Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 33
Filter
1.
Cleft Palate Craniofac J ; 58(12): 1547-1555, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526569

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Cleft lip and cleft palate (CLP) are among the world's most common congenital malformation and has a higher prevalence in developing nations due to environmental and genetic factors. Global efforts have been developed in order to prevent and treat the malformation. Telemedicine has been implemented in various humanitarian global missions with success and is currently the primary means of care due to COVID-19. OBJECTIVE: To assess the benefits and barriers of telehealth in the care of patients with CLP through a global approach. METHODS: Systematic review of the PubMed and Cochrane Review databases with relevant terms related to telemedicine in cleft lip and palate surgery. RESULTS: Eight articles fit the inclusion criteria and suggested benefits with the use of telemedicine in regard to education, preoperative, and postoperative care as well as increased access to underserved populations. Barriers included connectivity and accessibility concerns. CONCLUSION: Telehealth is a beneficial way to evaluate patients with CLP in developing countries with proper care and follow-up to reduce complications and to improve health outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cleft Lip , Cleft Palate , Telemedicine , Cleft Lip/therapy , Cleft Palate/therapy , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Intern Med J ; 51(7): 1151-1155, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1273100

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in the rapid implementation of telehealth. However, little is known about its suitability for the older population. We evaluated the use of telehealth in geriatric outpatient clinics. Half of the appointments needed to be re-scheduled due to language barrier, poor connection, hard of hearing and inability to perform assessments. Advantages included time efficiency and ability to visualise the home. Preference for the future was initial appointments as face-face, but reviews as either telehealth or face-face.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telemedicine , Aged , Ambulatory Care Facilities , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
3.
J Adv Nurs ; 77(9): 3829-3841, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1270854

ABSTRACT

AIM: This study aimed to explore the experiences of alcohol and other drug nurses transitioning to telehealth due to the COVID-19 pandemic. BACKGROUND: COVID-19 has caused immense disruption to healthcare services, and to reduce viral transmission, many services moved to off-site care delivery modalities such as telehealth. DESIGN: We used a qualitative descriptive design for this study. METHODS: Secondary analysis of semistructured interviews with alcohol and other drug nurses from Australia and New Zealand (n = 19) was conducted in July and August 2020. Data were analysed using thematic analysis and reported using COREQ guidelines. RESULTS: Three were identified: '"All our face-to-face contact ceased with clients": Changing service delivery', '"How do I do my job when I can't see you?": An anxious shift in service delivery' and '"A lot of Indigenous people don't like the FaceTiming and all that": Challenges to delivery of services through telehealth'. CONCLUSION: Participants in our study reported challenges in transitioning to telehealth modalities. The perceived loss of therapeutic communication, difficulties in assessing risks to healthcare consumers such as domestic violence and challenges delivering telehealth care to a marginalized consumer cohort need to be overcome before telehealth is considered successful in alcohol and other drug treatment. However, telehealth was a successful adjunct to existing practices for nurses working with consumers in regional or remote areas or where consumers preferred this method of service delivery. IMPACT: Nurses in this study described substantial issues with the delivery of alcohol and other drug treatment via telehealth, including a perception that telehealth was a barrier to addressing risks to consumers who use alcohol and other drugs, and difficulties working in a therapeutically beneficial way via telehealth. Telehealth is a means to reduce viral transmission through a reduction in face-to-face contact, and although it may be useful for some service functions, it may be detrimental to the clinical services nurses provide.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , Pharmaceutical Preparations , Telemedicine , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
4.
5.
Am J Trop Med Hyg ; 105(1): 6-11, 2021 05 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1231560

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic contributed to the worldwide implementation of telemedicine because of the need for medical care for patients, especially those with chronic diseases. This perspective paper presents the current situation of telemedicine in Peru, showing advances in regulation, cases of successful implementation, and the current challenges. Access to health should be available to all, and more efforts need to be implemented to offer access to the internet to achieve high-quality telemedicine to all the vulnerable groups in Peru.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Services Accessibility , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine , Chronic Disease , Health Services Accessibility/standards , Health Services Accessibility/trends , Humans , Internet Access , Peru/epidemiology , Telemedicine/standards , Telemedicine/trends
6.
J Diabetes Sci Technol ; : 19322968211015241, 2021 May 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1226851

ABSTRACT

Digital health and telehealth connectivity have become important aspects of clinical care. Connected devices, including continuous glucose monitors and automated insulin delivery systems for diabetes, are being used increasingly to support personalized clinical decisions based on automatically collected data. Furthermore, the development, demand, and coverage for telehealth have all recently expanded, as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. Medical care, and especially diabetes care, are therefore becoming more digital through the use of both connected digital health devices and telehealth communication. It has therefore become necessary to integrate digital data into the electronic health record and maintain personal data confidentiality, integrity, and availability. Connected digital monitoring combined with telehealth communication is known as virtual health. For this virtual care paradigm to be successful, patients must have proper skills, training, and equipment. We propose that along with the five current vital signs of blood pressure, pulse, respiratory rate, temperature, and pain, at this time, digital connectivity should be considered as the sixth vital sign. In this article, we present a scale to assess digital connectivity.

7.
Neurologia (Engl Ed) ; 2021 Apr 15.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1192508

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic has caused an unexpected boost to telemedicine. We analyse the impact of the pandemic on telemedicine applied in Spanish headache consultations, review the literature, and issue recommendations for the implementation of telemedicine in consultations. METHOD: The study comprised 3 phases: 1) review of the MEDLINE database since 1958 (first reported experience with telemedicine); 2) Google Forms survey sent to all members of the Spanish Society of Neurology's Headache Study Group (GECSEN); and 3) online consensus of GECSEN experts to issue recommendations for the implementation of telemedicine in Spain. RESULTS: COVID-19 has increased waiting times for face-to-face consultations, increasing the use of all telemedicine modalities: landline telephone (from 75% before April 2020 to 97% after), mobile telephone (from 9% to 27%), e-mail (from 30% to 36%), and video consultation (from 3% to 21%). Neurologists are aware of the need to expand the availability of video consultations, which are clearly growing, and other e-health and m-health tools. CONCLUSIONS: The GECSEN recommends and encourages all neurologists who assist patients with headaches to implement telemedicine resources, with the optimal objective of offering video consultation to patients under 60-65 years of age and telephone calls to older patients, although each case must be considered on an individual basis. Prior approval and advice must be sought from legal and IT services and the centre's management. Most patients with stable headache and/or neuralgia are eligible for telemedicine follow-up, after a first consultation that must always be held in person.

8.
J Telemed Telecare ; : 1357633X211003810, 2021 Apr 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1181003

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Telehealth is an important tool in helping to provide services for hard-to-reach populations. One population that might benefit from telehealth are individuals with fragile X syndrome (FXS). Although FXS is the leading inherited cause of intellectual disability, it is nonetheless a low incidence disorder. Individuals with FXS and their families are involved in research studies, clinical trials and receive interventions - many of which are only offered in a few locations in the United States and thus, not easily accessible to many families. The current project explored the feasibility of using telehealth procedures to collect multimodal behavioural and psychological assessment data from these families. METHODS: Participation in the current study involved online surveys, measures of physiological indices of stress, live interviews and observations of mother-child interactions conducted via distance videoconferencing using the family's own technology when possible. Across all modes of data collection, we obtained information regarding the feasibility of participating entirely via distance by documenting missing data as well as each mother's overall impression of participating via distance. RESULTS: Our telehealth procedures were successfully implemented across a wide range of technology platforms with limited difficulty, and we documented little missing data due to technology-related challenges. Perhaps most importantly, however, our sample of mothers reported high satisfaction with participating via distance. DISCUSSION: These findings suggest that a wide range of services and types of assessments may be amenable to telehealth procedures. Further, the findings have immediate applications as the field shifts towards telehealth due to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic.

9.
Front Psychol ; 12: 604074, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1178024

ABSTRACT

It is critical to remember details about meetings with healthcare providers. Forgetting could result in inadequate knowledge about ones' health, non-adherence with treatments, and poorer health outcomes. Hearing the health care provider plays a crucial role in consolidating information for recall. The recent COVID-19 pandemic has meant a rapid transition to videoconference-based medicine, here described as telehealth. When using telehealth speech must be filtered and compressed, and research has shown that degraded speech is more challenging to remember. Here we present preliminary results from a study that compared memory for health information provided in-person to telehealth. The data collection for this study was stopped due to the pandemic, but the preliminary results are interesting because the pandemic forced a rapid transition to telehealth. To examine a potential memory deficit for health information provided through telehealth, we presented older and younger adults with instructions on how to use two medical devices. One set of instructions was presented in-person, and the other through telehealth. Participants were asked to recall the instructions immediately after the session, and again after a 1-week delay. Overall, the number of details recalled was significantly lower when instructions were provided by telehealth, both immediately after the session and after a 1-week delay. It is likely that a mix of technological and communication strategies by the healthcare provider could reduce this telehealth memory deficit. Given the rapid transition to telehealth due to COVID-19, highlighting this deficit and providing potential solutions are timely and of utmost importance.

10.
J Telemed Telecare ; : 1357633X21998211, 2021 Mar 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1145397

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The science of telemedicine has shown great advances over the past decade. However, the field needs to better understand if a change in care delivery from in-person to telehealth as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic will yield durable patient engagement and health outcomes for patients with obesity. The objective of this study was to examine the association of mode of healthcare utilization (telehealth versus in-person) and sociodemographic factors among patients with obesity during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A retrospective medical chart review identified patients with obesity from a university outpatient obesity medicine clinic and a community bariatric surgery practice. Patients completed an online survey (1 June 2020-24 September 2020) to assess changes in healthcare utilization modality during subsequent changes in infection rates in the geographic area. Logistic regression analysis examined the association of mode of healthcare utilization and key sociodemographic characteristics. RESULTS: A total of 583 patients (87% female, mean age 51.2 years (standard deviation 13.0), mean body mass index 40.2 (standard deviation 6.7), 49.2% non-Hispanic white, 28.7% non-Hispanic black, 16.4% Hispanic, 7% other ethnicity, 33.1% completed bariatric surgery) were included. Adjusted logistic regression models showed older age was inversely associated with telehealth use (adjusted odds ratio = 0.58, 95% confidence interval 0.34-0.98) and non-Hispanic black were more likely to use telehealth compared to non-Hispanic white (adjusted odds ratio = 1.72, 95% confidence interval 1.05-2.81). CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic is impacting access to healthcare among patients with obesity. Telehealth is an emerging modality that can maintain healthcare access during the pandemic, but utilization varies by age and ethnicity in this high-risk population.

11.
Sex Med Rev ; 9(2): 289-295, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1142250

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Although telemedicine (TM) has been available for several decades, the recent increase in its acceptance due to the COVID-19 pandemic has emerged as a valuable solution for the delivery of health care that provides easy, affordable, and convenient communication with urologic patients. OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to highlight limiting factors and provide successful practical solutions to assist urologists in incorporating and maintaining TM in their practices. METHODS: A thorough literature review was conducted utilizing PubMed, Cochrane library, clinicaltrials.gov, Google Scholar, and Web of Science. Search terms and keywords included "telemedicine" and "urology." Only articles written or translated into the English language were included. RESULTS: A total of 12 peer-reviewed articles were identified that discussed barriers for incorporation of TM in urology. Articles exclusive to the use of TM during the COVID-19 pandemic were also included, as well as American Urological Association and European Urological Association guidelines and Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services statements and policies regarding TM pertinent to urological practice. CONCLUSION: TM is currently a viable option and fills an unmet need for most practicing urologists, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic, offering insight to the relative ease of transition to online clinical practice. OA Raheem, S Brimley, C Natale, et al. The Emerging Critical Role of Telemedicine in the Urology Clinic: A Practical Guide. Sex Med Rev 2021;9:289-295.


Subject(s)
Telemedicine , Urologic Diseases/therapy , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Telemedicine/methods , Urologic Diseases/diagnosis
12.
Pac Symp Biocomput ; 26: 220-231, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1124182

ABSTRACT

Telehealth is an increasingly critical component of the health care ecosystem, especially due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Rapid adoption of telehealth has exposed limitations in the existing infrastructure. In this paper, we study and highlight photo quality as a major challenge in the telehealth workflow. We focus on teledermatology, where photo quality is particularly important; the framework proposed here can be generalized to other health domains. For telemedicine, dermatologists request that patients submit images of their lesions for assessment. However, these images are often of insufficient quality to make a clinical diagnosis since patients do not have experience taking clinical photos. A clinician has to manually triage poor quality images and request new images to be submitted, leading to wasted time for both the clinician and the patient. We propose an automated image assessment machine learning pipeline, TrueImage, to detect poor quality dermatology photos and to guide patients in taking better photos. Our experiments indicate that TrueImage can reject ~50% of the sub-par quality images, while retaining ~80% of good quality images patients send in, despite heterogeneity and limitations in the training data. These promising results suggest that our solution is feasible and can improve the quality of teledermatology care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Telemedicine , Algorithms , Computational Biology , Ecosystem , Humans , Machine Learning , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Contemp Clin Trials Commun ; 22: 100757, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1121546

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Contingency management (CM) is an intervention where incentives are provided in exchange for biochemically confirmed alcohol abstinence. CM is effective at initiating alcohol abstinence, but it is less effective at maintaining long-term abstinence. Phosphatidylethanol (PEth), collected via a finger-stick, can detect alcohol use for 14-28 days. PEth allows for the development of a CM model that includes increasingly less frequent monitoring of abstinence to assist high risk groups, such as formerly homeless individuals, maintain long-term abstinence. AIMS: Investigate whether PEth-based CM intervention targeting alcohol abstinence in formerly homeless, currently housed individuals with alcohol use disorders is: (1) acceptable and feasible for housing program tenants and personnel; and is associated with increased (2) alcohol abstinence and (3) housing tenure. METHODS: Acceptability and feasibility will be assessed using a QUAL+quant mixed-methods design using qualitative interviews and quantitative measures of satisfaction and attrition. Effectiveness will be evaluated through a randomized pilot trial of 50 study participants who will receive 6 months of either treatment as usual (TAU) including incentives (e.g., gift cards) for providing blood samples (Control Condition) or TAU and incentives for negative PEth results (PEth-CM Condition). Outcomes will be assessed during the intervention and at a three-month follow-up visit. The trial will be conducted via telehealth as a result of COVID-19. DISCUSSION: This protocol seeks to utilize a novel alcohol biomarker to evaluate the acceptability, feasibility, and initial effectiveness of a CM model that encourages long-term abstinence in a high-risk group.

14.
Front Pediatr ; 9: 629549, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1120412

ABSTRACT

Background: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has caused overwhelming challenges in healthcare worldwide. During such an outbreak, some needs of high-risk groups who require regular follow-ups and long-term management are not met. The vulnerable populations include patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Duchenne muscular dystrophy is characterized by respiratory complications caused by muscle weakness. Hence, patients with this condition are at high risk of severe diseases including COVID-19. Methods: To standardize care and provide optimal treatment to DMD patients in Saudi Arabia during the COVID-19 pandemic, a panel of experts including neurologists and pediatricians consolidated recommendations for healthcare professionals and caregivers. Results: During this pandemic, substituting unnecessary clinic visits with virtual clinic services was highly recommended, if possible, without compromising clinical outcomes. Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients with respiratory complications should be closely monitored, and those with cardiovascular complications must continue taking angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors or angiotensin receptor blockers. Moreover, individualized home-based rehabilitation management was preferred. Glucocorticoid and new gene correction therapies should be continued. However, new gene correction therapy must be post-poned in newly diagnosed patients. A multidisciplinary decision was required before the initiation of hydroxychloroquine based on the COVID-19 treatment protocol. Conclusion: COVID-19 has caused challenges and transformed access to health care. However, these limitations have provided opportunities for the health care system to adapt. Further, telemedicine has become a reliable platform for follow-up appointments that should be conducted by a multidisciplinary team including physicians, dieticians, and physical therapists.

15.
Psychiatry Res ; 299: 113848, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1117504

ABSTRACT

Whilst telehealth may overcome some traditional barriers to care, successful implementation into service settings is scarce, particularly within youth mental health care. This study aimed to leverage the rapid implementation of telehealth due to COVID-19 to understand the perspectives of young people and clinicians on how telehealth impacts service delivery, service quality, and to develop pathways for future uses. Youth mental health service users (aged 12-25) and clinicians took part in an online survey exploring service provision, use, and quality following the adoption of telehealth. Service use data from the period were also examined. Ninety-two clinicians and 308 young people responded to the survey. Service use was reduced compared to the same period in 2019, however, attendance rates were higher. Across eight domains of service quality, the majority of young people reported that telehealth positively impacted service quality, and were significantly more likely to rate telehealth as having a positive impact on service quality than clinicians. There was high interest in continuing to use telehealth as part of care beyond the pandemic, supporting its permanent role in youth mental health care for a segment of service users. Future work should explore how best to support its long-term implementation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Delivery of Health Care/methods , Mental Health Services/statistics & numerical data , Quality of Health Care , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Child , Diffusion of Innovation , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Health Services/organization & administration , Mental Health Services/trends , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Young Adult
16.
J Addict Med ; 16(1): e8-e15, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1072434

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The novel 2019 coronavirus (COVID-19) crisis has caused considerable upheaval in the U.S. healthcare system. The current study examined patient-reported experiences in substance use disorder (SUD) treatment during the early stages of the COVID-19 crisis. METHODS: Participants in SUD treatment were recruited via online crowdsourcing from April 14, 2020 to May 26, 2020, during the early stages of the COVID-19 crisis. Participants reported disruptions in SUD treatment, stress and anxiety caused by these disruptions on a 0-100 point visual analogue scale (VAS), stress associated with childcare responsibilities on a 0-100 VAS, current stress on the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), anxiety symptoms on the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), sleep disturbances on the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), and whether they used drugs or alcohol during the COVID-19 crisis. RESULTS: Participants (N = 240) endorsed that at least 1 SUD treatment was switched to telemedicine (63.7%), had some appointments cancelled (37.5%), or was discontinued due to COVID-19 (29.6%). Participants who did versus did not endorse drug/alcohol use reported difficulty obtaining medications to treat their SUD (OR = 2.47, 95% CI, 1.17-5.22, χ2 = 5.98, P = .016), greater scores on VAS treatment-related stress (F1,197 = 5.70, P = .018) and anxiety (F1,197 = 4.07, P = .045), greater VAS stress related to childcare (F1,107 = 10.24, P = .002), and greater scores on the PSS (F1,235 = 19.27, P < .001), BAI (F1,235 = 28.59, P < .001), and ISI (F1,235 = 14.41, P < .001). CONCLUSIONS: Providers and public health officials should work to improve continuity and quality of care during the COVID-19 crisis, with special attention on addressing childcare difficulties and providing remote methods to improve stress, anxiety, and sleep for persons in SUD treatment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pharmaceutical Preparations , Substance-Related Disorders , Anxiety/epidemiology , Child , Child Care , Depression , Humans , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Substance-Related Disorders/epidemiology , Substance-Related Disorders/therapy
17.
J Am Med Inform Assoc ; 28(1): 119-125, 2021 01 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066362

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Widespread technological changes, like the rapid uptake of telehealth in the US during the COVID-19 pandemic, risk creating or widening racial/ethnic disparities. We conducted a secondary analysis of a cross-sectional, nationally representative survey of internet users to evaluate whether there were racial/ethnic disparities in self-reported telehealth use early in the pandemic. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The Pew Research Center fielded the survey March 19-24, 2020. Telehealth use because of the pandemic was measured by asking whether respondents (N = 10 624) "used the internet or e-mail to connect with doctors or other medical professionals as a result of the coronavirus outbreak." We conducted survey-weighted logistic regressions, adjusting for respondents' socioeconomic characteristics and perceived threat of the pandemic to their own health (eg, no threat, minor, major). RESULTS: Approximately 17% of respondents reported using telehealth because of the pandemic, with significantly higher unadjusted odds among Blacks, Latinos, and those identified with other race compared to White respondents. The multivariable logistic regressions and sensitivity analyses show Black respondents were more likely than Whites to report using telehealth because of the pandemic, particularly when perceiving the pandemic as a minor threat to their own health. DISCUSSION: Black respondents are most likely to report using telehealth because of the COVID-19 pandemic, particularly when they perceive the pandemic as a minor health threat. CONCLUSION: The systemic racism creating health and health care disparities has likely raised the need for telehealth among Black patients during the pandemic. Findings suggest opportunities to leverage a broadly defined set of telehealth tools to reduce health care disparities postpandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Healthcare Disparities/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , African Americans/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Internet , Logistic Models , Pandemics , Racism , Self Report , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States
18.
Telemed J E Health ; 27(1): 107-112, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066233

ABSTRACT

Purpose: This study sought to determine whether the necessitated use of telemedicine due to coronavirus disease 2019, and limited choice of both the provider and patient, impacts the perceptions of telemedicine by patients who experienced telemedicine prepandemic and those who first experienced telemedicine during the pandemic. Methodology: Participants for this survey were a convenience sample. An invitation to participate was shared through social media and e-mail listservs. To participate, individuals had to be at least 18 years of age and gave consent to their data being used. The online survey took ∼10-15 min to complete, the survey was available from March 31 to April 20, 2020. Results: Two hundred sixty-four (n = 264, 60.8%) individuals had used telemedicine on or before December 2019 and 170 (39.2%) individuals used telemedicine for the first time January 2020 or later. There were no significant differences in demographics between groups, except that new users were more likely to have a primary care physician [F(407) = 13.51, p < 0.001]. Satisfaction of telemedicine was measured using a 10-item scale, demonstrating that all participants were overall satisfied with their telemedicine experience(s), (mean = 1.67, standard deviation = 0.61). Broadly, the differences in perceptions between the groups included the reasons for using telemedicine, perceptions of quality of in-person care, continuity of care, and a technical issue. Conclusions: Overall, patients are satisfied using telemedicine, however, for new users, both providers and patients, some acclimation needs to occur.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Patients/psychology , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Patient Satisfaction , Perception , SARS-CoV-2 , Sex Factors , Socioeconomic Factors , Young Adult
19.
JMIR Med Inform ; 9(1): e25435, 2021 Jan 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1067578

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Although telehealth is considered a key component in combating the worldwide crisis caused by COVID-19, the factors that influence its acceptance by the general population after the flattening of the COVID-19 curve remain unclear. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to identify factors affecting telehealth acceptance, including anxiety related to COVID-19, after the initial rapid spread of the disease in South Korea. METHODS: We proposed an extended technology acceptance model (TAM) and performed a cross-sectional survey of individuals aged ≥30 years. In total, 471 usable responses were collected. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to examine the validity of measurements, and the partial least squares (PLS) method was used to investigate factors influencing telehealth acceptance and the impacts of COVID-19. RESULTS: PLS analysis showed that increased accessibility, enhanced care, and ease of telehealth use had positive effects on its perceived usefulness (P=.002, P<.001, and P<.001, respectively). Furthermore, perceived usefulness, ease, and privacy/discomfort significantly impacted the acceptance of telehealth (P<.001, P<.001, and P<.001, respectively). However, anxiety toward COVID-19 was not associated with telehealth acceptance (P=.112), and this insignificant relationship was consistent in the cluster (n=216, 46%) of respondents with chronic diseases (P=.185). CONCLUSIONS: Increased accessibility, enhanced care, usefulness, ease of use, and privacy/discomfort are decisive variables affecting telehealth acceptance in the Korean general population, whereas anxiety about COVID-19 is not. This study may lead to a tailored promotion of telehealth after the pandemic subsides.

20.
Laryngoscope ; 131(8): 1741-1748, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-986313

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE/HYPOTHESIS: The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in telehealth becoming commonplace in many health care fields. Telehealth benefits include improving access, decreasing costs, and elevating patient's experience. A review of cost minimization (CM) analyses was performed in order to explore scientific studies associated with integrating tele-otolaryngology in clinical practice. Our primary objective was to evaluate published literature for cost related to the implementation of telemedicine across otolaryngology, and to determine CM when compared to in-person visits. STUDY DESIGN: Systematic Literature Review. METHODS: We performed a systematic review using PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane in May 2020, to identify studies with a cost analysis of tele-otolaryngology care. Inclusion criteria focused on articles citing CM data from telehealth services. Literature quality was assessed using the MINORS scoring system. RESULTS: From 380 original articles screened only nine evaluated cost in otolaryngology. CM in the US ranged from $68 to $900 per visit. Cost was evaluated in general otolaryngology, sleep medicine, otology, and head and neck cancer surgery, the latter had the most benefit. The most common types of telehealth visits were routine follow-up and screening. Data were insufficient for meta-analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Telemedicine has been trialed across various otolaryngology subspecialties; its incorporation is projected to have a meaningful impact on access to specialty care. This research suggests that the delivery of virtual care reduces cost with the potential of increasing net revenue across multiple otolaryngology subspecialties. Further studies are needed to better discern the entirety of cost savings and the best settings for integration. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: 3 Laryngoscope, 131:1741-1748, 2021.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/economics , Otolaryngology/economics , Telemedicine/economics , Cost-Benefit Analysis , Humans , Otolaryngology/methods , SARS-CoV-2
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL