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1.
Psychosom Med ; 83(4): 368-372, 2021 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1931979

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Infectious diseases can cause psychological changes in patients. This study aimed to evaluate the prevalence and related risk factors for anxiety and depression in patients with COVID-19. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was performed on patients with COVID-19 admitted to the Sino-French New City branch of Wuhan Tongji Hospital from January to February 2020. The Zung Self-Rating Anxiety and Depression Scales were used to evaluate the prevalence of anxiety and depression. Demographic, clinical, and sociological data were also collected. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was used to identify independent risk factors of anxiety and depression in patients with COVID-19. RESULTS: In the current study, 183 patients were enrolled (mean age = 53 ± 9 years; 41.1% women). The prevalences of anxiety and depression were 56.3% and 39.3%, respectively. Logistic regression analysis revealed that older age, female sex, being divorced or widowed, COVID-19 disease duration, renal disease, and depression were identified as independent risk factors for anxiety in patients with COVID-19. Factors that were associated with depression were female sex, being widowed, COVID-19 disease duration, and anxiety. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates a high prevalence of anxiety and depression in patients with COVID-19 at the peak of the epidemic in Wuhan, China. The identification of demographic, clinical, and social factors may help identify health care professionals to provide psychological care as part of treatment for patients with COVID-19 and other life-threatening infectious diseases.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Depression/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , COVID-19/complications , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/etiology , Female , Humans , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Prevalence , Psychiatric Status Rating Scales , Risk Factors
2.
J Am Coll Emerg Physicians Open ; 2020 Jun 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1898671

ABSTRACT

There is limited guidance on the use of helicopter medical personnel to facilitate care of critically ill COVID-19 patients. This manuscript describes the emergence of this novel virus, its mode of transmission, and the potential impacts on patient care in the unique environment of rotor wing aircraft. It details the development of clinical and operational guidelines for flight crew members. This allows other out-of-hospital clinicians to utilize our framework to augment or supplement their own for the current response effort to COVID-19. It further serves as a road map for future response to the care of high consequence infectious disease patients.

3.
Turk Kardiyol Dern Ars ; 48(Suppl 1): 1-48, 2020 03.
Article in Turkish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1835514

ABSTRACT

In December 2019, in the city of Wuhan, in the Hubei province of China, treatment-resistant cases of pneumonia emerged and spread rapidly for reasons unknown. A new strain of coronavirus (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 [SARS-CoV-2]) was identified and caused the first pandemic of the 21st century. The virus was officially detected in our country on March 11, 2020, and the number of cases increased rapidly; the virus was isolated in 670 patients within 10 days. The rapid increase in the number of patients has required our physicians to learn to protect both the public and themselves when treating patients with this highly infectious disease. The group most affected by the outbreak and with the highest mortality rate is elderly patients with known cardiovascular disease. Therefore, it is necessary for cardiology specialists to take an active role in combating the epidemic. The aim of this article is to make a brief assessment of current information regarding the management of cardiovascular patients affected by COVID-19 and to provide practical suggestions to cardiology specialists about problems and questions they have frequently encountered.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Cardiology/standards , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , Cardiovascular Diseases/virology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Consensus , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Societies, Medical , Turkey
4.
Turk Kardiyol Dern Ars ; 48(Suppl 1): 1-87, 2020 05.
Article in Turkish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1835513

ABSTRACT

In December 2019, in the city of Wuhan, in the Hubei province of China, treatment-resistant cases of pneumonia emerged and spread rapidly for reasons unknown. A new strain of coronavirus (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 [SARS-CoV-2]) was identified and caused the first pandemic of the 21st century. The virus was officially detected in our country on March 11, 2020, and the number of cases increased rapidly; the virus was isolated in 670 patients within 10 days. The rapid increase in the number of patients has required our physicians to learn to protect both the public and themselves when treating patients with this highly infectious disease. The group most affected by the outbreak and with the highest mortality rate is elderly patients with known cardiovascular disease. Therefore, it is necessary for cardiology specialists to take an active role in combating the epidemic. The aim of this article is to make a brief assessment of current information regarding the management of cardiovascular patients affected by COVID-19 and to provide practical suggestions to cardiology specialists about problems and questions they have frequently encountered.


Subject(s)
Cardiovascular Diseases , Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Cardiology/standards , Cardiovascular Diseases/complications , Cardiovascular Diseases/therapy , Consensus , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Practice Guidelines as Topic , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Indian J Crit Care Med ; 24(9): 763-770, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1792080

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and has been declared as a pandemic. COVID-19 patients may require transport for diagnostic or therapeutic purposes intra- or interhospital or transport from an outside hospital to a healthcare facility. Transport of critically ill or infectious patients is always challenging and involves the integration of various tasks and manpower. The adverse events have been attributed to various factors such as a multidisciplinary team and lack of appropriate communication among team members, absence of equipment, or failure during transport, apart from physiological alteration inherent to the disease of the patient. The transport of COVID-19 patients carries an additional risk of not only the disease itself but also due to the risk of its transmission to the transport team. The human-to-human transmission of the virus can occur via respiratory droplets. So, the person involved in the transport of such patients shall be at risk and warrants appropriate steps for their safety. Appropriate planning by a well-trained transport team is an essence for the safe transport of the suspected or confirmed COVID-19 patients. The Transport Medicine Society guidelines present consensus guidelines for the safe transport of COVID-19 patients. DISCLAIMER: These consensus guidelines are applicable for the safe transport of suspected or confirmed COVID-19 adult patients. These recommendations should be used in conjunction with medical management guidelines and advisories related to COVID-19. These recommendations should be adapted to the local policies prevalent at the workplace and also per agreement among the hospitals for transport (agreement between referring and receiving facilities). With the emergence of new scientific evidence, these guidelines may require modification. HOW TO CITE THIS ARTICLE: Munjal M, Ahmed SM, Garg R, Das S, Chatterjee N, Mittal K, et al. The Transport Medicine Society Consensus Guidelines for the Transport of Suspected or Confirmed COVID-19 Patients. Indian J Crit Care Med 2020;24(9):763-770.

6.
QJM ; 114(9): 625-635, 2021 Nov 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1746245

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection has been linked to the Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). The objective of the present study is to identify specific clinical features of cases of GBS reported in the literature associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection. We searched Pubmed, and included single case reports and case series with full text in English, reporting original data of patients with GBS and a confirmed recent SARS-CoV-2 infection. Clinical data were extracted. We identified 28 articles (22 single case reports and 6 case series), reporting on a total of 44 GBS patients with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection. SARS-CoV-2 infection was confirmed through serum reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction in 72.7% of cases. A total of 40 patients (91%) had symptoms compatible with SARS-CoV-2 infection before the onset of the GBS. The median period between the onset of symptoms of SARS-CoV-2 infection and symptoms of the GBS was 11.2 days (range, 2-23). The most common clinical features were: leg weakness (61.4%), leg paresthesia (50%), arm weakness (50.4%), arm paresthesia (50.4%), hyporeflexia/areflexia (48%) and ataxia (22.7%). In total, 38.6% (n = 17) were found to have facial paralysis. Among 37 patients in whom nerve-conduction studies and electromyography were performed, of which 26 patients (59.1%) were consistent with the acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy subtype of the GBS. The present retrospective analysis support the role of the SARS-CoV-2 infection in the development of the GBS, may trigger GBS as para-infectious disease, and lead to SARS-CoV-2-associated GBS.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communicable Diseases , Guillain-Barre Syndrome , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/complications , Humans , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
7.
J Virol ; 94(13)2020 06 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1583223

ABSTRACT

Fusion with, and subsequent entry into, the host cell is one of the critical steps in the life cycle of enveloped viruses. For Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV), the spike (S) protein is the main determinant of viral entry. Proteolytic cleavage of the S protein exposes its fusion peptide (FP), which initiates the process of membrane fusion. Previous studies on the related severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) FP have shown that calcium ions (Ca2+) play an important role in fusogenic activity via a Ca2+ binding pocket with conserved glutamic acid (E) and aspartic acid (D) residues. SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV FPs share a high sequence homology, and here, we investigated whether Ca2+ is required for MERS-CoV fusion by screening a mutant array in which E and D residues in the MERS-CoV FP were substituted with neutrally charged alanines (A). Upon verifying mutant cell surface expression and proteolytic cleavage, we tested their ability to mediate pseudoparticle (PP) infection of host cells in modulating Ca2+ environments. Our results demonstrate that intracellular Ca2+ enhances MERS-CoV wild-type (WT) PP infection by approximately 2-fold and that E891 is a crucial residue for Ca2+ interaction. Subsequent electron spin resonance (ESR) experiments revealed that this enhancement could be attributed to Ca2+ increasing MERS-CoV FP fusion-relevant membrane ordering. Intriguingly, isothermal calorimetry showed an approximate 1:1 MERS-CoV FP to Ca2+ ratio, as opposed to an 1:2 SARS-CoV FP to Ca2+ ratio, suggesting significant differences in FP Ca2+ interactions of MERS-CoV and SARS-CoV FP despite their high sequence similarity.IMPORTANCE Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) is a major emerging infectious disease with zoonotic potential and has reservoirs in dromedary camels and bats. Since its first outbreak in 2012, the virus has repeatedly transmitted from camels to humans, with 2,468 confirmed cases causing 851 deaths. To date, there are no efficacious drugs and vaccines against MERS-CoV, increasing its potential to cause a public health emergency. In order to develop novel drugs and vaccines, it is important to understand the molecular mechanisms that enable the virus to infect host cells. Our data have found that calcium is an important regulator of viral fusion by interacting with negatively charged residues in the MERS-CoV FP region. This information can guide therapeutic solutions to block this calcium interaction and also repurpose already approved drugs for this use for a fast response to MERS-CoV outbreaks.


Subject(s)
Calcium/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/metabolism , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Ions/metabolism , Membrane Fusion , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/physiology , Virus Internalization , Amino Acid Sequence , Amino Acid Substitution , Animals , Cell Line , Chlorocebus aethiops , Humans , Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus/pathogenicity , Models, Molecular , Mutation , Protein Binding , Proteolysis , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Structure-Activity Relationship , Vero Cells , Virulence , Virus Assembly
8.
Clin Infect Dis ; 73(10): 1822-1830, 2021 11 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1522141

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Prompt identification of infections is critical for slowing the spread of infectious diseases. However, diagnostic testing shortages are common in emerging diseases, low resource settings, and during outbreaks. This forces difficult decisions regarding who receives a test, often without knowing the implications of those decisions on population-level transmission dynamics. Clinical prediction rules (CPRs) are commonly used tools to guide clinical decisions. METHODS: Using early severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus disease 2 (SARS-CoV-2) as an example, we used data from electronic health records to develop a parsimonious 5-variable CPR to identify those who are most likely to test positive. To consider the implications of gains in daily case detection at the population level, we incorporated testing using the CPR into a compartmentalized model of SARS-CoV-2. RESULTS: We found that applying this CPR (area under the curve, 0.69; 95% confidence interval, .68-.70) to prioritize testing increased the proportion of those testing positive in settings of limited testing capacity. We found that prioritized testing led to a delayed and lowered infection peak (ie, "flattens the curve"), with the greatest impact at lower values of the effective reproductive number (such as with concurrent community mitigation efforts), and when higher proportions of infectious persons seek testing. In addition, prioritized testing resulted in reductions in overall infections as well as hospital and intensive care unit burden. CONCLUSION: We highlight the population-level benefits of evidence-based allocation of limited diagnostic capacity.SummaryWhen the demand for diagnostic tests exceeds capacity, the use of a clinical prediction rule to prioritize diagnostic testing can have meaningful impact on population-level outcomes, including delaying and lowering the infection peak, and reducing healthcare burden.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Clinical Decision Rules , Diagnostic Techniques and Procedures , Diagnostic Tests, Routine , Hospitals , Humans
9.
Clin Infect Dis ; 73(10): 1920-1923, 2021 11 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1522136

ABSTRACT

Nationally, immunization delivery has decreased significantly during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Internationally, >60 national vaccine programs have been disrupted or suspended. As a result of these immunization declines, the global community is at risk for a resurgence in vaccine-preventable infections including measles, pertussis, and polio-all highly contagious diseases that result in significant morbidity and mortality in children. Measles outbreaks have already occurred in many countries that suspended their vaccination programs. Outbreaks in the United States are likely to occur when social distancing stops and children return to school. Healthcare providers have acted quickly to institute multiple risk mitigation strategies to restore vaccine administration. However, childhood immunization rates remain below pre-COVID-19 levels. Partnerships between healthcare providers, community leaders, and local, state, regional, and national public health departments are needed to reassure families that vaccine delivery during COVID-19 is safe and to identify and catch up those children who are underimmunized.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Vaccines , Child , Humans , Immunization , Immunization Programs , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology , Vaccination
10.
Geroscience ; 43(3): 1093-1112, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1499503

ABSTRACT

We are in the midst of the global pandemic. Though acute respiratory coronavirus (SARS-COV2) that leads to COVID-19 infects people of all ages, severe symptoms and mortality occur disproportionately in older adults. Geroscience interventions that target biological aging could decrease risk across multiple age-related diseases and improve outcomes in response to infectious disease. This offers hope for a new host-directed therapeutic approach that could (i) improve outcomes following exposure or shorten treatment regimens; (ii) reduce the chronic pathology associated with the infectious disease and subsequent comorbidity, frailty, and disability; and (iii) promote development of immunological memory that protects against relapse or improves response to vaccination. We review the possibility of this approach by examining available evidence in metformin: a generic drug with a proven safety record that will be used in a large-scale multicenter clinical trial. Though rigorous translational research and clinical trials are needed to test this empirically, metformin may improve host immune defenses and confer protection against long-term health consequences of infectious disease, age-related chronic diseases, and geriatric syndromes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communicable Diseases , Metformin , Aged , Communicable Diseases/drug therapy , Humans , Metformin/therapeutic use , Multicenter Studies as Topic , RNA, Viral , SARS-CoV-2
11.
J Med Virol ; 93(10): 5783-5788, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1432409

ABSTRACT

More and more rapid antigen tests for the diagnosis of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) appear in the market with varying performance. The sensitivity of these tests heavily depends on the viral load, extrapolated by the threshold cycle (Ct). It is therefore essential to verify their performance before their inclusion in routine. The Coronavirus Ag Rapid Test Cassette Bio-Rad, the GSD NovaGen SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) Antigen Rapid Test, and the Aegle Coronavirus Ag Rapid Test Cassette were evaluated on 199 samples: 150 fresh samples from the routine and positive in quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), nine fresh samples negative in RT-qPCR, and 40 frozen samples, taken before the discovery of SARS-CoV-2 but positive for other respiratory viruses. Positive RT-qPCR samples were categorized according to their Ct: Ct < 20 (18.7%), ≥ 20-< 25 (27.3%), ≥ 25-< 30 (18.7%), ≥ 30-35 (17.3%), and > 35 (18.0%). Sensitivities (95% confidence interval) for Ct below 25 were 95.7% (92.4-98.9), 97.1% (94.4-99.8), and 97.1% (94.4-99.8) for GSD NovaGen, Bio-Rad, and Aegle, respectively but drastically dropped when Ct exceeded 27. Among samples with previously diagnosed viruses, seven false-positive results were found with GSD NovaGen only (specificity 85.7%). Equivalent, high sensitivities were observed with the highest viral load samples. The GSD NovaGen assay showed less specificity. Although the three kits tested in this study are inadequate for routine testing in a high throughput laboratory, they can help to quickly identify the most infectious patients and screen their close contacts in an environment where molecular tests are not readily available.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Serological Testing , COVID-19/diagnosis , Point-of-Care Testing , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Viral Load , Antigens, Viral/analysis , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing/statistics & numerical data , Humans , RNA, Viral/analysis , RNA, Viral/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Sensitivity and Specificity
12.
Lancet Infect Dis ; 21(8): 1184-1191, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1433936

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Non-communicable diseases (NCDs) have been highlighted as important risk factors for COVID-19 mortality. However, insufficient data exist on the wider context of infectious diseases in people with NCDs. We aimed to investigate the association between NCDs and the risk of death from any infection before the COVID-19 pandemic (up to Dec 31, 2019). METHODS: For this observational study, we used data from the UK Biobank observational cohort study to explore factors associated with infection death. We excluded participants if data were missing for comorbidities, body-mass index, smoking status, ethnicity, and socioeconomic deprivation, and if they were lost to follow-up or withdrew consent. Deaths were censored up to Dec 31, 2019. We used Poisson regression models including NCDs present at recruitment to the UK Biobank (obesity [defined by use of body-mass index] and self-reported hypertension, chronic heart disease, chronic respiratory disease, diabetes, cancer, chronic liver disease, chronic kidney disease, previous stroke or transient ischaemic attack, other neurological disease, psychiatric disorder, and chronic inflammatory and autoimmune rheumatological disease), age, sex, ethnicity, smoking status, and socioeconomic deprivation. Separate models were constructed with individual NCDs replaced by the total number of prevalent NCDs to define associations with multimorbidity. All analyses were repeated with non-infection-related death as an alternate outcome measure to establish differential associations of infection death and non-infection death. Associations are reported as incidence rate ratios (IRR) accompanied by 95% CIs. FINDINGS: After exclusion of 9210 (1·8%) of the 502 505 participants in the UK Biobank cohort, our study sample comprised 493 295 individuals. During 5 273 731 person-years of follow-up (median 10·9 years [IQR 10·1-11·6] per participant), 27 729 deaths occurred, of which 1385 (5%) were related to infection. Advancing age, male sex, smoking, socioeconomic deprivation, and all studied NCDs were independently associated with the rate of both infection death and non-infection death. Compared with White ethnicity, a pooled Black, Asian, and minority ethnicity group was associated with a reduced risk of infection death (IRR 0·64, 95% CI 0·46-0·87) and non-infection death (0·80, 0·75-0·86). Stronger associations with infection death than with non-infection death were observed for advancing age (age 65 years vs 45 years: 7·59, 95% CI 5·92-9·73, for infection death vs 5·21, 4·97-5·48, for non-infection death), current smoking (vs never smoking: 3·69, 3·19-4·26, vs 2·52, 2·44-2·61), socioeconomic deprivation (most vs least deprived quintile: 2·13, 1·78-2·56, vs 1·38, 1·33-1·43), class 3 obesity (vs non-obese: 2·21, 1·74-2·82, vs 1·55, 1·44-1·66), hypertension (1·36, 1·22-1·53, vs 1·15, 1·12-1·18), respiratory disease (2·21, 1·96-2·50, vs 1·28, 1·24-1·32), chronic kidney disease (5·04, 4·28-7·31, vs 2·50, 2·20-2·84), psychiatric disease (1·56, 1·30-1·86, vs 1·23, 1·18-1·29), and chronic inflammatory and autoimmune rheumatological disease (2·45, 1·99-3·02, vs 1·41, 1·32-1·51). Accrual of multimorbidity was also more strongly associated with risk of infection death (five or more comorbidities vs none: 9·53, 6·97-13·03) than of non-infection death (5·26, 4·84-5·72). INTERPRETATION: Several NCDs are associated with an increased risk of infection death, suggesting that some of the reported associations with COVID-19 mortality might be non-specific. Only a subset of NCDs, together with the accrual of multimorbidity, advancing age, smoking, and socioeconomic deprivation, were associated with a greater IRR for infection death than for other causes of death. Further research is needed to define why these risk factors are more strongly associated with infection death, so that more effective preventive strategies can be targeted to high-risk groups. FUNDING: British Heart Foundation.


Subject(s)
Biological Specimen Banks , COVID-19/etiology , Noncommunicable Diseases , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/mortality , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Risk Factors , Socioeconomic Factors
13.
Bundesgesundheitsblatt Gesundheitsforschung Gesundheitsschutz ; 63(1): 65-73, 2020 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1396373

ABSTRACT

Today's world is characterized by increasing population density, human mobility, urbanization, and climate and ecological change. This global dynamic has various effects, including the increased appearance of emerging infectious diseases (EIDs), which pose a growing threat to global health security.Outbreaks of EIDs, like the 2013-2016 Ebola outbreak in West Africa or the current Ebola outbreak in Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), have not only put populations in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) at risk in terms of morbidity and mortality, but they also have had a significant impact on economic growth in affected regions and beyond.The Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovation (CEPI) is an innovative global partnership between public, private, philanthropic, and civil society organizations that was launched as the result of a consensus that a coordinated, international, and intergovernmental plan was needed to develop and deploy new vaccines to prevent future epidemics.CEPI is focusing on supporting candidate vaccines against the World Health Organization (WHO) Blueprint priority pathogens MERS-CoV, Nipah virus, Lassa fever virus, and Rift Valley fever virus, as well as Chikungunya virus, which is on the WHO watch list. The current vaccine portfolio contains a wide variety of technologies, ranging across recombinant viral vectors, nucleic acids, and recombinant proteins. To support and accelerate vaccine development, CEPI will also support science projects related to the development of biological standards and assays, animal models, epidemiological studies, and diagnostics, as well as build capacities for future clinical trials in risk-prone contexts.


Subject(s)
Communicable Diseases, Emerging , Epidemics , Vaccines , Africa, Western , Animals , Disease Outbreaks , Germany , Humans
14.
Optim Control Appl Methods ; 2020 Aug 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1396370

ABSTRACT

In this paper, the problem of social distancing in the spread of infectious diseases in the human network is extended by optimal control and differential game approaches. Hear, SEAIR model on simulation network is used. Total costs for both approaches are formulated as objective functions. SEAIR dynamics for group k that contacts with k individuals including susceptible, exposed, asymptomatically infected, symptomatically infected and improved or safe individuals is modeled. A novel random model including the concept of social distancing and relative risk of infection using Markov process is proposed. For each group, an aggregate investment is derived and computed using adjoint equations and maximum principle. Results show that for each group, investments in the differential game are less than investments in an optimal control approach. Although individuals' participation in investment for social distancing causes to reduce the epidemic cost, the epidemic cost according to the second approach is too much less than the first approach.

16.
Animals (Basel) ; 11(1)2021 Jan 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389262

ABSTRACT

Despite the possibilities of routine clinical measures and assays on readily accessible bio-samples, it is not always essential in animals to investigate the dynamics of disease longitudinally. In this regard, minimally invasive imaging methods provide powerful tools in preclinical research. They can contribute to the ethical principle of gathering as much relevant information per animal as possible. Besides, with an obvious parallel to clinical diagnostic practice, such imaging platforms are potent and valuable instruments leading to a more refined use of animals from a welfare perspective. Non-human primates comprise highly relevant species for preclinical research to enhance our understanding of disease mechanisms and/or the development of improved prophylactic or therapeutic regimen for various human diseases. In this paper, we describe parameters that critically affect the quality of integrated positron emission tomography and computed tomography (PET-CT) in non-human primates. Lessons learned are exemplified by results from imaging experimental infectious respiratory disease in macaques; specifically tuberculosis, influenza, and SARS-CoV-2 infection. We focus on the thorax and use of 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose as a PET tracer. Recommendations are provided to guide various stages of PET-CT-supported research in non-human primates, from animal selection, scan preparation, and operation, to processing and analysis of imaging data.

17.
PLoS One ; 16(3): e0248808, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1388908

ABSTRACT

A number of epidemics, including the SARS-CoV-1 epidemic of 2002-2004, have been known to exhibit superspreading, in which a small fraction of infected individuals is responsible for the majority of new infections. The existence of superspreading implies a fat-tailed distribution of infectiousness (new secondary infections caused per day) among different individuals. Here, we present a simple method to estimate the variation in infectiousness by examining the variation in early-time growth rates of new cases among different subpopulations. We use this method to estimate the mean and variance in the infectiousness, ß, for SARS-CoV-2 transmission during the early stages of the pandemic within the United States. We find that σß/µß ≳ 3.2, where µß is the mean infectiousness and σß its standard deviation, which implies pervasive superspreading. This result allows us to estimate that in the early stages of the pandemic in the USA, over 81% of new cases were a result of the top 10% of most infectious individuals.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Models, Theoretical , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , United States/epidemiology
18.
PLoS One ; 16(3): e0247439, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1388901

ABSTRACT

This paper presents a method to predict the spread of the SARS-CoV-2 in a population with a known age-structure, and then, to quantify the effects of various containment policies, including those policies that affect each age-group differently. The model itself is a compartmental model in which each compartment is divided into a number of age-groups. The parameters of the model are estimated using an optimisation scheme and some known results from the theory of monotone systems such that the model output agrees with some collected data on the spread of SARS-CoV-2. To highlight the strengths of this framework, a few case studies are presented in which different populations are subjected to different containment strategies. They include cases in which the containment policies switch between scenarios with different levels of severity. Then a case study on herd immunity due to vaccination is presented. And then it is shown how we can use this framework to optimally distribute a limited number of vaccine units in a given population to maximise their impact and reduce the total number of infectious individuals.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Vaccination , Adolescent , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/immunology , Child , Humans , Immunity, Herd , Middle Aged , Physical Distancing , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Young Adult
19.
Science ; 2021 May 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1388438

ABSTRACT

Airborne transmission by droplets and aerosols is important for the spread of viruses. Face masks are a well-established preventive measure, but their effectiveness for mitigating SARS-CoV-2 transmission is still under debate. We show that variations in mask efficacy can be explained by different regimes of virus abundance and related to population-average infection probability and reproduction number. For SARS-CoV-2, the viral load of infectious individuals can vary by orders of magnitude. We find that most environments and contacts are under conditions of low virus abundance (virus-limited) where surgical masks are effective at preventing virus spread. More advanced masks and other protective equipment are required in potentially virus-rich indoor environments including medical centers and hospitals. Masks are particularly effective in combination with other preventive measures like ventilation and distancing.

20.
Med Klin Intensivmed Notfmed ; 115(5): 390-392, 2020 Jun.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1384336

ABSTRACT

Pregnant employees should be protected, particularly in crisis situations. The Maternity Protection Act states that employees are not allowed to have contact with infectious people, including people with SARS-CoV-2 infections; no new regulation is required here.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Health Personnel , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Pregnant Women , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Female , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2
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