Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 1.657
Filter
1.
3.
BMC Musculoskelet Disord ; 22(1): 465, 2021 May 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2053892

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Care continuum models (also known as care cascade models) are used by researchers and health system planners to identify potential gaps or disparities in healthcare, but these models have limited applications to complex or chronic clinical conditions. Cyclical continuum models that integrate more complex clinical information and that are displayed using circular data visualization tools may help to overcome these limitations. We performed proof-of-concept cyclical continuum modeling for one such group of conditions-musculoskeletal infections-and assessed for racial and ethnic disparities across the complex care process related to these infections. METHODS: Cyclical continuum modeling was performed in a diverse, retrospective cohort of 1648 patients with musculoskeletal infections, including osteomyelitis, septic arthritis, and/or infectious myositis, in the University of New Mexico Health System. Logistic regression was used to estimate the relative odds of each element or outcome of care in the continuum. Results were visualized using circularized, map-like images depicting the continuum of care. RESULTS: Racial and ethnic disparities differed at various phases in the care process. Hispanic/Latinx patients had evidence of healthcare disparities across the continuum, including diabetes mellitus [odds ratio (OR) 2.04, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.61, 2.60 compared to a white non-Hispanic reference category]; osteomyelitis (OR 1.28, 95% CI: 1.01, 1.63); and amputation (OR 1.48; 95% CI: 1.10, 2.00). Native American patients had evidence of disparities early in the continuum (diabetes mellitus OR 3.59, 95% CI: 2.63, 4.89; peripheral vascular disease OR 2.50; 95% CI: 1.45, 4.30; osteomyelitis OR 1.43; 95% CI: 1.05, 1.95) yet lower odds of later-stage complications (amputation OR 1.02; 95% CI: 0.69, 1.52). African American/Black non-Hispanic patients had higher odds of primary risk factors (diabetes mellitus OR 2.70; 95% CI: 1.41, 5.19; peripheral vascular disease OR 4.96; 95% CI: 2.06, 11.94) and later-stage outcomes (amputation OR 2.74; 95% CI: 1.38, 5.45) but not intervening, secondary risk factors (osteomyelitis OR 0.79; 95% CI: 0.42, 1.48). CONCLUSIONS: By identifying different structural and clinical barriers to care that may be experienced by groups of patients interacting with the healthcare system, cyclical continuum modeling may be useful for the study of healthcare disparities.


Subject(s)
Healthcare Disparities , Continuity of Patient Care , Humans , Mexico , Retrospective Studies , United States
4.
PLoS Pathog ; 16(10): e1008942, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2021974

ABSTRACT

Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) is a leading cause of viral respiratory infection in children, and can cause severe lower respiratory tract infection in infants, the elderly, and immunocompromised patients. However, there remain no licensed vaccines or specific treatments for hMPV infection. Although the hMPV fusion (F) protein is the sole target of neutralizing antibodies, the immunological properties of hMPV F remain poorly understood. To further define the humoral immune response to the hMPV F protein, we isolated two new human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), MPV458 and MPV465. Both mAbs are neutralizing in vitro and were determined to target a unique antigenic site using competitive biolayer interferometry. We determined both MPV458 and MPV465 have higher affinity for monomeric hMPV F than trimeric hMPV F. MPV458 was co-crystallized with hMPV F, and the mAb primarily interacts with an alpha helix on the F2 region of the hMPV F protein. Surprisingly, the major epitope for MPV458 lies within the trimeric interface of the hMPV F protein, suggesting significant breathing of the hMPV F protein must occur for host immune recognition of the novel epitope. In addition, significant glycan interactions were observed with a somatically mutated light chain framework residue. The data presented identifies a novel epitope on the hMPV F protein for epitope-based vaccine design, and illustrates a new mechanism for human antibody neutralization of viral glycoproteins.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Monoclonal/immunology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Pneumovirus/immunology , Antibodies, Neutralizing/pharmacology , Epitopes/immunology , Humans , Metapneumovirus/immunology , Paramyxoviridae Infections/virology , Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Human/immunology , Viral Fusion Proteins/immunology
6.
Monatsschr Kinderheilkd ; 168(12): 1138-1141, 2020.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1905986

ABSTRACT

Due to the shortage of pediatric hospital beds in general and due to the large annual burden of hospital admissions for common respiratory tract infections, such as influenza or RSV [respiratory syncytial virus] in particular, it can be expected that hospitalization of children with suspected or confirmed SARS-CoV­2 infections will face hospitals with an even more tense situation than usual in the winter 2020/2021. This tenuous shortage may touch various aspects but in the first place it will affect isolation and cohorting. In addition, this shortage will not only apply to acutely ill children with viral respiratory tract infections but all children with need for hospital care, either chronically ill or e.g. being premature babies or newborns. Therefore, approaches are required which on the one hand are based on pragmatic grounds but on the other hand fulfill the basics of hygiene and infection control. The recommendations proposed in this statement are intended to give assistance to hospitals for the management of testing, isolation and cohorting of pediatric patients with suspected or confirmed SARS-CoV­2 infections. The most important factor navigating the essential measures is the cumulative incidence of newly diagnosed infections per 100,000 over the last 7 days, which is given by the RKI or the local public health authorities. In the situation of low (<25/100,000) or medium (25-50/100,000) incidence the respective diagnostic measures and hospital admission can be performed under standard hygiene precautions and the children will be cohorted according to their clinical presentation until the results of SARS-CoV­2 test (or RSV [respiratory syncytial virus] or influenza test) are available. In the situation of high (>50/100,000) incidence the respective diagnostic measures and the admission have to be performed under SARS-CoV­2 precautions as specified by the RKI, and the children have to be isolated until the results of SARS-CoV­2 test are available. The assessment of the incidence figures and the respective measures may be adapted by the local public health authorities on an individual basis. In case of shortfalls in admission capacities, the requirement of acute emergency care may necessitate that isolation and cohorting in the hospital will have to be performed temporarily in a less restrictive way than recommended here for standard.

7.
Hepatol Commun ; 4(9): 1242-1256, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1898760

ABSTRACT

The recent outbreak of the novel virus severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2), which causes the corona virus disease of 2019 (COVID19), has spread globally and affects millions of people. This pandemic has taxed our health care system and disrupted normal operations, even life-saving procedures, such as liver transplants. During these unprecedented times, providers and patients are imperiled and resources for diagnosis and care may be limited. Continuing to perform resource-intense advanced procedures is challenging, as is caring for patients with end-stage liver disease or patients with urgent needs for liver tumor control. Liver transplantation, in particular, requires critical resources, like blood products and critical care beds, which are fairly limited in the COVID19 pandemic. The potential of COVID19 infections in posttransplant recipients on immunosuppression and staff contacts further adds to the complexity. Therefore, transplant programs must reevaluate the ethicality, feasibility, and safety of performing liver transplants during this pandemic. Herein, we discuss the clinical and ethical challenges posed by performing liver transplants and offer guidance for managing patients with end-stage liver disease during the COVID19 pandemic.

8.
Pacing Clin Electrophysiol ; 45(6): 807-810, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1832218

ABSTRACT

In the era of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), the management of cardiac implantable electronic devices infections with concomitant viral infection has not been completely defined yet. In this explorable context, we report the first experience of a Cardiac resynchronization therapy with defibrillator (CRT-D) implantation after transvenous lead extraction for endocarditis in a COVID-19 patient. We describe both the measures and procedures implemented to reduce the cross-infection in the operating room and our clinical practice to improving procedure effectiveness on patient care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy , Defibrillators, Implantable , Endocarditis , Heart Diseases , Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy Devices , Device Removal/methods , Humans , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
9.
Perfusion ; 37(4): 350-358, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1820033

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of the novel coronavirus pandemic (COVID-19) has resulted in dramatic changes to the conduct of surgery both from a patient management perspective and in protecting healthcare providers. The current study reports on the status of COVID-19 infections in patients presenting for cardiac surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) on circuit complications. A tracking process for monitoring the presence of COVID-19 in adult cardiac surgery patients was integrated into a case documentation system across United States hospitals where out-sourced perfusion services were provided. Assessment included infection status, testing technique employed, surgery status and CPB complications. Records from 5612 adult patients who underwent cardiac surgery between November 1, 2020 and January 18, 2021 from 176 hospitals were reviewed. A sub-cohort of coronary artery bypass graft patients (3283) was compared using a mixed effect binary logistic regression analysis. 4297 patients had negative test results (76.6%) while 49 (0.9%) tested positive for COVID-19, and unknown or no results were reported in 693 (12.4%) and 573 (10.2%) respectively. Coagulation complications were reported at 0.2% in the negative test results group versus 4.1% in the positive test result group (p < 0.001). Oxygenator gas exchange complications were 0.2% in the negative test results group versus 2.0% in the positive test results group (p = 0.088). Coronary artery bypass graft patients with a positive test had significantly higher risk for any CPB complication (p = 0.003) [OR 10.38, CI 2.18-49.53] then negative test patients [OR 0.01, CI 0.00-0.20]. The present study has shown that patients undergoing cardiac surgery with CPB who test positive for COVID-19 have higher CPB complication rate than those who test negative.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cardiac Surgical Procedures , Cardiac Surgical Procedures/adverse effects , Cardiopulmonary Bypass/adverse effects , Coronary Artery Bypass/adverse effects , Coronary Artery Bypass/methods , Humans , Postoperative Complications/etiology
10.
Int J Nurs Sci ; 7(2): 143-147, 2020 Apr 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1796684

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This article summarizes the experience in the prevention and control of coronavirus disease 2019(COVID-19) epidemic in non-isolated areas in a general hospital. METHODS: Based on refined management theory, we professionally developed the standards for prevention and control of COVID-19 in non-isolated areas, systematically implemented various prevention and control measures, performed gridding audits, effectively communicated among teams and between medical staff and patients assisted by information techniques, and reported results for quality improvement. RESULTS: There was no hospital-acquired COVID-19 infections among staff in the hospital. The rates of mask-wearing, epidemiological history screening, and the medical supplies disinfection were all 100% in the hospital. The accuracy rate of mask-wearing of patients and their families was 73.79% and the compliance rate of their hand hygiene was 40.78%. CONCLUSION: Refined management strategies for the prevention and control of COVID-19 infection in non-isolated areas of the general hospital are effective. The accuracy rate of mask-wearing and hand hygiene compliance of patients and their families need to be further improved.

11.
Risk Manag Healthc Policy ; 13: 1563-1569, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1793247

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) is a new infectious disease. The COVID-19 outbreak has quickly spread globally and now is having remarkable effects on public health and national economies. PURPOSE: Effective measures for prevention and control of nosocomial infection are urgently needed to control COVID-19 infection among medical staff. METHODS: Herein, we described COVID-19 prevention and control strategies that have been implemented in a tertiary hospital in the middle east of China. Hospital layout was adjusted to prevent and control transmission. Other procedures were then implemented to prevent the spread of the virus, including specialized training and evaluation of medical staff, pre-testing and triage, measures to promote early identification of patients, environmental cleaning and disinfection, new medical waste processing procedures, new patient management procedures, timely disinfection of potential sources of nosocomial infection, and strict protective measures. RESULTS: Since the new measures were implemented, to date there have only been three new confirmed cases of COVID-19 infection, no cases of medical staff infection, and no COVID-19-related deaths at the hospital. CONCLUSION: The current report provides a protocol that could be implemented in medical departments in similar cities worldwide.

13.
Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol ; 43(6): 757-763, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1751560

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To determine the effect of 2 regulations issued by the Israel Ministry of Health on coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infections and quarantine among healthcare workers (HCWs) in general hospitals. DESIGN: Before-and-after intervention study without a control group (interrupted time-series analysis). SETTING: All 29 Israeli general hospitals. PARTICIPANTS: All HCWs. INTERVENTIONS: Two national regulations were issued on March 25, 2020: one required universal masking of HCWs, patients, and visitors in general hospitals and the second defined what constitutes HCW exposure to severe acute respiratory coronavirus virus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and when quarantine is required. RESULTS: Overall, 283 HCWs were infected at work or from an unknown source. Before the intervention, the number of HCWs infected at work increased by 0.5 per day (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.2-0.7; P < .001), peaking at 16. After the intervention, new infections declined by 0.2 per day (95% CI, -0.3 to -0.1; P < .001). Before the intervention, the number of HCWs in quarantine or isolation increased by 97 per day (95% CI, 90-104; P < .001), peaking at 2,444. After the intervention, prevalence decreased by 59 per day (95% CI, -72 to -46; P < .001). Epidemiological investigations determined that the most common source of HCW infection (58%) was a coworker. CONCLUSIONS: Universal masking in general hospitals reduced the risk of hospital-acquired COVID-19 among HCWs. Universal masking combined with uniform definitions of HCW exposure and criteria for quarantine limited the absence of HCWs from the workforce.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Policy , Masks , Personnel, Hospital , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross Infection/epidemiology , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Hospitals, General , Humans , Israel , Quarantine , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 17(10)2020 05 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1725623

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has dramatically changed our habits and routines. Uncertainty, insecurity, instability for the present and future, and reduced autonomy and self-directedness, are common feelings at the time of COVID-19. These aspects are very important during emerging adulthood. In spite of the fact that medical reports suggest that youth are less prone to experience COVID-19 infections, emerging adults might be at higher risk for their psychological adjustment. Emerging adults showed higher concerns about their role as a possible asymptomatic carrier than being positive with COVID-19 themselves. Both worries and concerns about COVID-19 and psychological maladjustment may be related to cultural factors. Individualism, collectivism, equality, and hierarchy seem to be meaningful perspectives to take into account. A total of 1183 Italian emerging adults were asked to fill out an online survey during the second week of the national lockdown in Italy. Results showed they reported an accurate perceived knowledge about COVID-19. At the same time, they showed higher worries and concerns about COVID-19 for their relatives, followed by more general/social worries. The lowest score included worries about COVID-19 related to themselves. State anxiety and stress levels were above the normal cutoff, confirming the challenges that emerging adults are facing during the pandemic. On one hand, emerging adults' collectivistic orientation was related to higher perceived risks of infection; on the other hand, it predicted lower psychological maladjustment, controlling for socio-demographic variables. The study suggests that to fight the COVID-19 pandemic and decrease levels of psychological maladjustment in emerging adulthood, individuals' cultural orientation such as the wish of sharing common goals with others, interdependence, and sociability, have to be emphasized and promoted as protective factors.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , Anxiety/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Adult , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Pandemics , Perception , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
16.
Chin Med J (Engl) ; 133(9): 1015-1024, 2020 May 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1722617

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Human infections with zoonotic coronaviruses (CoVs), including severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)-CoV and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS)-CoV, have raised great public health concern globally. Here, we report a novel bat-origin CoV causing severe and fatal pneumonia in humans. METHODS: We collected clinical data and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) specimens from five patients with severe pneumonia from Wuhan Jinyintan Hospital, Hubei province, China. Nucleic acids of the BAL were extracted and subjected to next-generation sequencing. Virus isolation was carried out, and maximum-likelihood phylogenetic trees were constructed. RESULTS: Five patients hospitalized from December 18 to December 29, 2019 presented with fever, cough, and dyspnea accompanied by complications of acute respiratory distress syndrome. Chest radiography revealed diffuse opacities and consolidation. One of these patients died. Sequence results revealed the presence of a previously unknown ß-CoV strain in all five patients, with 99.8% to 99.9% nucleotide identities among the isolates. These isolates showed 79.0% nucleotide identity with the sequence of SARS-CoV (GenBank NC_004718) and 51.8% identity with the sequence of MERS-CoV (GenBank NC_019843). The virus is phylogenetically closest to a bat SARS-like CoV (SL-ZC45, GenBank MG772933) with 87.6% to 87.7% nucleotide identity, but is in a separate clade. Moreover, these viruses have a single intact open reading frame gene 8, as a further indicator of bat-origin CoVs. However, the amino acid sequence of the tentative receptor-binding domain resembles that of SARS-CoV, indicating that these viruses might use the same receptor. CONCLUSION: A novel bat-borne CoV was identified that is associated with severe and fatal respiratory disease in humans.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Adult , Aged , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/diagnostic imaging , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnostic imaging , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Tomography, X-Ray , Treatment Outcome
17.
Transplantation ; 106(3): 641-647, 2022 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1703842

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Heart transplant (HT) recipients may be at higher risk of acquiring SARS-CoV-2 infection and developing critical illness. The aim of this study is to describe characteristics and outcomes of HT recipients infected by SARS-COV-2, from a high-volume transplant center. METHODS: We have described data of all adult HT recipients with confirmed coronavirus disease 2019 by RT-PCR in nasopharyngeal samples from April 5, 2020, to January 5, 2021. Outcomes and follow-up were recorded until February 5, 2021. RESULTS: Forty patients were included. Twenty-four patients (60%) were men; the median age was 53 (40-60) y old; median HT time was 34 mo; and median follow-up time 162 d. The majority needed hospitalization (83%). Immunosuppressive therapy was reduced/withdrawn in the majority of patients, except from steroids, which were maintained. Seventeen patients (42.5%) were classified as having severe disease according to the ordinal scale developed by the World Health Organization Committee. They tended to have lower absolute lymphocyte count (P < 0.001) during follow-up when compared with patients with mild disease. Thirty-day mortality was 12.5%. However, a longer follow-up revealed increased later mortality (27.5%), with median time to death around 35 d. Bacterial nosocomial infections were a leading cause of death. Cardiac allograft rejection (10%) and ventricular dysfunction (12.5%) were also not negligible. CONCLUSIONS: Major findings of this study corroborate other cohorts' results, but it also reports significant rate of later events, suggesting that a strict midterm surveillance is advisable to HT recipients with coronavirus disease 2019.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Heart Transplantation , Adult , Heart Transplantation/adverse effects , Hospitalization , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Transplant Recipients
18.
J Clin Rheumatol ; 28(2): e348-e352, 2022 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1703196

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to examine the incidence of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) among patients with immunomediated inflammatory diseases (IMIDs) treated with biologic or targeted synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (bDMARDs and tsDMARDs) and to evaluate the influence of either IMIDs or related therapies on the incidence and evolution of COVID-19. METHODS: This observational, cross-sectional study was conducted from January 31, 2020, to May 15, 2020. Data of 902 patients were obtained from clinical records in hospitals, primary care units, and community pharmacies. Inclusion criteria were adults with IMIDs treated with bDMARDs or tsDMARDs who started therapy 3 months prior to study commencement. Patients with poor adherence to treatments were excluded. COVID-19 was classified as "definitive" (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 polymerase chain reaction [PCR]-positive), "possible" (characteristic symptoms and negative PCR), and "suspected" (characteristic symptoms but PCR not performed). RESULTS: COVID-19 was diagnosed in 70 patients (11 definitive, 19 possible, and 40 suspected). The cumulative incidence of definitive COVID-19 was 1.2%. When considering all cases, the incidence was 7.8%. Patients on biosimilars tumor necrosis factor blockers were more likely to have a diagnosis of COVID-19 (odds ratio, 2.308; p < 0.001). Patients on anti-B-cell therapies had a lower incidence of infections (p = 0.046). Low rates of hospitalization (14.3%), pneumonia (14.3%), death (2.9%), or thrombosis (2.9%) were observed, and 94.3% of patients recovered. CONCLUSIONS: The cumulative incidence of confirmed cases of COVID-19 was similar to the general population, with generally low hospitalization, intensive care management, and mortality rates. COVID-19 incidence was less frequent in patients with more severe immunosuppression.


Subject(s)
Antirheumatic Agents , Biosimilar Pharmaceuticals , COVID-19 , Antirheumatic Agents/therapeutic use , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Incidence , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Clin Infect Dis ; 74(5): 897-900, 2022 03 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1702282

ABSTRACT

Little is known about severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 "vaccine-breakthrough" infections (VBIs). Here we characterize 24 VBIs in predominantly young healthy persons. While none required hospitalization, a proportion endorsed severe symptoms and shed live virus as high as 4.13 × 103 plaque-forming units/mL. Infecting genotypes included both variant-of-concern (VOC) and non-VOC strains.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Genetic Variation , Humans , Phenotype , RNA, Messenger , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Vaccines, Synthetic , Virus Shedding
20.
Clin Infect Dis ; 74(5): 802-811, 2022 03 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1701306

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in unprecedented healthcare challenges, and COVID-19 has been linked to secondary infections. Candidemia, a fungal healthcare-associated infection, has been described in patients hospitalized with severe COVID-19. However, studies of candidemia and COVID-19 coinfection have been limited in sample size and geographic scope. We assessed differences in patients with candidemia with and without a COVID-19 diagnosis. METHODS: We conducted a case-level analysis using population-based candidemia surveillance data collected through the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Emerging Infections Program during April-August 2020 to compare characteristics of candidemia patients with and without a positive test for COVID-19 in the 30 days before their Candida culture using chi-square or Fisher's exact tests. RESULTS: Of the 251 candidemia patients included, 64 (25.5%) were positive for SARS-CoV-2. Liver disease, solid-organ malignancies, and prior surgeries were each >3 times more common in patients without COVID-19 coinfection, whereas intensive care unit-level care, mechanical ventilation, having a central venous catheter, and receipt of corticosteroids and immunosuppressants were each >1.3 times more common in patients with COVID-19. All-cause in-hospital fatality was 2 times higher among those with COVID-19 (62.5%) than without (32.1%). CONCLUSIONS: One-quarter of candidemia patients had COVID-19. These patients were less likely to have certain underlying conditions and recent surgery commonly associated with candidemia and more likely to have acute risk factors linked to COVID-19 care, including immunosuppressive medications. Given the high mortality, it is important for clinicians to remain vigilant and take proactive measures to prevent candidemia in patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Candidemia , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Testing , Candidemia/drug therapy , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL