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1.
J Patient Saf ; 17(4): 323-330, 2021 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1231053

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Although recommendations to prevent COVID-19 healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) have been proposed, data on their effectivity are currently limited. OBJECTIVE: The aim was to evaluate the effectivity of a program of control and prevention of COVID-19 in an academic general hospital in Spain. METHODS: We captured the number of COVID-19 cases and the type of contact that occurred in hospitalized patients and healthcare personnel (HCP). To evaluate the impact of the continuous use of a surgical mask among HCP, the number of patients with COVID-19 HAIs and accumulated incidence of HCP with COVID-19 was compared between the preintervention and intervention periods. RESULTS: Two hundred fifty-two patients with COVID-19 have been admitted to the hospital. Seven of them had an HAI origin (6 in the preintervention period and 1 in the intervention period). One hundred forty-two HCP were infected with SARS-CoV-2. Of them, 22 (15.5%) were attributed to healthcare (2 in the emergency department and none in the critical care departments), and 120 (84.5%) were attributed to social relations in the workplace or during their non-work-related personal interactions. The accumulated incidence during the preintervention period was 22.3 for every 1000 HCP and 8.2 for every 1000 HCP during the intervention period. The relative risk was 0.37 (95% confidence interval, 0.25 to 0.55) and the attributable risk was -0.014 (95% confidence interval, -0.020 to -0.009). CONCLUSIONS: A program of control and prevention of HAIs complemented with the recommendation for the continuous use of a surgical mask in the workplace and social environments of HCP effectively decreased the risk of COVID-19 HAIs in admitted patients and HCP.


Subject(s)
Academic Medical Centers , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Cross Infection/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Incidence , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/statistics & numerical data , Male , Masks/statistics & numerical data , Middle Aged , Personnel, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Program Evaluation , Risk Assessment/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Spain/epidemiology
2.
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol ; 43(3): 334-343, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1189150

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Nosocomial outbreaks leading to healthcare worker (HCW) infection and death have been increasingly reported during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. OBJECTIVE: We implemented a strategy to reduce nosocomial acquisition. METHODS: We summarized our experience in implementing a multipronged infection control strategy in the first 300 days (December 31, 2019, to October 25, 2020) of the COVID-19 pandemic under the governance of Hospital Authority in Hong Kong. RESULTS: Of 5,296 COVID-19 patients, 4,808 (90.8%) were diagnosed in the first pandemic wave (142 cases), second wave (896 cases), and third wave (3,770 cases) in Hong Kong. With the exception of 1 patient who died before admission, all COVID-19 patients were admitted to the public healthcare system for a total of 78,834 COVID-19 patient days. The median length of stay was 13 days (range, 1-128). Of 81,955 HCWs, 38 HCWs (0.05%; 2 doctors and 11 nurses and 25 nonprofessional staff) acquired COVID-19. With the exception of 5 of 38 HCWs (13.2%) infected by HCW-to-HCW transmission in the nonclinical settings, no HCW had documented transmission from COVID-19 patients in the hospitals. The incidence of COVID-19 among HCWs was significantly lower than that of our general population (0.46 per 1,000 HCWs vs 0.71 per 1,000 population; P = .008). The incidence of COVID-19 among professional staff was significantly lower than that of nonprofessional staff (0.30 vs 0.66 per 1,000 full-time equivalent; P = .022). CONCLUSIONS: A hospital-based approach spared our healthcare service from being overloaded. With our multipronged infection control strategy, no nosocomial COVID-19 in was identified among HCWs in the first 300 days of the COVID-19 pandemic in Hong Kong.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cross Infection , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross Infection/epidemiology , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Health Personnel , Hong Kong/epidemiology , Hospitals , Humans , Infection Control , Pandemics/prevention & control
3.
Jpn J Infect Dis ; 73(6): 399-403, 2020 Nov 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-976562

ABSTRACT

In December 2019, a cluster of cases of acute respiratory illness, novel coronavirus-infected pneumonia, occurred in Wuhan, Hubei Province, China. The false-negative nasopharyngeal swabs for SARS-CoV-2 caused delayed diagnosis of COVID-19, which hindered the prevention and control of the pandemic. The transmission risk of SARS-CoV-2 in negative nasopharyngeal swabs cases has rarely been addressed previously. This study evaluated two clusters of COVID-19 in six patients, four of whom (66.7%) tested negative for RNA of SARS-CoV-2 on RT-PCR of nasopharyngeal swabs. All epidemiological, clinical, and laboratory data were collected. The first cluster was a nosocomial infection of four health care providers in early January. One case resulted in a sequential familial cluster of infection. All patients either self-quarantined at home or were admitted to hospital for isolated treatment. All recovered and were anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG- and/or IgM-positive (100%) for serological detection of SARS-CoV-2 at the recovery stage. Our study provides a cautionary warning that negative results for nasopharyngeal swabs of suspected SARS-CoV-2 infection can increase the risk of nosocomial infection among health care providers. Serologic detection for anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgG and/or IgM is an important test in the diagnosis of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Testing/methods , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/transmission , Disease Outbreaks , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Adult , Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , China/epidemiology , Cross Infection , False Negative Reactions , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Nasopharynx/virology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology
4.
Sleep Med X ; 2: 100028, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-857168

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Healthcare workers (HCWs) are at the forefront of fighting against the COVID-19 pandemic. However, they are at high risk of acquiring the pathogen from infected patients and transmitting to other HCWs. We aimed to investigate risk factors for nosocomial COVID-19 infection among HCWs in a non-COVID-19 hospital yard. METHODS: Retrospective data collection on demographics, lifestyles, contact status with infected subjects for 118 HCWs (including 12 COVID-19 HCWs) at Union Hospital of Wuhan, China. Sleep quality and working pressure were evaluated by the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and The Nurse Stress Index (NSI), respectively. The follow-up duration was from Dec 25, 2019, to Feb 15, 2020. RESULTS: A high proportion of COVID-19 HCWs had engaged in night shift-work (75.0% vs. 40.6%) and felt working under pressure (66.7% vs. 32.1%) than uninfected HCWs. SARS-CoV-2 infected HCWs had significantly higher scores of PSQI and NSI than uninfected HCWs (P < 0.001). Specifically, scores of 5 factors (sleep quality, sleep time, sleep efficiency, sleep disorder, and daytime dysfunction) in PSQI were higher among infected HCWs. For NSI, its 5 subscales (nursing profession and work, workload and time allocation, working environment and resources, patient care, management and interpersonal relations) were all higher in infected than uninfected nurse. Furthermore, total scores of PSQI (HR = 2.97, 95%CI = 1.86-4.76; P <0.001) and NSI (HR = 4.67, 95%CI = 1.42-15.45; P = 0.011) were both positively associated with the risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection. CONCLUSION: Our analysis shows that poor sleep quality and higher working pressure may increase the risk of nosocomial SARS-CoV-2 infection among HCWs.

6.
Brachytherapy ; 20(1): 279-283, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-733925

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: COVID-19 broke out in late 2019 and rapidly spread around the world and became a pandemic. This highly contagious disease affects routine health care services and patients with cancer who are susceptible to it. Delivering brachytherapy on time is critical for patients with cancer to get better prognosis. The purpose of this study is to present workflow and standard for radiation centers to deliver brachytherapy and avoid cross-infection during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS AND MATERIALS: This study combined previous literature and guidelines of precaution with clinical experience in the COVID-19 pandemic. RESULTS: A workflow covering patients' screening, health care workers' precaution, training, and other aspects of the whole brachytherapy procedure was established. CONCLUSIONS: From the reopening of radiation center to mid-May in 2020, there is no hospital infection of COVID-19 in patients or health care workers. This recommendation is effective and helpful to other cancer centers.


Subject(s)
Brachytherapy/methods , COVID-19/prevention & control , Neoplasms/radiotherapy , Radiation Oncology/organization & administration , Workflow , Cancer Care Facilities , China , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Environment Design , Health Personnel , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Pandemics , Practice Guidelines as Topic , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Am J Infect Control ; 49(4): 447-451, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-726383

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 has spread globally and been a public health emergency worldwide. It is important to reduce the risk of healthcare associated infections among the healthcare workers and patients. This study aimed to investigate the contamination of environment in isolation wards and sewage, and assess the quality of routine disinfection procedures in our hospital. METHODS: Routine disinfection procedures were performed 3-times a day in general isolation wards and 6-times a day in isolated ICU wards in our hospital. Environmental surface samples and sewage samples were collected for viral RNA detection. Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 RNA detection was performed with quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. RESULTS: A total of 163 samples were collected from February 6 to April 4. Among 122 surface samples, 2 were positive for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 RNA detection. One was collected from the flush button of the toilet bowl, and the other was collected from a hand-basin. Although 10 of the sewage samples were positive for viral RNA detection, all positive samples were negative for viral culture. CONCLUSION: These results revealed the routine disinfection procedures in our hospital were effective in reducing the potential risk of healthcare associated infection. Two surface samples were positive for viral detection, suggesting that more attention should be paid when disinfecting places easy to be ignored.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Disinfection/methods , Hospitals, Isolation/standards , SARS-CoV-2 , Disinfection/standards , Health Personnel , Humans , Occupational Exposure/prevention & control
8.
Immun Inflamm Dis ; 8(4): 840-843, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-723382

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: As an emerging infectious disease, coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has rapidly spread throughout worldwide. Health care workers (HCWs) on frontline directly participated in the diagnosis, treatment, and care of COVID-19 patients are at high risk of getting infected with the highly infectious severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19. In Nanjing Drum Tower Hospital, a total of 222 medical staff went to Wuhan city for support. In this study, we aimed to determine any nosocomial infection among our cohort of HCWs who worked in Wuhan. METHODS: Throat swab samples were obtained for RNA testing on day 1 and 14 of their quarantine upon their return to Nanjing. Radiological assessments were performed by chest computed tomography (CT) on day 14 of their quarantine. The blood was collected from 191 HCWs between May 12 and May 15. Anti-SARS-CoV-2 immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG antibody responses were determined by a chemiluminescence immunoassay. RESULTS: All the throat swab specimens were found negative for SARS-CoV-2. The radiological analysis revealed that there was no typical chest CT scan of COVID-19 among 222 HCWs. Consistently, anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgM or IgG was also found to be negative among 191 HCWs. CONCLUSIONS: There was no nosocomial infection of SARS-CoV-2 among our cohort of the frontline HCWs, suggesting that zero occupational infection is an achievable goal with appropriate training, strict compliance, and psychological support for the frontline HCWs.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Adult , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Cross Infection/diagnosis , Cross Infection/epidemiology , Cross Infection/virology , Female , Humans , Infection Control/organization & administration , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/statistics & numerical data , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Male , Middle Aged , Occupational Exposure/adverse effects , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pharynx/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , SARS-CoV-2 , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Young Adult
9.
Ann Otol Rhinol Laryngol ; 130(2): 177-181, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-691087

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The novel coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak which was first reported in Wuhan, China has been declared a pandemic by the World Health Organization on March 11, 2020. Otorhinolaryngologists deal intimately with pathologies of the head and neck region and upper respiratory tract and have been reported as a vulnerable group of healthcare workers who may be more susceptible to COVID-19 nosocomial infection. METHODS: In this article, we provide a comprehensive overview of the adaptations of Singapore's largest tertiary Otorhinolaryngology department during the COVID-19 outbreak. This was undertaken via an evidence-based approach. The relevant medical literature and evidence underlying our adaptations are highlighted. RESULTS: A four-pronged strategy including (1) personnel segregation, (2) triaging and decantment, (3) use of personal protective equipment and (4) changes in clinical practice was employed. The strategy was bolstered by drawing upon a collective learnt experience from the 2003 Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS) outbreak. CONCLUSION: A rigorous framework which can preserve operationality while navigating the heightened risks during this outbreak is critical for every Otorhinolaryngology department. As the pandemic continues to evolve and more scientific reports of this disease are made available, approaches will need to be morphed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Hospital Departments/statistics & numerical data , Otorhinolaryngologic Diseases/epidemiology , Otorhinolaryngologic Surgical Procedures/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , Comorbidity , Disease Outbreaks , Humans , Otorhinolaryngologic Diseases/surgery , Singapore/epidemiology
10.
J Med Internet Res ; 22(7): e19514, 2020 07 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-669450

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Most patients with coronavirus disease (COVID-19) who show mild symptoms are sent home by physicians to recover. However, the condition of some of these patients becomes severe or critical as the disease progresses. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate a telemedicine model that was developed to address the challenges of treating patients with progressive COVID-19 who are home-quarantined and shortages in the medical workforce. METHODS: A telemedicine system was developed to continuously monitor the progression of home-quarantined patients with COVID-19. The system was built based on a popular social media smartphone app called WeChat; the app was used to establish two-way communication between a multidisciplinary team consisting of 7 medical workers and 188 home-quarantined individuals (including 74 confirmed patients with COVID-19). The system helped patients self-assess their conditions and update the multidisciplinary team through a telemedicine form stored on a cloud service, based on which the multidisciplinary team made treatment decisions. We evaluated this telemedicine system via a single-center retrospective study conducted at Tongji Hospital in Wuhan, China, in January 2020. RESULTS: Among 188 individuals using the telemedicine system, 114 (60.6%) were not infected with COVID-19 and were dismissed. Of the 74 confirmed patients with COVID-19, 26 (35%) recovered during the study period and voluntarily stopped using the system. The remaining 48/76 confirmed patients with COVID-19 (63%) used the system until the end of the study, including 6 patients whose conditions progressed to severe or critical. These 6 patients were admitted to hospital and were stabilized (one received extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support for 17 days). All 74 patients with COVID-19 eventually recovered. Through a comparison of the monitored symptoms between hospitalized and nonhospitalized patients, we found prolonged persistence and deterioration of fever, dyspnea, lack of strength, and muscle soreness to be diagnostic of need for hospitalization. CONCLUSIONS: By continuously monitoring the changes in several key symptoms, the telemedicine system reduces the risks of delayed hospitalization due to disease progression for patients with COVID-19 quarantined at home. The system uses a set of scales for quarantine management assessment that enables patients to self-assess their conditions. The results are useful for medical staff to identify disease progression and, hence, make appropriate and timely treatment decisions. The system requires few staff to manage a large cohort of patients. In addition, the system can solicit help from recovered but self-quarantined medical workers to alleviate shortages in the medical workforce and free healthy medical workers to fight COVID-19 on the front line. Thus, it optimizes the usage of local medical resources and prevents cross-infections among medical workers and patients.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Disease Progression , Housing , Monitoring, Physiologic , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Quarantine , Telemedicine/methods , Adult , Aged , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Female , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Patient Admission , Physicians/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Quarantine/methods , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Injury ; 51(10): 2135-2141, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-623925

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: As the COVID-19 pandemic sweeps across the world, healthcare departments must adapt to meet the challenges of service provision and staff/patient protection. Unlike elective surgery, acute care surgery (ACS) workloads cannot be artificially reduced providing a unique challenge for administrators to balance healthcare resources between the COVID-19 surge and regular patient admissions. METHODS: An enhanced ACS (eACS) model of care is described with the aim of limiting COVID-19 healthcare worker and patient cross-infection as well as providing 24/7 management of emergency general surgical (GS) and trauma patients. The eACS service comprised 5 independent teams covering a rolling 1:5 24-hr call. Attempts to completely separate eACS teams and patients from the elective side were made. The service was compared to the existing ACS service in terms of clinical and efficiency outcomes. Finally, a survey of staff attitudes towards these changes, concerns regarding COVID-19 and psychological well-being was assessed. RESULTS: There were no staff/patient COVID-19 cross-infections. Compared to the ACS service, eACS patients had reduced overall length of stay (2-days), time spent in the Emergency Room (46 min) and time from surgery to discharge (2.4-hours). The eACS model of care saved financial resources and bed-days for the organisation. The changes were well received by team-members who also felt that their safety was prioritised. CONCLUSION: In healthcare systems not overwhelmed by COVID-19, an eACS model may assist in preserving psychological well-being for healthcare staff whilst providing 24/7 care for emergency GS and trauma patients.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Delivery of Health Care/methods , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Surgery Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Surgical Procedures, Operative , Adult , Aged , Attitude of Health Personnel , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Emergency Service, Hospital , Female , Health Personnel , Humans , Infection Control , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Length of Stay , Male , Medical Staff, Hospital/organization & administration , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Workflow
12.
Beijing Da Xue Xue Bao Yi Xue Ban ; 52(3): 414-419, 2020 Jun 18.
Article in Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-599892

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To explore the infection prevention and control strategy of bedside blood purification treatment in corona virus disease 2019 (COVID-19) isolation ward, and to evaluate the effect of infection prevention and control management measures. METHODS: We summarized and analyzed the clinical features, infection status, outcome and infection prevention and control measures of bedside blood purification treatment patients in COVID-19 isolation ward from February 8, 2020 to March 31, 2020, analyzed the COVID-19 cross-infection between the patients and medical staffs, and the blood-borne pathogens cross-infection situation between the patients, and analyzed the effect of bundle prevention and control measures in controlling the occurrence and spread of cross-infection. RESULTS: A total of 101 COVID-19 patients were hospitalized in this COVID-19 isolation ward, of whom 10 patients (9.90%) received bedside blood purification treatment and the blood purification treatment method was continuous hemodialysis filtration (CVVHDF), and the 10 patients received 79 times of blood purification treatment in total. The prevention and control management measures adopted included divisional isolation, patient behavior isolation and patient placement, operator personal protection and hand hygiene, dialysis waste fluid disposal, isolation room air purification, object surfaces, medical devices and medical fabrics dis-infection management. There were no occurrence and spread of COVID-19 in the medical healthcare workers and blood-borne pathogens cross-infection in the patients. And all the twice throat swabs (two sampling interval > 1 day) of the medical staffs in COVID-19 virus nucleic acid test were negative. The 2 suspected COVID-19 patients' throat swab virus nucleic acid test and the COVID-19 IgG, IgM were always both negative, the chest CT showed no viral pneumonia. CONCLUSION: Bedside blood purification treatment in the COVID-19 isolation ward, the occurrence and spread of healthcare associated infection can be effectively controlled through effective infection prevention and control management, including divisional isolation, patient behavior isolation and patient placement, operator personal protection and hand hygiene, dialysis waste fluid disposal, isolation room's air purification, object surfaces, medical devices and medical fabrics disinfection, which can provide experience for diagnosis, treatment and prevention and control of patients in the respiratory infectious disease ward.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Infection Control , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/blood , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/blood , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , SARS-CoV-2
13.
J Am Soc Nephrol ; 31(7): 1398-1408, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-459123

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Health care-associated infections during previous coronavirus epidemics involving severe acute respiratory syndrome and Middle East respiratory syndrome resulted from human-to-human transmission in hemodialysis (HD) facilities. The effect of a strategy of HD with cohort isolation-separate dialysis sessions for close contacts of patients with confirmed coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)-on the prevention of secondary transmission of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) in HD units is unknown. METHODS: Our multicenter cohort study of an HD with cohort isolation strategy enrolled close contacts of patients with confirmed COVID-19, including patients on HD and health care workers in HD units. Close contacts had been identified by epidemiologic investigation and tested negative on an immediate screening test for SARS-CoV-2. RESULTS: As of March 14, 11 patients on HD and 7 health care workers from 11 HD centers were diagnosed as having COVID-19. The immediate screening test was performed in 306 people, and among them, 302 close contacts with negative test results were enrolled. HD with cohort isolation was performed among all close contacts for a median of 14 days in seven centers. During cohort isolation, nine patients showed symptoms but tested negative for SARS-CoV-2. Two health care workers in the HD units (0.66% of the total group) were diagnosed at the termination test for SARS-CoV-2. CONCLUSIONS: The transmission of COVID-19 can be controlled without closure of HD centers by implementing preemptive activities, including early detection with rapid testing, cohort isolation, collaboration between institutions, and continuous monitoring of infection. Our strategy and experience may provide helpful guidance for circumstances involving the rapid spread of infectious diseases such as COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Kidney Failure, Chronic/therapy , Patient Isolation/organization & administration , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Renal Dialysis/methods , Adult , COVID-19 , Chi-Square Distribution , Cohort Studies , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Female , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Incidence , Infection Control/organization & administration , Kidney Failure, Chronic/diagnosis , Kidney Failure, Chronic/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Occupational Health , Pandemics , Patient Safety , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Program Evaluation , Renal Dialysis/statistics & numerical data , Republic of Korea/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Secondary Prevention/organization & administration , Statistics, Nonparametric , Survival Rate
14.
Zhonghua Jie He He Hu Xi Za Zhi ; 43(0): E015, 2020 Feb 16.
Article in Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-985

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory infection (SARI) diseases (such as SARS, MERS, pH1N1) can rapidly progress to acute respiratory failure with high lethality. The outbreak of a novel coronavirus infection can lead to 15% ~ 30% patients developing into acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Respiratory support is the most important therapy for SARI patients with respiratory failure. However, respiratory support is a high skilled technology, which means inappropriate application may bring related complications and cross infection of SARI pathogens among medical staff and non-medical personnel in hospital. Therefore, it is meaningful to established a standardized indication of respiratory support and to prevent related nosocomial transmission in SARI patients.

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