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1.
J Telemed Telecare ; 28(7): 481-487, 2022 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1927941

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the COVID-19 pandemic emergency departments have noted a significant decrease in stroke patients. We performed a timely analysis of the Bavarian telestroke TEMPiS "working diagnosis" database. METHODS: Twelve hospitals from the TEMPiS network were selected. Data collected for January through April in years 2017 through 2020 were extracted and analyzed for presumed and definite ischemic stroke (IS), amongst other disorders. In addition, recommendations for intravenous thrombolysis (rtPA) and endovascular thrombectomy (EVT) were noted and mobility data of the region analyzed. If statistically valid, group-comparison was tested with Fisher's exact test considering unpaired observations and ap-value < 0.05 was considered significant. RESULTS: Upon lockdown in mid-March 2020, we observed a significant reduction in recommendations for rtPA compared to the preceding three years (14.7% [2017-2019] vs. 9.2% [2020], p = 0.0232). Recommendations for EVT were significantly higher in January to mid-March 2020 compared to 2017-2019 (5.4% [2017-2019] vs. 9.3% [2020], p = 0.0013) reflecting its increasing importance. Following the COVID-19 lockdown mid-March 2020 the number of EVT decreased back to levels in 2017-2019 (7.4% [2017-2019] vs. 7.6% [2020], p = 0.1719). Absolute numbers of IS decreased in parallel to mobility data. CONCLUSIONS: The reduced stroke incidence during the COVID-19 pandemic may in part be explained by patient avoidance to seek emergency stroke care and may have an association to population mobility. Increasing mobility may induce a rebound effect and may conflict with a potential second COVID-19 wave. Telemedical networks may be ideal databases to study such effects in near-real time.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Stroke , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Incidence , Pandemics , Stroke/drug therapy , Stroke/therapy , Thrombectomy , Thrombolytic Therapy , Tissue Plasminogen Activator/therapeutic use , Treatment Outcome
2.
Neurologia (Engl Ed) ; 2021 May 11.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1804923

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Ischaemic stroke may be a major complication of SARS-CoV-2 infection.Studying and characterising the different aetiological subtypes, clinical characteristics, and functional outcomes may be valuable in guiding patient selection for optimal management and treatment. METHODS: Data were collected retrospectively on consecutive patients with COVID-19 who developed acute focal brain ischaemia (between 1 March and 19 April 2020) at a tertiary university hospital in Madrid (Spain). RESULTS: During the study period, 1594 patients were diagnosed with COVID-19. We found 22 patients with ischaemic stroke (1.38%), 6 of whom did not meet the inclusion criteria. The remaining 16 patients were included in the study (15 cases of ischaemic stroke and one case of transient ischaemic attack).Median baseline National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score was 9 (interquartile range: 16), and mean (standard deviation) age was 73 years (12.8). Twelve patients (75%) were men. Mean time from COVID-19 symptom onset to stroke onset was 13 days. Large vessel occlusion was identified in 12 patients (75%).We detected elevated levels of D-dimer in 87.5% of patients and C-reactive protein in 81.2%. The main aetiology was atherothrombotic stroke (9 patients, 56.3%), with the predominant subtype being endoluminal thrombus (5 patients, 31.2%), involving the internal carotid artery in 4 cases and the aortic arch in one. The mortality rate in our series was 44% (7 of 16 patients). CONCLUSIONS: In patients with COVID-19, the most frequent stroke aetiology was atherothrombosis, with a high proportion of endoluminal thrombus (31.2% of patients). Our clinical and laboratory data support COVID-19-associated coagulopathy as a relevant pathophysiological mechanism for ischaemic stroke in these patients.

3.
Semin Respir Crit Care Med ; 42(2): 316-326, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1493288

ABSTRACT

Venous thromboembolism, occlusion of dialysis catheters, circuit thrombosis in extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) devices, acute limb ischemia, and isolated strokes, all in the face of prophylactic and even therapeutic anticoagulation, are features of novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) coagulopathy. It seems well established at this time that a COVID-19 patient deemed sick enough to be hospitalized, should receive at least prophylactic dose anticoagulation. However, should some hospitalized patients have dosage escalation to intermediate dose? Should some be considered for full-dose anticoagulation without a measurable thromboembolic event and how should that anticoagulation be monitored? Should patients receive postdischarge anticoagulation and with what medication and for how long? What thrombotic issues are related to the various medications being used to treat this coagulopathy? Is antiphospholipid antibody part of this syndrome? What is the significance of isolated ischemic stroke and limb ischemia in this disorder and how does this interface with the rest of the clinical and laboratory features of this disorder? The aims of this article are to explore these questions and interpret the available data based on the current evidence.


Subject(s)
Anticoagulants/administration & dosage , COVID-19/drug therapy , Thrombophilia/drug therapy , Thrombosis/prevention & control , Venous Thromboembolism/prevention & control , Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Adenosine Monophosphate/therapeutic use , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/therapeutic use , Ambulatory Care , Antibodies, Antiphospholipid/immunology , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized/therapeutic use , Antirheumatic Agents/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/therapy , Dose-Response Relationship, Drug , Drug Combinations , Duration of Therapy , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Hospitalization , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Immunization, Passive , Lopinavir/therapeutic use , Ritonavir/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombolytic Therapy , Thrombophilia/blood , Thrombophilia/etiology , Thrombosis/drug therapy , Thrombosis/immunology , Venous Thromboembolism/drug therapy , Venous Thromboembolism/immunology
4.
Heart Rhythm ; 18(6): 855-861, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1390228

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Accumulating data suggest blood biomarkers could inform stroke etiology. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to investigate the performance of multiple blood biomarkers in elucidating stroke etiology with a focus on new-onset atrial fibrillation (AF) and cardioembolism. METHODS: Between January and December 2017, information on clinical and laboratory parameters and stroke characteristics was prospectively collected from ischemic stroke patients recruited from the National University Hospital, Singapore. Multiple blood biomarkers (N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide [NT-proBNP], d-dimer, S100ß, neuron-specific enolase, vitamin D, cortisol, interleukin-6, insulin, uric acid, and albumin) were measured in plasma. These variables were compared with stroke etiology and the risk of new-onset AF and cardioembolism using multivariable regression methods. RESULTS: Of the 515 ischemic stroke patients (mean age 61 years; 71% men), 44 (8.5%) were diagnosed with new-onset AF, and 75 (14.5%) had cardioembolism. The combination of 2 laboratory parameters (total cholesterol ≤169 mg/dL; triglycerides ≤44.5 mg/dL) and 3 biomarkers (NT-proBNP ≥294 pg/mL; S100ß ≥64 pg/mL; cortisol ≥471 nmol/l) identified patients with new-onset AF (negative predictive value [NPV] 90%; positive predictive value [PPV] 73%; area under curve [AUC] 85%). The combination of 2 laboratory parameters (total cholesterol ≤169 mg/dL; triglycerides ≤44.5 mg/dL) and 2 biomarkers (NT-proBNP ≥507 pg/mL; S100ß ≥65 pg/mL) identified those with cardioembolism (NPV 86%; PPV 78%; AUC 87%). Adding clinical predictors did not improve the performance of these models. CONCLUSION: Blood biomarkers could identify patients with increased likelihood of cardioembolism and direct the search for occult AF.


Subject(s)
Atrial Fibrillation/diagnosis , Biomarkers/blood , Embolism/diagnosis , Heart Diseases/diagnosis , Ischemic Stroke/diagnosis , Aged , Atrial Fibrillation/blood , Atrial Fibrillation/complications , Embolism/blood , Embolism/etiology , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Heart Diseases/blood , Heart Diseases/etiology , Humans , Ischemic Stroke/blood , Ischemic Stroke/etiology , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies
5.
A A Pract ; 15(5): e01458, 2021 May 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1329124

ABSTRACT

A significant number of patients with coronavirus disease 2019 develop strokes with large vessel obstructions that may require endovascular treatment for revascularization. Our series focuses on periprocedural issues and the anesthetic management of these patients. We analyzed medical records of 5 patients with positive reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction tests for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 during their hospitalization who underwent endovascular treatment at our hospital between March and mid-June 2020. We found that our patients were different from the typical patients with ischemic stroke in that they had signs of hypercoagulability, hypoxia, and a lack of hypertension at presentation.


Subject(s)
Anesthetics , Brain Ischemia , COVID-19 , Endovascular Procedures , Stroke , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
6.
J Neurosurg Anesthesiol ; 33(3): 268-272, 2021 Jul 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1322669

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic is currently a major challenge for health care systems around the world. For a time-sensitive emergency such as acute ischemic stroke (AIS), streamlined workflow times are essential to ensure good clinical outcomes. METHODS: The aim of this single-center, retrospective, observational study was to describe changes in stroke workflow patterns and clinical care during the COVID-19 pandemic. Data from AIS patients undergoing emergent endovascular treatment (EVT) between 23 January and 8 April 2020 were retrospectively collected and compared with data from patients admitted during a similar period in 2019. The primary outcome was difference in time from symptom onset to recanalization. Secondary outcomes included workflow times, clinical management, discharge outcomes, and health-economic data. RESULTS: In all, 21 AIS patients were admitted for emergent EVT during the 77-day study period, compared with 42 cases in 2019. Median time from symptom onset to recanalization was 132 minutes longer during the pandemic compared with the previous year (672 vs. 540 min, P=0.049). Patients admitted during the pandemic had a higher likelihood of endotracheal intubation (84.6% vs. 42.4%, P<0.05) and a higher incidence of delayed extubation after EVT (69.2% vs. 45.5%, P<0.05). National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale at hospital discharge was similar in the 2 cohorts, whereas neurointensive care unit stay was longer in patients admitted during the pandemic (10 vs. 7 days, P=0.013) and hospitalization costs were higher (123.9 vs. 95.2 thousand Chinese Yuan, P=0.052). CONCLUSION: Disruptions to medical services during the COVID-19 pandemic has particularly impacted AIS patients undergoing emergent EVT, resulting in increased workflow times. A structured and multidisciplinary protocol should be implemented to minimize treatment delays and maximize patient outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Endovascular Procedures/methods , Ischemic Stroke/therapy , Time-to-Treatment/statistics & numerical data , Acute Disease , Aged , Beijing , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
7.
Stroke Vasc Neurol ; 5(3): 279-284, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1318202

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: COVID-19 is an infectious disease caused by Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Apart from respiratory complications, acute cerebrovascular disease (CVD) has been observed in some patients with COVID-19. Therefore, we described the clinical characteristics, laboratory features, treatment and outcomes of CVD complicating SARS-CoV-2 infection. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Demographic and clinical characteristics, laboratory findings, treatments and clinical outcomes were collected and analysed. Clinical characteristics and laboratory findings of patients with COVID-19 with or without new-onset CVD were compared. RESULTS: Of 219 patients with COVID-19, 10 (4.6%) developed acute ischaemic stroke and 1 (0.5%) had intracerebral haemorrhage. COVID-19 with new onset of CVD were significantly older (75.7±10.8 years vs 52.1±15.3 years, p<0.001), more likely to present with severe COVID-19 (81.8% vs 39.9%, p<0.01) and were more likely to have cardiovascular risk factors, including hypertension, diabetes and medical history of CVD (all p<0.05). In addition, they were more likely to have increased inflammatory response and hypercoagulable state as reflected in C reactive protein (51.1 (1.3-127.9) vs 12.1 (0.1-212.0) mg/L, p<0.05) and D-dimer (6.9 (0.3-20.0) vs 0.5 (0.1-20.0) mg/L, p<0.001). Of 10 patients with ischemic stroke; 6 received antiplatelet treatment with aspirin or clopidogrel; and 3 of them died. The other four patients received anticoagulant treatment with enoxaparin and 2 of them died. As of 24 March 2020, six patients with CVD died (54.5%). CONCLUSION: Acute CVD is not uncommon in COVID-19. Our findings suggest that older patients with risk factors are more likely to develop CVD. The development of CVD is an important negative prognostic factor which requires further study to identify optimal management strategy to combat the COVID-19 outbreak.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Cerebrovascular Disorders/virology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Acute Disease , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , COVID-19 , Cerebrovascular Disorders/diagnosis , Cerebrovascular Disorders/drug therapy , Cerebrovascular Disorders/mortality , China , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Female , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
8.
Open Heart ; 8(1)2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1269804

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Prior diagnosis of heart failure (HF) is associated with increased length of hospital stay (LOS) and mortality from COVID-19. Associations between substance use, venous thromboembolism (VTE) or peripheral arterial disease (PAD) and its effects on LOS or mortality in patients with HF hospitalised with COVID-19 remain unknown. OBJECTIVE: This study identified risk factors associated with poor in-hospital outcomes among patients with HF hospitalised with COVID-19. METHODS: Case-control study was conducted of patients with prior diagnosis of HF hospitalised with COVID-19 at an academic tertiary care centre from 1 January 2020 to 28 February 2021. Patients with HF hospitalised with COVID-19 with risk factors were compared with those without risk factors for clinical characteristics, LOS and mortality. Multivariate regression was conducted to identify multiple predictors of increased LOS and in-hospital mortality in patients with HF hospitalised with COVID-19. RESULTS: Total of 211 patients with HF were hospitalised with COVID-19. Women had longer LOS than men (9 days vs 7 days; p<0.001). Compared with patients without PAD or ischaemic stroke, patients with PAD or ischaemic stroke had longer LOS (7 days vs 9 days; p=0.012 and 7 days vs 11 days, p<0.001, respectively). Older patients (aged 65 and above) had increased in-hospital mortality compared with younger patients (adjusted OR: 1.04; 95% CI 1.00 to 1.07; p=0.036). Prior diagnosis of VTE increased mortality more than threefold in patients with HF hospitalised with COVID-19 (adjusted OR: 3.33; 95% CI 1.29 to 8.43; p=0.011). CONCLUSION: Vascular diseases increase LOS and mortality in patients with HF hospitalised with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Comorbidity/trends , Heart Failure/mortality , Vascular Diseases/complications , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/virology , Case-Control Studies , Female , Heart Failure/diagnosis , Heart Failure/drug therapy , Heart Failure/virology , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Ischemic Stroke/complications , Ischemic Stroke/epidemiology , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Peripheral Arterial Disease/complications , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Substance-Related Disorders/complications , Venous Thromboembolism/complications
9.
Geroscience ; 43(4): 2055-2065, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1263172

ABSTRACT

Prior research has identified abnormal platelet procoagulant responses in COVID-19. Coated-platelets, a form of procoagulant platelets, support thrombin formation and are elevated in ischemic stroke patients with increased risk for recurrent infarction. Our goal was to examine changes in coated-platelet levels over the course of COVID-19 infection and determine their association with disease severity, thrombosis, and death. Coated-platelet levels were assayed after admission and repeated weekly in COVID-19 patients, and in COVID-19 negative controls. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to calculate area under the curve (AUC) values for a model including baseline coated-platelets to predict death. Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards analysis was used to predict risk for death at 90 days. We enrolled 33 patients (22 with moderate and 11 with severe infection) and 20 controls. Baseline coated-platelet levels were lower among moderate (mean ± SD; 21.3 ± 9.8%) and severe COVID-19 patients (28.5 ± 11.9%) compared to controls (38.1 ± 10.4%, p < 0.0001). Coated-platelet levels increased during follow-up in COVID-19 patients by 7% (relative) per day from symptom onset (95% CI 2-12%, p = 0.007). A cut-off of 33.9% for coated-platelet levels yielded 80% sensitivity and 96% specificity for death at 90 days, with resulting AUC of 0.880 (95% CI 0.680-1.0, p = 0.0002). The adjusted hazard ratio for death in patients with coated-platelet levels > 33.9% was 40.99 when compared to those with levels ≤ 33.9% (p < 0.0001). Platelet procoagulant potential is transiently decreased in most patients during COVID-19; however, increased baseline platelet procoagulant levels predict death. Defining the mechanisms involved and potential links with aging may yield novel treatment targets.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
10.
PLoS One ; 16(6): e0252351, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1262545

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 may predispose to both venous and arterial thromboembolism event (TEE). Reports on the prevalence and prognosis of thrombotic complications are still emerging. OBJECTIVE: To describe the rate of TEE complications and its influence in the prognosis of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 after a cross-sectional study. METHODS: We evaluated the prevalence of TEE and its relationship with in-hospital death among hospitalized patients with COVID-19 who were admitted between 1st March to 20th April 2020 in a multicentric network of sixteen Hospitals in Spain. TEE was defined by the occurrence of venous thromboembolism (VTE), acute ischemic stroke (AIS), systemic arterial embolism or myocardial infarction (MI). RESULTS: We studied 1737 patients with proven COVID-19 infection of whom 276 died (15.9%). TEE were presented in 64 (3.7%) patients: 49 (76.6%) patients had a VTE, 8 (12.5%) patients had MI, 6 (9.4%%) patients had AIS, and one (1.5%) patient a thrombosis of portal vein. TEE patients exhibited a diffuse profile: older, high levels of D-dimer protein and a tendency of lower levels of prothrombin. The multivariate regression models, confirmed the association between in-hospital death and age (odds ratio [OR] 1.12 [95% CI 1.10-1.14], p<0.001), diabetes (OR 1.49 [95% CI 1.04-2.13], p = 0.029), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (OR 1.61 [95% CI 1.03-2.53], p = 0.039), ICU care (OR 9.39 [95% CI 5.69-15.51], p<0.001), and TTE (OR 2.24 [95% CI 1.17-4.29], p = 0.015). CONCLUSIONS: Special attention is needed among hospitalized COVID-19 patients with TTE and other comorbidities as they have an increased risk of in-hospital death.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/pathology , Thromboembolism/mortality , Thromboembolism/virology , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Prognosis , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Spain/epidemiology , Survival Rate , Thromboembolism/epidemiology
11.
BMJ Open ; 11(5): e043488, 2021 05 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1259007

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Stroke is a common cause of epilepsy that may be mediated via glutamate dysregulation. There is currently no evidence to support the use of antiseizure medications as primary prevention against poststroke epilepsy. Perampanel has a unique antiglutamatergic mechanism of action and may have antiepileptogenic properties. This study aims to evaluate the efficacy and safety of perampanel as an antiepileptogenic treatment in patients at high risk of poststroke epilepsy. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: Up to 328 patients with cortical ischaemic stroke or lobar haemorrhage will be enrolled, and receive their first treatment within 7 days of stroke onset. Patients will be randomised (1:1) to receive perampanel (titrated to 6 mg daily over 4 weeks) or matching placebo, stratified by stroke subtype (ischaemic or haemorrhagic). Treatment will be continued for 12 weeks after titration. 7T MRI will be performed at baseline for quantification of cerebral glutamate by magnetic resonance spectroscopy and glutamate chemical exchange saturation transfer imaging. Blood will be collected for measurement of plasma glutamate levels. Participants will be followed up for 52 weeks after randomisation.The primary study outcome will be the proportion of participants in each group free of late (more than 7 days after stroke onset) poststroke seizures by the end of the 12-month study period, analysed by Fisher's exact test. Secondary outcomes will include time to first seizure, time to treatment withdrawal and 3-month modified Rankin Scale score. Quality of life, cognitive function, mood and adverse events will be assessed by standardised questionnaires. Exploratory outcomes will include correlation between cerebral and plasma glutamate concentration and stroke and seizure outcomes. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: This study was approved by the Alfred Health Human Research Ethics Committee (HREC No 44366, Reference 287/18). TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: ACTRN12618001984280; Pre-results.


Subject(s)
Brain Ischemia , COVID-19 , Stroke , Clinical Trials, Phase II as Topic , Double-Blind Method , Humans , Nitriles , Pyridones , Quality of Life , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke/complications , Stroke/drug therapy , Treatment Outcome
12.
Neurologia (Engl Ed) ; 36(7): 531-536, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1253425

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The COVID-19 pandemic has had an impact on ischaemic stroke management, with a reported decrease in hospital admissions, and even disruptions in healthcare and increased in-hospital mortality. However, there is a lack of evidence on the impact of the pandemic on functional prognosis. The aim of this study is to analyse the effect of the COVID-19 pandemic on the 3-month functional outcomes of patients hospitalised due to acute ischaemic stroke in Aragon (Spain). METHODS: We reviewed the data of all patients admitted due to ischaemic stroke to any hospital in our regional healthcare system between 30 December 2019 and 3 May 2020. We compared modified Rankin Scale scores and mortality at 3 months in patients hospitalised before and after the declaration of a state of emergency due to the COVID-19 pandemic. RESULTS: In total, 318 patients with acute ischaemic stroke met our inclusion criteria. No differences were observed between periods in global or specific characteristics, with the exception of a higher proportion of patients older than 80 years during the first period (42.2% vs 29.0%, P = .028). In the comparative analysis, we found no significant differences in mortality (12.3 vs 7.9, P = .465) or in the proportion of patients with modified Rankin Scale scores ≤ 2 (57.7% vs 57.1%, P = .425) at 3 months. CONCLUSION: To our knowledge, this is the first study to analyse the impact of COVID-19 pandemic on the 3-month functional outcomes of patients with ischaemic stroke. In our region, there has been no increase in rates of mortality or disability at 3 months in patients admitted due to ischaemic stroke during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Brain Ischemia , COVID-19 , Ischemic Stroke , Stroke , Brain Ischemia/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Prognosis , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke/epidemiology , Treatment Outcome
13.
J Stroke Cerebrovasc Dis ; 30(8): 105919, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1253283

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The characteristics and pathophysiological mechanisms involved in acute ischemic stroke in patients with COVID-19 infection have not been fully clarified. We prospectively studied the phenotypic and etiological features of acute stroke occurring in COVID-19 infection. PATIENTS & METHODS: Within nine months starting from April-2020, the presence of COVID-19 infection was determined by thoracic CT and SARS-CoV-2 PCR in all acute stroke cases managed in a single tertiary center. Consecutive and prospective data on vascular risk factors/comorbidities, in-hospital quality metrics, discharge outcomes, etiological subclassification and blood markers of thrombosis / inflammation were compared in 44 COVID-19 positive cases (37 acute ischemic stroke, 5 TIA, 2 intracerebral hematoma) and 509 COVID-19 negative patients (355 ischemic, 105 TIA, 44 hematoma and 5 stroke mimic). RESULTS: COVID-19 positive patients had more severe strokes, delayed hospital admission, longer hospital stay, higher mortality rates, but had similar vascular risk factors/comorbidities frequency, thrombolysis/thrombectomy utilization rates, metrics, and stroke etiological subtype. They had significantly higher CRP, fibrinogen, ferritin, leukocyte count and lower lymphocyte count. No difference was detected in aPTT, INR, D-dimer, platelet, hemoglobin, homocysteine levels and ANA, anti-dsDNA antibody and ENA panel positivity rates. Anti-phospholipid antibodies have been studied in 70% of COVID-19 positive and all cryptogenic patients, but were never found positive. Tests for coagulation factor levels and hereditary thrombophilia did not show major thrombophilia in any of the stroke patients with COVID-19. CONCLUSION: We documented that there is no significant difference in etiological spectrum in acute stroke patients with COVID-19 infection. In addition, cryptogenic stroke and antiphospholipid antibody positivity rates did not increase.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Hemorrhagic Stroke/etiology , Ischemic Attack, Transient/etiology , Ischemic Stroke/etiology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Biomarkers/blood , Blood Coagulation , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19/virology , Case-Control Studies , Female , Hemorrhagic Stroke/diagnosis , Hemorrhagic Stroke/therapy , Humans , Inflammation Mediators/blood , Ischemic Attack, Transient/diagnosis , Ischemic Attack, Transient/therapy , Ischemic Stroke/diagnosis , Ischemic Stroke/therapy , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , Prospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors
14.
Ital J Pediatr ; 47(1): 123, 2021 Jun 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1255951

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To describe clinical characteristics, laboratory tests, radiological data and outcome of pediatric cases with SARS-CoV-2 infection complicated by neurological involvement. STUDY DESIGN: A computerized search was conducted using PubMed. An article was considered eligible if it reported data on pediatric patient(s) with neurological involvement related to SARS-CoV-2 infection. We also described a case of an acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) in a 5-year-old girl with SARS-CoV-2 infection: this case was also included in the systematic review. RESULTS: Forty-four articles reporting 59 cases of neurological manifestations in pediatric patients were included in our review. Most (32/59) cases occurred in the course of a multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C). Neurological disorders secondary to cerebrovascular involvement were reported in 10 cases: 4 children with an ischemic stroke, 3 with intracerebral hemorrhage, 1 with a cerebral sinus venous thrombosis, 1 with a subarachnoid hemorrhage, 1 with multiple diffuse microhemorrhages. Reversible splenial lesions were recognized in 9 cases, benign intracranial hypertension in 4 patients, meningoencephalitis in 4 cases, autoimmune encephalitis in 1 girl, cranial nerves impairment in 2 patients and transverse myelitis in 1 case. Five cases had Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) and two, including ours, had ADEM. Radiological investigations were performed in almost all cases (45/60): the most recurrent radiological finding was a signal change in the splenium of the corpus callosum. The presence of SARS-CoV-2 viral nucleic acid in the cerebrospinal fluid was proved only in 2 cases. The outcome was favorable in almost all, except in 5 cases. CONCLUSIONS: Our research highlights the large range of neurological manifestations and their presumed pathogenic pathways associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection in children. Nervous system involvement could be isolated, developing during COVID-19 or after its recovery, or arise in the context of a MIS-C. The most reported neurological manifestations are cerebrovascular accidents, reversible splenial lesions, GBS, benign intracranial hypertension, meningoencephalitis; ADEM is also a possible complication, as we observed in our patient. Further studies are required to investigate all the neurological complications of SARS-CoV-2 infection and their underlying pathogenic mechanism.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Nervous System Diseases/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Child , Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2
15.
J Neurol ; 269(1): 19-25, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1252121

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The negative impact of the COVID-19 outbreak on stroke care has been reported, but no data exist on the influence of the lockdown on medication adherence to antithrombotic treatment for stroke prevention. We present a comparison of electronic adherence data of stroke patients treated with direct oral anticoagulants (DOAC) prior to and during the COVID-19 lockdown in spring 2020 in Switzerland. METHODS: This is a secondary analysis using data from the ongoing MAAESTRO study, in which stroke patients with atrial fibrillation electronically monitor their adherence to DOAC treatment. Eligible patients for this analysis had at least four weeks of adherence data prior to and during the COVID-19 lockdown. Three adherence metrics (taking adherence, timing adherence, drug holidays) were calculated and compared descriptively. RESULTS: The analysis included eight patients (median age 81.5 years, IQR 74.8-84.5). Five patients had a pre-lockdown taking adherence over 90% (mean 96.8% ± 2.9), with no change during lockdown, high timing adherence in both periods and no drug holidays. The remaining three patients had pre-lockdown taking and timing adherence below 90%. Of those, two patients showed a moderate decline either in taking or timing adherence compared to pre-lockdown. One showed a substantial increase in taking and timing adherence during lockdown (both + 25.8%). CONCLUSION: Our data suggest that a major disruption of social life (i.e., the imposed COVID-19 lockdown) is unlikely to relevantly affect the medication intake behaviour of patients with high pre-established adherence, but might have an impact in patients with previously suboptimal adherence. TRIAL REGISTRATION NUMBER: MAAESTRO: electronic Monitoring and improvement of Adherence to direct oral Anticoagulant treatment-a randomized crossover study of an Educational and reminder-based intervention in ischaemic STROke patients under polypharmacy, NCT03344146.


Subject(s)
Atrial Fibrillation , Brain Ischemia , COVID-19 , Stroke , Administration, Oral , Aged, 80 and over , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , Atrial Fibrillation/complications , Atrial Fibrillation/drug therapy , Brain Ischemia/drug therapy , Communicable Disease Control , Cross-Over Studies , Humans , Medication Adherence , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke/drug therapy
16.
Emerg Radiol ; 28(5): 887-890, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1242796

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 was initially described as a pulmonary disease. Increasing attention is now directed to extrapulmonary disease manifestations mediated by viral tropism to the vascular endothelium. Here, we report a case of an adult patient with COVID-19 who presented to the emergency department with neurological signs disproportionate to pulmonary symptoms and was found to have a subacute ischemic stroke. Imaging studies suggested an active inflammatory vasculopathy. The case highlights the utility of vascular wall imaging studies when positive findings are present on emergent CT angiography. Current treatment algorithms should consider the addition of adjunct intracranial vessel wall imaging to assess for inflammatory vasculopathy when a patient with acute or recent COVID infection presents to the emergency department with stroke.


Subject(s)
Brain Ischemia , COVID-19 , Stroke , Adult , Computed Tomography Angiography , Humans , Magnetic Resonance Angiography , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , SARS-CoV-2
17.
J Neurol ; 269(1): 1-11, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1241609

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To characterize patients with acute ischemic stroke related to SARS-CoV-2 infection and assess the classification performance of clinical and laboratory parameters in predicting in-hospital outcome of these patients. METHODS: In the setting of the STROKOVID study including patients with acute ischemic stroke consecutively admitted to the ten hub hospitals in Lombardy, Italy, between March 8 and April 30, 2020, we compared clinical features of patients with confirmed infection and non-infected patients by logistic regression models and survival analysis. Then, we trained and tested a random forest (RF) binary classifier for the prediction of in-hospital death among patients with COVID-19. RESULTS: Among 1013 patients, 160 (15.8%) had SARS-CoV-2 infection. Male sex (OR 1.53; 95% CI 1.06-2.27) and atrial fibrillation (OR 1.60; 95% CI 1.05-2.43) were independently associated with COVID-19 status. Patients with COVID-19 had increased stroke severity at admission [median NIHSS score, 9 (25th to75th percentile, 13) vs 6 (25th to75th percentile, 9)] and increased risk of in-hospital death (38.1% deaths vs 7.2%; HR 3.30; 95% CI 2.17-5.02). The RF model based on six clinical and laboratory parameters exhibited high cross-validated classification accuracy (0.86) and precision (0.87), good recall (0.72) and F1-score (0.79) in predicting in-hospital death. CONCLUSIONS: Ischemic strokes in COVID-19 patients have distinctive risk factor profile and etiology, increased clinical severity and higher in-hospital mortality rate compared to non-COVID-19 patients. A simple model based on clinical and routine laboratory parameters may be useful in identifying ischemic stroke patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection who are unlikely to survive the acute phase.


Subject(s)
Brain Ischemia , COVID-19 , Ischemic Stroke , Stroke , Brain Ischemia/complications , Brain Ischemia/epidemiology , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke/epidemiology
18.
Am J Case Rep ; 22: e930291, 2021 Apr 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1241342

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND National guidelines and consensus statements suggest a 24-hour window for endovascular recanalization in patients presenting with acute ischemic stroke due to large-vessel occlusion. However, the safety and efficacy of extending the window for intervention remains to be definitively established. CASE REPORT A healthy 26-year-old woman presented with headache, left-sided hemiplegia, and rightward gaze palsy 2 days after a minor trauma. Time last known well was approximately 50 hours prior to presentation. Computed tomography angiography revealed dissection of the distal right internal carotid artery and occlusion of the M1 segment of the right middle cerebral artery. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a small area of acute infarct in the right basal ganglia and right insular cortex, but suggested a large ischemic penumbra; this was confirmed with cerebral perfusion analysis. In light of the patient's young age and potential for penumbral salvage, mechanical thrombectomy of an M1 thrombus and stenting of an internal carotid artery dissection were performed nearly 60 hours after the onset of symptoms. The patient demonstrated marked clinical improvement over the following days and was discharged home in excellent condition one week after presentation. Based on our clinical experience and other emerging data, we propose that extension of the 24-hour window for endovascular intervention may improve functional outcomes among select individuals. CONCLUSIONS A 24-hour window for endovascular thrombectomy is appropriate for many patients presenting with acute ischemic stroke. However, in select individuals, extension of the window to 48 hours or beyond may improve functional outcomes.


Subject(s)
Brain Ischemia , Endovascular Procedures , Ischemic Stroke , Stroke , Adult , Brain Ischemia/etiology , Carotid Artery, Internal , Female , Humans , Stroke/etiology , Thrombectomy , Treatment Outcome
19.
Semin Vasc Surg ; 34(2): 20-27, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1240794

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) causes a systemic disease that affects nearly all organ systems through infection and subsequent dysregulation of the vascular endothelium. One of the most striking phenomena has been a coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)-associated coagulopathy. Given these findings, questions naturally emerged about the prothrombotic impact of COVID-19 on cerebrovascular disease and whether ischemic stroke is a clinical feature specific to COVID-19 pathophysiology. Early reports from China and several sites in the northeastern United States seemed to confirm these suspicions. Since these initial reports, many cohort studies worldwide observed decreased rates of stroke since the start of the pandemic, raising concerns for a broader impact of the pandemic on stroke treatment. In this review, we provide a comprehensive assessment of how the pandemic has affected stroke presentation, epidemiology, treatment, and outcomes to better understand the impact of COVID-19 on cerebrovascular disease. Much evidence suggests that this decline in stroke admissions stems from the global response to the virus, which has made it more difficult for patients to get to the hospital once symptoms start. However, there does not appear to be a demonstrable impact on quality metrics once patients arrive at the hospital. Despite initial concerns, there is insufficient evidence to ascribe a causal relationship specific to the pathogenicity of SARS-CoV-2 on the cerebral vasculature. Nevertheless, when patients infected with SARS-CoV-2 present with stroke, their presentation is likely to be more severe, and they have a markedly higher rate of in-hospital mortality than patients with either acute ischemic stroke or COVID-19 alone.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Cerebrovascular Disorders/epidemiology , Cerebrovascular Disorders/virology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , Cerebrovascular Disorders/therapy , Humans
20.
Medicina (Kaunas) ; 57(5)2021 May 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1234775

ABSTRACT

Background and Objectives: The Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic caused significant disruption to established medical care systems globally. Thus, this study was aimed to compare the admission and outcome variables such as number of patient and its severity, acute recanalisation therapy given pre-post COVID-19 at a primary stroke centre located in Malaysia. Methods: This cross-sectional hospital-based study included adult ischaemic stroke patients. Variables of the study included the number of ischaemic stroke patients, the proportions of recanalisation therapies, stroke severity during admission based on the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, functional outcome at discharge based on the modified Rankin Scale, and relevant workflow metrics. We compared the outcome between two six-month periods, namely the pre-COVID-19 period (March 2019 to September 2019) and the COVID-19 period (March 2020 to September 2020). Results: There were 131 and 156 patients, respectively, from the pre-COVID-19 period and the COVID-19 period. The median door-to-scan time and the median door-to-reperfusion time were both significantly shorter in the COVID-19 period (24.5 min versus 12.0 min, p = 0.047) and (93.5 min versus 60.0 min, p = 0.015), respectively. There were also significantly more patients who received intravenous thrombolysis (7.6% versus 17.3%, p = 0.015) and mechanical thrombectomy (0.8% versus 6.4%, p = 0.013) in the COVID-19 period, respectively. Conclusions: The COVID-19 pandemic may not have caused disruptions of acute stroke care in our primary stroke centre. Our data indicated that the number of ischaemic stroke events remained stable, with a significant increase of recanalisation therapies and better in-hospital workflow metrics during the COVID-19 pandemic period. However, we would like to highlight that the burden of COVID-19 cases in the study area was very low. Therefore, the study may not have captured the true burden (and relevant delays in stroke patient management) during the COVID-19 pandemic. The effect of the pandemic crisis is ongoing and both pre-hospital and in-hospital care systems must continue to provide optimal, highly time-dependent stroke care services.


Subject(s)
Brain Ischemia , COVID-19 , Stroke , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Malaysia/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Stroke/epidemiology , Stroke/therapy , Thrombectomy , Thrombolytic Therapy , Time-to-Treatment , Treatment Outcome
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