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1.
Lancet Respir Med ; 9(5): 533-544, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1931217

ABSTRACT

Cough is one of the most common presenting symptoms of COVID-19, along with fever and loss of taste and smell. Cough can persist for weeks or months after SARS-CoV-2 infection, often accompanied by chronic fatigue, cognitive impairment, dyspnoea, or pain-a collection of long-term effects referred to as the post-COVID syndrome or long COVID. We hypothesise that the pathways of neurotropism, neuroinflammation, and neuroimmunomodulation through the vagal sensory nerves, which are implicated in SARS-CoV-2 infection, lead to a cough hypersensitivity state. The post-COVID syndrome might also result from neuroinflammatory events in the brain. We highlight gaps in understanding of the mechanisms of acute and chronic COVID-19-associated cough and post-COVID syndrome, consider potential ways to reduce the effect of COVID-19 by controlling cough, and suggest future directions for research and clinical practice. Although neuromodulators such as gabapentin or opioids might be considered for acute and chronic COVID-19 cough, we discuss the possible mechanisms of COVID-19-associated cough and the promise of new anti-inflammatories or neuromodulators that might successfully target both the cough of COVID-19 and the post-COVID syndrome.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/physiopathology , Cough/etiology , Inflammation/etiology , Nervous System Diseases/etiology , Neuroimmunomodulation , Cough/physiopathology , Humans , Inflammation/physiopathology , Nervous System Diseases/physiopathology , SARS-CoV-2 , Syndrome
2.
Lancet Respir Med ; 9(5): 533-544, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1537202

ABSTRACT

Cough is one of the most common presenting symptoms of COVID-19, along with fever and loss of taste and smell. Cough can persist for weeks or months after SARS-CoV-2 infection, often accompanied by chronic fatigue, cognitive impairment, dyspnoea, or pain-a collection of long-term effects referred to as the post-COVID syndrome or long COVID. We hypothesise that the pathways of neurotropism, neuroinflammation, and neuroimmunomodulation through the vagal sensory nerves, which are implicated in SARS-CoV-2 infection, lead to a cough hypersensitivity state. The post-COVID syndrome might also result from neuroinflammatory events in the brain. We highlight gaps in understanding of the mechanisms of acute and chronic COVID-19-associated cough and post-COVID syndrome, consider potential ways to reduce the effect of COVID-19 by controlling cough, and suggest future directions for research and clinical practice. Although neuromodulators such as gabapentin or opioids might be considered for acute and chronic COVID-19 cough, we discuss the possible mechanisms of COVID-19-associated cough and the promise of new anti-inflammatories or neuromodulators that might successfully target both the cough of COVID-19 and the post-COVID syndrome.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/physiopathology , Cough/etiology , Inflammation/etiology , Nervous System Diseases/etiology , Neuroimmunomodulation , Cough/physiopathology , Humans , Inflammation/physiopathology , Nervous System Diseases/physiopathology , SARS-CoV-2 , Syndrome
3.
Int J Biometeorol ; 65(12): 2241-2243, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1258217

ABSTRACT

With this letter to Editor, we aim at offering our viewpoint on the potential use of the spa resources to contribute to the treatment of persistent COVID-19 sequelae. In particular, our argumentations focus on the comprehensive management of fatigue persisting after the resolution of the acute infection. This sequela seems to be the most frequent disabling outcome, leading to a delay in social reintegration and return to working life.We suggest that spa facilities including multidisciplinary interventions and trained staffs could be an appropriate setting for providing rehabilitative protocols to treat chronic fatigue in post COVID-19 subjects. Spa treatments may improve the physical symptoms of chronic fatigue and modulate the immune imbalance, reducing persisting inflammation. Moreover, in the spa setting, specific respiratory rehabilitation and neuropsychological interventions could be provided. The rehabilitative protocol could also properly address comorbidities.In conclusion, respecting the hygiene and preventive measures, the spa setting could represent the appropriate environment to take care of post-COVID chronic fatigue, offering adequate and multidisciplinary rehabilitation protocols. Further, prospective trials on this topic are needed to fully evaluate the positive impact of a comprehensive rehabilitative treatment in the spa environment for subjects with post-COVID-19 fatigue.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
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