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1.
Diabetes Metab Syndr Obes ; 14: 1987-1997, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1225833

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The precautions taken during the pandemic period may cause stress-related eating behavior disorders. It was aimed to test this hypothesis, and the study was carried out to examine pandemic measures the effect of on the nutritional, depression and stress conditions of people with obesity. METHODS: The individuals who participated in the study were people with obesity who received follow-up dietary therapy in a private hospital. Three separate scales were applied to the individuals, which measured the desire to overeating request, depression status and stress-fighting status. RESULTS: This study was conducted on 368 individuals. Women had lower values of BMI (28.57±3.89 kg/cm2) than men (30.64±2.87 kg/cm2). When the scores of the excessive eating request scale mean scores before and during the pandemic were examined, it was seen that the scores of the individuals increased during the pandemic. In the multivariate regression model, it was seen that the increase of stress and BMI increased the FCQ score (p<0.001). Multiple regression models were created by taking into account the criteria that caused the score increase. Each variable can predict the FCQ score separately. The predictor significance order of variants on FCQ score ß values is as follows: the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9) (ß=0.774), before pandemic FCQ (ß=0.601), the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) (ß=-0.268), before pandemic BMIa (ß=-0.223), during pandemic BMIb (ß=0.073), and age (ß=-0.013). CONCLUSION: COVID-19 pandemic, making applications such as quarantine in pandemic processes has successful results in being able to combat its. However, undesirable conditions such as stress can have serious negative consequences on other health measurements. It was observed in the results of this study that excessive eating food desire developed in people with obesity.

2.
Foods ; 10(4)2021 Apr 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1194618

ABSTRACT

Sensory perception alterations are common in relation to COVID-19 disease, but less is known about the characteristic of the sensory alterations, and how they associate with alterations in appetite and eating behaviour. The current study aims to investigate the acute and long-term effects of COVID-19 disease on (1) the desire for food, hunger, and satiety sensations; (2) smell, taste, and flavour perception; (3) meals and intake of food types; and (4) the frequency of commonly applied strategies to tackle potential changes in appetite and sensory perception. An online survey was conducted among Danish adults (n = 102) who had experienced changes in appetite, sensory perception, and/or food-related pleasure due to COVID-19 disease. Key results include appetite-altering effects at all times during the day when suffering from COVID-19 and often associated with impaired sensory function. Severe sensory perception alterations were found, namely, for the perception of taste, ageusia > hypogeusia > hypergeusia, and for the perception of smell, anosmia > parosmia > hyposmia > hyperosmia. Eating behavioural changes included alteration in quantitative and qualitative aspects of intake. The effects were, in general, more pronounced during the acute phase of disease than during the post-acute phase. The findings illustrate the complexity by which COVID-19 affects human appetite, sensory perception, and eating behaviour, but also point to strategies to cope with these changes.

3.
Appetite ; 161: 105120, 2021 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1163356

ABSTRACT

Emotional eating, generally defined as (over)-eating in response to negative emotions, has been associated with poor physical and psychological outcomes. During a time of heightened negative affect, it is important to understand the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and associated lockdown measures on eating behaviours, and further elucidate the ways in which emotional eating is related to emotion dysregulation and impaired abilities to identify emotions (i.e. alexithymia). The aims of this study were to explore perceived changes in eating behaviours in relation to self-reported negative affect during the pandemic and to examine direct and indirect effects of alexithymia on emotional eating. An online questionnaire measured these constructs in the general population of the United Kingdom (n = 136). Findings demonstrated that those who reported changes to their eating behaviours during the pandemic also reported greater levels of depression during the same time frame. Mediation analyses revealed that difficulties identifying and describing feelings both predicted emotional eating indirectly via emotion dysregulation. Findings contribute to the understanding of the mechanisms underpinning the relationship between alexithymia and emotional eating and describe changes to eating behaviours during COVID-19. We discuss how these findings should be applied, and recommendations for future research.


Subject(s)
Affective Symptoms/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Emotions , Feeding Behavior/psychology , Pandemics , Adolescent , Adult , Affective Symptoms/psychology , Aged , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Surveys and Questionnaires , United Kingdom/epidemiology , Young Adult
4.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 17(19)2020 09 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1000273

ABSTRACT

Assessing healthy diet literacy and eating behaviors is critical for identifying appropriate public health responses to the COVID-19 pandemic. We examined the psychometric properties of digital healthy diet literacy (DDL) and its association with eating behavior changes during the COVID-19 pandemic among nursing and medical students. We conducted a cross-sectional study from 7 April to 31 May 2020 at 10 public universities in Vietnam, in which 7616 undergraduate students aged 19-27 completed an online survey to assess socio-demographics, clinical parameters, health literacy (HL), DDL, and health-related behaviors. Four items of the DDL scale loaded on one component explained 71.32%, 67.12%, and 72.47% of the scale variances for the overall sample, nursing, and medical students, respectively. The DDL scale was found to have satisfactory item-scale convergent validity and criterion validity, high internal consistency reliability, and no floor or ceiling effect. Of all, 42.8% of students reported healthier eating behavior during the pandemic. A 10-index score increment of DDL was associated with 18%, 23%, and 17% increased likelihood of healthier eating behavior during the pandemic for the overall sample (OR, 1.18; 95%CI, 1.13, 1.24; p < 0.001), nursing students (OR, 1.23; 95%CI, 1.10, 1.35; p < 0.001), and medical students (OR, 1.17; 95%CI, 1.11, 1.24; p < 0.001), respectively. The DDL scale is a valid and reliable tool for the quick assessment of digital healthy diet literacy. Students with higher DDL scores had a higher likelihood of healthier eating behavior during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Diet, Healthy , Feeding Behavior , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Students, Medical , Students, Nursing , Adult , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate , Humans , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Vietnam , Young Adult
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