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1.
J Clin Neurophysiol ; 39(2): 159-165, 2022 Feb 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1868451

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Neurologic manifestations of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) such as encephalopathy and seizures have been described. To our knowledge, detailed EEG findings in COVID-19 have not yet been reported. This report adds to the scarce body of evidence. METHODS: We identified eight COVID-19 positive patients who underwent EEG monitoring in our hospital system. RESULTS: EEGs were most commonly ordered for an altered level of consciousness, a nonspecific neurologic manifestation. We observed generalized background slowing in all patients and generalized epileptiform discharges with triphasic morphology in three patients. Focal electrographic seizures were observed in one patient with a history of focal epilepsy and in another patient with no such history. Five of eight patients had a previous diagnosis of epilepsy, suggesting that pre-existing epilepsy can be a potential risk factor for COVID-19-associated neurological manifestations. Five of eight patients who underwent EEG experienced a fatal outcome of infection. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings underscore previous observations that neurologic manifestations are common in severe cases. COVID-19 patients with epilepsy may have an increased risk of neurological manifestations and abnormal EEG.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Epilepsies, Partial , Electroencephalography , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Seizures/diagnosis , Seizures/etiology
2.
Pacing Clin Electrophysiol ; 45(6): 807-810, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1832218

ABSTRACT

In the era of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), the management of cardiac implantable electronic devices infections with concomitant viral infection has not been completely defined yet. In this explorable context, we report the first experience of a Cardiac resynchronization therapy with defibrillator (CRT-D) implantation after transvenous lead extraction for endocarditis in a COVID-19 patient. We describe both the measures and procedures implemented to reduce the cross-infection in the operating room and our clinical practice to improving procedure effectiveness on patient care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy , Defibrillators, Implantable , Endocarditis , Heart Diseases , Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Devices , Device Removal/methods , Humans , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
3.
J Telemed Telecare ; 28(3): 213-223, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775070

ABSTRACT

Access to paediatric neurology care is complex, resulting in significant wait times and negative patient outcomes. The goal of the American Academy of Pediatrics National Coordinating Center for Epilepsy's project, Access Improvement and Management of Epilepsy with Telehealth (AIM-ET), was to identify access and management challenges in the deployment of telehealth technology. AIM-ET organised four paediatric neurology teams to partner with primary-care providers (PCP) and their multidisciplinary teams. Telehealth visits were conducted for paediatric epilepsy patients. A post-visit survey assessed access and satisfaction with the telehealth visit compared to an in-person visit. Pre/post surveys completed by PCPs and neurologists captured telehealth visit feasibility, functionality and provider satisfaction. A provider focus group assessed facilitators and barriers to telehealth. Sixty-one unique patients completed 75 telehealth visits. Paired t-test analysis demonstrated that telehealth enhanced access to epilepsy care. It reduced self-reported out-of-pocket costs (p<0.001), missed school hours (p<0.001) and missed work hours (p<0.001), with 94% equal parent/caregiver satisfaction. Focus groups indicated developing and maintaining partnerships, institutional infrastructure and education as facilitators and barriers to telehealth. Telehealth shortened travelling distance, reduced expenses and time missed from school and work. Further, it provides significant opportunity in an era when coronavirus disease 2019 limits in-person clinics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Epilepsy , Neurology , Pediatrics , Telemedicine , Child , Epilepsy/therapy , Humans , Telemedicine/methods
4.
Acta Neurol Scand ; 143(2): 206-209, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1388169

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Lockdown due to the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic became a challenge to maintain care for patients with epilepsy; we aimed to find out how the pandemic affected them. METHODS: We sent an online 22-item questionnaire to patients from our outpatient clinic, a reference centre in Spain for drug-resistant epilepsy, inquiring about the effects of lockdown, from March to May 2020. RESULTS: We sent the survey to 627 patients; 312 (58% women) sent a complete response and were included. Of all respondents, 57% took >2 antiseizure medications. One-third of respondents (29%) declared an associated cognitive or motor disability. A minority had confirmed infection with SARS-CoV-2 (1.92%). Seizure frequency remained like usual in 56% of patients, while 31.2% reported an increase. Less than 10% needed emergent assistance. Almost half reported anxiety or depression, and 25% increased behavioural disorders. Mood (F: 5.40; p: 0.002) and sleep disorders (F = 2.67; p: 0.05) were associated with increase in seizure frequency. Patients were able to contact their physicians when needed and were open to a future telematic approach to follow-up visits. CONCLUSIONS: Seizure frequency and severity remained unchanged in most patients during the lockdown. Mood and sleep disorders were common and associated with seizure worsening. Patients were open to telematic care in the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Epilepsy/therapy , Pandemics , Quarantine/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Anticonvulsants/therapeutic use , Anxiety/complications , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cognition Disorders/complications , Communicable Disease Control , Depression/complications , Disabled Persons , Epilepsy/complications , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Disorders/complications , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Motor Disorders/complications , Outpatients , Seizures/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/classification , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Spain/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine
5.
Epileptic Disord ; 23(2): 274-280, 2021 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1291312

ABSTRACT

The objective of this brief report is to review an assessment paradigm for conducting virtual neuropsychological pre-surgical evaluations in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. A multidisciplinary epilepsy team at a Level 4 epilepsy center within a large children's academic medical center convened to discuss the challenges and possible solutions for Phase II evaluations for pediatric patients with pharmacoresistant epilepsy during the COVID-19 pandemic. The neuropsychologists explored evidence-based methods of virtual evaluation and developed a systematic decision-making process for youth requiring a Phase II evaluation. We propose models of assessment which prioritize teleneuropsychology when possible to reduce the risk of infection: (1) evaluation with directly administered tests through a completely virtual format; (2) virtual/in-person hybrid evaluation; and (3) clinical observation/interview in a virtual format supplemented by survey data. These models are illustrated by three cases. Using virtual assessment models, the team was able to meet the urgent patient care needs and collect useful data while minimizing the risk of virus spread. The paradigms presented may be useful examples for other multidisciplinary surgical teams interested in incorporating teleneuropsychology into their practices.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Drug Resistant Epilepsy/diagnosis , Drug Resistant Epilepsy/psychology , Pandemics , Telemedicine/methods , Adolescent , Child , Clinical Decision-Making , Drug Resistant Epilepsy/therapy , Epilepsies, Partial/diagnosis , Epilepsies, Partial/psychology , Epilepsies, Partial/therapy , Female , Humans , Infant , Models, Theoretical , Neuropsychological Tests , Patient Care Team , Seizures/diagnosis , Seizures/therapy , User-Computer Interface
6.
Epilepsy Behav ; 122: 108115, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1272803

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: During COVID-19 pandemic the global population is facing an important psychosocial distress. The aim of this study was to evaluate how people with epilepsy (PWE) in Brazil is dealing with the pandemic, in relation to seizure frequency, access to antiseizure medicines (ASM), medical follow-up, and well-being. METHODS: An online questionnaire survey among PWE (group 1) and caregivers (group 2) was applied in the social networks of the Brazilian Association of Epilepsy, the official Brazilian chapter of the International Bureau for Epilepsy. The questionnaire was composed of 46 generic questions in four areas, namely, demographics and baseline clinical data as well as epilepsy and quality-of-life impact by COVID-19 pandemic based on the domains of the abbreviated World Health Organization Quality of Life (WHOQOL-BREF) instrument. RESULTS: The questionnaire was answered by 464 participants including 380 (81.9%) PWE (78.7% female; age 34.3 yrs.; ±9.76) and 84 (18.1%) caregivers (patients' age 14.1 yrs.; ±10.30). During the COVID-19 pandemic, 36.8% of PWE and 36.4% of caregivers reported difficulties in accessing the epilepsy healthcare provider, and visits occurred normally only in 29.7% of PWE and in 34.5% of the caregivers group. Telehealth was not provided for 66.6% of group 1 and for 58.5% of group 2. Lack of availability of ASM was reported by 21.9% of PWE and 28.0% of caregivers in public dispensing units and by 19.2% and 17.8%, respectively, in private pharmacies. Increase in seizures during pandemic was mentioned by 26.3% and 27.9% of groups 1 and 2, respectively. Patients who had increase in seizure frequency had more frequently reported problems with treatment and in quality-of-life concepts. Fear of having a more severe COVID-19 presentation because of epilepsy was reported by 74.5% of PWE and by 89.8% of caregivers. Dissatisfaction with current health status was reported by 36.7% and 38.1% in groups 1 and 2, respectively, and that the support from others has decreased (56.1% and 66.1%, in groups 1 and 2) during the pandemic. The factors with higher Odds Ratio of increase in seizure frequency during pandemic were age >41 yrs., treatment in public healthcare system, drug-resistant epilepsy, adversities in getting ASM in public dispensing units, difficulties with prescription renewals, current financial problems and belief that epilepsy or ASM are risk factors for contracting COVID-19. CONCLUSION: During COVID-19 pandemic in Brazil, PWE and caregivers reported increase in seizures in one-fourth of the patients and several difficulties, namely problems in accessing the healthcare system including ASM dispensation, telehealth, and fear of having a more severe COVID-19 because of epilepsy. There were also physical, psychological, and social concerns which affected quality-of-life-related aspects in this population. These facts may increase treatment gap in epilepsy in Brazil as well in other developing countries.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Epilepsy , Adolescent , Adult , Brazil/epidemiology , Epilepsy/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
7.
Epilepsy Res ; 173: 106626, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1269273

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Essential oils (EOs) like eucalyptus and camphor have pro-convulsant properties. These EOs are present in many over- the- counter balms and oils. The effect of exposure to these EOs and occurrence of seizure is not systematically studied. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between essential oils and the first episode of seizure and breakthrough seizures in known epileptic patients. METHODS: This was a multi-center prospective study, conducted in four hospitals over four years. Every person presenting with the first episode of seizure or breakthrough seizure was asked about exposure to EOs, mode of exposure, time to onset of a seizure in relationship to exposure, duration of seizure, type of seizure, and antiepileptic drug therapy. RESULTS: During the four-year period there were 55 patients with essential oil-related seizure (EORS). 22(40 %) had essential oil-induced seizures (EOIS) and 33(60 %) had essential oil-provoked seizures (EOPS). The female: male ratio was 1:1.1, the age of the patients ranged from 8 months to 77 years. In the EOIS group, 95 % had generalized tonic-clonic seizures and 5% had focal impaired awareness seizures. In the EOPS group, 42.4 % had focal impaired awareness seizures, 27.3 % generalized tonic-clonic seizures, 15 % focal to bilateral tonic-clonic seizures, and 15 % focal aware motor seizures. EOs implicated were preparations containing eucalyptus and camphor. CONCLUSION: Exposure to essential oils of eucalyptus and camphor is an under-recognized cause of the first and breakthrough seizure. Identifying the true causative factor will prevent unnecessary antiepileptic drug therapy and future recurrence.


Subject(s)
Epilepsies, Partial , Oils, Volatile , Adult , Anticonvulsants/adverse effects , Epilepsies, Partial/drug therapy , Female , Humans , Infant , Male , Oils, Volatile/adverse effects , Prospective Studies , Seizures/chemically induced , Seizures/drug therapy
8.
Neurodiagn J ; 61(2): 95-103, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1263635

ABSTRACT

Due to the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, the state of Texas-limited elective procedures to conserve beds and personal protective equipment (PPE); therefore, between March 22 and May 18, 2020, admission to the epilepsy monitoring unit (EMU) was limited only to urgent and emergent cases. We evaluated clinical characteristics and outcomes of these patients who were admitted to the EMU. Nineteen patients were admitted (one patient twice) with average age of 36.26 years (11 female) and average length of stay 3 days (range: 2-9 days). At least one event was captured on continuous EEG (cEEG) and video monitoring in all 20 admissions (atypical in one). One patient had both epileptic (ES) and psychogenic non-epileptic seizures (PNES) while 10 had PNES and 9 had ES. In 8 of 9 patients with ES, medications were changed, while in 5 patients with PNES, anti-epileptic drugs (AED) were stopped; the remaining 5 were not on medications. Of the 14 patients who had seen an epileptologist pre-admission, 13 (or 93%) had their diagnosis confirmed by EMU stay; a statistically significant finding. While typically an elective admission, in the setting of the COVID-19 pandemic, urgent and emergent EMU admissions were required for increased seizure or event frequency. In the vast majority of patients (13 of 19), admission lead to medication changes to either better control seizures or to change therapeutics as appropriate when PNES was identified.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Epilepsy , Hospitalization/legislation & jurisprudence , Adult , Aged , Clinical Decision-Making , Epilepsy/diagnosis , Epilepsy/therapy , Female , Hospital Units , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Monitoring, Physiologic , SARS-CoV-2 , Seizures/diagnosis , Seizures/therapy , Young Adult
9.
Epilepsy Behav ; 118: 107919, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1253750

ABSTRACT

Insular epilepsy is increasingly recognized in epilepsy surgery centers. Recent studies suggest that resection of an epileptogenic zone that involves the insula as a treatment for drug-resistant seizures is associated with good outcomes in terms of seizure control. However, despite the existing evidence of a role of the insula in emotions and affective information processing, the long-term psychological outcome of patients undergoing these surgeries remain poorly documented. A group of 27 adults (18 women) who underwent an insulo-opercular resection (in combination with a part of the temporal lobe in 10, and of the frontal lobe in 5) as part of epilepsy surgery at our center between 2004 and 2019 completed psychometric questionnaires to assess depression (Beck Depression Inventory - 2nd edition; BDI-II), anxiety (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, Trait Version; STAI-T), and quality of life (Patient Weighted Quality of Life In Epilepsy; QOLIE-10-P). Scores were compared to those of patients who had standard temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) surgery with similar socio-demographic and disease characteristics. Seizure control after insular epilepsy surgery was comparable to that observed after TLE surgery, with a majority of patients reporting being seizure free (insular: 63.0%; temporal: 63.2%) or having rare disabling seizures (insular: 7.4%; temporal: 18.4%) at the time of questionnaire completion. Statistical comparisons revealed no significant group difference on scores of depression, anxiety, or quality of life. Hemisphere or extent of insular resection had no significant effect on the studied variables. In the total sample, employment status and seizure control, but not location of surgery, significantly predicted quality of life. Self-reported long-term psychological status after insulo-opercular resection as part of epilepsy surgery thus appears to be similar to that observed after TLE surgery, which is commonly performed in epilepsy surgery centers.


Subject(s)
Epilepsy, Temporal Lobe , Epilepsy , Adult , Anxiety/etiology , Cerebral Cortex , Depression/etiology , Epilepsy/complications , Epilepsy/surgery , Epilepsy, Temporal Lobe/complications , Epilepsy, Temporal Lobe/surgery , Female , Humans , Male , Quality of Life
10.
Seizure ; 91: 60-65, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1253625

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Analyzing parents' and physicians' opinions regarding phone-based encounters in emergency shifts of a French pediatric epilepsy center compared to traditional face-to-face encounters during the first lockdown of the COVID-19 pandemic METHODS: Prospective monocentric study on remote encounters at Necker rare epilepsy reference center from March 20th, 2020 to April 23rd, 2020 due to lockdown measures. This study was conducted with a survey based on 5-point Likert scales (LS-2/2) designed for both parents and physicians. We compared first versus follow-up encounters as well as physicians' and parents' opinions. RESULTS: We had a total of 224 responses, among which 204 were completed by physicians (91%) and 173 (84,4%) by parents. Twenty five were first encounters (14,2%). Physicians pointed out the need for clinical examination (42.6%), mainly for first encounters (p=0.0004). Physicians rated the quality of communication lower (p=0.003) as their capacity to answer parents' questions (p=0.004). They were significantly less satisfied with remote encounters compared to parents (p<10-4). We identified six urgent (2.9%) and 50 semi-urgent (24%) situations requiring programming face-to-face encounter during or shortly after the lockdown. CONCLUSION: Remote encounters could be a helpful practice for pediatric patients with epilepsy in emergency situations such as pandemics. It allowed the identification and prioritization of emergency situations. Physicians were less positive than parents. We raised the possible use of remote encounters in association to face-to-face encounters for routine follow-up of pediatric patients with epilepsy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Epilepsy , Physicians , Telemedicine , Child , Communicable Disease Control , Epilepsy/epidemiology , Epilepsy/therapy , Humans , Outpatients , Pandemics , Patient Satisfaction , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Front Neurol ; 12: 677828, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1238873

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Our hypothesis in this study was that differences might exist between patients with epilepsy (PWE) who underwent epilepsy surgery before and within the period of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. The purpose of this study was to compare results of the Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS) between PWE who underwent epilepsy surgery before and during the pandemic period. Methods: Participants were PWE who underwent open cranial epilepsy surgery between February 2019 and February 2021 in our hospital. Patients who underwent surgery in the first half of this period, between February 2019 and January 2020, were defined as the pre-pandemic period group (pre-Group) and those treated in the second half, between February 2020 and February 2021, were categorized as the pandemic period group (within-Group). All patients completed the SDS before surgery, and scores were compared between groups. Results: SDS score was significantly higher in the pre-Group than in the within-Group (p = 0.037). Other factors, including age (p = 0.51), sex (p = 0.558), epilepsy duration from onset to SDS score evaluation (p = 0.190), seizure frequency (p = 0.794), number of anti-seizure medications (p = 0.787), and intelligence quotient (p = 0.871) did not differ significantly between groups. Conclusion: SDS score was higher in the pre-pandemic group than in the within-pandemic group, which may indicate that PWE with less-positive outlooks may be less likely to seek medical attention during stressful periods.

12.
Seizure ; 89: 99-106, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1230773

ABSTRACT

We reviewed the literature on cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) studies in patients who had a seizure in the setting of COVID-19 infection to evaluate for evidence of viral neuroinvasion. We performed a systematic review of Medline and Embase to identify publications that reported one or more patients with COVID-19 who had a seizure and had CSF testing preformed. The search ranged from December 1st 2019 to November 18th 2020. We identified 56 publications which described 69 unique patients who met our inclusion criteria. Of the 54 patients whose past medical history was provided, 2 (4%) had epilepsy and 1 (2%) had a prior seizure in the setting of hyperglycemia, but the remaining 51 (94%) had no history of seizures. Seizure was the initial symptom of COVID-19 for 15 (22%) patients. There were 26 (40%) patients who developed status epilepticus. SARS-CoV-2 PCR testing was performed in the CSF for 45 patients; 6 (13%) had a positive CSF SARS-CoV-2 PCR, only 1 (17%) of whom had status epilepticus. The cycle thresholds were not reported. Evaluation for CSF SARS-CoV-2 antibodies (directly or indirectly, via testing for CSF oligoclonal bands or immunoglobulins) was performed in 26 patients, only 2 (8%) of whom had evidence of intrathecal antibody synthesis. Of the 11 patients who had CSF autoimmune antibody panels tested, 1 had NMDA antibodies and 1 had Caspr-2 antibodies. Detection of SARS-CoV-2 in the CSF of patients with seizures who have COVID-19 is uncommon. Our review suggests that seizures in this patient population are not likely due to direct viral invasion of the brain.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Status Epilepticus , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Seizures
13.
J Psychosom Res ; 147: 110514, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1230633

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: We investigated whether the COVID-19 pandemic has affected the clinical characteristics of patients with functional seizure (FS) (at the time of diagnosis). METHODS: In a retrospective study of a prospectively developed and maintained database, all patients diagnosed with FS before and during the COVID-19 pandemic were studied at the outpatient epilepsy clinic at Shiraz University of Medical Sciences, Shiraz, Iran, from December 2008 until February 2021. RESULTS: Three hundred and eighty-eight patients were studied. Three hundred and sixty-four patients (94%) were diagnosed before and 24 persons (6%) during the pandemic. Patients diagnosed during the COVID-19 pandemic less frequently had generalized motor seizures [odds ratio (OR): 0.30, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.12-0.77; p = 0.012] and had higher seizure frequencies (OR: 1.00, 95% CI: 1.00-1.01; p = 0.044). Functional seizures were inversely associated with the education level as a trend during the COVID-19 pandemic (OR: 0.36, 95% CI: 0.13-1.01; p = 0.052). CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic has affected the characteristics of patients with FS (at the time of diagnosis). Larger and multi-center studies are needed to investigate the links and associations between the COVID-19 pandemic and characteristics of FS.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Seizures/complications , Adult , Ambulatory Care Facilities , Educational Status , Electroencephalography , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Odds Ratio , Retrospective Studies , Seizures/diagnosis , Seizures/psychology , Young Adult
14.
Epilepsy Curr ; : 15357597211018219, 2021 May 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1231223

ABSTRACT

Due to COVID-19 a live, in-person meeting was not possible for the American Epilepsy Society in 2020. An alternative, virtual event, the AES2020, was held instead. AES2020 was a great success with 4679 attendees from 70 countries. The educational content was outstanding and spanned the causes, treatments, and outcomes from epileptic encephalopathy to the iatrogenicity of epilepsy interventions to neurocognitive disabilities to the approach to neocortical epilepsies. New gene therapy approaches such as antisense oligonucleotide treatment for Dravet syndrome were introduced and neuromodulation devices were discussed. There were many other topics discussed in special interest groups and investigators' workshops. A highlight was having a Nobel prize winner speak about memory processing. Human intracranial electrophysiology contributes insights into memory processing and complements animal work. In a special COVID symposium, the impact of COVID on patients with epilepsy was reviewed. Telehealth has been expanded rapidly and may be well suited for some parts of epilepsy care. In summary, the epilepsy community was alive and engaged despite being limited to a virtual platform.

15.
Epilepsy Behav ; 121(Pt A): 108026, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1228173

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To perform a follow-up study of the quality of life in patients with epilepsy in the era of the COVID-19 crisis. METHODS: Two months before the first case of the COVID-19 in Serbia, we obtained the Serbian Version of Quality of Life Inventory for Epilepsy 31 (SVQOLIE-31) and Neurological Disorders Depression Inventory for Epilepsy scores (SVNDDI-E) for another study. We retested the same patients one year after in COVID-19 pandemic. In addition to SVQOLIE-31, and SVNDDI-E we used a generic questionnaire compiled from items related to the COVID-19. RESULTS: We retested 97 out of 118 patients (82.2%) for the follow-up analysis. The average age was 36.1 ±â€¯12.2 (range: 18-69), and 49 were women (50.5%). The median duration of epilepsy was 13 years (range: 1.5-48). The structural etiology of epilepsy was noted in 41 (42.3%), unknown etiology in 41 (42.3%), and genetic etiology in 15 (15.4%) patients. Fewer patients (27.8%) experienced at least one seizure three months before follow-up testing when compared to patients who experienced at least one seizure three months in initial testing (36.0%) (p = 0.15). All patients reported full compliance with anti-seizure medication in the follow-up. The SVQOLIE-31 score during the COVID-19 pandemic visit (64.5 ±â€¯14.6) was significantly lower than the SVQOLIE-31 score before the pandemic (p < 0.001). The SVNDDI-E score during the COVID-19 pandemic (10.5 ±â€¯3.5) was significantly higher than the SVNDDI-E score before it (p < 0.001). Multiple linear regression analyses revealed fear of seizures, and fear of a reduction in household income, significantly associated with SVQOLIE-31 and SVNDDI-E overall score. These variables accounted for 66% and 27% of the variance of SVQOLIE-31 and SVNDDI-E overall score. SIGNIFICANCE: Lower quality of life, higher prevalence of depression, healthcare availability issues, and perceived fears during pandemic all suggest COVID-19 has negatively impacted lives of patients with epilepsy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Epilepsy , Adult , Epilepsy/epidemiology , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2 , Serbia , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
16.
Epilepsy Behav ; 120: 107996, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1217627

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The study assessed the prevalence and risk factors for SARS-CoV-2 infection in patients with epilepsy (PWE). Additionally, the course of COVID-19 and its impact on seizure control was investigated. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Subjects with definite (confirmed by positive RT-PCR nasopharyngeal swab or serum anti-SARS-CoV-2 antibodies) and probable COVID-19 were identified via telephone survey among PWE treated at the university epilepsy clinic. RESULTS: Of 252 screened subjects, 17 (6.7%) had definite and 14 (5.5%) probable COVID-19. The percentage of PWE with definite COVID-19 was much higher than the percentage of subjects with confirmed COVID-19 in Polish general population (3.65%). In the heterogenous population of PWE, including patients with drug-resistant epilepsy, physical/intellectual disability, and comorbidities, we were not able to identify any risk factors for contracting COVID-19. The course of infection was mild or moderate in all subjects, not requiring oxygen therapy or respiratory support. The most common symptoms were fever, fatigue, headaches, muscle aches, and loss of smell/taste and continued for approximately 7-21 days, except for loss of smell/taste which lasted usually several weeks. Seizure exacerbation was noted in only one pregnant patient with confirmed COVID-19 and it was likely related to decreased serum level of levetiracetam in the third trimester. CONCLUSION: The study provided reassuring findings related to the low risk of seizure exacerbation in PWE during the course of COVID-19. Patients with epilepsy may be at increased risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Epilepsy characteristics are not likely to modify the risk of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Epilepsy , Epilepsy/epidemiology , Humans , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Seizures
17.
Acta Neurol Scand ; 144(1): 99-108, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1203828

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To analyze the medium-term impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on epilepsy patients, focusing on psychological effects and seizure control. METHODS: Prospective follow-up study to evaluate the medium-term effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on a cohort of epilepsy patients from a tertiary hospital previously surveyed during the first peak of the pandemic. Between July 1, 2020, and August 30, 2020, the patients answered an online 19-item questionnaire, HADS, and PSIQ scales. Short- and medium-term effects of the pandemic confinement and the perception of telemedicine were compared. RESULTS: 153 patients completed the questionnaire, mean ± SD age, 47.6 ± 19.3 years; 49.7% women. Depression was reported by 43 patients, significantly more prevalent than in the short-term analysis (29.2% vs. 19.7%; p = .038). Anxiety (38.1% vs. 36.1%; p = 0.749) and insomnia (28.9% vs. 30.9%, p = .761) remained highly prevalent. Seventeen patients reported an increase in seizure frequency (11.1% vs. 9.1%, p = .515). The three factors independently associated with an increase in seizure frequency in the medium term were drug-resistant epilepsy (odds ratio [OR] = 8.2, 95% CI 2.06-32.52), depression (OR = 6.46, 95% CI 1.80-23.11), and a reduction in income (OR = 5.47, 95% CI 1.51-19.88). A higher proportion of patients found telemedicine unsatisfactory (11.2% vs. 2.4%), and a lower percentage (44.8% vs. 56.8%) found it very satisfactory (p = .005). CONCLUSIONS: Depression rates increased significantly after the first wave. Depression, drug-resistant epilepsy, and a reduction in family income were independent risk factors for an increased seizure frequency. Perception of telemedicine worsened, indicating need for re-adaptation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Epilepsy/epidemiology , Adult , Aged , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Socioeconomic Factors
18.
Nutrients ; 13(4)2021 Apr 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1187011

ABSTRACT

E-health technologies improve healthcare quality and disease management. The aim of this study was to develop a ketogenic diet management app as well as a website about this dietary treatment and to evaluate the benefits of giving caregivers access to various web materials designed for paediatric patients with refractory epilepsy. Forty families participated in the questionnaire survey, from January 2016 to March 2016. All caregivers were exposed to paper-based materials about the ketogenic diet, whereas only 22 received the app, called KetApp, and videos produced by dieticians. Caregivers with free access to web materials were more satisfied than the others with the informative material provided by the centre (p ≤ 0.001, Mann-Whitney test). Indeed, they showed a better attitude towards treatment, and they became more aware of dietary management in comparison to the control group (p ≤ 0.001). Moreover, caregivers provided with web materials were stimulated to pursue the treatment (p = 0.002) and to introduce it to their children and other people (p = 0.001). Additionally, caregivers supplied with web materials were more willing to help other families in choosing the ketogenic diet (p = 0.004). Overall, these findings indicate that web materials are beneficial for caregivers of paediatric patients with refractory epilepsy in our centres. Thus, the use of e-health applications could be a promising tool in the daily aspects of ketogenic diet management, and it is especially of value in the attempt to start or maintain the diet during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic crisis.


Subject(s)
Diet, Ketogenic/methods , Drug Resistant Epilepsy/diet therapy , Mobile Applications , Telemedicine/methods , Adolescent , COVID-19/epidemiology , Caregivers , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Italy , Male , Patient Satisfaction , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
19.
Eur Neurol ; 84(3): 192-199, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1183420

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIM: Although anyone can be affected by the COVID-19 pandemic, it may cause additional concern for people with chronic conditions. Epilepsy is the most common neurological disease in childhood and adolescence. The aim of this study was to determine anxiety levels among the mothers of children under follow-up for epilepsy in our clinic during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: The study group consisted of the mothers of epilepsy patients who were under follow-up in the pediatric neurology outpatient clinic of the tertiary care center and were scheduled for a routine examination during the COVID-19 pandemic. The mothers' anxiety levels according to the Beck Anxiety Inventory and their opinions about COVID-19 in relation to their child were assessed and compared based on whether the mother/patient attended their appointments in person and whether the child had frequent or infrequent seizures. RESULTS: There was no statistically significant difference in anxiety level between the mothers of 64 children with epilepsy who attended their appointment during the pandemic and those of the mothers of 52 who did not attend their appointment. However, the mothers of children with frequent seizures had significantly higher anxiety levels. CONCLUSION: Anxiety level of mothers whose children have frequent seizures was significantly higher compared to mothers whose children have infrequent seizures. It is important to be aware about this point and using telemedicine approach in suitable population and postpone routine outpatient follow-up appointments as much as possible.


Subject(s)
Anxiety , COVID-19/psychology , Epilepsy , Mothers/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , Anxiety/etiology , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
20.
Epileptic Disord ; 23(2): 268-273, 2021 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1177866

ABSTRACT

The current study screened major depression in people with epilepsy (PWE) during the epidemic of the novel coronavirus-related disease COVID-19, in order to identify whether the outbreak generated negative psychological impact on PWE. A Chinese version of the Neurological Disorders Depression Inventory for Epilepsy (C-NDDI-E), a self-reporting depression inventory, was applied for rapid detection of major depression. Assessment was carried out online during three different periods (prior to, during, and after the outbreak of COVID-19), with the aim of identifying changes in prevalence of depression and associated risk factors. A total of 158 PWE were recruited into the study (48.7% female). The questionnaire completion rates were 94.3% and 70.9% during and after the outbreak, respectively. The prevalence of depression prior to the epidemic, as the baseline, was 34.8% and increased to 42.3% during the period of the epidemic. Towards the end of the outbreak, the prevalence declined towards the baseline (36.6%). Factors such as living alone (OR = 4.022, 95% CI: 1.158-13.971, P = 0.028) and active seizures before the epidemic (OR = 2.993, 95% CI: 1.197-7.486, P = 0.019) were associated with depression during the epidemic. Monotherapy appeared to be protective against depression (OR = 0. 105, 95% CI: 0.047-0.235, P <0.001). Our results suggest that the pandemic exerts negative influence on PWE's mental health. Depression is one of the common psychological disorders that needs greater attention during this extraordinary period.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Depression/complications , Depression/epidemiology , Epilepsy/complications , Epilepsy/epidemiology , Pandemics , Adult , Anticonvulsants/therapeutic use , China/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Prevalence , Risk Factors , Seizures/drug therapy , Seizures/epidemiology , Self Report , Socioeconomic Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
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