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1.
Neuromodulation ; 24(3): 604-605, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1216756
3.
Front Hum Neurosci ; 15: 628105, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1167351

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Public health guidelines have recommended that elective medical procedures, including deep brain stimulation (DBS) surgery for Parkinson's disease (PD), should not be scheduled during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic to prevent further virus spread and overload on health care systems. However, delaying DBS surgery for PD may not be in the best interest of individual patients and is not called for in regions where virus spread is under control and inpatient facilities are not overloaded. METHODS: We administered a newly developed phone questionnaire to 20 consecutive patients with PD who received DBS surgery in Ruijin Hospital in Shanghai during the COVID-19 pandemic. The questionnaire was designed to gather the patients' experiences and perceptions on the impact of COVID-19 on their everyday activities and access to medical care. RESULTS: Most of the patients felt confident about the preventive measures taken by the government and hospitals, and they have changed their daily living activities accordingly. Moreover, a large majority of patients felt confident obtaining access to regular and COVID-19-related health care services if needed. Routine clinical referral, sense of security in the hospital during the outbreak, and poor control of PD symptoms were the three main reasons given by patients for seeking DBS surgery during the COVID-19 pandemic. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic has considerably impacted medical care and patients' lives but elective procedures, such as DBS surgery for PD, do not need to be rescheduled when the health care system is not overloaded and adequate public health regulations are in place.

4.
Front Neurol ; 11: 616550, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1006082

ABSTRACT

Background: The containment measures taken by Italian government authorities during the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic caused the interruption of neurological activities of outpatient clinics. Vulnerable patients, as Parkinson's disease (PD) and dystonic patients with deep brain stimulation (DBS), may have an increased risk of chronic stress related to social restriction measures and may show a potential worsening of motor and psychiatric symptoms. Methods: This cross-sectional multicenter study was carried out during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic and was based on a structured survey administered during a telephone call. The questionnaire was designed to gather motor and/or psychiatric effects of the lockdown and coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) epidemiologic information in PD and dystonic patients with a functioning DBS implant. Results: One hundred four patients were included in the study, 90 affected by PD and 14 by dystonia. Forty-nine patients reported a subjective perception of worsening of global neurological symptoms (motor and/or psychiatric) related to the containment measures. In the multivariate analysis, having problems with the DBS device was the only independent predictor of motor worsening [odds ratio (OR) = 3.10 (1.22-7.91), p = 0.018]. Independent predictors of psychiatric worsening were instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) score [OR = 0.78 (0.64-0.95), p = 0.012] and problems with DBS [OR = 5.69 (1.95-16.62), p = 0.001]. Only one patient underwent nasopharyngeal swabs, both negative, and no patient received a diagnosis of COVID-19. Conclusions: Lockdown restriction measures were associated with subjective worsening of motor and psychiatric symptoms in PD and dystonic patients treated with DBS, and they may have exacerbated the burden of neurological disease and increased the chronic stress related to the DBS management.

5.
Neuromodulation ; 24(2): 331-336, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-917754

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a well-established therapy for the management of patients with advanced Parkinson's disease and other movement disorders. Patients implanted with DBS require life-long management of the medical device as well as medications. Patients are often challenged to frequently visit the specialized DBS centers and such challenges are aggravated depending on geography, socioeconomic factors, and support systems. We discuss the need for digital health solutions to overcome these barriers to better and safely take care of patients, especially in the current COVID-19 pandemic. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A review of the literature was conducted for technology and logistics necessary in forming a digital health program. RESULTS: Digital health encounters can take place in both a synchronous and asynchronous manner. Factors involving patients include cognitive capacity, physical safety, physical capacity, connectivity, and technological security. Physician factors include examining the patient, system diagnostics, and adjusting stimulation or medications. Technology is focused on bridging the gap between patient and physician through integrating the DBS lead, implantable pulse generator (IPG), programmer, novel devices/applications to grade motor function, and teleconference modalities. CONCLUSIONS: For patients with Parkinson's disease, digital health has the potential to drastically change the landscape after DBS surgery. Furthermore, technology is fundamental in connectivity, diagnostic evaluation, and security in order to create stable and useful patient-focused care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Deep Brain Stimulation/methods , Pandemics , Parkinson Disease/therapy , Telemedicine , Humans
6.
J Mov Disord ; 13(3): 218-222, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-732633

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic and public health measures to control it have resulted in unique challenges in the management of patients with deep brain stimulation (DBS). We report our experience with the management of acute worsening of symptoms due to battery exhaustion in 3 patients with DBS. METHODS: Patients with DBS for movement disorders who visited the emergency room due to battery exhaustion during the nationwide lockdown from April to May 2020 were included. RESULTS: Two patients with subthalamic nucleus-DBS for Parkinson's disease (PD) and one with globus pallidus interna-DBS for generalized dystonia presented with acute worsening of symptoms due to battery exhaustion. Urgent battery replacement was performed in both patients with PD. The patient with generalized dystonia was managed with medication adjustment as he chose to defer battery replacement. CONCLUSION: DBS battery replacement can be an emergency. Decisions regarding DBS battery replacement should be individualized during this COVID-19 pandemic.

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