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1.
Niger J Clin Pract ; 24(5): 753-761, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1239069

ABSTRACT

AIMS: We aimed to objectively assess the COVID-19 awareness of the patients requiring dental interventions in our dental clinic by utilizing a newly generated questionnaire, which may serve helpfully in the hard battle against the pandemic in our country. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This study included 306 volunteer adults who applied to our dental clinic for dental interventions during the early days of COVID-19 outbreak in Turkey. All patients responded to a newly created questionnaire composed of four sections with 19 questions those mostly assessing the social and demographic details; like the participant's age, gender, marital status, education status, medical history, basic dental hygiene habits, occupation, and general information about the COVID-19 infection and its protection methods. RESULTS: The outcomes of 306 participants revealed that their gender, age, and education status showed significant distinctions about the dissemination of coronavirus via dental interventions. Higher education status was linked to a loftier level of social awareness about the COVID-19 infection and its potential associations with dental interventions. It was observed that the participants were unsatisfactorily cautious against the COVID-19 infection and its dissemination pathways in their social environment, particularly in the specific case of systematic diseases and preventive measures. The primary way of obtaining information about the COVID-19 infection was the electronic websites. CONCLUSION: Deplorably, accentuating the urgent need for further intensive training programs on the relationship between the systemic diseases and COVID-19 infection, and explicit daily care methods in the social environment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adult , Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Turkey/epidemiology
2.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(8)2021 04 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1178252

ABSTRACT

Dental care has been affected by SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) worldwide. In contrast to other dental clinics, the Justus-Liebig-University Giessen (Germany) decided not to limit dental treatment to emergencies alone, but to continue dental care for all patients, with increased safety measures. As such, health care professionals may be exposed to additional physical and mental stress. The aim of this study was to assess the perspectives of all persons involved in dental care (dentists, dental assistants, students, and patients) regarding the aspects of safety measures, anxiety about self-infection and infecting others, and other prospects in the period March to December 2020 using a questionnaire. Data collection was performed between 14 December 2020 and 23 January 2021. A total of 35 dentists (response rate of 79.5%), 23 dental assistants (65.7%), 84 students (80%), and 51 patients (21.8%) completed the survey. The patients did not notice any changes in the care received. Dentists and dental assistants reported a higher workload due to additional safety measures. The majority of dentists, students, and patients agreed that normal patient care was maintained. One-third of dental assistants would have preferred emergency treatment alone and expressed significantly higher anxiety about COVID-19 infection than all other groups (p < 0.05). In conclusion, all groups showed a predominantly positive perspective on dental care, and anxiety about self-infection and infecting others was especially low. However, additional measures are time-consuming and compound daily patient care. This concept, based on well-established infection control, might be a viable proposal for current and future pandemics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Cross-Sectional Studies , Dental Assistants , Dental Care , Dentists , Germany , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Students , Surveys and Questionnaires
3.
A A Pract ; 15(2): e01398, 2021 Feb 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1099913

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic prompted the creation of novel techniques to protect patients and health care providers. Simulations showed that disposable oxygen face tents act as a physical barrier and can be repurposed as a negative airflow tent. This case study presents a pediatric patient requiring dental surgery, ineligible for preoperative testing for COVID-19 due to developmental delay and aggression. Precautionary measures were taken by means of full personal protective equipment (PPE) and negative airflow tent. The tent added additional protection and is a promising new technique that is disposable, widely available, and offers full access to proceduralists.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/transmission , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Personal Protective Equipment , Tooth Extraction , Aggression/psychology , Air Movements , Anesthesia, General , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19 Testing , Child , Developmental Disabilities/psychology , Humans , Male , Patient Compliance/psychology , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Bull Natl Res Cent ; 45(1): 32, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1059717

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is considered a highly contagious disease with flu-like symptoms and causing relatively high level of death. It can be transmitted from a person to another through droplets and that makes the dentists at high risk of infection. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to assess the awareness and knowledge of dental students about the signs and symptoms of Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) and to evaluate their awareness about the required infection control measures during the dental treatment to control the spread of the disease. A questionnaire was formed using Google forms and distributed among dental students and interns in different universities in Cairo, Egypt. Questions were about signs and symptoms of COVID-19, attitude of the dentists toward dental treatment of suspected patients and the required personal protective equipment (PPE) and infection control measures at the dental clinic. RESULTS: The majority of the participants strongly agreed/agreed that COVID-19 is a highly dangerous disease, Participants reported that the most common symptom is difficulty in breathing (89.4%) followed by fever (84.4%). Face shield was the most recommended personal protective equipment (PPE) during dental treatment (98.6%) followed by disposable gown (96.3%). The majority of participants (84.8%) recommended using 70% ethyl alcohol as the first method to disinfect surfaces in between dental visits, followed by sodium hypochlorite. CONCLUSIONS: Dental students and interns in Cairo, Egypt, have good knowledge and awareness about COVID-19 and the necessary precautions required to provide adequate dental treatment for the patients during the pandemic COVID-19; however, the importance of infection control should be highlighted for both clinical and preclinical dental students, to provide safe dental treatment to the patients as well as protection of the dentists and healthcare workers.

5.
Eur J Paediatr Dent ; 21(4): 277-282, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-994937

ABSTRACT

AIM: The aim of this study was to evaluate the features of inhalation conscious sedation for urgent dental treatments in uncooperative paediatric patients during COVID-19 outbreak. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Forty-two uncooperative patients, attending primary and secondary schools, were submitted to emergency dental treatments with inhalation conscious sedation using nitrous oxide and oxygen during COVID-19 pandemic. Collected data included: number of working sessions, success/failure, adverse events, side effects, number of teeth treated; type of dental procedure. Parents filled in an e-mailed questionnaire on post-discharge children status to evaluate: pain; crying; fever; vomiting; headache; drowsiness; excitability; irritability; ability to eat; need for drugs. RESULTS: One working session was carried out in 29 patients, 2 working sessions were carried out in 6 patients and 3 working sessions were carried out in 7 patients. Success rate was 87.1%. In relation to success, there was no statistically significant difference between males and females, healthy and disabled patients, respectively; while there was a statistically significant difference between patients attending primary and secondary schools (p=0.023). No adverse events occurred. The most frequent side effect was nausea. In relation to side effects, there was no statistically significant difference between males and females, healthy and disabled patients, patients attending primary and secondary schools, respectively. In relation to e-mailed questionnaires on post-discharge children status, 29.6% of the patients had pain, 22.2% vomited, 14.8% had headache, 18.5% experienced drowsiness, 29.6% failed to eating normally, 35.2% needed to take drugs. None of the patients cried, had a fever, exhibited irritability and excitability. CONCLUSION: Inhalation conscious sedation is a safe, practical and effective procedure with minimal side effects to perform emergency dental treatments in uncooperative paediatric patients during COVID-19 outbreak.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia, Dental , Anesthetics, Inhalation , COVID-19 , Aftercare , Anesthetics, Inhalation/adverse effects , Child , Child Behavior , Conscious Sedation , Female , Humans , Male , Nitrous Oxide/adverse effects , Oxygen , Pandemics , Patient Discharge , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
6.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 17(21)2020 10 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-983186

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to assess dental care needs in Cluj region during the State of Emergency, declared due to the COVID-19 pandemic, compared to the same period of the year 2019. A descriptive retrospective analysis was conducted, which retrieved patients seeking emergency dental services at the Emergency Department of County General Hospital and "Iuliu Hațieganu" University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Cluj-Napoca, Romania, the only dental service available in April 2020. Recorded data cover the month of April 2020 and is compared with the same period of 2019. During April 2020, 724 patients received dental care, whereas only 160 patients were treated in April 2019 in the same facility. The number of patients with acute apical periodontitis, abscess, and acute pulpitis was significantly higher in 2020. The percentage of patients receiving sedative filling for the treatment of acute pulpitis in 2020 was significantly higher than in 2019, while the proportion of patients receiving pulpectomy was higher in 2019. The percentage of patients receiving endodontic drainage for the treatment of acute periapical periodontitis in 2020 was higher. This study demonstrates that the COVID-19 pandemic impacted the use of medical care services and could further impact the oral health and quality of life of patients.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Dentistry/statistics & numerical data , Emergency Service, Hospital , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Romania/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
7.
BMC Oral Health ; 20(1): 354, 2020 12 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-958035

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The highly contagious nature of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV2), besides the fact that dental procedures commonly generate blood and saliva droplets that could lead to the contagion have resulted in the closure of many dental clinics. In the present study, we aimed to evaluate the impact of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on dental practice by conducting an online questionnaire among the Iranian dental practitioners and finding their perspectives on the subject. METHODS: This report is based on a questionnaire that was conducted among Iranian dentists. The survey included questions that evaluate the dentists' perceptions and attitudes toward the COVID-19 pandemic and its effect on their personal life, financial status, and the quality of dental services for patients. RESULTS: Overall, 240 dentists contributed to this study (214 general dentists and 26 specialists). The majority of the participants (n = 170, 70%) did not perform non-emergency procedures during the pandemic. The dental practitioners have suggested several strategies to decrease the risk of contagion, such as reducing treatment sessions (n = 90, 37%), strict triage of patients (n = 156, 64%), and using personal protective equipment (n = 108, 45%). However, most of the dentists (n = 210, 87%) had problems, providing personal protective equipment during the pandemic. Moreover, 97% (n = 234) of the participants reported that they encountered a decrease in their financial income since the eruption of the pandemic. CONCLUSION: Dental health care workers are at the highest risk of contracting COVID-19. Thus, dental practitioners ought to execute the standard protocols more cautiously during the pandemic. They could also lower their work hours and limit dental procedures to emergency treatments to reduce the risk of COVID-19 transmission. Besides, the public organizations should provide proper equipment for the dental practitioners to decrease the risk of contagion.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Dentistry/methods , Adult , Aged , Dentists , Female , Humans , Income/trends , Infection Control , Iran/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , Surveys and Questionnaires
9.
Phys Fluids (1994) ; 32(8): 083111, 2020 Aug 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-752385

ABSTRACT

The aerosol transmissibility of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has impacted the delivery of health care and essentially stopped the provision of medical and dental therapies. Dentistry uses rotary, ultrasonic, and laser-based instruments that produce water-based aerosols in the daily, routine treatment of patients. Abundant aerosols are generated, which reach health care workers and other patients. Viruses, including SARS-CoV-2 virus and related coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic, continued expansion throughout the USA and the world. The virus is spread by both droplet (visible drops) and aerosol (practically invisible drops) transmission. The generation of aerosols in dentistry-an unavoidable part of most dental treatments-creates a high-risk situation. The US Centers for Disease Control and The Occupational Safety and Health Administration consider dental procedures to be of "highest risk" in the potential spreading of SARS-CoV-2 and other respiratory viruses. There are several ways to reduce or eliminate the virus: (i) cease or postpone dentistry (public and personal health risk), (ii) screen patients immediately prior to dental treatment (by appropriate testing, if any), (iii) block/remove the virus containing aerosol by engineering controls together with stringent personal protective equipment use. The present work takes a novel, fourth approach. By altering the physical response of water to the rotary or ultrasonic forces that are used in dentistry, the generation of aerosol particles and the distance any aerosol may spread beyond the point of generation can be markedly suppressed or completely eliminated in comparison to water for both the ultrasonic scaler and dental handpiece.

10.
J Dent Sci ; 16(1): 540-543, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-712204

ABSTRACT

People with disabilities are challenged managing their oral hygiene and more often burdened with oral diseases. They often require immediate dental treatment for severe pain and greater precautions are needed to cope with COVID-19. The potential for COVID-19 infection can be relatively high in patients with disabilities due to concomitant systemic diseases, unique individual circumstances, relationship with caregivers and the living conditions of long-term care facilities, which make them vulnerable to the virus. For behavior management, dental treatment is often provided under general anesthesia with meticulous preoperative evaluation and the use of high-quality viral filters. In response to COVID-19, additional considerations should be taken for dental procedures on patients with special needs. These recommendations for dental treatment of the disabled are based on 6 months of authors COVID-19 pandemic experience.

11.
J Oral Microbiol ; 12(1): 1794363, 2020 Jul 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-668333

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The outbreak, and pandemic of COVID-19 causing widespread concerns in all health systems of countries. Virus-carrying aerosols can penetrate the healthy human body and lungs, resulting in rapid transmission. For the first time, in this evidence-based article, the effects of different types of mouthwashes to reduce the viral load were investigated. Also, another aim of this essay is a reduction in viral load in patients with COVID-19 and prevention developing ventilator-associated pneumonia in critically ill patients. METHODS: Related databases were comprehensively searched for relevant studies. The present study was performed according to the preferred cases for standard systematic reviews (PRISMA). RESULTS: Five original studies in which the subject matter was directly evaluated were included. Different types of mouthwashes and viruses were investigated in this study. CONCLUSIONS: The antiviral mouthwashes play a certainly important role in reducing the viral load of the salivary virus. In the present study, this importance could be proved in two different aspects, that is, the use of mouthwash before dental procedures to reduce the risk of transmission of the virus to the dental team and the use of this mouthwash in COVID-19 patients to help improve systemic problems associated with oral microbial flora.

12.
Int J Dent ; 2020: 8817424, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-611602

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) rapidly escalated into a worldwide pandemic, creating a global health and economic crisis. It is a novel virus which is distinct from SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV, with Chinese horseshoe bats being the most probable origin. Transmission occurs primarily through droplet spread or contact routes. Due to the characteristics of dental settings, the risk of cross infection between dental health care personnel (DHCP) and patients can be very high. This article provides a brief overview of the structure of the virus, modes of transmission, and clinical features of COVID-19 disease. The aim of this article is to recommend infection control strategies and patient management protocols to provide optimum dental care and simultaneously prevent nosocomial infection in dental settings.

13.
J Zhejiang Univ Sci B ; 21(5): 361-368, 2020 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-8786

ABSTRACT

Since its emergence in December 2019, corona virus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has impacted several countries, affecting more than 90 thousand patients and making it a global public threat. The routes of transmission are direct contact, and droplet and possible aerosol transmissions. Due to the unique nature of dentistry, most dental procedures generate significant amounts of droplets and aerosols, posing potential risks of infection transmission. Understanding the significance of aerosol transmission and its implications in dentistry can facilitate the identification and correction of negligence in daily dental practice. In addition to the standard precautions, some special precautions that should be implemented during an outbreak have been raised in this review.


Subject(s)
Aerosols , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Dentistry , Infection Control/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Hand Hygiene , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personal Protective Equipment , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2
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