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1.
Eur Heart J Cardiovasc Pharmacother ; 8(2): 157-164, 2022 02 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1692232

ABSTRACT

AIM: Assessing the effect of statin therapy (ST) at hospital admission for COVID-19 on in-hospital mortality. METHODS AND RESULTS: Retrospective observational study. Patients taking statins were 11 years older and had significantly more comorbidities than patients who were not taking statins. A genetic matching (GM) procedure was performed prior to analysis of the mortality risk. A Cox proportional hazards model was used for the cause-specific hazard (CSH) function, and a competing-risks Fine and Gray (FG) model was also used to study the direct effects of statins on risk. Data from reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction-confirmed 2157 SARS-CoV-2-infected patients [1234 men, 923 women; age: 67 y/o (IQR 54-78)] admitted to the hospital were retrieved from the clinical records in anonymized manner. Three hundred and fifty-three deaths occurred. Five hundred and eighty-one patients were taking statins. Univariate test after GM showed a significantly lower mortality rate in patients on ST than the matched non-statin group (19.8% vs. 25.4%, χ2 with Yates continuity correction: P = 0.027). The mortality rate was even lower in patients (n = 336) who maintained their statin treatments during hospitalization compared with the GM non-statin group (17.4%; P = 0.045). The Cox model applied to the CSH function [HR = 0.58(CI: 0.39-0.89); P = 0.01] and the competing-risks FG model [HR = 0.60 (CI: 0.39-0.92); P = 0.02] suggest that statins are associated with reduced COVID-19-related mortality. CONCLUSIONS: A lower SARS-CoV-2 infection-related mortality was observed in patients treated with ST prior to hospitalization. Statin therapy should not be discontinued due to the global concern of the pandemic or in patients hospitalized for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors , Aged , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/adverse effects , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Elife ; 102021 04 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1200330

ABSTRACT

Many enveloped viruses induce multinucleated cells (syncytia), reflective of membrane fusion events caused by the same machinery that underlies viral entry. These syncytia are thought to facilitate replication and evasion of the host immune response. Here, we report that co-culture of human cells expressing the receptor ACE2 with cells expressing SARS-CoV-2 spike, results in synapse-like intercellular contacts that initiate cell-cell fusion, producing syncytia resembling those we identify in lungs of COVID-19 patients. To assess the mechanism of spike/ACE2-driven membrane fusion, we developed a microscopy-based, cell-cell fusion assay to screen ~6000 drugs and >30 spike variants. Together with quantitative cell biology approaches, the screen reveals an essential role for biophysical aspects of the membrane, particularly cholesterol-rich regions, in spike-mediated fusion, which extends to replication-competent SARS-CoV-2 isolates. Our findings potentially provide a molecular basis for positive outcomes reported in COVID-19 patients taking statins and suggest new strategies for therapeutics targeting the membrane of SARS-CoV-2 and other fusogenic viruses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Giant Cells/pathology , Host-Pathogen Interactions , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Virus Internalization , A549 Cells , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Cholesterol , Coculture Techniques , Humans , Lung/pathology , Membrane Fusion , Membrane Lipids/metabolism
3.
Drugs ; 81(6): 685-695, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1157035

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The impact of statins on COVID-19 outcomes is important given the high prevalence of their use among individuals at risk for severe COVID-19. Our aim is to assess whether patients receiving chronic statin treatment who are hospitalized with COVID-19 have reduced in-hospital mortality if statin therapy is maintained during hospitalization. METHODS: This work is a cross-sectional, observational, retrospective multicenter study that analyzed 2921 patients who required hospital admission at 150 Spanish centers included in the nationwide SEMI-COVID-19 Network. We compared the clinical characteristics and COVID-19 disease outcomes between patients receiving chronic statin therapy who maintained this therapy during hospitalization versus those who did not. Propensity score matching was used to match each statin user whose therapy was maintained during hospitalization to a statin user whose therapy was withdrawn during hospitalization. RESULTS: After propensity score matching, continuation of statin therapy was associated with lower all-cause mortality (OR 0.67, 0.54-0.83, p < 0.001); lower incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI) (OR 0.76,0.6-0.97, p = 0.025), acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) (OR 0.78, 0.69- 0.89, p < 0.001), and sepsis (4.82% vs 9.85%, p = 0.008); and less need for invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV) (5.35% vs 8.57, p < 0.001) compared to patients whose statin therapy was withdrawn during hospitalization. CONCLUSIONS: Patients previously treated with statins who are hospitalized for COVID-19 and maintain statin therapy during hospitalization have a lower mortality rate than those in whom therapy is withdrawn. In addition, statin therapy was associated with a decreased probability that patients with COVID-19 will develop AKI, ARDS, or sepsis and decreases the need for IMV.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Hospital Mortality/trends , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/administration & dosage , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/mortality , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Propensity Score , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , SARS-CoV-2 , Spain/epidemiology
4.
J Clin Lipidol ; 15(3): 451-459, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1118495

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Statins have been associated with a reduction in inflammatory markers and improved endothelial function. Whether statins offer any benefit in COVID-19 needs to be elucidated. OBJECTIVE: To determine the association between antecedent statin use and severe disease outcomes among COVID-19 patients. METHODS: A retrospective cohort study on 1014 patients with confirmed COVID-19 diagnosis. Outcomes were mortality, need for mechanical ventilation, and intensive care admission. Patients were classified into statin-users vs statin non-users based on antecedent use of statins. Multivariable regression analysis was performed adjusting for confounders such as age, sex, race, BMI, smoking, insurance, and comorbidities. Propensity score matching was performed to achieve a 1:1 balanced cohort. RESULTS: A total of 1014 patients (Median age 65 (IQR 53-73); 530 (52.3%) males; 753 (74.3%) African Americans; median BMI 29.4 (IQR 25.1-35.9); 615 (60.7%) with Medicare insurance) were included in the study. About 454 patients (44.77%) were using statins as home medication. Antecedent statin use was associated with significant decrease in mortality in the total cohort (OR, 0.66; 95% CI, 0.46 - 0.95; p = 0.03). Among the propensity score matched (PSM) cohort of 466 patients (233 statin users and 233 statin non-users), all the baseline characteristics had similar distribution among the two groups. Statin users had significant reduction in mortality in the PSM cohort as well (OR, 0.56; 95% CI, 0.37 - 0.83; p = 0.004). CONCLUSIONS: Statin use was associated with significant reduction in mortality among COVID-19 patients. These findings support the pursuit of randomized clinical trials to explore the possible benefits of statins in COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , Hospital Mortality , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/administration & dosage , SARS-CoV-2 , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/mortality , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Propensity Score , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment
5.
Front Med (Lausanne) ; 8: 639804, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1094176

ABSTRACT

The severe respiratory illness due to SARS-CoV-2, the virus responsible for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), is triggered by an intense pro-inflammatory host response. Statins, prescribed primarily for lipid reduction, are known to have anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory properties and have been associated with a reduced mortality rate among COVID-19 patients taking statins as reported in two recent retrospective studies. However, a meta-analysis that included nine studies showed that statin use did not improve in-hospital outcomes of those with COVID-19. In addition, concerns regarding the use of statins and an increase in COVID-19 infections have been raised, as statins may increase the expression of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2), the primary receptor for the SARS-CoV-2 virus. Our goal was to investigate the effect of statins in COVID-19 patients in a large, diverse patient population across the United States containing nearly 120,000 patients diagnosed with COVID-19. We used propensity score matching of demographics, comorbidities, and medication indication to compare statin-treated patients (N = 2,297) with matched controls (N = 4,594). We observed a small, but statistically significant, decrease in mortality among patients prescribed statins (16.1%) when compared with matched COVID-19-positive controls (18.0 to 20.6%). These results support previous evidence that statins do not increase COVID-19-related mortality and may, in fact, have a mitigating effect on severity of the disease reflected in a slight reduction in mortality. Mixed findings on effects of statins in COVID-19 patients reported in the literature should prompt prospective randomized controlled trials in order to define better who might be advantaged with respect to clinical outcomes.

6.
Postgrad Med J ; 98(1159): 354-359, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066935

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Observations studies have shown that prior use of statins is associated with a reduced risk of adverse clinical outcomes in patients with COVID-19. However, the available data are limited, inconsistent and conflicting. Besides, no randomised controlled trial exists in this regard. Hence, the present meta-analysis was conducted to provide an updated summary and collate the effect of statin use on clinical outcomes in COVID-19 using unadjusted and adjusted risk estimates. METHODS: PubMed, Scopus and Web of Science databases were systematically searched using appropriate keywords till December 18 2020, to identify observational studies reporting clinical outcomes in COVID-19 patients using statins versus those not using statins. Prior and in-hospital use of statins were considered. Study quality was assessed using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. Unadjusted and adjusted pooled odds ratio (OR) with 95% CIs were calculated. RESULTS: We included 14 observational studies pooling data retrieved from 19 988 patients with COVID-19. All the studies were of high/moderate quality. Pooled analysis of unadjusted data showed that statin use was not associated with improved clinical outcomes (OR 1.02; 95% CI 0.69 to 1.50, p=0.94, I2=94%, random-effects model). However, on pooling adjusted risk estimates, the use of statin was found to significantly reduce the risk of adverse outcomes (OR 0.51; 95% CI 0.41 to 0.63, p<0.0005, I2=0%, fixed-effects model). CONCLUSIONS: Statin use is associated with improved clinical outcomes in patients with COVID-19. Individuals with multiple comorbidities on statin therapy should be encouraged to continue the drug amid the ongoing pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors , Comorbidity , Hospitals , Humans , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Odds Ratio
7.
Diabetes Metab ; 47(2): 101202, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1064995

ABSTRACT

AIM: Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) represent a high-risk population for both cardiovascular diseases and severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Recent studies have reported interactions between statin treatment and COVID-19-related outcomes. The study reported here specifically assessed the association between routine statin use and COVID-19-related outcomes in inpatients with T2DM. METHODS: The Coronavirus-SARS-CoV-2 and Diabetes Outcomes (CORONADO) study was a nationwide observational study aiming to describe the phenotypic characteristics and prognosis of T2DM patients with COVID-19 admitted to 68 French hospitals between 10 March and 10 April 2020. The composite primary outcome comprised tracheal intubation and/or death within 7 and 28 days of admission. The association between statin use and outcomes was estimated by logistic regression analysis after applying inverse probability of treatment weighting (IPTW) using a propensity score-weighting approach. RESULTS: Of the 2449 patients with T2DM (881 women, 1568 men; aged 70.9 ± 12.5 years) suitable for analysis, 1192 (49%) were using statin treatment before admission. In unadjusted analyses, patients using statins had rates of the primary outcome similar to those of non-users within both 7 (29.8% vs 27.0%, respectively; P = 0.1338) and 28 days (36.2% vs 33.8%, respectively; P = 0.2191) of admission. However, mortality rates were significantly higher in statin users within 7 (12.8% vs 9.8%, respectively; P = 0.02) and 28 days (23.9% vs 18.2%, respectively; P < 0.001). After applying IPTW, significant associations were observed with statin use and the primary outcome within 7 days (OR [95% CI]: 1.38 [1.04-1.83]) and with death within both 7 (OR [95% CI]: 1.74 [1.13-2.65]) and 28 days (OR [95% CI]: 1.46 [1.08-1.95]). CONCLUSION: Routine statin treatment is significantly associated with increased mortality in T2DM patients hospitalized for COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/mortality , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications , Female , Humans , Inpatients , Male , SARS-CoV-2
8.
J Am Heart Assoc ; 9(24): e018475, 2020 12 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-970883

ABSTRACT

Background Severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is characterized by a proinflammatory state with high mortality. Statins have anti-inflammatory effects and may attenuate the severity of COVID-19. Methods and Results An observational study of all consecutive adult patients with COVID-19 admitted to a single center located in Bronx, New York, was conducted from March 1, 2020, to May 2, 2020. Patients were grouped as those who did and those who did not receive a statin, and in-hospital mortality was compared by competing events regression. In addition, propensity score matching and inverse probability treatment weighting were used in survival models to examine the association between statin use and death during hospitalization. A total of 4252 patients were admitted with COVID-19. Diabetes mellitus modified the association between statin use and in-hospital mortality. Patients with diabetes mellitus on a statin (n=983) were older (69±11 versus 67±14 years; P<0.01), had lower inflammatory markers (C-reactive protein, 10.2; interquartile range, 4.5-18.4 versus 12.9; interquartile range, 5.9-21.4 mg/dL; P<0.01) and reduced cumulative in-hospital mortality (24% versus 39%; P<0.01) than those not on a statin (n=1283). No difference in hospital mortality was noted in patients without diabetes mellitus on or off statin (20% versus 21%; P=0.82). Propensity score matching (hazard ratio, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.83-0.94; P<0.01) and inverse probability treatment weighting (HR, 0.88; 95% CI, 0.84-0.92; P<0.01) showed a 12% lower risk of death during hospitalization for statin users than for nonusers. Conclusions Statin use was associated with reduced in-hospital mortality from COVID-19 in patients with diabetes mellitus. These findings, if validated, may further reemphasize administration of statins to patients with diabetes mellitus during the COVID-19 era.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Diabetes Mellitus/mortality , Dyslipidemias/drug therapy , Hospital Mortality , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , Diabetes Mellitus/diagnosis , Dyslipidemias/diagnosis , Dyslipidemias/mortality , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , New York/epidemiology , Prognosis , Protective Factors , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Time Factors
9.
Front Med (Lausanne) ; 7: 584870, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-963101

ABSTRACT

Background: Statins have multiple protective effects on inflammation, immunity and coagulation, and may help alleviate pneumonia. However, there was no report focusing on the association of statin use with in-hospital outcomes of patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). We investigated the association between the use of statins and in-hospital outcomes of patients with COVID-19. Methods: In this retrospective case series, consecutive COVID-19 patients admitted at 2 hospitals in Wuhan, China, from March 12, 2020 to April 14, 2020 were analyzed. A 1:1 matched cohort was created by propensity score-matched analysis. Demographic data, laboratory findings, comorbidities, treatments and in-hospital outcomes were collected and compared between COVID-19 patients taking and not taking statins. Result: A total of 2,147 patients with COVID-19 were enrolled in this study. Of which, 250 patients were on statin therapy. The mortality was 2.4% (6/250) for patients taking statins while 3.7% (70/1,897) for those not taking statins. In the multivariate Cox model, after adjusting for age, gender, admitted hospital, comorbidities, in-hospital medications and blood lipids, the risk was lower for mortality (adjusted HR, 0.428; 95% CI, 0.169-0.907; P = 0.029), acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) (adjusted HR, 0.371; 95% CI, 0.180-0.772; P = 0.008) or intensive care unit (ICU) care (adjusted HR, 0.319; 95% CI, 0.270-0.945; P = 0.032) in the statin group vs. the non-statin group. After propensity score-matched analysis based on 18 potential confounders, a 1:1 matched cohort (206:206) was created. In the matched cohort, the Kaplan-Meier survival curves showed that the use of statins was associated with better survival (P = 0.025). In a Cox regression model, the use of statins was associated with lower risk of mortality (unadjusted HR, 0.254; 95% CI, 0.070-0.926; P = 0.038), development of ARDS (unadjusted HR, 0.240; 95% CI, 0.087-0.657; P = 0.006), and admission of ICU (unadjusted HR, 0.349; 95% CI, 0.150-0.813; P = 0.015). The results remained consistent when being adjusted for age, gender, total cholesterol, triglyceride, low density lipoprotein cholesterol, procalcitonin, and brain natriuretic peptide. The favorable outcomes in statin users remained statistically significant in the first sensitivity analysis with comorbid diabetes being excluded in matching and in the second sensitivity analysis with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease being added in matching. Conclusion: In this retrospective analysis, the use of statins in COVID-19 patients was associated with better clinical outcomes and is recommended to be continued in patients with COVID-19.

10.
Semergen ; 46(7): 497-502, 2020 Oct.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-688825

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The COVID-19 pandemic has shown that cardiovascular diseases carry a higher risk of mortality. Doubts have been raised regarding lipid therapy in these patients. The objectives are to analyze the efficacy and safety of lipid lowering therapy in patients with COVID-19. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A review of the scientific literature was conducted in PubMed, CDC Reports, NIH, and NCBI SARS-CoV-2 using the keywords: COVID-2, statins, ezetimibe, PCSK9 inhibitors, hypercholesterolemia, and hypolipidemic drugs. RESULTS: The statins should continue to use patients with COVID-19 based on their efficacy, safety, immunosuppressive effects, anti-inflammatory availability and accessibility. Depending on the cardiovascular risk levels of these patients, the use of high potency statins and/or ezetimibe and/or iPCSK9 may be necessary in patients with high and very high cardiovascular risk. Patients treated with iPCSK9 should continue treatment for its beneficial effects in preventing cardiovascular disease. Patients with familial hypercholesterolemia and COVID-19 are especially vulnerable to cardiovascular disease and should continue to receive severe lipid lowering therapy. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with COVID-19, the majority of baseline CVDs are of atherosclerotic origin, with the worst prediction for patients with high risk and very high risk of CVD. In these patients, intensive treatment with statins and/or fixed combination with ezetimibe and/or iPCSK9 plays a fundamental role.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/complications , Hypercholesterolemia/drug therapy , Hypolipidemic Agents/therapeutic use , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Humans , Hypercholesterolemia/complications , Pandemics , Patient Safety , SARS-CoV-2
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