expression , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral
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