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1.
Pediatr Emerg Care ; 38(1): e398-e403, 2022 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1767003

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) in pediatric patients has been associated with low risk of concomitant bacterial infection. However, in children with severe disease, it occurs in 22% to 50% of patients. As viral testing becomes routine, bacterial codetections are increasingly identified in patients with non-RSV viruses. We hypothesized, among patients intubated for respiratory failure secondary to suspected infection, there are similar rates of codetection between RSV and non-RSV viral detections. METHODS: This retrospective chart review, conducted over a 5-year period, included all patients younger than 2 years who required intubation secondary to respiratory failure from an infectious etiology in a single pediatric emergency department. Patients intubated for noninfectious causes were excluded. RESULTS: We reviewed 274 patients, of which 181 had positive viral testing. Of these, 48% were RSV-positive and 52% were positive for viruses other than RSV. Codetection of bacteria was found in 76% (n = 65; 95% confidence interval [CI], 66%, 84%) of RSV-positive patients and 66% (n = 63, 95% CI: 57%, 76%) of patients positive with non-RSV viruses. Among patients with negative viral testing, 33% had bacterial growth on lower respiratory culture. Male sex was the only patient-related factor associated with increased odds of codetection (odds ratio [OR], 2.2; 95% CI, 1.08-4.38). The odds of codetection between RSV-positive patients and non-RSV viruses were not significantly different (OR, 1.3; 95% CI, 0.62-2.71). CONCLUSIONS: Bacterial codetection is common and not associated with anticipated patient-related factors or with a specific virus. These results suggest consideration of empiric antibiotics in infants with respiratory illness requiring intubation.


Subject(s)
Bacterial Infections , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections , Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human , Respiratory Tract Infections , Bacteria , Child , Humans , Infant , Male , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/complications , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/diagnosis , Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infections/epidemiology , Respiratory Tract Infections/diagnosis , Respiratory Tract Infections/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies
2.
Pak J Med Sci ; 36(COVID19-S4): S67-S72, 2020 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1726831

ABSTRACT

Children are not indifferent to the significant psychological impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic. They experience fears, uncertainties, substantial changes to their routines, physical and social isolation alongside high level of parental stress. Understanding their emotions and responses is essential to properly address their needs during this pandemic. In this article, we highlight children's vulnerability, provide an overview of common symptoms of distress in different age groups, and summarize the interventions and resources available to promote child mental health and wellbeing during these challenging times. We advocate that prioritizing mental health including child & adolescent mental health is an essential component of any universal, community led response to COVID-19 Pandemic.

4.
Neurosurgery ; 87(2): E239-E240, 2020 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526170
5.
Curr Opin Ophthalmol ; 31(5): 374-379, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1511065

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The use of slit lamp shields has been recommended by the American Academy of Ophthalmology as an infection control measure during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic. However, there is limited evidence regarding its efficacy to reduce viral transmission risks. We aim to provide an evidence-based approach to optimize the use of slit lamp shields during clinical examination. RECENT FINDINGS: Respiratory droplets from coughing and sneezing can travel up to 50 m/s and over a distance of 2 m, with a potential area of spread of 616 cm. Slit lamp shields confer added protection against large droplets but are limited against smaller particles. A larger shield curved toward the ophthalmologist and positioned closer to the patient increases protection against large droplets. A potential improvement to the design of such shields is the use of hydrophilic materials with antiviral properties which may help to minimize splashing of infectious droplets, reducing transmission risks. These include gold or silver nanoparticles and graphene oxide. SUMMARY: Slit lamp shields serve as a barrier for large droplets, but its protection against smaller droplets is undetermined. It should be large, positioned close to the patient, and used in tandem with routine basic disinfection practices.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Infection Control/instrumentation , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Protective Devices , Slit Lamp , COVID-19 , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Minerva Gastroenterol (Torino) ; 67(3): 283-288, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1485664

ABSTRACT

World Gastroenterology Organization define acute on chronic liver failure (ACLF) a syndrome in patients with chronic liver disease with or without previously diagnosed cirrhosis, characterized by acute hepatic decompensation resulting in liver failure and one or more extrahepatic organ failures, associated with increased mortality up to three months. A-56-year-old gentleman with alcohol related liver cirrhosis (ARLC) and history of variceal bleeding with insertion of transjugular intrahepatic porto-systemic stent shunt presented with two days history of fever, dry cough and worsening of the sensory. The severe acute respiratory coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) nasopharingeal C-reactive protein test was positive. X-ray showed multiple patchy ground glass opacities in both lungs. Despite the therapy, the clinical and laboratory picture deteriorated rapidly. The patient succumbed on day 14 with multi-organ-failure. SARS-Cov-2 infection can overlap with pre-existing chronic liver disease or induce liver damage directly or indirectly. From the data of the literature and from what is inferred from the case report it clearly emerges that alcohol related liver disease (ALD) patients are particularly vulnerable to SARS-Cov-2 infection. Thereafter, some considerations can be deduced from the analysis of the case report. In subjects with pre-existing cirrhosis hepatologists should play more attention to hepatic injury and monitor risk of hepatic failure caused by coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). It is appropriate to promptly define the alcoholic etiology and investigate whether the patient is actively consuming. In fact, withdrawal symptoms may be present, and the prognosis of these patients is also worse. Physicians should be alerted to the possibility of the development of ACLF in this population, hepatotoxic drugs should be avoided, it is recommended to use of hepatoprotective therapy to mitigate the negative impact of COVID-19, and it is mandatory to administer anti COVID-19 vaccine to patients with alcohol related liver cirrhosis.


Subject(s)
Acute-On-Chronic Liver Failure/etiology , Alcoholism/complications , COVID-19/complications , Liver Cirrhosis/complications , Humans , Male , Middle Aged
8.
Clin Dermatol ; 39(1): 104-106, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1300697

ABSTRACT

The clinical trials industry faces a number of challenges during the evolving coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, for example, site closures, mandatory self-isolation, travel restrictions, interruptions to delivery of investigational product, or staff or participants becoming infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2. These challenges can pose difficulties in adhering to visit schedules, performing laboratory testing, conducting protocol-specified procedures, and administration of investigational product. As a result, clinical trial sites, contract research organizations, and sponsors have had to act swiftly to ensure that trial patients are safe and systems are in place for continuing trials. Protocols should also be amended to reflect changes and approved by an ethics board. The authors provide practical considerations and recommendations for dermatology clinical trial operations during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Clinical Trials as Topic/methods , Dermatology , Patient Safety , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Can Geriatr J ; 24(2): 151-153, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1273651

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has had a profound impact on long-term care (LTC) homes in Canada. But the measures put in place to control infection within LTC homes have also had devastating impacts on the health and well-being of residents through the effects on social connection. Here, we offer guiding principles to enable social connection and promote health and quality of life for LTC residents during COVID-19 and beyond. These principles were generated by a working group of the COVID-19 and Dementia Task Force, convened by the Alzheimer Society of Canada to identify the urgent and emerging issues raised by COVID-19 for Canadians with dementia.

10.
Am J Phys Med Rehabil ; 100(7): 712-717, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1270769

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The field of physical medicine and rehabilitation should strive for a physician workforce that is ethnically/racially, sex, and ability diverse. Considering the recent realities of disparities in health outcomes related to COVID-19 and in racial injustice in the United States, we are called to be champions for antiracism and equity. The specialty of physical medicine and rehabilitation should be the leaders in fostering a culture of inclusion and pay special attention to the population of applicants who are underrepresented in medicine. The specialty needs tools to start addressing these disparities. This article aims to provide strategic and intentional evidence-based recommendations for programs to follow. Holistic review, implicit bias training, structured interviews, and targeted outreach for those underrepresented in medicine are some of the tools that will help students enter and become successful in our specialty. Furthermore, this article provides novel guidance and considerations for virtual interviews during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Cultural Diversity , Disabled Persons , Education, Medical, Graduate/standards , Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine , Prejudice/prevention & control , Workforce , Humans , Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine/education , Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine/organization & administration , Physical and Rehabilitation Medicine/standards , Prejudice/ethnology , Socioeconomic Factors , United States , Workforce/organization & administration , Workforce/standards
11.
Res Sq ; 2021 Jun 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1270324

ABSTRACT

Background: While pre-existing cardiovascular disease (CVD) appears to be associated with poor outcomes in patients with Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19), data on patients with CVD and concomitant cancer is limited. Evaluate the effect of underlying CVD and CVD risk factors with cancer history on in-hospital mortality in those with COVID-19. Methods: Data from symptomatic adults hospitalized with COVID-19 at 86 hospitals in the US enrolled in the American Heart Association’s COVID-19 CVD Registry was analyzed. The primary exposure was cancer history. The primary outcome was in-hospital death. Multivariable logistic regression models were adjusted for demographics, CVD risk factors, and CVD. Interaction between history of cancer with concomitant CVD and CVD risk factors were tested. Results: Among 8222 patients, 892 (10.8%) had a history of cancer and 1501 (18.3%) died. Cancer history had significant interaction with CVD risk factors of age, body mass index (BMI), and smoking history, but not underlying CVD itself. History of cancer was significantly associated with increased in-hospital death (among average age and BMI patients, adjusted odds ratio [aOR]=3.60, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.07-6.24; p<0.0001 in those with a smoking history and aOR=1.33, 95%CI: 1.01 - 1.76; p=0.04 in non-smokers). Among the cancer subgroup, prior use of chemotherapy within 2 weeks of admission was associated with in-hospital death (aOR=1.72, 95%CI: 1.05-2.80; p=0.03). Underlying CVD demonstrated a numerical but statistically nonsignificant trend toward increased mortality (aOR=1.18, 95% CI: 0.99 - 1.41; p=0.07). Conclusion: Among hospitalized COVID-19 patients, cancer history was a predictor of in-hospital mortality. Notably, among cancer patients, recent use of chemotherapy, but not underlying CVD itself, was associated with worse survival. These findings have important implications in cancer therapy considerations and vaccine distribution in cancer patients with and without underlying CVD and CVD risk factors.

12.
Bull World Health Organ ; 99(2): 155-161, 2021 Feb 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1261337

ABSTRACT

Restrictive measures imposed because of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic have resulted in severe social, economic and health effects. Some countries have considered the use of immunity certification as a strategy to relax these measures for people who have recovered from the infection by issuing these individuals a document, commonly called an immunity passport. This document certifies them as having protective immunity against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2), the virus that causes COVID-19. The World Health Organization has advised against the implementation of immunity certification at present because of uncertainty about whether long-term immunity truly exists for those who have recovered from COVID-19 and concerns over the reliability of the proposed serological test method for determining immunity. Immunity certification can only be considered if scientific thresholds for assuring immunity are met, whether based on antibodies or other criteria. However, even if immunity certification became well supported by science, it has many ethical issues in terms of different restrictions on individual liberties and its implementation process. We examine the main considerations for the ethical acceptability of immunity certification to exempt individuals from restrictive measures during the COVID-19 pandemic. As well as needing to meet robust scientific criteria, the ethical acceptability of immunity certification depends on its uses and policy objectives and the measures in place to reduce potential harms, and prevent disproportionate burdens on non-certified individuals and violation of individual liberties and rights.


Les restrictions imposées dans le cadre de la lutte contre la pandémie de maladie à coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) ont eu de lourdes conséquences économiques, sociales et sanitaires. Certains pays ont envisagé la mise en place d'une stratégie visant à alléger ces restrictions pour les individus guéris en leur octroyant un document communément appelé «passeport d'immunité¼. Ce document atteste qu'ils ont développé une immunité protectrice contre le coronavirus 2 du syndrome respiratoire aigu sévère (SARS-CoV-2), le virus à l'origine de la COVID-19. L'Organisation mondiale de la Santé a déconseillé l'usage du certificat d'immunité pour l'instant, car l'incertitude demeure quant à l'existence réelle d'une immunité à long terme pour ceux qui se sont remis de la COVID-19. En outre, la fiabilité des tests sérologiques censés déterminer si l'individu est immunisé n'est pas avérée. Un tel certificat ne peut être instauré que si les seuils scientifiques en matière d'immunité sont respectés, qu'ils soient fondés sur les anticorps ou sur d'autres critères. Néanmoins, même si le certificat d'immunité est désormais bien accepté par la science, il s'accompagne de nombreuses questions d'ordre éthique en ce qui concerne la limitation des libertés individuelles et la mise en œuvre. Dans le présent document, nous examinons les principales considérations à prendre en compte pour garantir l'acceptabilité éthique du certificat d'immunité visant à lever les mesures de restriction pour certaines personnes durant la pandémie de COVID-19. Cette acceptabilité éthique dépend non seulement de son degré de conformité à des critères scientifiques stricts, mais aussi de son usage, des objectifs politiques ainsi que des mesures mises en place pour atténuer les préjudices potentiels et éviter d'imposer une charge disproportionnée sur les individus dépourvus de certificat, ou de bafouer les droits et libertés de tout un chacun.


Las medidas restrictivas impuestas a causa de la pandemia de la enfermedad coronavirus de 2019 (COVID-19) han tenido graves efectos sociales, económicos y sanitarios. Algunos países han considerado la posibilidad de utilizar la certificación de inmunidad como estrategia para flexibilizar dichas medidas para las personas que se han recuperado de la infección mediante la expedición a dichas personas de un documento, comúnmente denominado pasaporte de inmunidad. Este documento certifica que han desarrollado inmunidad protectora contra el coronavirus-2 del síndrome respiratorio agudo severo (SARS-CoV-2), el virus que causa la COVID-19. La Organización Mundial de la Salud ha desaconsejado la aplicación de la certificación de la inmunidad en la actualidad debido a la incertidumbre sobre si existe realmente una inmunidad a largo plazo para quienes se han recuperado de la COVID-19 y a las preocupaciones sobre la fiabilidad del método de prueba serológica propuesto para determinar la inmunidad. La certificación de la inmunidad solo puede considerarse si se cumplen los umbrales científicos para asegurar la inmunidad, ya sea que se basen en anticuerpos o en otros criterios. Sin embargo, incluso si la certificación de la inmunidad llegara a estar bien respaldada por la ciencia, tiene muchas cuestiones éticas en cuanto a las diferentes restricciones de las libertades individuales y su proceso de aplicación. Examinamos las principales consideraciones sobre la aceptabilidad ética de la certificación de la inmunidad para eximir a los individuos de las medidas restrictivas durante la pandemia de la COVID-19. Además de necesitar cumplir criterios científicos sólidos, la aceptabilidad ética de la certificación de inmunidad depende de sus usos y objetivos de política y de las medidas que se apliquen para reducir los posibles daños y evitar que se impongan cargas desproporcionadas a las personas que no cuenten con dicha certificación y se violen las libertades y derechos individuales.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Serological Testing/ethics , COVID-19/diagnosis , Certification/ethics , Pandemics , Public Health/ethics , Humans , Immunity, Humoral
13.
Ann Med ; 53(1): 777-785, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1246573

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus SARS-CoV-2, the aetiological agent of COVID-19 disease, is representing a worldwide threat for the medical community and the society at large so that it is being defined as "the twenty-first-century disease". Often associated with a severe cytokine storm, leading to more severe cases, it is mandatory to block such occurrence early in the disease course, to prevent the patients from having more severe, sometimes fatal, outcomes. In this framework, early detection of "danger signals", possibly represented by alarmins, can represent one of the most promising strategies to effectively tailor the disease and to better understand the underlying mechanisms eventually leading to death or severe consequences. In light of such considerations, the present article aims at evaluating the role of alarmins in patients affected by COVID-19 disease and the relationship of such compounds with the most commonly reported comorbidities. The conducted researches demonstrated yet poor literature on this specific topic, however preliminarily confirming a role for danger signals in the amplification of the inflammatory reaction associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection. As such, a number of chronic conditions, including metabolic syndrome, gastrointestinal and respiratory diseases, in turn, associated with higher levels of alarmins, both foster the infection and predispose to a worse prognosis. According to these preliminary data, prompt detection of high levels of alarmins in patients with COVID-19 and co-morbidities could suggest an immediate intense anti-inflammatory treatment.Key messageAlarmins have a role in the amplification of the inflammatory reaction associated with SARS-CoV-2 infectiona prompt detection of high levels of alarmins in patients with COVID-19 could suggest an immediate intense anti-inflammatory treatment.


Subject(s)
Alarmins/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Animals , COVID-19/virology , Comorbidity , Cytokine Release Syndrome/immunology , Cytokine Release Syndrome/virology , Humans , Inflammation/immunology , Inflammation/virology , Prognosis , Severity of Illness Index
14.
J Health Psychol ; 27(6): 1462-1469, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1226843

ABSTRACT

This research investigated how implicit theories of health and consideration of future consequences influence people's engagement in health-protective behaviors during the COVID-19 pandemic in China. Three hundred and ninety Chinese completed the study during the peak period of COVID-19 pandemic in China. Gender, education level, implicit theories of health, and consideration of future consequences were significant predictors of people's engagement in health-protective behaviors. Consideration of future consequences mediated the effect of implicit (incremental) theories of health on people's engagement in health-protective behaviors. Implications of the current research for promoting engagement in health-protective behaviors during pandemics of infectious diseases and directions for future research are discussed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Health Behavior , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Asian Bioeth Rev ; 12(2): 85, 2020 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1225084

ABSTRACT

[This corrects the article DOI: 10.1007/s41649-020-00125-3.].

16.
Minerva Gastroenterol (Torino) ; 67(3): 283-288, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1224412

ABSTRACT

World Gastroenterology Organization define acute on chronic liver failure (ACLF) a syndrome in patients with chronic liver disease with or without previously diagnosed cirrhosis, characterized by acute hepatic decompensation resulting in liver failure and one or more extrahepatic organ failures, associated with increased mortality up to three months. A-56-year-old gentleman with alcohol related liver cirrhosis (ARLC) and history of variceal bleeding with insertion of transjugular intrahepatic porto-systemic stent shunt presented with two days history of fever, dry cough and worsening of the sensory. The severe acute respiratory coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) nasopharingeal C-reactive protein test was positive. X-ray showed multiple patchy ground glass opacities in both lungs. Despite the therapy, the clinical and laboratory picture deteriorated rapidly. The patient succumbed on day 14 with multi-organ-failure. SARS-Cov-2 infection can overlap with pre-existing chronic liver disease or induce liver damage directly or indirectly. From the data of the literature and from what is inferred from the case report it clearly emerges that alcohol related liver disease (ALD) patients are particularly vulnerable to SARS-Cov-2 infection. Thereafter, some considerations can be deduced from the analysis of the case report. In subjects with pre-existing cirrhosis hepatologists should play more attention to hepatic injury and monitor risk of hepatic failure caused by coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). It is appropriate to promptly define the alcoholic etiology and investigate whether the patient is actively consuming. In fact, withdrawal symptoms may be present, and the prognosis of these patients is also worse. Physicians should be alerted to the possibility of the development of ACLF in this population, hepatotoxic drugs should be avoided, it is recommended to use of hepatoprotective therapy to mitigate the negative impact of COVID-19, and it is mandatory to administer anti COVID-19 vaccine to patients with alcohol related liver cirrhosis.


Subject(s)
Acute-On-Chronic Liver Failure/etiology , Alcoholism/complications , COVID-19/complications , Liver Cirrhosis/complications , Humans , Male , Middle Aged
17.
Cleve Clin J Med ; 2021 May 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1222247

ABSTRACT

Pregnant women are also affected by COVID-19, with infection rates similar to nonpregnant women. Labor and delivery by a women with COVID-19 presents unique challenges for ensuring the safety of the mother, fetus, and newborn as well as the safety of clinicians and other healthcare personnel. In this article, we present perinatal obstetric anesthetic management strategies derived from the best available evidence to provide guidance in caring for the obstetric patient with COVID-19.

18.
Ethique Sante ; 18(2): 134-141, 2021 Jun.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1201513

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The current new SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has had a profound impact on medical practice. The objective was to analyse the ethical questions raised by the French ENT community during the first wave of COVID-19 infections. METHODS: Four open-ended questions concerning ethical considerations in ENT were sent out in April 2020: (i) difficulties to care for COVID-19 positive patients; (ii) impact of the health crisis on COVID-19 negative patients; (iii) communication within the healthcare teams and with hospital staff; and (iv) management of information by the press, or national ENT societies. A thematic analysis was carried out and crossed with the epidemiological data of each respondent. RESULTS: Thirty-one responses from 13 different French Departments, including 21 from public institutions and 10 from private practice, median age of 45 and 17 men for 14 women, were analysed. The main ethical considerations concerned the management by ENTs of COVID-19 positive patients, the modification of practices in consultation and in the operating room, the fear of loss of chance for COVID-19 negative patients, the appropriate use of teleconsultations and teleworking and the consequences of fake-news for the population. CONCLUSION: In preparation of possible future pandemic outbreaks, key ethical aspects are to adapt patient management to local resources and infection prevalence, and circulate clear institutional guidelines.

19.
Clin Nutr ; 40(3): 895-900, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1198670

ABSTRACT

There are reports of children COVID-19 or COVID-19 like symptoms with hyperinflammatory multisystem syndrome, ARDS, gastrointestinal and atypical Kawasaki disease presenting to PICU worldwide temporally associated with COVID-19, for which there are important nutrition support considerations. As a result, the European Society of Pediatric and Neonatal Intensive Care - Metabolism, Endocrine and Nutrition group (ESPNIC-MEN) and paediatric nutritionists working in PICUs are being consulted regarding nutrition management of critically ill children with COVID-19 or COVID-19 like symptoms. Therefore, the aim of this short report is to provide a summary of nutrition support recommendations for critically ill children with COVID-19. They are based on the ESPNIC-MEN section recommendations published in January 2020 and surviving sepsis recommendations from February 2020.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Nutritional Support/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/therapy , Child , Critical Care/methods , Critical Illness , Enteral Nutrition/methods , Humans , Intensive Care Units, Pediatric , Nutritional Status
20.
Biomed Rep ; 14(6): 53, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1197576

ABSTRACT

During the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, some countries, including Indonesia, have faced a double burden with regards to disease control. As Indonesia is a tropical country, it serves as a suitable host for disease vectors and multiple microorganisms of causative agents of disease. In total, five of the neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) should be a consideration in Indonesia during the COVID-19 pandemic, including leprosy, yaws, filariasis, soil-transmitted helminths and schistosomiasis. The present review summarises the preparedness of Indonesia in facing NTDs during the COVID-19 pandemic. Strengthening government leadership will be a valuable factor for combating NTDs in Indonesia. For instance, strong leadership can lead to precise management, by increasing the number of health facilities, engaging in active case identification, conducting health campaigns and instituting new regulations to prevent the stigmatization faced by patients. Preventive medicine in the first level of health facilities can be prioritized and presented to the community via health campaigns, health advocacy and improvement in follow-up after active case surveillance. Government-supported integrated management is also a key component in eliminating NTD. Moreover, healthy lifestyle campaigns that include social distancing, wearing a mask and regularly washing hands should be promoted continuously to reduce the transmission of COVID-19, which is potentially associated with a poor outcome in individuals with NTDs. This review concluded that the Indonesian government should strengthen their efforts toward NTD control using alternative methods, such as involving key citizens in the collaboration of the detection of new cases and introducing mobile health as a means of detecting health problems or following up on patient progress. To reduce the transmission of COVID-19, testing, tracing and treatment must be improved, so that the gap between suspected cases and confirmed cases of COVID-19 can be closed. If the transmission of COVID-19 can be decreased, case detection and efforts toward NTD control can be conducted effectively.

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