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1.
Lancet Diabetes Endocrinol ; 9(5): 293-303, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1531930

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In patients with type 2 diabetes, hyperglycaemia is an independent risk factor for COVID-19-related mortality. Associations between pre-infection prescription for glucose-lowering drugs and COVID-19-related mortality in people with type 2 diabetes have been postulated but only investigated in small studies and limited to a few agents. We investigated whether there are associations between prescription of different classes of glucose-lowering drugs and risk of COVID-19-related mortality in people with type 2 diabetes. METHODS: This was a nationwide observational cohort study done with data from the National Diabetes Audit for people with type 2 diabetes and registered with a general practice in England since 2003. Cox regression was used to estimate the hazard ratio (HR) of COVID-19-related mortality in people prescribed each class of glucose-lowering drug, with covariate adjustment with a propensity score to address confounding by demographic, socioeconomic, and clinical factors. FINDINGS: Among the 2 851 465 people with type 2 diabetes included in our analyses, 13 479 (0·5%) COVID-19-related deaths occurred during the study period (Feb 16 to Aug 31, 2020), corresponding to a rate of 8·9 per 1000 person-years (95% CI 8·7-9·0). The adjusted HR associated with recorded versus no recorded prescription was 0·77 (95% CI 0·73-0·81) for metformin and 1·42 (1·35-1·49) for insulin. Adjusted HRs for prescription of other individual classes of glucose-lowering treatment were as follows: 0·75 (0·48-1·17) for meglitinides, 0·82 (0·74-0·91) for SGLT2 inhibitors, 0·94 (0·82-1·07) for thiazolidinediones, 0·94 (0·89-0·99) for sulfonylureas, 0·94 (0·83-1·07) for GLP-1 receptor agonists, 1·07 (1·01-1·13) for DPP-4 inhibitors, and 1·26 (0·76-2·09) for α-glucosidase inhibitors. INTERPRETATION: Our results provide evidence of associations between prescription of some glucose-lowering drugs and COVID-19-related mortality, although the differences in risk are small and these findings are likely to be due to confounding by indication, in view of the use of different drug classes at different stages of type 2 diabetes disease progression. In the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, there is no clear indication to change prescribing of glucose-lowering drugs in people with type 2 diabetes. FUNDING: None.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/drug therapy , Hypoglycemic Agents/adverse effects , Aged , COVID-19/complications , Cohort Studies , England , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Proportional Hazards Models
2.
Rehabilitacion (Madr) ; 55(4): 282-290, 2021.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1454497

ABSTRACT

One of the main roles of the prescription of physical activity for people with type 2 diabetes is to reduce hyperglycemia. The beneficial effect of physical training on glycemic levels is considered as the sum of the effects of each exercise session. A better understanding of acute responses to exercise, through short-term glycemic variability, could explain the differences in the results of distinct training protocols. The objective of this study was to analyze the scientific information on different exercise protocols and their association with short-term glycemic variability in patients with type 2 diabetes. A systematic review of studies published in English and Spanish was carried out. The databases used were PubMed, Cochrane, ScienceDirect, and Medline. Only studies conducted in adults (older than 18 years) were included. A total of 36 studies were identified, which were analyzed and completed using the Covidence® platform. The final analysis included 10 articles with 296 patients. The 10 included articles were divided according to the type of intervention protocol used: group 1, acute exercise, and group 2, training. Significant differences were found in glycemic variability in 71.4% of the articles in group 1 and in 100% of the articles included in group 2. Positive effects of acute exercise and physical training on short-term glycemic variability were demonstrated. The findings were more pronounced in the intervention protocols than in physical training.


Subject(s)
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , Hyperglycemia , Adult , Blood Glucose , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/therapy , Exercise , Humans , Hyperglycemia/prevention & control
3.
Diabetes Obes Metab ; 23 Suppl 1: 3-16, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1324985

ABSTRACT

Obesity is a chronic multisystem disease associated with increased morbidity and mortality. The increasing prevalence of obesity makes it a major healthcare challenge across both developed and developing countries. Traditional measures such as body mass index do not always identify individuals at increased risk of comorbidities, yet continue to be used in deciding who qualifies for weight loss treatment. A better understanding of how obesity is associated with comorbidities, in particular non-metabolic conditions, is needed to identify individuals at risk in order to prioritize treatment. For metabolic disorders such as type 2 diabetes (T2D), weight loss can prevent T2D in individuals with prediabetes. It can improve and reverse T2D if weight loss is achieved early in the course of the disease. However, access to effective weight loss treatments is a significant barrier to improved health for people with obesity. In the present paper, we review the rising prevalence of obesity and why it should be classed as a multisystem disease. We will discuss potential mechanisms underlying its association with various comorbidities and how these respond to treatment, with a particular focus on cardiometabolic disease, malignancy and mental health.


Subject(s)
Bariatric Surgery , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , Prediabetic State , Body Mass Index , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/epidemiology , Humans , Obesity/complications , Obesity/epidemiology , Weight Loss
4.
JMIR Diabetes ; 6(3): e25820, 2021 Jul 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1311338

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: With increasing type 2 diabetes prevalence, there is a need for effective programs that support diabetes management and improve type 2 diabetes outcomes. Mobile health (mHealth) interventions have shown promising results. With advances in wearable sensors and improved integration, mHealth programs could become more accessible and personalized. OBJECTIVE: The study aimed to evaluate the feasibility, acceptability, and effectiveness of a personalized mHealth-anchored intervention program in improving glycemic control and enhancing care experience in diabetes management. The program was coincidentally implemented during the national-level lockdown for COVID-19 in Singapore, allowing for a timely study of the use of mHealth for chronic disease management. METHODS: Patients with type 2 diabetes or prediabetes were enrolled from the Singapore Armed Forces and offered a 3-month intervention program in addition to the usual care they received. The program was standardized to include (1) in-person initial consultation with a clinical dietitian; (2) in-person review with a diabetes specialist doctor; (3) 1 continuous glucose monitoring device; (4) access to the mobile app for dietary intake and physical activity tracking, and communication via messaging with the dietitian and doctor; and (5) context-sensitive digital health coaching over the mobile app. Medical support was rendered to the patients on an as-needed basis when they required advice on adjustment of medications. Measurements of weight, height, and glycated hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) were conducted at 2 in-person visits at the start and end of the program. At the end of the program, patients were asked to complete a short acceptability feedback survey to understand the motivation for joining the program, their satisfaction, and suggestions for improvement. RESULTS: Over a 4-week recruitment period, 130 individuals were screened, the enrollment target of 30 patients was met, and 21 patients completed the program and were included in the final analyses; 9 patients were lost to follow-up (full data were not available for the final analyses). There were no differences in the baseline characteristics between patients who were included and excluded from the final analyses (age category: P=.23; gender: P=.21; ethnicity: P>.99; diabetes status category: P=.52, medication adjustment category: P=.65; HbA1c category: P=.69; BMI: P>.99). The 21 patients who completed the study rated a mean of 9.0 out of 10 on the Likert scale for both satisfaction questions. For the Yes-No question on benefit of the program, all of the patients selected "Yes." Mean HbA1c decreased from 7.6% to 7.0% (P=.004). There were no severe hypoglycemia events (glucose level <3.0 mmol/L) reported. Mean weight decreased from 76.8 kg to 73.9 kg (P<.001), a mean decrease of 3.5% from baseline weight. Mean BMI decreased from 27.8 kg/m2 to 26.7 kg/m2 (P<.001). CONCLUSIONS: The personalized mHealth program was feasible, acceptable, and produced significant reductions in HbA1c (P=.004) and body weight (P<.001) in individuals with type 2 diabetes. Such mHealth programs could overcome challenges posed to chronic disease management by COVID-19, including disruptions to in-person health care access.

6.
Diabetol Metab Syndr ; 13(1): 63, 2021 Jun 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1266502

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic is a global public health emergency, which presents wide-ranging negative impacts on individuals with diabetes. To examine psychosocial well-being and diabetes outcomes in individuals with type 1 diabetes during the COVID-19 pandemic, and investigate how these factors vary in different countries. METHODS: Between April and June 2020 we employed a cross national comparative research study in the United States (US), Brazil, and Iran to collect data from 1788 adults with type 1 diabetes using web-based survey. Study participants answered questions relevant to diabetes distress, diabetes burnout, depressive symptoms, COVID-19 related changes, and socio-demographic characteristics. They also reported their last Hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) and daily Time-in-Range (TiR) blood glucose. We analyzed data using comparative tests (Chi-square, Kruskal-Wallis and McNemar test), logistic and linear regression adjusted for fixed effects. RESULTS: There were significant changes prior and during the pandemic regarding access to diabetes care, diabetes supplies and medications, healthy food and safe places to exercise in all countries (p < 0.05). Participants in Iran experienced higher levels of diabetes distress (57.1%), diabetes burnout (50%), and depressive symptoms (60.9%), followed by Brazil and US (p < 0.0001). US participants reported better glycemic control (HbA1c = 6.97%, T1R = 69.64%) compared to Brazil (HbA1c = 7.94%, T1R = 51.95%) and Iran (HbA1c = 7.47%, T1R = 51.53%) (p < 0.0001). There were also significant relationships between psychosocial well-being, diabetes outcomes, socio-demographic data, and COVID-19 related challenges in overall sample (p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Regardless of differences among US, Brazil, and Iran, our findings revealed that different countries may experience similar challenges related to the COVID-19 pandemic which can impact negatively diabetes outcomes and psychosocial well-being in individuals with type 1 diabetes. Countries need to consider modifiable variables associated with poor diabetes outcomes and sub optimal psychosocial well-being and target vulnerable population using significant socio-demographic variables.

8.
Diabet Med ; 38(9): e14616, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1249409

ABSTRACT

The National Diabetes Audit (NDA) collates and analyses data on the quality and variation in clinical care and outcomes for people with diabetes. It also provides opportunities to assess trends, determinants, and outcomes of diabetes to help guide clinical and public health priorities. COHORT: Between 1 January 2003 and 31 March 2020, a total of 5,280,885 people diagnosed with diabetes were included in at least one NDA data collection. To this date, median follow-up was 12 and 8 years for people with type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes respectively. Comparisons with the 2019/20 Quality and Outcomes Framework show it included 98% of adults in England and Wales with diagnosed type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Data include demographic characteristics (age, sex, ethnicity, age at diagnosis, deprivation), risk factors (HbA1c , blood pressure, cholesterol, body mass index, smoking status) diabetic and cardiovascular complications and deaths. SECONDARY ANALYSIS: Secondary analyses have included comparisons of HbA1c and blood pressure measurements in cohorts with similar characteristics to the Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications study and the UK Prospective Diabetes Study; COVID-19 related mortality in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes and incidence of type 2 diabetes following admission to intensive care units. FUTURE PLANS: Commissioned NDA reports will continue to inform service development in England and Wales. The same data, with or without linkages to other external datasets, are also a rich resource for clinically orientated research.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Clinical Audit , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Blood Pressure , Child , Child, Preschool , Cohort Studies , Comorbidity , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/physiopathology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/physiopathology , England/epidemiology , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Glycated Hemoglobin A/analysis , Humans , Hypoglycemic Agents/therapeutic use , Infant , Male , Middle Aged , Quality of Health Care , Treatment Outcome , Wales/epidemiology , Young Adult
9.
GMS Hyg Infect Control ; 16: Doc17, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1232519

ABSTRACT

Background: The cytotoxic effects of COVID-19 raise the question of a possible relation between COVID-19 infection and new-onset type 1 diabetes. We report the case of an eight-year-old boy with new-onset type 1 diabetes and an asymptomatic COVID-19 infection. Case presentation: The eight-year-old boy was hospitalized on December 18th, 2020 due to increased polyuria during the preceding 1 week. Type 1 diabetes was diagnosed with autoantibodies against glutamic acid decarboxylase, tyrosine phosphatase and insulin. The Hba1c value was 11.6%. Upon admission, the PCR test for COVID-19 was positive, the duration of the infection was not clear due to the asymptomatic course, and antibodies were initially negative. Significantly elevated antibodies against COVID-19 were detected 15 days later. Conclusion: The laboratory findings led us to the hypothesis that the boy already had an increased risk of developing autoimmune diseases (HLA DR3-DQB1*02:01 and DR4-DQB1*03:02 positive). The Hba1c value allows speculation that the diabetes manifestation was already "on the way" and that a relatively recent COVID-19 infection could have accelerated the process. The findings are in contrast to a recent report in which COVID-19 infection preceded the manifestation of an insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus by about 5-7 weeks. Due to the paucity of reports, cases with a suspected connection between diabetes mellitus and COVID-19 infection should be entered into the CoviDiab registry (https://covidiab.e-dendrite.com).

10.
Diabetologia ; 64(8): 1717-1724, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1219907

ABSTRACT

AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The aim of this work was to describe the clinical characteristics of adults with type 1 diabetes admitted to hospital and the risk factors associated with severe coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) in the UK. METHODS: A retrospective cohort study was performed using data collected through a nationwide audit of people admitted to hospital with diabetes and COVID-19, conducted by the Association of British Clinical Diabetologists from March to October 2020. Prespecified demographic, clinical, medication and laboratory data were collected from the electronic and paper medical record systems of the participating hospitals by local clinicians. The primary outcome of the study, severe COVID-19, was defined as death in hospital and/or admission to the adult intensive care unit (AICU). Logistic regression models were used to generate age-adjusted ORs. RESULTS: Forty UK centres submitted data. The final dataset included 196 adults who were admitted to hospital and had both type 1 diabetes and COVID-19 on admission (male sex 55%, white 70%, with mean [SD] age 62 [19] years, BMI 28.3 [7.3] kg/m2 and last recorded HbA1c 76 [31] mmol/mol [9.1 (5.0)%]). The prevalence of pre-existing microvascular disease and macrovascular disease was 56% and 39%, respectively. The prevalence of diabetic ketoacidosis on admission was 29%. A total of 68 patients (35%) died or were admitted to AICU. The proportions of people that died were 7%, 38% and 38% of those aged <55, 55-74 and ≥75 years, respectively. BMI, serum creatinine levels and having one or more microvascular complications were positively associated with the primary outcome after adjusting for age. CONCLUSIONS/INTERPRETATION: In people with type 1 diabetes and COVID-19 who were admitted to hospital in the UK, higher BMI, poorer renal function and presence of microvascular complications were associated with greater risk of death and/or admission to AICU. Risk of severe COVID-19 is reassuringly very low in people with type 1 diabetes who are under 55 years of age without microvascular or macrovascular disease. IN PEOPLE WITH TYPE 1 DIABETES AND COVID-19 ADMITTED TO HOSPITAL IN THE UK, BMI AND ONE OR MORE MICROVASCULAR COMPLICATIONS HAD A POSITIVE ASSOCIATION AND LOW SERUM CREATINE LEVELS HAD A NEGATIVE ASSOCIATION WITH DEATH/ADMISSION TO INTENSIVE CARE UNIT AFTER ADJUSTING FOR AGE.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/pathology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/epidemiology , Patient Admission/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/complications , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/therapy , Female , Hospitals/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Severity of Illness Index , United Kingdom/epidemiology
11.
Diabet Med ; 38(2): e14458, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1214788

ABSTRACT

Dapagliflozin (SGLT-2 inhibitor) and sotagliflozin (SGLT1/2 inhibitor) are two of the drugs of SGLT inhibitor class which have been recommended by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) in people with type 1 diabetes with BMI ≥27 kg/m2 . Dapagliflozin is licensed in the UK for use in the NHS while sotagliflozin may be available in future. These and possibly other SGLT inhibitors may be increasingly used in people with type 1 diabetes as new licences are obtained. These drugs have the potential to improve glycaemic control in people with type 1 diabetes with the added benefit of weight loss, better control of blood pressure and more time in optimal glucose range. However, SGLT inhibitors are associated with a higher incidence of diabetic ketoacidosis without significant hyperglycaemia. The present ABCD/Diabetes UK joint updated position statement is to guide people with type 1 diabetes and clinicians using these drugs help mitigate this risk and other potential complications. Particularly, caution needs to be exercised in people who are at risk of diabetic ketoacidosis due to low calorie diets, illnesses, injuries, starvation, excessive exercise, excessive alcohol consumption and reduced insulin administration among other precipitating factors for diabetic ketoacidosis.


Subject(s)
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/drug therapy , Diabetic Ketoacidosis/epidemiology , Overweight/metabolism , Sodium-Glucose Transporter 2 Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Benzhydryl Compounds/therapeutic use , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/complications , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/metabolism , Drug Therapy, Combination , Glucosides/therapeutic use , Glycosides/therapeutic use , Humans , Hypoglycemic Agents/therapeutic use , Insulin/therapeutic use , Overweight/complications , Practice Guidelines as Topic , United Kingdom
12.
Lancet Diabetes Endocrinol ; 9(6): 350-359, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1208494

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Obesity is a major risk factor for adverse outcomes after infection with SARS-CoV-2. We aimed to examine this association, including interactions with demographic and behavioural characteristics, type 2 diabetes, and other health conditions. METHODS: In this prospective, community-based, cohort study, we used de-identified patient-level data from the QResearch database of general practices in England, UK. We extracted data for patients aged 20 years and older who were registered at a practice eligible for inclusion in the QResearch database between Jan 24, 2020 (date of the first recorded infection in the UK) and April 30, 2020, and with available data on BMI. Data extracted included demographic, clinical, clinical values linked with Public Health England's database of positive SARS-CoV-2 test results, and death certificates from the Office of National Statistics. Outcomes, as a proxy measure of severe COVID-19, were admission to hospital, admission to an intensive care unit (ICU), and death due to COVID-19. We used Cox proportional hazard models to estimate the risk of severe COVID-19, sequentially adjusting for demographic characteristics, behavioural factors, and comorbidities. FINDINGS: Among 6 910 695 eligible individuals (mean BMI 26·78 kg/m2 [SD 5·59]), 13 503 (0·20%) were admitted to hospital, 1601 (0·02%) to an ICU, and 5479 (0·08%) died after a positive test for SARS-CoV-2. We found J-shaped associations between BMI and admission to hospital due to COVID-19 (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] per kg/m2 from the nadir at BMI of 23 kg/m2 of 1·05 [95% CI 1·05-1·05]) and death (1·04 [1·04-1·05]), and a linear association across the whole BMI range with ICU admission (1·10 [1·09-1·10]). We found a significant interaction between BMI and age and ethnicity, with higher HR per kg/m2 above BMI 23 kg/m2 for younger people (adjusted HR per kg/m2 above BMI 23 kg/m2 for hospital admission 1·09 [95% CI 1·08-1·10] in 20-39 years age group vs 80-100 years group 1·01 [1·00-1·02]) and Black people than White people (1·07 [1·06-1·08] vs 1·04 [1·04-1·05]). The risk of admission to hospital and ICU due to COVID-19 associated with unit increase in BMI was slightly lower in people with type 2 diabetes, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease than in those without these morbidities. INTERPRETATION: At a BMI of more than 23 kg/m2, we found a linear increase in risk of severe COVID-19 leading to admission to hospital and death, and a linear increase in admission to an ICU across the whole BMI range, which is not attributable to excess risks of related diseases. The relative risk due to increasing BMI is particularly notable people younger than 40 years and of Black ethnicity. FUNDING: NIHR Oxford Biomedical Research Centre.


Subject(s)
Body Mass Index , COVID-19/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/epidemiology , Independent Living/trends , Severity of Illness Index , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnosis , Cohort Studies , Databases, Factual , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/diagnosis , England/epidemiology , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Hospitalization/trends , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Risk Factors , Young Adult
14.
Telemed J E Health ; 28(1): 107-114, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1185586

ABSTRACT

Aims: The COVID-19 pandemic has caused strain on hospital systems and potential delay in diagnosis of type 1 diabetes (T1D). Outpatient diagnosis and treatment of metabolically stable young persons with new-onset T1D have been shown to be equivalent to inpatient. We describe an approach to outpatient management of newly diagnosed T1D during the COVID-19 pandemic using an interdisciplinary team, telemedicine, and diabetes technologies including rapid implementation of continuous glucose monitoring (CGM). Methods: Following the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic, new-onset cases of T1D were tracked. After laboratory confirmation of diagnosis and metabolic stability, patients and families were referred for ambulatory initiation of insulin therapy and diabetes education. These cases were reviewed using data extracted from the electronic health record, comments from multidisciplinary team members, and cloud-based glucose data. Results: We report on seven young people with new-onset T1D without diabetic ketoacidosis from April to June 2020, during the COVID-19 pandemic. Ages ranged 9-23 years with presenting hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) values 10-14.5%. Initial evaluation was generally face-to-face, followed by frequent telemedicine visits. Five patients had a family history of T1D. Two patients had access to at-home HbA1c kits prompting evaluation in the absence of symptoms. Four patients required emergency department evaluation. Five patients presented with ketosis. All patients were prescribed CGM at the first visit, most starting within 1 month. Conclusions: Technology is extraordinarily useful for the care of young persons with new-onset T1D in the ambulatory setting during the COVID-19 pandemic. Large observational studies are needed to better understand outcomes of an outpatient, technology-focused approach.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1 , Telemedicine , Adolescent , Adult , Ambulatory Care , Blood Glucose , Blood Glucose Self-Monitoring , Child , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/diagnosis , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/therapy , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
15.
Diabetes Obes Metab ; 23(7): 1624-1630, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1175046

ABSTRACT

AIM: To assess the effect of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) lockdown on glycaemic control in subjects with type 2 diabetes (T2D). MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this observational, multicentre, retrospective study conducted in the Lazio region, Italy, we compared the differences in the HbA1c levels of 141 subjects with T2D exposed to lockdown with 123 matched controls with T2D who attended the study centres 1 year before. Basal data were collected from 9 December to 9 March and follow-up data from 3 June to 10 July in 2020 for the lockdown group, and during the same timeframes in 2019 for the control groups. Changes in HbA1c (ΔHbA1c) and body mass index (ΔBMI) during lockdown were compared among patients with different psychological well-being, as evaluated by tertiles of the Psychological General Well-Being Index (PGWBS). RESULTS: No difference in ΔHbA1c was found between the lockdown and control groups (lockdown group -0.1% [-0.5%-0.3%] vs. control group -0.1% [-0.4%-0.2%]; p = .482). Also, no difference was found in ΔBMI (p = .316) or ΔGlucose (p = .538). In the lockdown group, subjects with worse PGWBS showed a worsening of HbA1c (p = .041 for the trend among PGWBS tertiles) and BMI (p = .022). CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 lockdown did not significantly impact glycaemic control in people with T2D. People with poor psychological well-being may experience a worsening a glycaemic control because of restrictions resulting from lockdown. These findings may aid healthcare providers in diabetes management once the second wave of COVID-19 has ended.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , Blood Glucose , Communicable Disease Control , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/epidemiology , Glycemic Control , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
17.
JMIR Diabetes ; 6(1): e25295, 2021 Feb 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1161018

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Translation of diabetes self-management education and support (DSMES) into a digital format can improve access, but few digital programs have demonstrated outcomes using rigorous evaluation metrics. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of a digital DSMES program on hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) for people with type 2 diabetes. METHODS: A single-arm, nonrandomized trial was performed to evaluate a digital DSMES program that includes remote monitoring and lifestyle change, in addition to comprehensive diabetes education staffed by a diabetes specialist. A sample of 195 participants were recruited using an online research platform (Achievement Studies, Evidation Health Inc). The primary outcome was change in laboratory-tested HbA1c from baseline to 4 months, and secondary outcomes included change in lipids, diabetes distress, and medication adherence. RESULTS: At baseline, participants had a mean HbA1c of 8.9% (SD 1.9) and mean BMI of 37.5 kg/m2 (SD 8.3). The average age was 45.1 years (SD 8.9), 70% were women, and 67% were White. At 4-month follow up, the HbA1c decreased by 0.8% (P<.001, 95% CI -1.1 to -0.5) for the total population and decreased by 1.4% (P<.001, 95% CI -1.8 to -0.9) for those with an HbA1c of >9.0% at baseline. Diabetes distress and medication adherence were also significantly improved between baseline and follow up. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides early evidence that a digitally enhanced DSMES program improves HbA1c and disease self-management outcomes.

18.
Pilot Feasibility Stud ; 7(1): 76, 2021 Mar 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1143272

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: People with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) generally spend a large amount of time sitting. This increases their risk of cardiovascular disease, premature mortality, diabetes-related complications and mental health problems. There is a paucity of research that has evaluated interventions aimed at reducing and breaking up sitting in people with T2DM. The primary aim of this study is to assess the feasibility of delivering and evaluating a tailored intervention to reduce and break up sitting in ambulatory adults with T2DM. METHODS: This is a mixed-methods randomised controlled feasibility trial. Participants (n=70) with T2DM aged 18-85 years who sit ≥7 h/day and are able to ambulate independently will be randomly allocated to receive the REgulate your SItting Time (RESIT) intervention or usual care (control group) for 24 weeks. RESIT is a person-focused intervention that delivers a standardised set of behaviour change techniques to the participants, but the mode through which they are delivered can vary depending on the tools selected by each participant. The intervention includes an online education programme, health coach support, and a range of self-selected tools (smartphone apps, computer-prompt software, and wearable devices) that deliver behaviour change techniques such as self-monitoring of sitting and providing prompts to break up sitting. Measures will be taken at baseline, 12 and 24 weeks. Eligibility, recruitment, retention and data completion rates will be used to assess trial feasibility. Sitting, standing and stepping will be measured using a thigh-worn activity monitor. Cardiometabolic health, physical function, psychological well-being, sleep and musculoskeletal symptoms will also be assessed. A process evaluation will be conducted including evaluation of intervention acceptability and fidelity. DISCUSSION: This study will identify the feasibility of delivering a tailored intervention to reduce and break up sitting in ambulatory adults with T2DM and evaluating it through a randomised controlled trial (RCT) design. The findings will inform a fully powered RCT to evaluate the effectiveness of the intervention. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ISRCTN, ISRCTN14832389 ; Registered 6 August 2020.

19.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 6428, 2021 03 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1142462

ABSTRACT

Hyperactivation of the immune system through obesity and diabetes may enhance infection severity complicated by Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS). The objective was to determine the circulatory biomarkers for macrophage activation at baseline and after serum glucose normalization in obese type 2 diabetes (OT2D) subjects. A case-controlled interventional pilot study in OT2D (n = 23) and control subjects (n = 23). OT2D subjects underwent hyperinsulinemic clamp to normalize serum glucose. Plasma macrophage-related proteins were determined using Slow Off-rate Modified Aptamer-scan plasma protein measurement at baseline (control and OT2D subjects) and after 1-h of insulin clamp (OT2D subjects only). Basal M1 macrophage activation was characterized by elevated levels of M1 macrophage-specific surface proteins, CD80 and CD38, and cytokines or chemokines (CXCL1, CXCL5, RANTES) released by activated M1 macrophages. Two potent M1 macrophage activation markers, CXCL9 and CXCL10, were decreased in OT2D. Activated M2 macrophages were characterized by elevated levels of plasma CD163, TFGß-1, MMP7 and MMP9 in OT2D. Conventional mediators of both M1 and M2 macrophage activation markers (IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-13) were not altered. No changes were observed in plasma levels of M1/M2 macrophage activation markers in OT2D in response to acute normalization of glycemia. In the basal state, macrophage activation markers are elevated, and these reflect the expression of circulatory cytokines, chemokines, growth factors and matrix metalloproteinases in obese individuals with type 2 diabetes, that were not changed by glucose normalisation. These differences could potentially predispose diabetic individuals to increased infection severity complicated by ARDS. Clinical trial reg. no: NCT03102801; registration date April 6, 2017.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/etiology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications , Macrophage Activation , Obesity/complications , Adult , Aged , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/immunology , Cytokines/blood , Cytokines/immunology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/blood , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/immunology , Female , Humans , Inflammation/blood , Inflammation/complications , Inflammation/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Obesity/blood , Obesity/immunology , Pilot Projects , Prospective Studies , Risk Factors
20.
Diabetes Res Clin Pract ; 172: 108626, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1139479

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The DaR Global survey was conducted to determine the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the intentions to fast and the outcomes of fasting in <18 years versus ≥18 years age groups with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). METHODS: Muslim people with T1DM were surveyed in 13 countries between June and August 2020, shortly after the end of Ramadan (23rd April-23rd May 2020) using a simple questionnaire. RESULTS: 71.1% of muslims with T1DM fasted during Ramadan. Concerns about COVID-19 were higher in individuals ≥18 years (p = 0.002). The number of participants who decided not to fast plus those who received Ramadan-focused education were significantly higher in the ≥18-year group (p < 0.05). Hypoglycemia (60.7%) as well as hyperglycemia (44.8%) was major complications of fasting during Ramadan in both groups irrespective of age. CONCLUSION: COVID-19 pandemic had minor impact on the decision to fast Ramadan in T1DM cohort. This was higher in the age group of ≥18 years compared to those <18 years group. Only regional differences were noted for fasting attitude and behavior among T1DM groups. This survey highlights the need for Ramadan focused diabetes education to improve glucose control and prevent complications during fasting.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/epidemiology , Fasting/physiology , Health Education/methods , Islam , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/psychology , Cohort Studies , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/psychology , Female , Global Health , Humans , Hypoglycemic Agents , Male , Middle Aged , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
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