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1.
Rev Panam Salud Publica ; 44: e87, 2020.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1893618

ABSTRACT

The basic clinical characteristics of the first 100 fatal cases from COVID-19 in Colombia were analyzed based on reports from the National Institute of Health (INS) since the beginning of the pandemic. Since the INS records do not include clinical variables of comorbidity in the total number of cases reported as positive, but only in patients with fatal outcome, comorbidities, age and sex available in the daily INS reports were reviewed. Their frequency was identified and mortality risk behavior for the analyzed variables was established and compared with the behavior described in the international literature. Of the 100 cases, 63 were male, the mean age was 65.75 ± 18.11 years, and in 22 of them no comorbidity had been reported. The most frequently reported comorbidities were arterial hypertension (35%), diabetes mellitus (21%), cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease (19%), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (16%), obesity (12%), smoking (9%) and thyroid disease (8%). Patients over 60 years of age presented a higher risk of mortality (OR 10.31, IC95% 6.67-15.94, p < 0.0001). Ten percent of the deceased patients were under 60 years of age and did not present comorbidity.

2.
J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr ; 85(2): 123-126, 2020 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1806747

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 disease has spread globally and was declared a pandemic on March 11, 2020, by the World Health Organization. On March 10, the State of Michigan confirmed its first 2 cases of COVID-19, and the number of confirmed cases has reached 47,182 as of May 11, 2020, with 4555 deaths. SETTING: Currently, little is known if patients living with HIV (PLWH) are at a higher risk of severe COVID-19 or if their antiretrovirals are protective. This study presents epidemiologic and clinical features of COVID-19 infected PLWH in Detroit, Michigan. METHODS: This is a case series that included 14 PLWH with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 infection who were evaluated at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit, Michigan, between March 20, 2020, and April 30, 2020. RESULTS: Fourteen PLWH were diagnosed with COVID-19. Twelve patients were men and 2 were women; 13 patients were virally suppressed. Eight patients were hospitalized, and 6 patients were told to self-quarantine at home after their diagnoses. Three patients who were admitted expired during their hospital stay. No patient required bilevel positive airway pressure or nebulizer use in the emergency department, and none developed acute respiratory distress syndrome, pulmonary embolism, deep venous thrombosis, or a cytokine storm while on therapy for COVID-19. CONCLUSION: Although the clinical spectrum of COVID-19 among PLWH cannot be fully ascertained by this report, it adds to the data that suggest that HIV-positive patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection are not at a greater risk of severe disease or death as compared to HIV-negative patients.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/complications , HIV Infections/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , African Americans , COVID-19 , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/ethnology , Female , HIV Infections/epidemiology , HIV Infections/ethnology , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/ethnology
3.
Transplant Direct ; 6(7): e572, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1794966

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The early effects of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) on transplantation are dramatic: >75% of kidney and liver programs are either suspended or operating under major restrictions. To resume transplantation, it is important to understand the prevalence of COVID-19 among transplant recipients, donors, and healthcare workers (HCWs) and its associated mortality. METHODS: To investigate this, we studied severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 diagnostic test results among patients with end-stage renal disease or kidney transplants from the Johns Hopkins Health System (n = 235), and screening test results from deceased donors from the Southwest Transplant Alliance Organ Procurement Organization (n = 27), and donors, candidates, and HCWs from the National Kidney Registry and Viracor-Eurofins (n = 253) between February 23 and April 15, 2020. RESULTS: We found low rates of COVID-19 among donors and HCWs (0%-1%) who were screened, higher rates of diagnostic tests among patients with end-stage renal disease or kidney transplant (17%-20%), and considerable mortality (7%-13%) among those who tested positive. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest the threat of COVID-19 for the transplant population is significant and ongoing data collection and reporting is critical to inform transplant practices during and after the pandemic.

4.
Exp Clin Transplant ; 20(3): 285-292, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1771685

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: With the declaration of the COVID-19 pandemic and the increased COVID-19 risk shown in transplant recipients, the prevalence, clinical course, and outcomes of COVID-19 infections among liver transplant recipients were assessed. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A questionnaire was designed and used to survey medical services for liver transplant recipients seen at our center in terms of COVID-19 infection. RESULTS: Twenty-five patients infected with COVID-19 were identified from 265 liver transplant recipients. Most patients were male and had COVID-19 despite quarantine at home. All patients received modified immunosuppressive drugs during infection with COVID-19 with minor changes in routine immunosuppressive therapy. Among the identified patients, 21 recovered and 4 patients died. One of the dead patients, in addition to having a liver transplant, had brain cancer with metastasis to the lungs. CONCLUSIONS: In liver transplant recipients infected with COVID-19, immunosuppressive drugs seemed to cause only mild to moderate illnesses or even helped them recover from the disease. However, more evidence is needed to prove this hypothesis. It is also recommended that transplant recipients should be warned about personal hygiene and be monitored closely by organ transplant centers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Kidney Transplantation , Liver Transplantation , Humans , Immunosuppressive Agents/adverse effects , Iran/epidemiology , Kidney Transplantation/adverse effects , Liver Transplantation/adverse effects , Male , Pandemics , Registries , SARS-CoV-2 , Transplant Recipients , Treatment Outcome
5.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 17(12)2020 06 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1725658

ABSTRACT

This study aims to underline the clinical characteristics of patients who died after testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 infection in one region of Italian and to evaluate the influence of underlying health conditions on the fatal outcome. A matched case-control study was designed by analyzing the data regarding positive subjects observed up to April 21, 2020. The case fatality rate was 7.9%, with a higher proportion of deaths in men than women. The specific standardized mortality ratio was 0.15-0.13 for males and 0.2 for females, showing that mortality is much lower than expected. Cardiovascular diseases, chronic lung diseases and diabetes mellitus showed a significant association with the outcome. Although the case fatality rate in Sardinia in regard to age and gender patterns seems to be similar to that for Italy as a whole, its quantitative value was far lower than the national one and possible explanations might include the genetic characteristics of the Sardinian population or the immediate closure of its borders as soon as the epidemic started. Our results highlighted that lethality is strongly dependent on the presence of multiple concomitant serious diseases. It is important to have epidemiological strategies for effective guidance on public health actions in order to improve chances of survival.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , Case-Control Studies , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Female , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Transplantation ; 105(7): 1405-1422, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1706459

ABSTRACT

The emergence of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) virus responsible for the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has raised concerns for programs overseeing donation and transplantation of cells, tissues, and organs (CTO) that this virus might be transmissible by transfusion or transplantation. Transplant recipients are considered particularly vulnerable to pathogens because of immunosuppression, and SARS-CoV-2 is likely to generate complications if contracted. Several signs and symptoms observed in COVID-19 positive patients reflect damage to multiple organs and tissues, raising the possibility of extrapulmonary SARS-CoV-2 infections and risk of transmission. At the beginning of the pandemic, a consensus has emerged not to consider COVID-19 positive patients as potential living or deceased donors, resulting in a global decrease in transplantation procedures. Medical decision-making at the time of organ allocation must consider safely alongside the survival advantages offered by transplantation. To address the risk of transmission by transplantation, this review summarizes the published cases of transplantation of cells or organs from donors infected with SARS-CoV-2 until January 2021 and assesses the current state of knowledge for the detection of this virus in different biologic specimens, cells, tissues, and organs. Evidence collected to date raises the possibility of SARS-CoV-2 infection and replication in some CTO, which makes it impossible to exclude transmission through transplantation. However, most studies focused on evaluating transmission under laboratory conditions with inconsistent findings, rendering the comparison of results difficult. Improved standardization of donors and CTO screening practices, along with a systematic follow-up of transplant recipients could facilitate the assessment of SARS-CoV-2 transmission risk by transplantation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/transmission , Donor Selection/methods , Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation/adverse effects , Organ Transplantation/adverse effects , Postoperative Complications/etiology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Postoperative Complications/diagnosis , Postoperative Complications/prevention & control , Risk
7.
J Pain Symptom Manage ; 60(4): e2-e13, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1638060

ABSTRACT

CONTEXT: Preparation for an impending death through end-of-life (EOL) discussions and human presence when a person is dying is important for both patients and families. OBJECTIVES: The aim was to study whether EOL discussions were offered and to what degree patients were alone at time of death when dying from coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), comparing deaths in nursing homes and hospitals. METHODS: The national Swedish Register of Palliative Care was used. All expected deaths from COVID-19 in nursing homes and hospitals were compared with, and contrasted to, deaths in a reference population (deaths in 2019). RESULTS: A total of 1346 expected COVID-19 deaths in nursing homes (n = 908) and hospitals (n = 438) were analyzed. Those who died were of a more advanced age in nursing homes (mean 86.4 years) and of a lower age in hospitals (mean 80.7 years) (P < 0.0001). Fewer EOL discussions with patients were held compared with deaths in 2019 (74% vs. 79%, P < 0.001), and dying with someone present was much more uncommon (59% vs. 83%, P < 0.0001). In comparisons between nursing homes and hospital deaths, more patients dying in nursing homes were women (56% vs. 37%, P < 0.0001), and significantly fewer had a retained ability to express their will during the last week of life (54% vs. 89%, P < 0.0001). Relatives were present at time of death in only 13% and 24% of the cases in nursing homes and hospitals, respectively (P < 0.001). The corresponding figures for staff were 52% and 38% (P < 0.0001). CONCLUSION: Dying from COVID-19 negatively affects the possibility of holding an EOL discussion and the chances of dying with someone present. This has considerable social and existential consequences for both patients and families.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Loneliness , Palliative Care , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Quality of Health Care , Terminal Care , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 , Child , Child, Preschool , Communication , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Infant , Male , Middle Aged , Nursing Homes , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Registries , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Support , Sweden/epidemiology , Young Adult
8.
N Engl J Med ; 385(1): 11-22, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1585668

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Evidence is urgently needed to support treatment decisions for children with multisystem inflammatory syndrome (MIS-C) associated with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. METHODS: We performed an international observational cohort study of clinical and outcome data regarding suspected MIS-C that had been uploaded by physicians onto a Web-based database. We used inverse-probability weighting and generalized linear models to evaluate intravenous immune globulin (IVIG) as a reference, as compared with IVIG plus glucocorticoids and glucocorticoids alone. There were two primary outcomes: the first was a composite of inotropic support or mechanical ventilation by day 2 or later or death; the second was a reduction in disease severity on an ordinal scale by day 2. Secondary outcomes included treatment escalation and the time until a reduction in organ failure and inflammation. RESULTS: Data were available regarding the course of treatment for 614 children from 32 countries from June 2020 through February 2021; 490 met the World Health Organization criteria for MIS-C. Of the 614 children with suspected MIS-C, 246 received primary treatment with IVIG alone, 208 with IVIG plus glucocorticoids, and 99 with glucocorticoids alone; 22 children received other treatment combinations, including biologic agents, and 39 received no immunomodulatory therapy. Receipt of inotropic or ventilatory support or death occurred in 56 patients who received IVIG plus glucocorticoids (adjusted odds ratio for the comparison with IVIG alone, 0.77; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.33 to 1.82) and in 17 patients who received glucocorticoids alone (adjusted odds ratio, 0.54; 95% CI, 0.22 to 1.33). The adjusted odds ratios for a reduction in disease severity were similar in the two groups, as compared with IVIG alone (0.90 for IVIG plus glucocorticoids and 0.93 for glucocorticoids alone). The time until a reduction in disease severity was similar in the three groups. CONCLUSIONS: We found no evidence that recovery from MIS-C differed after primary treatment with IVIG alone, IVIG plus glucocorticoids, or glucocorticoids alone, although significant differences may emerge as more data accrue. (Funded by the European Union's Horizon 2020 Program and others; BATS ISRCTN number, ISRCTN69546370.).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/therapeutic use , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/drug therapy , Adolescent , Antibodies, Viral , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Child , Child, Preschool , Cohort Studies , Confidence Intervals , Drug Therapy, Combination , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Immunomodulation , Male , Propensity Score , Regression Analysis , Respiration, Artificial , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/immunology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/mortality , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/therapy , Treatment Outcome
9.
Clin Infect Dis ; 73(11): e4141-e4151, 2021 12 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1561160

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) can cause severe illness and death. Predictors of poor outcome collected on hospital admission may inform clinical and public health decisions. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective observational cohort investigation of 297 adults admitted to 8 academic and community hospitals in Georgia, United States, during March 2020. Using standardized medical record abstraction, we collected data on predictors including admission demographics, underlying medical conditions, outpatient antihypertensive medications, recorded symptoms, vital signs, radiographic findings, and laboratory values. We used random forest models to calculate adjusted odds ratios (aORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for predictors of invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV) and death. RESULTS: Compared with age <45 years, ages 65-74 years and ≥75 years were predictors of IMV (aORs, 3.12 [95% CI, 1.47-6.60] and 2.79 [95% CI, 1.23-6.33], respectively) and the strongest predictors for death (aORs, 12.92 [95% CI, 3.26-51.25] and 18.06 [95% CI, 4.43-73.63], respectively). Comorbidities associated with death (aORs, 2.4-3.8; P < .05) included end-stage renal disease, coronary artery disease, and neurologic disorders, but not pulmonary disease, immunocompromise, or hypertension. Prehospital use vs nonuse of angiotensin receptor blockers (aOR, 2.02 [95% CI, 1.03-3.96]) and dihydropyridine calcium channel blockers (aOR, 1.91 [95% CI, 1.03-3.55]) were associated with death. CONCLUSIONS: After adjustment for patient and clinical characteristics, older age was the strongest predictor of death, exceeding comorbidities, abnormal vital signs, and laboratory test abnormalities. That coronary artery disease, but not chronic lung disease, was associated with death among hospitalized patients warrants further investigation, as do associations between certain antihypertensive medications and death.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Aged , Hospitalization , Humans , Middle Aged , Respiration, Artificial , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
10.
Clin Infect Dis ; 73(11): e4166-e4174, 2021 12 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1560158

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We compared the efficacy of the antiviral agent, remdesivir, versus standard-of-care treatment in adults with severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) using data from a phase 3 remdesivir trial and a retrospective cohort of patients with severe COVID-19 treated with standard of care. METHODS: GS-US-540-5773 is an ongoing phase 3, randomized, open-label trial comparing two courses of remdesivir (remdesivir-cohort). GS-US-540-5807 is an ongoing real-world, retrospective cohort study of clinical outcomes in patients receiving standard-of-care treatment (non-remdesivir-cohort). Inclusion criteria were similar between studies: patients had confirmed severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection, were hospitalized, had oxygen saturation ≤94% on room air or required supplemental oxygen, and had pulmonary infiltrates. Stabilized inverse probability of treatment weighted multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate the treatment effect of remdesivir versus standard of care. The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients with recovery on day 14, dichotomized from a 7-point clinical status ordinal scale. A key secondary endpoint was mortality. RESULTS: After the inverse probability of treatment weighting procedure, 312 and 818 patients were counted in the remdesivir- and non-remdesivir-cohorts, respectively. At day 14, 74.4% of patients in the remdesivir-cohort had recovered versus 59.0% in the non-remdesivir-cohort (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] 2.03: 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.34-3.08, P < .001). At day 14, 7.6% of patients in the remdesivir-cohort had died versus 12.5% in the non-remdesivir-cohort (aOR 0.38, 95% CI: .22-.68, P = .001). CONCLUSIONS: In this comparative analysis, by day 14, remdesivir was associated with significantly greater recovery and 62% reduced odds of death versus standard-of-care treatment in patients with severe COVID-19. CLINICAL TRIALS REGISTRATION: NCT04292899 and EUPAS34303.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Adult , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Cohort Studies , Humans , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Standard of Care , Treatment Outcome
11.
Clin Infect Dis ; 73(11): e4047-e4057, 2021 12 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1560034

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Emerging evidence suggests ethnic minorities are disproportionately affected by coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Detailed clinical analyses of multicultural hospitalized patient cohorts remain largely undescribed. METHODS: We performed regression, survival, and cumulative competing risk analyses to evaluate factors associated with mortality in patients admitted for COVID-19 in 3 large London hospitals between 25 February and 5 April, censored as of 1 May 2020. RESULTS: Of 614 patients (median age, 69 [interquartile range, 25] years) and 62% male), 381 (62%) were discharged alive, 178 (29%) died, and 55 (9%) remained hospitalized at censoring. Severe hypoxemia (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 4.25 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 2.36-7.64]), leukocytosis (aOR, 2.35 [95% CI, 1.35-4.11]), thrombocytopenia (aOR [1.01, 95% CI, 1.00-1.01], increase per 109 decrease), severe renal impairment (aOR, 5.14 [95% CI, 2.65-9.97]), and low albumin (aOR, 1.06 [95% CI, 1.02-1.09], increase per gram decrease) were associated with death. Forty percent (n = 244) were from black, Asian, and other minority ethnic (BAME) groups, 38% (n = 235) were white, and ethnicity was unknown for 22% (n = 135). BAME patients were younger and had fewer comorbidities. Although the unadjusted odds of death did not differ by ethnicity, when adjusting for age, sex, and comorbidities, black patients were at higher odds of death compared to whites (aOR, 1.69 [95% CI, 1.00-2.86]). This association was stronger when further adjusting for admission severity (aOR, 1.85 [95% CI, 1.06-3.24]). CONCLUSIONS: BAME patients were overrepresented in our cohort; when accounting for demographic and clinical profile of admission, black patients were at increased odds of death. Further research is needed into biologic drivers of differences in COVID-19 outcomes by ethnicity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Aged , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , London/epidemiology , Male , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , State Medicine
12.
Ann Hepatol ; 25: 100350, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1525673

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVES: Viral infections have been described to increase the risk of decompensation in patients with cirrhosis. We aimed to determine the effect of SARS-CoV-2 infection on outcome of hospitalized patients with cirrhosis and to compare the performance of different prognostic models for predicting mortality. PATIENTS: We performed a prospective cohort study including 2211 hospitalized patients with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection from April 15, 2020 through October 1, 2020 in 38 Hospitals from 11 Latin American countries. We registered clinical and laboratory parameters of patients with and without cirrhosis. All patients were followed until discharge or death. We evaluated the prognostic performance of different scoring systems to predict mortality in patients with cirrhosis using ROC curves. RESULTS: Overall, 4.6% (CI 3.7-5.6) subjects had cirrhosis (n = 96). Baseline Child-Turcotte-Pugh (CTP) class was assessed: CTP-A (23%), CTP-B (45%) and CTP-C (32%); median MELD-Na score was 19 (IQR 14-25). Mortality was 47% in patients with cirrhosis and 16% in patients without cirrhosis (P < .0001). Cirrhosis was independently associated with death [OR 3.1 (CI 1.9-4.8); P < .0001], adjusted by age, gender, and body mass index >30. The areas under the ROC curves for performance evaluation in predicting 28-days mortality for Chronic Liver Failure Consortium (CLIF-C), North American Consortium for the Study of End-Stage Liver Disease (NACSELD), CTP score and MELD-Na were 0.85, 0.75, 0.69, 0.67; respectively (P < .0001). CONCLUSIONS: SARS-CoV-2 infection is associated with elevated mortality in patients with cirrhosis. CLIF-C had better performance in predicting mortality than NACSELD, CTP and MELD-Na in patients with cirrhosis and SARS-CoV-2 infection. Clinicaltrials.gov:NCT04358380.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Hospitalization , Liver Cirrhosis/epidemiology , Body Mass Index , Comorbidity , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Liver Cirrhosis/diagnosis , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , South America/epidemiology , Survival Rate/trends
13.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 7334, 2021 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1500696

ABSTRACT

To identify the risk factors of mortality for the coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) patients admitted to intensive care units (ICUs) through a retrospective analysis. The demographic, clinical, laboratory, and chest imaging data of patients admitted to the ICU of Huoshenshan Hospital from February 10 to April 10, 2020 were retrospectively analyzed. Student's t-test and Chi-square test were used to compare the continuous and categorical variables, respectively. The logistic regression model was employed to ascertain the risk factors of mortality. This retrospective study involved 123 patients, including 64 dead and 59 survivors. Among them, 57 people were tested for interleukin-6 (IL-6) (20 died and 37 survived). In all included patients, the oxygenation index (PaO2/FiO2) was identified as an independent risk factor (odd ratio [OR] = 0.96, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.928-0.994, p = 0.021). The area under the curve (AUC) was 0.895 (95% CI: 0.826-0.943, p < 0.0001). Among the patients tested for IL-6, the PaO2/FiO2 (OR = 0.955, 95%CI: 0.915-0.996, p = 0.032) and IL-6 (OR = 1.013, 95%CI: 1.001-1.025, p = 0.028) were identified as independent risk factors. The AUC was 0.9 (95% CI: 0.791-0.964, p < 0.0001) for IL-6 and 0.865 (95% CI: 0.748-0.941, p < 0.0001) for PaO2/FiO2. PaO2/FiO2 and IL-6 could potentially serve as independent risk factors for predicting death in COVID-19 patients requiring intensive care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Interleukin-6/analysis , Aged , Area Under Curve , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Comorbidity , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Oxygen Consumption , ROC Curve , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
14.
Jpn J Infect Dis ; 74(5): 458-464, 2021 Sep 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1497875

ABSTRACT

We aimed to determine the predictors of intensive care unit (ICU) admission or death in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pneumonia. This retrospective, single-center study included patients aged ≥18 years who were diagnosed with COVID-19 pneumonia (laboratory and radiologically confirmed) between March 9 and April 8, 2020. The composite endpoint was ICU admission or in-hospital mortality. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to evaluate the factors associated with the composite endpoint. A total of 336 patients with COVID-19 pneumonia were evaluated. The median age was 54 years (interquartile range: 21), and 187 (55.7%) were men. Fifty-one (15.2%) patients were admitted to the ICU. In-hospital mortality occurred in 33 patients (9.8%). In the univariate analysis, 17 parameters were associated with the composite endpoint, and procalcitonin had the highest odds ratio (odds ratio [OR] = 36.568, confidence interval [CI] = 5.145-259.915). Our results revealed that body temperature (OR = 1.489, CI = 1.023-2.167, P = 0.037), peripheral capillary oxygen saturation (SpO2) (OR = 0.835, CI = 0.773-0.901, P < 0.001), and consolidation (> 25%) on chest computed tomography (OR = 3.170, CI = 1.218-8.252, P = 0.018) at admission were independent predictors. As a result, increased body temperature, decreased SpO2, a high level of procalcitonin, and degree of consolidation on chest computed tomography may predict a poor prognosis and have utility in the management of patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Turkey/epidemiology
15.
Arch Med Res ; 52(7): 738-745, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1491707

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: It has been observed that subjects with comorbidities related to metabolic syndrome (MetS) as hypertension, obesity, cardiovascular disease (CVD), and diabetes mellitus (DM2) show severe cases and a higher mortality by COVID-19. To date, there is little information available on the impact of the interaction between these comorbidities in the risk of death by COVID-19. AIM OF THE STUDY: To evaluate the impact of the combinations of MetS components in overall survival (OS) and risk of death among COVID-19 patients. METHODS: Using public data of the Ministry of Health, suspected, and confirmed COVID-19 cases from February 25-June 6, 2020 was analyzed. Mortality odds ratio (OR) was calculated with a univariate analysis (95% CI) and attributable risk. Interactions between components and survival curves were analyzed and a multivariate logistics regression analysis was conducted. RESULTS: The analysis included 528,651 cases out of which 202,951 were confirmed for COVID-19. Probabilities of OS among confirmed patients were 0.93, 0.89, 0.87, 0.86, and 0.83 while the OR of multivariate analysis was 1.83 (1.77-1.89), 2.58 (2.48-2.69), 2.83 (2.66-3.01), and 3.36 (2.83-3.99) for zero, one, two, three, and four MetS components, respectively. The combination with the highest risk was DM2 + hypertension at 2.22 (2.15-2.28), and the attributable risk for any component was 9.35% (9.21-9.49). Only the combination obesity + CVD showed no significant interaction. CONCLUSION: The presence of one MetS component doubles the risk of death by COVID-19, which was higher among patients with DM2 + hypertension. Only obesity and CVD do not interact significantly.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus , Hypertension , Metabolic Syndrome , Comorbidity , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Humans , Hypertension/complications , Hypertension/epidemiology , Metabolic Syndrome/complications , Metabolic Syndrome/epidemiology , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Front Cardiovasc Med ; 7: 590688, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1485040

ABSTRACT

Background: There are growing evidence demonstrating that coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is companied by acute myocardial injury. However, the associations of SARS-CoV-2-induced myocardial injury with the risk of death and prognosis after discharge in COVID-19 patients are unclear. Methods: This prospective cohort study analyzed 355 COVID-19 patients from two hospitals in different regions. Clinical and demographic information were collected and prognosis was followed up. Results: Of 355 hospitalized patients with COVID-19, 213 were mild, 90 severe, and 52 critically ill patients. On admission, 59 (16.7%) patients were with myocardial injury. Myocardial injury was more popular in critically ill patients. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression revealed that male, older age and comorbidity with hypertension were three crucial independent risk factors predicting myocardial injury of COVID-19 patients. Among 59 COVID-19 patients with myocardial injury, 25 (42.4%) died on average 10.9 days after hospitalization. Mortality was increased among COVID-19 patients with myocardial injury (42.4 vs. 3.38%, RR = 12.542, P < 0.001). Follow-up study observed that 4.67% COVID-19 patients with myocardial injury were not fully recovered in 14 days after discharge. Conclusion: Myocardial injury at early stage elevates mortality of COVID-19 patients. Male elderly patients with hypertension are more vulnerable to myocardial injury. SARS-CoV-2-induced myocardial injury has not completely recovered in 14 days after discharge.

17.
Engineering (Beijing) ; 7(7): 958-965, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1482579

ABSTRACT

The longitudinal immunologic status of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2)-infected patients and its association with the clinical outcome are barely known. Thus, we sought to analyze the temporal profiles of specific antibodies, as well as the associations between the antibodies, proinflammatory cytokines, and survival of patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). A total of 1830 laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 cases were recruited. The temporal profiles of the virus, antibodies, and cytokines of the patients until 12 weeks since illness onset were fitted by the locally weighted scatter plot smoothing method. The mediation effect of cytokines on the associations between antibody responses and survival were explored by mediation analysis. Of the 1830 patients, 1435 were detectable for SARS-CoV-2, while 395 were positive in specific antibodies only. Of the 1435 patients, 2.4% presented seroconversion for neither immunoglobulin G (IgG) nor immunoglobulin M (IgM) during hospitalization. The seropositive rates of IgG and IgM were 29.6% and 48.1%, respectively, in the first week, and plateaued within five weeks. For the patients discharged from the hospital, the IgM decreased slowly, while high levels of IgG were maintained at around 188 AU·mL-1 for the 12 weeks since illness onset. In contrast, in the patients who subsequently died, IgM declined rapidly and IgG dropped to 87 AU·mL-1 at the twelfth week. Elevated interleukin-6, interleukin-8, interleukin-10, interleukin-1ß, interleukin-2R, and tumor necrosis factor-α levels were observed in the deceased patients in comparison with the discharged patients, and 12.5% of the association between IgG level and mortality risk was mediated by these cytokines. Our study deciphers the temporal profiles of SARS-CoV-2-specific antibodies within the 12 weeks since illness onset and indicates the protective effect of antibody response on survival, which may help to guide prognosis estimation.

18.
Rechtsmedizin (Berl) ; 31(5): 418-426, 2021.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1482197

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Several evaluations of deaths in persons of advanced age associated with SARS-CoV­2 can be found in the international literature. The aim of this work was the evaluation of deaths associated with SARS-CoV­2 of persons of younger or middle age (up to 50 years) at the Institute of Legal Medicine in Hamburg, Germany, with presentation of frequency, comorbidities and disease courses. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 735 SARS-CoV-2-associated cases of decedents with registered addresses in Hamburg were evaluated in 2020 at the Institute of Legal Medicine in Hamburg, Germany, using various examination methods. The selection and performance of the respective methods was based on the consent given by the relatives. In addition, more autopsies of decedents with a registered address outside Hamburg and positive SARS-CoV­2 detection were performed. RESULTS AND CONCLUSION: Of the 735 decedents 9 with a registered Hamburg address and 3 of the deaths studied with an external registered address (n = 12; 7 men and 5 women) were aged 50 years or younger, with an average age of 39.8 years. Essentially, there were cardiovascular, neurological, and malignant pre-existing diseases, as well as obesity. The SARS-CoV­2 was detected post-mortem for the first time in two cases; these were found to have a virus-independent cause of death. Of the individuals 7 died from COVID-19 pneumonia, 3 individuals from the consequences of the necessary intensive medical treatment.Several studies have demonstrated an association between obesity and severe SARS-CoV-2-related disease progression, particularly in younger patients and this was confirmed in the legal medicine study population.

19.
J Transl Med ; 18(1): 405, 2020 10 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1477432

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Tocilizumab blocks pro-inflammatory activity of interleukin-6 (IL-6), involved in pathogenesis of pneumonia the most frequent cause of death in COVID-19 patients. METHODS: A multicenter, single-arm, hypothesis-driven trial was planned, according to a phase 2 design, to study the effect of tocilizumab on lethality rates at 14 and 30 days (co-primary endpoints, a priori expected rates being 20 and 35%, respectively). A further prospective cohort of patients, consecutively enrolled after the first cohort was accomplished, was used as a secondary validation dataset. The two cohorts were evaluated jointly in an exploratory multivariable logistic regression model to assess prognostic variables on survival. RESULTS: In the primary intention-to-treat (ITT) phase 2 population, 180/301 (59.8%) subjects received tocilizumab, and 67 deaths were observed overall. Lethality rates were equal to 18.4% (97.5% CI: 13.6-24.0, P = 0.52) and 22.4% (97.5% CI: 17.2-28.3, P < 0.001) at 14 and 30 days, respectively. Lethality rates were lower in the validation dataset, that included 920 patients. No signal of specific drug toxicity was reported. In the exploratory multivariable logistic regression analysis, older age and lower PaO2/FiO2 ratio negatively affected survival, while the concurrent use of steroids was associated with greater survival. A statistically significant interaction was found between tocilizumab and respiratory support, suggesting that tocilizumab might be more effective in patients not requiring mechanical respiratory support at baseline. CONCLUSIONS: Tocilizumab reduced lethality rate at 30 days compared with null hypothesis, without significant toxicity. Possibly, this effect could be limited to patients not requiring mechanical respiratory support at baseline. Registration EudraCT (2020-001110-38); clinicaltrials.gov (NCT04317092).


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Betacoronavirus/immunology , COVID-19 , Cohort Studies , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Mortality , Off-Label Use , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome , Validation Studies as Topic
20.
Vox Sang ; 116(9): 983-989, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1462885

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The novel coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) caused a sudden and unexpected increase in the number of hospital admissions and deaths worldwide. The impact of social distancing on blood stocks was significant. Data on the use of blood products by patients with COVID-19 are scarce. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A retrospective observational study was conducted by analysing the medical records of 3014 hospitalized COVID-19 patients in 16 Brazilian hospitals. Individual data related to clinical, laboratory and transfusion characteristics and outcomes of these patients were collected. Patients characteristics association with mortality and transfusion need were tested independently by logistic regression models. RESULTS: Patients mean age was 57·6 years. In 2298 (76·2%) patients, there was an underlying clinical comorbidity. A total of 1657 (55%) patients required admission to intensive care unit (ICU), and 943 (31%) patients required ventilatory support and orotracheal intubation (OTI). There was a total of 471 (15·6%) deaths among all patients. 325 patients (10·7%) required blood transfusion; 3187 blood products were transfused: 1364 red blood cells in 303 patients, 1092 platelet units in 78 patients, 303 fresh frozen plasma in 49 patients and 423 cryoprecipitates in 21 patients. The mortality among patients who received transfusion was substantially higher than that among the total study population. CONCLUSION: Need for transfusion was low in COVID-19 patients, but significantly higher in patients admitted to ICU and in those who needed OTI. Knowledge of the transfusion profile of these patients allows better strategies for maintaining the blood stocks of hospitals during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Blood Transfusion , Brazil/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Hospitalization , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Intensive Care Units , Respiration, Artificial , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
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