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1.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(2): e210202, 2021 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1858185

ABSTRACT

Importance: Owing to concerns of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreaks, many congregant settings are forced to close when cases are detected because there are few data on the risk of different markers of transmission within groups. Objective: To determine whether symptoms and laboratory results on the first day of COVID-19 diagnosis are associated with development of a case cluster in a congregant setting. Design, Setting, and Participants: This cohort study of trainees with COVID-19 from May 11 through August 24, 2020, was conducted at Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, the primary site of entry for enlistment in the US Air Force. Symptoms and duration, known contacts, and cycle threshold for trainees diagnosed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction were collected. A cycle threshold value represents the number of nucleic acid amplification cycles that occur before a specimen containing the target material generates a signal greater than the predetermined threshold that defines positivity. Cohorts with 5 or more individuals with COVID-19 infection were defined as clusters. Participants included 10 613 trainees divided into 263 parallel cohorts of 30 to 50 people arriving weekly for 7 weeks of training. Exposures: All trainees were quarantined for 14 days on arrival. Testing was performed on arrival, on day 14, and anytime during training when indicated. Protective measures included universal masking, physical distancing, and rapid isolation of trainees with COVID-19. Main Outcomes and Measures: Association between days of symptoms, specific symptoms, number of symptoms, or cycle threshold values of individuals diagnosed with COVID-19 via reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and subsequent transmission within cohorts. Results: In this cohort study of 10 613 US Air Force basic trainees in 263 cohorts, 403 trainees (3%) received a diagnosis of COVID-19 in 129 cohorts (49%). Among trainees with COVID-19 infection, 318 (79%) were men, and the median (interquartile range [IQR]) age was 20 (19-23) years; 204 (51%) were symptomatic, and 199 (49%) were asymptomatic. Median (IQR) cycle threshold values were lower in symptomatic trainees compared with asymptomatic trainees (21.2 [18.4-27.60] vs 34.8 [29.3-37.4]; P < .001). Cohorts with clusters of individuals with COVID-19 infection were predominantly men (204 cohorts [89%] vs 114 cohorts [64%]; P < .001), had more symptomatic trainees (146 cohorts [64%] vs 53 cohorts [30%]; P < .001), and had more median (IQR) symptoms per patient (3 [2-5] vs 1 [1-2]; P < .001) compared with cohorts without clusters. Within cohorts, subsequent development of clusters of 5 or more individuals with COVID-19 infection compared with those that did not develop clusters was associated with cohorts that had more symptomatic trainees (31 of 58 trainees [53%] vs 43 of 151 trainees [28%]; P = .001) and lower median (IQR) cycle threshold values (22.3 [18.4-27.3] vs 35.3 [26.5-37.8]; P < .001). Conclusions and Relevance: In this cohort study of US Air Force trainees living in a congregant setting during the COVID-19 pandemic, higher numbers of symptoms and lower cycle threshold values were associated with subsequent development of clusters of individuals with COVID-19 infection. These values may be useful if validated in future studies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing/methods , COVID-19/transmission , Military Personnel/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Carrier State/diagnosis , Carrier State/epidemiology , Carrier State/transmission , Cohort Studies , Cough/physiopathology , Female , Headache/physiopathology , Humans , Male , Myalgia/physiopathology , Pharyngitis/physiopathology , Residence Characteristics , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
2.
Work ; 67(2): 281-283, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1725333

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has affected the entire world. It is difficult to follow protocols and regulations set forth by governments, designed by the World Health Organization. The most common protocol set forth by governments is quarantining at home. Many occupations must stay home to comply with this protocol. Among these occupations, office workers are the most common group to comply and work from home. This has led to a lack of daily movement and increased sedentary lifestyle, which has made employees prone to developing coronary heart disease (CHD). Additionally, obesity is a known risk factor for this group. This commentary presents feasible protocols aimed at helping home-based office workers stay healthy and decrease the risk of developing CHD.


Subject(s)
Coronary Disease/etiology , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Coronavirus , Occupations/statistics & numerical data , Quarantine/psychology , Sedentary Behavior , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Disease Outbreaks , Humans , Iran , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control
3.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(3): e216315, 2021 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1384067

ABSTRACT

Importance: Nursing home residents account for approximately 40% of deaths from SARS-CoV-2. Objective: To identify risk factors for SARS-CoV-2 incidence, hospitalization, and mortality among nursing home residents in the US. Design, Setting, and Participants: This retrospective longitudinal cohort study was conducted in long-stay residents aged 65 years or older with fee-for-service Medicare residing in 15 038 US nursing homes from April 1, 2020, to September 30, 2020. Data were analyzed from November 22, 2020, to February 10, 2021. Main Outcomes and Measures: The main outcome was risk of diagnosis with SARS-CoV-2 (per International Statistical Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision, Clinical Modification [ICD-10-CM] codes) by September 30 and hospitalization or death within 30 days after diagnosis. Three-level (resident, facility, and county) logistic regression models and competing risk models conditioned on nursing home facility were used to determine association of patient characteristics with outcomes. Results: Among 482 323 long-stay residents included, the mean (SD) age was 82.7 (9.2) years, with 326 861 (67.8%) women, and 383 838 residents (79.6%) identifying as White. Among 137 119 residents (28.4%) diagnosed with SARS-CoV-2 during follow up, 29 204 residents (21.3%) were hospitalized, and 26 384 residents (19.2%) died within 30 days. Nursing homes explained 37.2% of the variation in risk of infection, while county explained 23.4%. Risk of infection increased with increasing body mass index (BMI; calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared) (eg, BMI>45 vs BMI 18.5-25: adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 1.19; 95% CI, 1.15-1.24) but varied little by other resident characteristics. Risk of hospitalization after SARS-CoV-2 increased with increasing BMI (eg, BMI>45 vs BMI 18.5-25: aHR, 1.40; 95% CI, 1.28-1.52); male sex (aHR, 1.32; 95% CI, 1.29-1.35); Black (aHR, 1.28; 95% CI, 1.24-1.32), Hispanic (aHR, 1.20; 95% CI, 1.15-1.26), or Asian (aHR, 1.46; 95% CI, 1.36-1.57) race/ethnicity; impaired functional status (eg, severely impaired vs not impaired: aHR, 1.15; 95% CI, 1.10-1.22); and increasing comorbidities, such as renal disease (aHR, 1.21; 95% CI, 1.18-1.24) and diabetes (aHR, 1.16; 95% CI, 1.13-1.18). Risk of mortality increased with age (eg, age >90 years vs 65-70 years: aHR, 2.55; 95% CI, 2.44-2.67), impaired cognition (eg, severely impaired vs not impaired: aHR, 1.79; 95% CI, 1.71-1.86), and functional impairment (eg, severely impaired vs not impaired: aHR, 1.94; 1.83-2.05). Conclusions and Relevance: These findings suggest that among long-stay nursing home residents, risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection was associated with county and facility of residence, while risk of hospitalization and death after SARS-CoV-2 infection was associated with facility and individual resident characteristics. For many resident characteristics, there were substantial differences in risk of hospitalization vs mortality. This may represent resident preferences, triaging decisions, or inadequate recognition of risk of death.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Homes for the Aged , Hospitalization , Nursing Homes , Pandemics , Severity of Illness Index , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Body Mass Index , COVID-19/mortality , Comorbidity , Female , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Physical Functional Performance , Residence Characteristics , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Sex Factors , United States
4.
Clin Infect Dis ; 73(Suppl 1): S17-S23, 2021 07 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1364779

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Pregnant women with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) are at increased risk for severe illness compared with nonpregnant women. Data to assess risk factors for illness severity among pregnant women with COVID-19 are limited. This study aimed to determine risk factors associated with COVID-19 illness severity among pregnant women with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. METHODS: Pregnant women with SARS-CoV-2 infection confirmed by molecular testing were reported during 29 March 2020-5 March 2021 through the Surveillance for Emerging Threats to Mothers and Babies Network (SET-NET). Criteria for illness severity (asymptomatic, mild, moderate-to-severe, or critical) were adapted from National Institutes of Health and World Health Organization criteria. Crude and adjusted risk ratios for moderate-to-severe or critical COVID-19 illness were calculated for selected demographic and clinical characteristics. RESULTS: Among 7950 pregnant women with SARS-CoV-2 infection, moderate-to-severe or critical COVID-19 illness was associated with age 25 years and older, healthcare occupation, prepregnancy obesity, chronic lung disease, chronic hypertension, and pregestational diabetes mellitus. Risk of moderate-to-severe or critical illness increased with the number of underlying medical or pregnancy-related conditions. CONCLUSIONS: Older age and having underlying medical conditions were associated with increased risk of moderate-to-severe or critical COVID-19 illness among pregnant women. This information might help pregnant women understand their risk for moderate-to-severe or critical COVID-19 illness and can inform targeted public health messaging.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious , Adult , Aged , Female , Humans , Mothers , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Pregnant Women , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Nephrol Dial Transplant ; 36(12): 2308-2320, 2021 12 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1269591

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patients on kidney replacement therapy (KRT) are at very high risk of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The triage pathway for KRT patients presenting to hospitals with varying severity of COVID-19 illness remains ill-defined. We studied the clinical characteristics of patients at initial and subsequent hospital presentations and the impact on patient outcomes. METHODS: The European Renal Association COVID-19 Database (ERACODA) was analysed for clinical and laboratory features of 1423 KRT patients with COVID-19 either hospitalized or non-hospitalized at initial triage and those re-presenting a second time. Predictors of outcomes (hospitalization, 28-day mortality) were then determined for all those not hospitalized at initial triage. RESULTS: Among 1423 KRT patients with COVID-19 [haemodialysis (HD), n = 1017; transplant, n = 406), 25% (n = 355) were not hospitalized at first presentation due to mild illness (30% HD, 13% transplant). Of the non-hospitalized patients, only 10% (n = 36) re-presented a second time, with a 5-day median interval between the two presentations (interquartile range 2-7 days). Patients who re-presented had worsening respiratory symptoms, a decrease in oxygen saturation (97% versus 90%) and an increase in C-reactive protein (26 versus 73 mg/L) and were older (72 vs 63 years) compared with those who did not return a second time. The 28-day mortality between early admission (at first presentation) and deferred admission (at second presentation) was not significantly different (29% versus 25%; P = 0.6). Older age, prior smoking history, higher clinical frailty score and self-reported shortness of breath at first presentation were identified as risk predictors of mortality when re-presenting after discharge at initial triage. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides evidence that KRT patients with COVID-19 and mild illness can be managed effectively with supported outpatient care and with vigilance of respiratory symptoms, especially in those with risk factors for poor outcomes. Our findings support a risk-stratified clinical approach to admissions and discharges of KRT patients presenting with COVID-19 to aid clinical triage and optimize resource utilization during the ongoing pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Aged , Hospitalization , Humans , Registries , Renal Replacement Therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Triage
6.
Infect Dis Ther ; 10(3): 1491-1504, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1269197

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Estimating the risk of disease progression is of utmost importance for planning appropriate setting of care and treatment for patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). This study aimed to develop and validate a novel prediction model of COVID-19 progression. METHODS: In total, 814 patients in the training set were included to develop a novel scoring system; and 420 patients in the validation set were included to validate the model. RESULTS: A prediction score, called ACCCDL, was developed on the basis of six risk factors associated with COVID-19 progression: age, comorbidity, CD4+ T cell count, C-reactive protein (CRP), D-dimer, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). For predicting COVID-19 progression, the ACCCDL score yielded a significantly higher area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUROC) compared with the CALL score, CoLACD score, PH-COVID-19 score, neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio, and lymphocyte-monocyte ratio both in the training set (0.92, 0.84, 0.83, 0.83, 0.76, and 0.65, respectively) and in the validation set (0.97, 0.83, 0.83, 0.78, 0.74, and 0.60, respectively). Over 99% of patients with the ACCCDL score < 12 points will not progress to severe cases, and over 30% of patients with the ACCCDL score > 20 points will progress to severe cases. CONCLUSION: The ACCCDL score could stratify patients with at risk of COVID-19 progression, and was useful in regulating the large flow of patients with COVID-19 between primary health care and tertiary centers.

7.
Res Sq ; 2021 Jun 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1270322

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: People living with HIV (PLWH) are immunodeficient, it is vague if they are more susceptible to SARS-CoV-2 infection than HIV negative individuals. METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, 857 PLWH and 1048 HIV negative individuals were enrolled from the Wuchang district in Wuhan, China. We compared the total rate of SARS-CoV-2 infection, the rate of COVID-19, asymptomatic carriers, and unapparent infectors in the two groups. The risk factors associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection among PLWH were explored. RESULTS: Fourteen out of 857 (1.63%) PLWH were infected with SARS-CoV-2, while 68 of 1048 (6.49%) HIV negative individuals were infected. In PLWH, there were 6 confirmed COVID-19 (0.70%), 4 asymptomatic carriers (0.47%) and 4 unapparent infectors (0.47%). In the HIV negative group, the cases of COVID-19, asymptomatic carrier, and unapparent infector were 5 (0.48%), 0 (0.00%), and 63 (6.01%), respectively. After adjusting for age, gender, and chronic comorbidities, the rate of SARS-CoV-2 infection in PLWH was lower than that in HIV negative group (1.96% vs 5.74%, P=0.001). The morbidity of COVID-19 was similar between the two groups (P=0.107), but the rate of unapparent infection in PLWH was lower than that in the HIV negative group (0.54% vs 5.46%, P=0.001). Older age (aOR=4.50, 95%CI: 1.34-15.13, P=0.015) and OIs (aOR=9.59, 95%CI: 1.54-59.92, P=0.016) were risk factors for SARS-CoV-2 infection among PLWH. CONCLUSIONS: PLWH has different infection forms of SARS-CoV-2 compared with the general population. Older age and OIs were considered to driving causes of SARS-CoV-2 infection among PLWH.

8.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 12414, 2021 06 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1268007

ABSTRACT

Primary aim was to assess prevalence and severity of potential and real drug-drug interactions (DDIs) among therapies for COVID-19 and concomitant medications in hospitalized patients with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection. The secondary aim was to analyze factors associated with rDDIs. An observational single center cohort study conducted at a tertiary hospital in Spain from March 1st to April 30th. rDDIs refer to interaction with concomitant drugs prescribed during hospital stay whereas potential DDIs (pDDIs) refer to those with domiciliary medication. DDIs checked with The University of Liverpool resource. Concomitant medications were categorized according to the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical classification system. Binomial logistic regression was carried out to identify factors associated with rDDIs. A total of 174 patients were analyzed. DDIs were detected in 152 patients (87.4%) with a total of 417 rDDIs between COVID19-related drugs and involved hospital concomitant medication (60 different drugs) while pDDIs were detected in 105 patients (72.9%) with a total of 553 pDDIs. From all 417 rDDIs, 43.2% (n = 180) were associated with lopinavir/ritonavir and 52.9% (n = 221) with hydroxychloroquine, both of them the most prescribed (106 and 165 patients, respectively). The main mechanism of interaction observed was QTc prolongation. Clinically relevant rDDIs were identified among 81.1% (n = 338) ('potential interactions') and 14.6% (n = 61) (contraindicated) of the patients. Charlson index (OR 1.34, 95% IC 1.02-1.76) and number of drugs prescribed during admission (OR 1.42, 95% IC 1.12-1.81) were independently associated with rDDIs. Prevalence of patients with real and pDDIs was high, especially those clinically relevant. Both comorbidities and polypharmacy were found as risk factors independently associated with DDIs development.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Drug Interactions , Hydroxychloroquine/chemistry , Lopinavir/chemistry , Ritonavir/chemistry , Aged , Analgesics/chemistry , Analgesics/therapeutic use , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Cardiovascular Diseases/drug therapy , Cohort Studies , Diuretics/chemistry , Diuretics/therapeutic use , Female , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Lopinavir/therapeutic use , Male , Middle Aged , Nervous System Diseases/drug therapy , Polypharmacy , Risk Factors , Ritonavir/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index , Spain
9.
Antimicrob Resist Infect Control ; 10(1): 87, 2021 06 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1259218

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the intensive care units' (ICUs) reorganization that was forced by the COVID-19 emergency, attention to traditional infection control measures may have been reduced. Nevertheless, evidence on the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) is still limited and mixed. In this study, we estimated the pandemic impact on HAI incidence and investigated the HAI type occurring in COVID-19 patients. METHODS: Patients admitted to the main ICU of the Umberto I teaching hospital of Rome from March 1st and April 4th 2020 were compared with patients hospitalized in 2019. We assessed the association of risk factors and time-to-first event through multivariable Fine and Grey's regression models, that consider the competitive risk of death on the development of HAI (Model 1) or device related-HAI (dr-HAI, Model 2) and provide estimates of the sub-distribution hazard ratio (SHR) and its associated confidence interval (CI). A subgroup analysis was performed on the 2020 cohort. RESULTS: Data from 104 patients were retrieved. Overall, 59 HAIs were recorded, 32 of which occurred in the COVID-19 group. Patients admitted in 2020 were found to be positively associated with both HAI and dr-HAI onset (SHR: 2.66, 95% CI 1.31-5.38, and SHR: 10.0, 95% CI 1.84-54.41, respectively). Despite being not confirmed at the multivariable analysis, a greater proportion of dr-HAIs seemed to occur in COVID-19 patients, especially ventilator-associated pneumonia, and catheter-related urinary tract infections. CONCLUSIONS: We observed an increase in the incidence of patients with HAIs, especially dr-HAIs, mainly sustained by COVID-19 patients. A greater susceptibility of these patients to device-related infections was hypothesized, but further studies are needed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross Infection/epidemiology , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Aged , Catheter-Related Infections/epidemiology , Critical Care , Delivery of Health Care , Female , Hospitalization , Hospitals, Teaching , Humans , Incidence , Infection Control , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Ventilator-Associated/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
10.
Viruses ; 13(6)2021 05 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1256661

ABSTRACT

To analyze the clinical characteristics and outcomes of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection in patients with sarcoidosis from a large multicenter cohort from Southern Europe and to identify the risk factors associated with a more complicated infection. We searched for patients with sarcoidosis presenting with SARS-CoV-2 infection (defined according to the European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control guidelines) among those included in the SarcoGEAS Registry, a nationwide, multicenter registry of patients fulfilling the American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society/World Association of Sarcoidosis and Other Granulomatous Disorders 1999 classification criteria for sarcoidosis. A 2:1 age-sex-matched subset of patients with sarcoidosis without SARS-CoV-2 infection was selected as control population. Forty-five patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection were identified (28 women, mean age 55 years). Thirty-six patients presented a symptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infection and 14 were hospitalized (12 required supplemental oxygen, 2 intensive care unit admission and 1 mechanical ventilation). Four patients died due to progressive respiratory failure. Patients who required hospital admission had an older mean age (64.9 vs. 51.0 years, p = 0.006), a higher frequency of baseline comorbidities including cardiovascular disease (64% vs. 23%, p = 0.016), diabetes mellitus (43% vs. 13%, p = 0.049) and chronic liver/kidney diseases (36% vs. 0%, p = 0.002) and presented more frequently fever (79% vs. 35%, p = 0.011) and dyspnea (50% vs. 3%, p = 0.001) in comparison with patients managed at home. Age- and sex-adjusted multivariate analysis identified the age at diagnosis of SARS-Cov-2 infection as the only independent variable associated with hospitalization (adjusted odds ratio 1.18, 95% conficence interval 1.04-1.35). A baseline moderate/severe pulmonary impairment in function tests was associated with a higher rate of hospitalization but the difference was not statistically significant (50% vs. 23%, p = 0.219). A close monitoring of SARS-CoV-2 infection in elderly patients with sarcoidosis, especially in those with baseline cardiopulmonary diseases and chronic liver or renal failure, is recommended. The low frequency of severe pulmonary involvement in patients with sarcoidosis from Southern Europe may explain the weak prognostic role of baseline lung impairment in our study, in contrast to studies from other geographical areas.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Sarcoidosis/complications , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/physiopathology , COVID-19/therapy , Cohort Studies , Comorbidity , Female , France , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Registries , Sarcoidosis/mortality , Sarcoidosis/physiopathology , Sarcoidosis/therapy , Treatment Outcome
11.
J Diabetes Complications ; 35(8): 107967, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1253171

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To explore predictors of severe COVID-19 disease in patients with diabetes hospitalized for COVID-19. METHODS: This is a retrospective observational study of adults with diabetes admitted for COVID-19. Bivariate tests and multivariable Cox regression were used to identify risk factors for severe COVID-19, defined as a composite endpoint of intensive care unit admission/intubation or in-hospital death. RESULTS: In 1134 patients with diabetes admitted for COVID-19, more severe disease was associated with older age (HR 1.02, p<0.001), male sex (HR 1.28, p=0.017), Asian race (HR 1.34, p=0.029 [reference: white]), and greater obesity (moderate obesity HR 1.59, p=0.015; severe obesity HR 2.07, p=0.002 [reference: normal body mass index]). Outpatient diabetes medications were not associated with outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: Age, male sex, Asian race, and obesity were associated with increased risk of severe COVID-19 disease in adults with type 2 diabetes hospitalized for COVID-19. SUMMARY: In patients with type 2 diabetes hospitalized for COVID-19 disease, we observed that age, male sex, Asian race, and obesity predicted severe COVID-19 outcomes of intensive care unit admission, intubation, or in-hospital death. The risk conferred by obesity increased with worsening obesity. Outpatient diabetes medications were not observed to be significant predictors of study outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/diagnosis , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/epidemiology , Patient Admission/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Body Mass Index , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/therapy , Comorbidity , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/therapy , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , New York/epidemiology , Obesity/complications , Obesity/diagnosis , Obesity/epidemiology , Obesity/therapy , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Severity of Illness Index
12.
Ann Intensive Care ; 11(1): 83, 2021 May 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1243820

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Empirical antibiotic has been considered in severe COVID-19 although little data are available regarding concomitant infections. This study aims to assess the frequency of infections, community and hospital-acquired infections, and risk factors for infections and mortality during severe COVID-19. METHODS: Retrospective single-center study including consecutive patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) for severe COVID-19. Competing-risk analyses were used to assess cumulative risk of infections. Time-dependent Cox and fine and gray models were used to assess risk factors for infections and mortality. Propensity score matching was performed to estimate the effect of dexamethasone. RESULTS: We included 100 patients including 34 patients with underlying malignancies or organ transplantation. First infectious event was bacterial for 35 patients, and fungal for one. Cumulative incidence of infectious events was 27% [18-35] at 10 ICU-days. Prevalence of community-acquired infections was 7% [2.8-13.9]. Incidence density of hospital-acquired infections was 125 [91-200] events per 1000 ICU-days. Risk factors independently associated with hospital-acquired infections included MV. Patient's severity and underlying malignancy were associated with mortality. Dexamethasone was associated with increased infections (36% [20-53] vs. 12% [4-20] cumulative incidence at day-10; p = 0.01). After matching, dexamethasone was associated with hospital-acquired infections (35% [18-52] vs. 13% [1-25] at 10 days, respectively, p = 0.03), except in the subset of patients requiring MV, and had no influence on mortality. CONCLUSIONS: In this population of COVID-19 patients with high prevalence of underlying immune defect, a high risk of infections was noted. MV and use of steroids were independently associated with infection rate.

13.
BMC Infect Dis ; 21(1): 474, 2021 May 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1243805

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Defining socio-demographic factors, clinical presentations and underlying diseases associated with COVID-19 severity could be helpful in its management. This study aimed to further clarify the determinants and clinical risk factors of the disease severity in patients infected with COVID-19. METHODS: A multi-centre descriptive study on all patients who have been diagnosed with COVID-19 in the province of Tehran from March 2020 up to Dec 2020 was conducted. Data on socio-demographic characteristics, clinical presentations, comorbidities, and the health outcomes of 205,654 patients were examined. Characteristics of the study population were described. To assess the association of study variables with the disease severity, the Chi-Squared test and Multiple Logistic Regression model were applied. RESULTS: The mean age of the study population was 52.8 years and 93,612 (45.5%) were women. About half of the patients have presented with low levels of blood oxygen saturation. The ICU admission rate was 17.8% and the overall mortality rate was 10.0%. Older age, male sex, comorbidities including hypertension, cancer, chronic respiratory diseases other than asthma, chronic liver diseases, chronic kidney diseases, chronic neurological disorders, and HIV/AIDS infection were risk markers of poor health outcome. Clinical presentations related with worse prognosis included fever, difficulty breathing, impaired consciousness, and cutaneous manifestations. CONCLUSION: These results might alert physicians to pay attention to determinants and risk factors associated with poor prognosis in patients with COVID-19. In addition, our findings aid decision makers to emphasise on vulnerable groups in the public health strategies that aim at preventing the spread of the disease and its mortalities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/mortality , Chi-Square Distribution , Child , Child, Preschool , Chronic Disease/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , HIV Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Hypertension/epidemiology , Infant , Iran/epidemiology , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Prognosis , Risk Factors , Severity of Illness Index , Young Adult
14.
Cureus ; 13(5): e14854, 2021 May 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1239157

ABSTRACT

Despite the many benefits of total knee arthroplasty (TKA) in the treatment of degenerative arthritis, infection of the total knee prosthesis presents a dangerous post-operative complication affecting 0.5-1.9% of all cases. Infection after the first three post-operative weeks is treated with either one or two-stage revision operations involving the removal of all prosthetic components. Two-stage revision operations are more commonly used and involve the removal of prosthetic components followed by the implantation of a cement mold infused with antibiotics (antibiotic spacer) as well as systemic antibiotic treatment for four to six weeks before prosthetic reimplantation. This case report details a TKA revision in a patient with osteoarthritis of the knee. The patient presented with an elevated erythrocyte sedimentation rate, C-reactive protein, and white blood cell count nearly two years after the primary operation and was found to have an infected total knee prosthetic. A two-stage revision was planned but due to scheduling disruption by the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic, the second stage of the operation was delayed until 12 months after the stage one operation. The patient ambulated without pain on an antibiotic spacer for 12 months, providing information about the long-term use of spacers. This case also offers a look at a potential benefit to one-stage operations, which have been shown in the literature to have similar outcomes as two-stage operations. The patient had a medical history of psoriasis and immunosuppressive treatment with methotrexate, two risk factors for prosthetic joint infection, and may have benefited from prophylactic antibiotic therapy extending beyond the perioperative period. The goal of this case report is to detail the prolonged use of an antibiotic spacer, examine the risks and benefits of one and two-stage total knee revisions, and discuss prophylactic antibiotic use in high-risk patients following TKA.

15.
J Thromb Haemost ; 19(8): 1981-1989, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1238451

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Some local protocols suggest using intermediate or therapeutic doses of anticoagulants for thromboprophylaxis in hospitalized patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). However, the incidence of bleeding, predictors of major bleeding, or the association between bleeding and mortality remain largely unknown. METHODS: We performed a cohort study of patients hospitalized for COVID-19 that received intermediate or therapeutic doses of anticoagulants from March 25 to July 22, 2020, to identify those at increased risk for major bleeding. We used bivariate and multivariable logistic regression to explore the risk factors associated with major bleeding. RESULTS: During the study period, 1965 patients were enrolled. Of them, 1347 (69%) received intermediate- and 618 (31%) therapeutic-dose anticoagulation, with a median duration of 12 days in both groups. During the hospital stay, 112 patients (5.7%) developed major bleeding and 132 (6.7%) had non-major bleeding. The 30-day all-cause mortality rate for major bleeding was 45% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 36%-54%) and for non-major bleeding 32% (95% CI: 24%-40%). Multivariable analysis showed increased risk for in-hospital major bleeding associated with D-dimer levels >10 times the upper normal range (hazard ratio [HR], 2.23; 95% CI, 1.38-3.59), ferritin levels >500 ng/ml (HR, 2.01; 95% CI, 1.02-3.95), critical illness (HR, 1.91; 95% CI, 1.14-3.18), and therapeutic-intensity anticoagulation (HR, 1.43; 95% CI, 1.01-1.97). CONCLUSIONS: Among patients hospitalized with COVID-19 receiving intermediate- or therapeutic-intensity anticoagulation, a major bleeding event occurred in 5.7%. Use of therapeutic-intensity anticoagulation, critical illness, and elevated D-dimer or ferritin levels at admission were associated with increased risk for major bleeding.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Venous Thromboembolism , Anticoagulants/adverse effects , Cohort Studies , Humans , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Microcirculation ; 28(7): e12718, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1236400

ABSTRACT

Recently, accumulating evidence has highlighted the role of endothelial dysfunction in COVID-19 progression. Coronary microvascular dysfunction (CMD) plays a pivotal role in cardiovascular disease (CVD) and CVD-related risk factors (eg, age, gender, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and obesity). Equally, these are also risk factors for COVID-19. The purpose of this review was to explore CMD pathophysiology in COVID-19, based on recent evidence. COVID-19 mechanisms were reviewed in terms of imbalanced renin-angiotensin-aldosterone-systems (RAAS), systemic inflammation and immune responses, endothelial dysfunction, and coagulatory disorders. Based on these mechanisms, we addressed CMD pathophysiology within the context of COVID-19, from five perspectives. The first was the disarrangement of local RAAS and Kallikrein-kinin-systems attributable to SARS-Cov-2 entry, and the concomitant decrease in coronary microvascular endothelial angiotensin I converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) levels. The second was related to coronary microvascular obstruction, induced by COVID-19-associated systemic hyper-inflammation and pro-thrombotic state. The third was focused on how pneumonia/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS)-related systemic hypoxia elicited oxidative stress in coronary microvessels and cardiac sympathetic nerve activation. Fourthly, we discussed how autonomic nerve dysfunction mediated by COVID-19-associated mental, physical, or physiological factors could elicit changes in coronary blood flow, resulting in CMD in COVID-19 patients. Finally, we analyzed reciprocity between the coronary microvascular endothelium and perivascular cellular structures due to viremia, SARS-CoV-2 dissemination, and systemic inflammation. These mechanisms may function either consecutively or intermittently, finally culminating in CMD-mediated cardiovascular symptoms in COVID-19 patients. However, the underlying molecular pathogenesis remains to be clarified.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/physiopathology , Coronary Vessels/physiopathology , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/immunology , Cardiovascular Diseases/etiology , Cardiovascular Diseases/physiopathology , Disease Progression , Endothelium, Vascular/physiopathology , Female , Humans , Inflammation/physiopathology , Male , Microcirculation/physiology , Models, Cardiovascular , Renin-Angiotensin System/physiology , Risk Factors , Thrombosis/etiology , Thrombosis/physiopathology
17.
Monaldi Arch Chest Dis ; 91(3)2021 May 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1234864

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is an emerging viral disease affecting more than 200 countries worldwide and it present with varied clinical profile throughout the world. Without effective drugs to cure COVID-19, early identification and control of risk factors are important measures to combat COVID-19.  This study was conducted to determine the clinical profile and risk factors associated with mortality among COVID-19 patients in a tertiary care hospital in South India. This record-based longitudinal study was conducted by reviewing the case records of COVID-19 patients admitted for treatment from June 2020 to September 2020 in a tertiary care centre in South India. The clinical details, discharge/death details, were collected and entered in MS Excel. Potential risk factors for COVID-19 mortality were analysed using univariate binomial logistic regression, generalized linear models (GLM) with Poisson distribution. Survival curves were made using the Kaplan-Meier method. Log-rank test was used to test the equality of survivor functions between the groups. Out of 854 COVID-19 patients, 56.6% were men and the mean (standard deviation) age was 45.3(17.2) years. The median survival time was significantly lesser in male COVID-19 patients (16 days) as compared to female patients (20 days). Increasing age, male gender, patients presenting with symptoms of fever, cough, breathlessness, smoking, alcohol consumption, comorbidities were significantly associated with mortality among COVID-19 patients. Patients with older age, male gender, breathlessness, fever, cough, smoking and alcohol and comorbidities need careful observation and early intervention.  Public health campaigns aimed at reducing the prevalence of risk factors like diabetes, hypertension, smoking and alcohol use are also needed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Aged , Female , Humans , India/epidemiology , Inpatients , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Middle Aged , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Tertiary Care Centers
18.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(10)2021 05 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1234717

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Although some studies have explored the effects of responses to COVID-19 on mortality, there are limited data on their effects on more immediate health risk factors and the trends of chronic diseases. OBJECTIVE: To explore the prevalence of some behavioral health risk factors, intermediate risk factors, and chronic diseases at different timepoints during 2020 using the data available from a currently used surveillance system in Saudi Arabia. METHODS: This study undertook a secondary analysis of data from the Sharik Health Indicators Surveillance System (SHISS). The SHISS employs short cross-sectional phone interviews, conducted in all 13 administrative regions of Saudi Arabia on a quarterly basis. Each interview lasts approximately 4 min and is conducted by a trained data collector. The SHISS collects demographic data, as well as data on the major behavioral and intermediate chronic disease risk factors and the major chronic diseases, including diabetes, heart disease, stroke, cancer, and chronic respiratory diseases. RESULTS: Of the 44,782 potential participants contacted in 2020, 30,134 completed the interview, with a response rate of 67.29%. Out of the total participants, 51.2% were female. The mean age was 36.5. The behavioral risk factors in this period exhibited significant changes compared to those in the first quarter (Q1) of 2020, when there were no significant restrictions on daily activities. These significant changes are related to reductions in fruit and vegetable intake (adjusted odds ratio (AOR), 0.23) and physical activity (AOR, 0.483), and a significant increase in e-cigarette use (AOR 1.531). In terms of the intermediate risk factors observed in the SHISS, significant increases in hypercholesterolemia (AOR, 1.225) and hypertension (AOR, 1.190) were observed. Finally, heart disease (AOR, 1.279) and diabetes (AOR, 1.138) displayed significant increases compared to Q1. CONCLUSIONS: This study shows some evidence of the impact of responses to COVID-19 on the health of the population in Saudi Arabia. Significant reductions in fruit and vegetable intake and physical activity, and significant increases in e-cigarette use, hypertension, and hypercholesterolemia may increase the burden of chronic diseases in Saudi Arabia in the near future. Thus, continuous monitoring of the health risk factors within the population, and early interventions, are recommended to prevent future increases in chronic diseases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems , Population Health , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology
19.
PLoS One ; 16(5): e0249964, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1232459

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is highly contagious and has affected the whole world. We seek to investigate the clinical and laboratory characteristics of COVID-19 patients in the high altitude areas of Sichuan, China. In this retrospective cohort study, a total of 67 patients with laboratory-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infections in Sichuan's Ngawa Tibetan and Qiang Autonomous Prefecture were included from February 1, 2020, to March 2, 2020. Their clinical characteristics, as well as radiological and laboratory features, were extracted. Four (6.0%) patients were categorized as severe cases; 39 (58.2%) were non-severe cases, and 24 (35.8%) were asymptomatic cases. A total of 46 (68.7%) patients were associated with cluster infection events in this study. The most common symptoms were cough, sputum production, dyspnea, fatigue or myalgia, and headache. Seven (10.4%) patients showed leucopenia, and 20 (29.9%) patients showed lymphopenia. Lymphocyte counts and neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratios (NPR) were different between the three groups. In total, 14 (20.9%) patients had thrombocytopenia, and prothrombin times (PT) and fibrinogen levels differed between groups. We also found significant differences in sodium, chloride and calcium levels between the three groups. Antiviral therapy did not lead to obvious adverse events or shortened durations from initial positive to subsequent negative nuclei acid tests. Advanced age, hypertension, high neutrophil count, the neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio, fibrinogen and lactate dehydrogenase levels were identified as independent risk factors for symptomatic cases of COVID-19. In conclusion, the symptoms of patients in high altitude areas were mild, and about one third were asymptomatic. We also identified several independent risk factors for symptomatic cases of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Altitude , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , China/epidemiology , Cough/etiology , Female , Fibrinogen/analysis , Humans , L-Lactate Dehydrogenase/metabolism , Lymphocytes/cytology , Male , Middle Aged , Neutrophils/cytology , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index , Young Adult
20.
BMC Psychiatry ; 21(1): 252, 2021 05 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1228994

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The current study aims to track the changes in the levels of smart phone addiction (SPA) and depressive symptoms between pre and during COVID-19 and potential risk factors of among Chinese college students in a four-wave longitudinal study. METHODS: The participants were recruited from a Chinese university (n = 195; 58.5% females). The first three-wave surveys were conducted before COVID-19 (during December of Year 1, June of Year 1, and December of Year 2 of their college study; Time 1, Time 2, Time 3), while the fourth survey (Time 4; during June of Year 2 of their college study) was conducted in June 2020 during COVID-19. COVID-19-related factors, including quarantine, lockdown, boredom, emotional loneliness, and social loneliness, were investigated. RESULTS: The results showed a significant increase in the levels of depressive symptoms and prevalence of probable depression during COVID-19 (69.2%) compared to those 18 months, 12 months and 6 months before COVID-19 (41.5, 45.6, 48.2%) but non-significant changes in SPA. Boredom and emotional loneliness were positively associated with both SPA and depressive symptoms during COVID-19. Social loneliness was also positively associated with depressive symptoms during COVID-19. Quarantine and lockdown were not significantly associated with SPA or depressive symptoms. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS: The results highlight that the study population may be a high risk group of probable depression. Future studies should continue to track these mental and behavioral status with the progression of the epidemic. The identified emotional factors could be used to reduce depressive symptoms during COVID-19 and prevent the potential risk of SPA.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Depression , China/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Smartphone , Students
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