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1.
Cogn Behav Pract ; 28(4): 555-572, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1252539

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has necessitated an abrupt transition to remote delivery of psychology services at a time when patients and practicing clinicians are experiencing an increase in life stressors (e.g., job loss, social isolation, need to adapt to telehealth practice), which can exacerbate mental health concerns and contribute to clinician burnout. Because the COVID-19 pandemic is affecting diverse individuals in myriad ways, these circumstances can elicit a wide range of emotions and emotional responses. Thus, treatment during this time must be able to address heterogeneous presenting problems while placing minimal burden on clinicians who are adjusting to continuously changing circumstances. Transdiagnostic, emotion-focused, cognitive behavioral treatments (CBT), such as the Unified Protocol for Transdiagnostic Treatment of Emotional Disorders (UP), may be particularly well suited to address the challenges faced by practicing psychologists, and their patients, in the current COVID-19 pandemic. This paper discusses the applicability and adaptability of transdiagnostic treatments to telehealth, focusing primarily on the UP in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. Further, while many CBT skills (e.g., mindfulness) can be easily translated to tele-delivery, other skills, such as exposure, can be more difficult to implement remotely, especially in the midst of a pandemic. Thus, this paper also provides practical suggestions for clinicians with regard to implementing the UP remotely.

2.
Br J Nurs ; 30(10): S8-S14, 2021 May 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1244357

ABSTRACT

The challenges presented by the global COVID-19 pandemic have intensified the stressors placed on nurses, leading to burnout. Oncology nurse burnout is likely to be an increasingly significant issue for cancer services as the true cost of the pandemic is revealed. Delays in diagnosis and treatment of cancers are reported widely, inevitably leading to poor prognosis and more aggressive treatments for patients. Gaining a better understanding of oncology nurse burnout, its prevalence and causes as well as strategies to reduce or prevent it will help to improve patient care and support staff wellbeing during and after the pandemic. Methodology: A search of the literature related to oncology nurse burnout, covering North America and Europe over 5 years (August 2014-January 2020), resulted in 31 articles for review. None of the studies were carried out in the UK, suggesting a need for robust investigations into oncology nurse burnout in the British health service. Summary: The prevalence of burnout among oncology nurses before the COVID-19 outbreak appeared to be high and is likely to have increased as a result of the pandemic. However, the studies investigating oncology nurse burnout are small and cross-sectional, with low-quality methods. The literature suggests the major causes of burnout arise in the workplace, particularly aspects of the environment that prevent nurses from working according to their values. Although burnout is frequently attributed to workplace factors, interventions remain focused on individuals' coping mechanisms and rarely on the workplace factors that are known to cause it.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Oncology Nursing , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Europe/epidemiology , Humans , North America/epidemiology
3.
BMJ Open ; 11(5): e050380, 2021 05 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1223611

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence of physician burnout during the pandemic and differences by gender, ethnicity or sexual orientation. DESIGN, SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: We conducted a cross-sectional survey (August-October in 2020) of internal medicine physicians at two academic hospitals in Vancouver, Canada. PRIMARY AND SECONDARY OUTCOMES: Physician burnout and its components, emotional exhaustion, depersonalisation and personal accomplishment were measured using the Maslach Burnout Inventory. RESULTS: The response rate was 38% (n=302/803 respondents, 49% women,). The prevalence of burnout was 68% (emotional exhaustion 63%, depersonalisation 39%) and feeling low personal accomplishment 22%. In addition, 21% reported that they were considering quitting the profession or had quit a position. Women were more likely to report emotional exhaustion (OR 2.00, 95% CI: 1.07 to 3.73, p=0.03) and feeling low personal accomplishment (OR 2.26, 95% CI: 1.09 to 4.70, p=0.03) than men. Visible ethnic minority physicians were more likely to report feeling lower personal accomplishment than white physicians (OR 1.81, 95% CI: 1.28 to 2.55, p=0.001). There was no difference in emotional exhaustion or depersonalisation by ethnicity or sexual orientation. Physicians who reported that COVID-19 affected their burnout were more likely to report any burnout (OR: 3.74, 95% CI: 1.99 to 7.01, p<0.001) and consideration of quitting or quit (OR: 3.20, 95% CI: 1.34 to 7.66, p=0.009). CONCLUSION: Burnout affects 2 out of 3 internal medicine physicians during the pandemic. Women, ethnic minority physicians and those who feel that COVID-19 affects burnout were more likely to report components of burnout. Further understanding of factors driving feelings of low personal accomplishment in women and ethnic minority physicians is needed.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Physicians , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Psychological , Canada/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Male , Minority Groups , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Sexual Behavior , Surveys and Questionnaires
4.
Nurs Crit Care ; 26(6): 467-475, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1223534

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the pandemic, increased numbers of patients requiring intensive care unit (ICU) admission required an increase in ICU capacity, including ICU staffing with competence to care for critically ill patients. Consequently, nurses from acute care areas were called in to staff the ICU along with experienced intensive care nurses. AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To describe Swedish registered nurses' experiences of caring for patients with COVID-19 in ICUs during the pandemic. DESIGN: Mixed method survey design. METHODS: An online questionnaire was distributed through social media to registered nurses who had been working in the ICU during the COVID-19 outbreak. Data were collected for 1 week (May 2020) and analysed using content analysis and descriptive statistics. RESULTS: Of the 282 nurses who participated, the majority were ICU nurses (n = 151; 54%). Half of the nurses specialized in ICU reported that they were responsible for the ICU care of three or more patients during the pandemic (n = 75; 50%). Among non-intensive care nurses, only 19% received introduction to the COVID-19 ICU (n = 26). The analysis of data regarding nurses' experiences resulted in three categories: tumbling into chaos, diminished nursing care, and transition into pandemic ICU care. Participants described how patient safety and care quality were compromised, and that nursing care was severely deprioritized during the pandemic. The situation of not being able to provide nursing care resulted in ethical stress. Furthermore, an increased workload and worsened work environment affected nurses' health and well-being. CONCLUSIONS: The findings from the present study indicate that nurses perceived that patient safety and quality of care were compromised during the pandemic. This resulted in ethical stress among nurses, which may have affected their physical and psychosocial well-being. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: The COVID-19 pandemic had a severe impact on nurses' work environment, which could result in burnout and staff turnover.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , Nursing Staff, Hospital , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
5.
J Am Pharm Assoc (2003) ; 61(5): e71-e77, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1220885

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has disrupted pharmacy practice. Little research has been done to assess how COVID-19 has affected pharmacists' employment, workload, and feelings of burnout. OBJECTIVES: The objectives of this study were to characterize the impact of COVID-19 on pharmacists' employment status, workload, and feelings of burnout, as well as to examine emotional health concerns related to COVID-19. METHODS: Wisconsin pharmacists were surveyed using an online instrument between August 25, 2020, and September 22, 2020. The data analysis, performed in December 2020, examined employment status, 3 common burnout risk factors (workload, rewards, and social depersonalization), and emotional health concerns related to COVID-19. RESULTS: Of the 1300 pharmacists, 439 completed the survey (33.8%). The study analysis included pharmacists in community (n = 127) and hospital or health system (n = 107) settings. With regard to employment changes and workload, hospital pharmacists (36%) were more likely to have their hours reduced than community pharmacists (13%) (P < 0.01), and, conversely, community pharmacists (19%) were more likely to have their hours increased than hospital pharmacists (8%) (P = 0.01). For the burnout domain of workload, 45% of the pharmacists reported increased feelings of physical exhaustion at work, and 53% reported increased feelings of emotional exhaustion at work, with no difference between settings. Regarding the burnout domain of rewards, 6% of the hospital pharmacists and 1% of the community pharmacists experienced a reduction in hourly wages or salaries as a result of COVID-19. For the burnout domain of depersonalization, 25% of the pharmacists reported that their ability to connect with colleagues and patients decreased during the COVID-19 pandemic. Additional emotional health concerns reported by the pharmacists included 40% experiencing more anxiety and 25% experiencing more sadness or depression during the COVID-19 pandemic, with no difference between settings. CONCLUSION: This study found that the burnout domains related to workload, rewards, and depersonalization were negatively affected by COVID-19. Pharmacy managers need to proactively combat burnout as well as be reactive when employees show signs of burnout to maintain their workforce and meet the COVID-19-associated challenges.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vaccines , Burnout, Psychological/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
6.
Curr Psychol ; 40(7): 3113-3124, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1216264

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study was to evaluate the factors affecting the ability and willingness of dentists to work during the COVID-19 pandemic and the effect of this situation on occupational burnout. A 51-question survey, including demographic and pandemic questions and the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), was used as a data collection method and administered to dentists in Turkey via the internet in two stages. A link to the survey (onlineanketler.com) was sent to the participants by e-mail or social media (WhatsApp©). A total of 442 dentists in the first stage and 264 dentists in the second stage answered the questionnaire. The second stage of the survey only applied to dentists who are assigned within the scope of COVID-19 measures in Turkey. Standard descriptive statistics, the chi-square test, independent samples t test and the Kruskal-Wallis test were used for statistical analysis. Most of the participants showed higher stress levels. Occupational burnout levels of participants according to filiation service (serve/FP, did not serve/FN) were 34.4% and 17.6%, respectively. The FP group showed significantly higher stress levels than the FN group. It is important to consider how these results, collected during an infectious disease epidemic, reflect the effects of psychological distress and burnout on dental staff. Trial Registration Number and Date of Registration: NCT04605692-10/27/2020. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The online version contains supplementary material available at 10.1007/s12144-021-01764-x.

7.
Respir Care ; 66(5): 881-883, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1209292
8.
Anaesthesia ; 76 Suppl 4: 24-31, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1119201

ABSTRACT

Physician burnout and poor mental health are prevalent and often stigmatised. Anaesthetists may be at particular risk and this is further increased for women anaesthetists due to biases and inequities within the specialty. However, gender-related risk factors for and experiences of burnout and poor mental health remain under-researched and under-reported. This negatively impacts individual practitioners, the anaesthesia workforce and patients and carries significant financial implications. We discuss the impact of anaesthesia and gender on burnout and mental health using the COVID-19 pandemic as an example illustrating how women and men differentially experience stressors and burnout. COVID-19 has further accentuated the gendered effects of burnout and poor mental health on anaesthetists and brought further urgency to the need to address these issues. While both personal and organisational factors contribute to burnout and poor mental health, organisational changes that recognise and acknowledge inequities are pivotal to bolster physician mental health.


Subject(s)
Anesthetists/psychology , Burnout, Professional/etiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Mental Health , SARS-CoV-2 , Female , Humans , Male , Sex Characteristics
9.
Tex Med ; 117(2): 16-21, 2021 Feb 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1102834

ABSTRACT

The malaise in physician practice long known as burnout - a term doctors increasingly balk at - has been exacerbated by the pandemic, as an extensive survey by the Physicians Foundation recently showed. It's created its own stressors and made existing ones worse.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Burnout, Professional/etiology , Humans , Physicians/psychology , Texas/epidemiology
11.
Front Public Health ; 8: 567250, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1004708

ABSTRACT

Background and aims: The COVID-19 pandemic has caused social and economic turmoil, which has led to enormous strain for many families. Past work with pandemic outbreaks suggests that media attention can increase anxiety and compensatory behaviors. Social isolation can lead to increase in online communication and parents who use social media may be affected by other people's emotions online through what is known as digital emotion contagion (DEC). The current study aimed to examine the role of DEC in the relationship between stress, concern about COVID-19, parental burnout and emotion regulation (ER). Methods: In April 2020, an online survey was advertised in Social Media Parenting Groups and published on FIU Psychology online research system SONA. Data were analyzed using correlational analysis, linear and multiple linear regression, and moderation analysis. Results: Concern about COVID-19 predicted stress, depression, and parental burnout. Susceptibility to DEC significantly increased the impact of stress on parental burnout. Having relatives infected with COVID-19 increased the effect of DEC on parental burnout. A higher level of ER buffered the relationship between emotion contagion and concern about COVID-19. Conclusion: These findings suggest that susceptibility to digital emotion contagion may have a negative effect on parents. Digital emotion contagion may increase parental burnout and is tied to stress.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Emotional Regulation , Pandemics , Parents/psychology , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States/epidemiology
12.
Front Psychiatry ; 11: 563781, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1000146

ABSTRACT

Background: The outbreak of COVID-19 in China was a sudden bio-disaster, which may bring a negative impact on the job burnout of health care professionals (HCPs). Objective: We aim to find out the association factors, especially those closely related to this outbreak, of job burnout in Chinese HCPs. Method: The cross-sectional survey about HCPs' job burnout based on a network platform was conducted in high and low infection regions during the COVID-19 outbreak in China. The demographic characteristics, medical-work-related factors, risk of getting infected due to occupational exposure, and family factors were collected by the self-reported questionnaire. The Chinese version of the Maslach Burnout Inventory (CMBI) and the Trait Coping Style Questionnaire (TCSQ) were employed in this study to evaluate the job burnout and coping style, respectively. Furthermore, statistical analysis was done to find out the associated factors of job burnout. Results: We collected 880 complete questionnaires from doctors and nurses from February 9, 2020 to February 11, 2020. In this study, the positive rates of three dimensions of burnout (emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and reduced personal accomplishment) and overall burnout were 9.09, 50.57, 56.59, and 73.98%, respectively. After the statistical analysis, we found that several factors can independently affect the dimensions. Working in the high infection region and negative coping styles can affect all three dimensions at once. More night shift quantity and having symptoms could increase emotional exhaustion and depersonalization, while higher work intensity and senior title could increase emotional exhaustion and reduce personal accomplishment, respectively. Conclusion: The rate of moderate and severe burnout had increased due to the outbreak. More attention should be paid to burnout in HCPs, especially those with negative coping. There were some potential ways to reduce burnout, such as reducing their workload and providing better protection from the virus.

13.
Healthcare (Basel) ; 8(4)2020 Oct 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-965235

ABSTRACT

Background: The current pandemic, COVID-19, has added to the already high levels of stress that medical professionals face globally. While most health professionals have had to shoulder the burden, physicians are not often recognized as being vulnerable and hence little attention is paid to morbidity and mortality within this group. Objective: To analyse and summarise the current knowledge on factors/potential factors contributing to burnout amongst healthcare professionals amidst the pandemic. This review also makes a few recommendations on how best to prepare intervention programmes for physicians. Methods: In August 2020, a systematic review was performed using the database Medline and Embase (OVID) to search for relevant papers on the impact of COVID-19 on physician burnout-the database was searched for terms such as "COVID-19 OR pandemic" AND "burnout" AND "healthcare professional OR physician". A manual search was done for other relevant studies included in this review. Results: Five primary studies met the inclusion criteria. A further nine studies were included which evaluated the impact of occupational factors (n = 2), gender differences (n = 4) and increased workload/sleep deprivation (n = 3) on burnout prior to the pandemic. Additionally, five reviews were analysed to support our recommendations. Results from the studies generally showed that the introduction of COVID-19 has heightened existing challenges that physicians face such as increasing workload, which is directly correlated with increased burnout. However, exposure to COVID-19 does not necessarily correlate with increased burnout and is an area for more research. Conclusions: There is some evidence showing that techniques such as mindfulness may help relieve burnout. However, given the small number of studies focusing on physician burnout amidst a pandemic, conclusions should be taken with caution. More studies are needed to support these findings.

14.
J Pain Symptom Manage ; 61(2): e4-e12, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-943377

ABSTRACT

CONTEXT: Providing palliative care (PC) at home for patients with advanced cancer has become essential during the COVID-19 emergency. Nevertheless, the home PC professionals (PCPs) faced a challenging situation because of increased number of discharged patients, reduced availability of health-care facilities, and physical/relational barriers between them and patients. OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to investigate the impact of COVID-19 pandemic on burnout and psychological morbidity among home PCPs in Italy. METHODS: One hundred and ninety-eight PC physicians and nurses working in home assistance in Italy were invited to participate. The results obtained by the investigation conducted during the COVID-19 emergency (COVID2020) were compared with data collected in 2016 in the same setting (BURNOUT2016). The questionnaires (socio-demographics, Maslach Burnout Inventory and General Health Questionnaire-12) were the same for both the surveys. The PCPs participating in COVID2020 survey (n = 145) were mostly the same (70%) who participated in the BURNOUT2016 study (n = 179). RESULTS: One hundred and forty-five PCPs participated in the study (response rate 73.2%). During the COVID-19 emergency, home PCPs presented a lower burnout frequency (P < .001) and higher level of personal accomplishment than in 2016 (P = .047). Conversely, the risk for psychological morbidity was significantly higher during the pandemic (P < .001). CONCLUSIONS: In the age of COVID-19, the awareness of being at the forefront of containing the pandemic along with the sense of responsibility toward their high-risk patients may arouse PCPs' psychological distress, but, on the other hand, this condition may improve their sense of professional satisfaction and personal accomplishment.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Home Care Services/organization & administration , Neoplasms/therapy , Palliative Care/organization & administration , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Fear/psychology , Female , Humans , Italy , Male , Middle Aged , Psychological Distress , Surveys and Questionnaires
15.
BMJ Open Gastroenterol ; 7(1)2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-934087

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Clinician burnout is an important occupational hazard that may be exacerbated by the novel COVID-19 pandemic. Within Southeast Asia, burnout in gastroenterology is understudied. The primary objective of this study is to estimate the prevalence of burnout symptoms within gastroenterology, in member states of the Associations of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN), during and after the COVID-19 pandemic. The secondary objective is to identify work-related stressors that contribute to burnout in ASEAN gastroenterologists. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This is an observational study that will use anonymised online surveys to estimate the prevalence of burnout symptoms at two time points: during the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020 and in 2022 (assumed to be after the pandemic). Gastroenterologists from Singapore, Malaysia, Thailand, Indonesia, Philippines and Brunei will be invited to participate in the online survey through their national gastroenterology and endoscopy societies. Burnout will be assessed using the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey tool. Supplementary questions will collect demographic and qualitative data. Associations between demographic characteristics and burnout will be tested by multiple regression. RESULTS: The prevalence of burnout symptoms in gastroenterology during the COVID-19 pandemic, and the baseline prevalence after COVID-19, will be established in the above-mentioned countries. Work-related stressors commonly associated with burnout will be identified, allowing the introduction of preventative measures to reduce burnout in the future. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: Ethical approval was granted by the Singhealth Centralised Institutional Review Board (2020/2709). Results will be submitted for publication.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Gastroenterology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Adult , Asia/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2
16.
J Contin Educ Nurs ; 51(11): 496-497, 2020 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-890434

ABSTRACT

The impact of long shifts, the puzzling illnesses and manifestations of COVID-19, its personal and family impacts, and the sustained grief of many losses in the past 6 months requires consideration of interventions to lift caregivers' spirits. Burnout has long been a challenge for nurses working in intense acute environments. Today, the risk and effects are even greater. Animal-assisted support is one intervention that shows some promise in supporting employee well-being. [J Contin Educ Nurs. 2020;51(11):496-497].


Subject(s)
Animal Assisted Therapy/methods , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Burnout, Professional/therapy , Coronavirus Infections/nursing , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Nursing Care/psychology , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/nursing , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Adult , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics
17.
J Surg Educ ; 78(2): 431-439, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-688701

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: COVID-19 emerged as a global pandemic in 2020 and has affected millions of lives. Surgical training has also been significantly affected by this pandemic, but the exact effect remains unknown. We sought to perform a national survey of general surgery residents in the United States to assess the effect of COVID-19 on surgical resident training, education, and burnout. METHODS: An anonymous online survey was created and distributed to general surgery residents across the United States. The survey aimed to assess changes to surgical residents' clinical schedules, operative volume, and educational curricula as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. Additionally, we sought to assess the impact of COVID-19 on resident burnout. RESULTS: One thousand one hundred and two general surgery residents completed the survey. Residents reported a significant decline in the number of cases performed during the pandemic. Educational curricula were largely shifted toward online didactics. The majority of residents reported spending more time on educational didactics than before the pandemic. The majority of residents feared contracting COVID-19 or transmitting it to their family during the pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 has had significant impact on surgical training and education. One positive consequence of the pandemic is increased educational didactics. Online didactics should continue to be a part of surgical education in the post-COVID-19 era. Steps need to be taken to ensure that graduating surgical residents are adequately prepared for fellowship and independent practice despite the significantly decreased case volumes during this pandemic. Surgery training programs should focus on providing nontechnical clinical training and professional development during this time.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Medical, Graduate/trends , General Surgery/education , Surgeons/psychology , Adult , Curriculum/trends , Female , Humans , Internship and Residency , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States/epidemiology
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