Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 391
Filter
1.
J Am Soc Nephrol ; 32(9): 2242-2254, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1702796

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Although coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) causes significan t morbidity, mainly from pulmonary involvement, extrapulmonary symptoms are also major componen ts of the disease. Kidney disease, usually presenting as AKI, is particularly severe among patients with COVID-19. It is unknown, however, whether such injury results from direct kidney infection with COVID-19's causative virus, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), or from indirect mechanisms. METHODS: Using ex vivo cell models, we sought to analyze SARS-CoV-2 interactions with kidney tubular cells and assess direct tubular injury. These models comprised primary human kidney epithelial cells (derived from nephrectomies) and grown as either proliferating monolayers or quiescent three-dimensional kidney spheroids. RESULTS: We demonstrated that viral entry molecules and high baseline levels of type 1 IFN-related molecules were present in monolayers and kidney spheroids. Although both models support viral infection and replication, they did not exhibit a cytopathic effect and cell death, outcomes that were strongly present in SARS-CoV-2-infected controls (African green monkey kidney clone E6 [Vero E6] cultures). A comparison of monolayer and spheroid cultures demonstrated higher infectivity and replication of SARS-CoV-2 in actively proliferating monolayers, although the spheroid cultures exhibited high er levels of ACE2. Monolayers exhibited elevation of some tubular injury molecules-including molecules related to fibrosis (COL1A1 and STAT6) and dedifferentiation (SNAI2)-and a loss of cell identity, evident by reduction in megalin (LRP2). The three-dimensional spheroids were less prone to such injury. CONCLUSIONS: SARS-CoV-2 can infect kidney cells without a cytopathic effect. AKI-induced cellular proliferation may potentially intensify infectivity and tubular damage by SARS-CoV-2, suggesting that early intervention in AKI is warranted to help minimize kidney infection.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/etiology , Acute Kidney Injury/virology , COVID-19/complications , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Spheroids, Cellular/virology , Animals , Cells, Cultured , Chlorocebus aethiops , Cohort Studies , Cytopathogenic Effect, Viral , Epithelial Cells/pathology , Epithelial Cells/virology , Host Microbial Interactions , Humans , Interferon Type I/metabolism , Kidney/immunology , Kidney/pathology , Kidney/virology , Mice , Mice, Inbred NOD , Mice, SCID , Models, Biological , Pandemics , Receptors, Virus/metabolism , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Spheroids, Cellular/pathology , Vero Cells , Virus Replication
3.
J Bras Nefrol ; 43(4): 551-571, 2021.
Article in English, Portuguese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575271

ABSTRACT

Acute kidney injury (AKI) in hospitalized patients with COVID-19 is associated with higher mortality and a worse prognosis. Nevertheless, most patients with COVID-19 have mild symptoms, and about 5% can develop more severe symptoms and involve hypovolemia and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. In a pathophysiological perspective, severe SARS-CoV-2 infection is characterized by numerous dependent pathways triggered by hypercytokinemia, especially IL-6 and TNF-alpha, leading to systemic inflammation, hypercoagulability, and multiple organ dysfunction. Systemic endotheliitis and direct viral tropism to proximal renal tubular cells and podocytes are important pathophysiological mechanisms leading to kidney injury in patients with more critical infection, with a clinical presentation ranging from proteinuria and/or glomerular hematuria to fulminant AKI requiring renal replacement therapies. Glomerulonephritis, rhabdomyolysis, and nephrotoxic drugs are also associated with kidney damage in patients with COVID-19. Thus, AKI and proteinuria are independent risk factors for mortality in patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection. We provide a comprehensive review of the literature emphasizing the impact of acute kidney involvement in the evolutive prognosis and mortality of patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury , COVID-19 , Acute Kidney Injury/therapy , Humans , Proteinuria , Renal Replacement Therapy , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Clin J Am Soc Nephrol ; 16(11): 1755-1765, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526737

ABSTRACT

Despite evidence of multiorgan tropism of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) in patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), direct viral kidney invasion has been difficult to demonstrate. The question of whether SARS-CoV2 can directly infect the kidney is relevant to the understanding of pathogenesis of AKI and collapsing glomerulopathy in patients with COVID-19. Methodologies to document SARS-CoV-2 infection that have been used include immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, RT-PCR, in situ hybridization, and electron microscopy. In our review of studies to date, we found that SARS-CoV-2 in the kidneys of patients with COVID-19 was detected in 18 of 94 (19%) by immunohistochemistry, 71 of 144 (49%) by RT-PCR, and 11 of 84 (13%) by in situ hybridization. In a smaller number of patients with COVID-19 examined by immunofluorescence, SARS-CoV-2 was detected in 10 of 13 (77%). In total, in kidneys from 102 of 235 patients (43%), the presence of SARS-CoV-2 was suggested by at least one of the methods used. Despite these positive findings, caution is needed because many other studies have been negative for SARS-CoV-2 and it should be noted that when detected, it was only in kidneys obtained at autopsy. There is a clear need for studies from kidney biopsies, including those performed at early stages of the COVID-19-associated kidney disease. Development of tests to detect kidney viral infection in urine samples would be more practical as a noninvasive way to evaluate SARS-CoV-2 infection during the evolution of COVID-19-associated kidney disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , Kidney Diseases/virology , Kidney/virology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Animals , Biopsy , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19 Testing , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Kidney Diseases/diagnosis , Kidney Diseases/mortality , Predictive Value of Tests , Prognosis , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors
5.
Pediatr Nephrol ; 36(9): 2627-2638, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1520348

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: COVID-19 is responsible for the 2019 novel coronavirus disease pandemic. Despite the vast research about the adult population, there has been little data collected on acute kidney injury (AKI) epidemiology, associated risk factors, treatments, and mortality in pediatric COVID-19 patients admitted to the ICU. AKI is a severe complication of COVID-19 among children and adolescents. METHODS: A comprehensive literature search was conducted in PubMed/MEDLINE and Cochrane Center Trials to find all published literature related to AKI in COVID-19 patients, including incidence and outcomes. RESULTS: Twenty-four studies reporting the outcomes of interest were included. Across all studies, the overall sample size of COVID positive children was 1,247 and the median age of this population was 9.1 years old. Among COVID positive pediatric patients, there was an AKI incidence of 30.51%, with only 0.56% of these patients receiving KRT. The mortality was 2.55% among all COVID positive pediatric patients. The incidence of multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children (MIS-C) among COVID positive patients was 74.29%. CONCLUSION: AKI has shown to be a negative prognostic factor in adult patients with COVID-19 and now also in the pediatric cohort with high incidence and mortality rates. Additionally, our findings show a strong comparison in epidemiology between adult and pediatric COVID-19 patients; however, they need to be confirmed with additional data and studies.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/epidemiology , COVID-19/complications , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Renal Replacement Therapy/statistics & numerical data , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/complications , Acute Kidney Injury/immunology , Acute Kidney Injury/therapy , Acute Kidney Injury/virology , Adult , Age Factors , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/mortality , Child , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Incidence , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/diagnosis , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/immunology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/mortality
6.
J Clin Med ; 10(8)2021 Apr 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526823

ABSTRACT

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection leads to 5% to 16% hospitalization in intensive care units (ICU) and is associated with 23% to 75% of kidney impairments, including acute kidney injury (AKI). The current work aims to precisely characterize the renal impairment associated to SARS-CoV-2 in ICU patients. Forty-two patients consecutively admitted to the ICU of a French university hospital who tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 between 25 March 2020, and 29 April 2020, were included and classified in categories according to their renal function. Complete renal profiles and evolution during ICU stay were fully characterized in 34 patients. Univariate analyses were performed to determine risk factors associated with AKI. In a second step, we conducted a logistic regression model with inverse probability of treatment weighting (IPTW) analyses to assess major comorbidities as predictors of AKI. Thirty-two patients (94.1%) met diagnostic criteria for intrinsic renal injury with a mixed pattern of tubular and glomerular injuries within the first week of ICU admission, which lasted upon discharge. During their ICU stay, 24 patients (57.1%) presented AKI which was associated with increased mortality (p = 0.007), hemodynamic failure (p = 0.022), and more altered clearance at hospital discharge (p = 0.001). AKI occurrence was associated with lower pH (p = 0.024), higher PaCO2 (CO2 partial pressure in the arterial blood) (p = 0.027), PEEP (positive end-expiratory pressure) (p = 0.027), procalcitonin (p = 0.015), and CRP (C-reactive protein) (p = 0.045) on ICU admission. AKI was found to be independently associated with chronic kidney disease (adjusted OR (odd ratio) 5.97 (2.1-19.69), p = 0.00149). Critical SARS-CoV-2 infection is associated with persistent intrinsic renal injury and AKI, which is a risk factor of mortality. Mechanical ventilation settings seem to be a critical factor of kidney impairment.

7.
J Clin Pathol ; 74(12): 796-803, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526518

ABSTRACT

AIMS: Hospitalised patients with COVID-19 have a variable incidence of acute kidney injury (AKI) according to studies from different nationalities. The present systematic review and meta-analysis describes the incidence of AKI, need for renal replacement therapy (RRT) and mortality among patients with COVID-19-associated AKI. METHODS: We systematically searched electronic database PubMed, SCOPUS and Web of Science to identify English articles published until 25 May 2020. In case of significant heterogeneity, the meta-analyses were conducted assuming a random-effects model. RESULTS: From 746 screened publications, we selected 21 observational studies with 15 536 patients with COVID-19 for random-effects model meta-analyses. The overall incidence of AKI was 12.3% (95% CI 7.3% to 20.0%) and 77% of patients with AKI were critically ill (95% CI 58.9% to 89.0%). The mortality among patients with AKI was 67% (95% CI 39.8% to 86.2%) and the risk of death was 13 times higher compared with patients without AKI (OR=13.3; 95% CI 6.1 to 29.2). Patients with COVID-19-associated AKI needed for RRT in 23.4% of cases (95% CI 12.6% to 39.4%) and those cases had high mortality (89%-100%). CONCLUSION: The present study evidenced an incidence of COVID-19-associated AKI higher than previous meta-analysis. The majority of patients affected by AKI were critically ill and mortality rate among AKI cases was high. Thus, it is extremely important for health systems to be aware about the impact of AKI on patients' outcomes in order to establish proper screening, prevention of additional damage to the kidneys and adequate renal support when needed.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Acute Kidney Injury/diagnosis , Acute Kidney Injury/mortality , Acute Kidney Injury/therapy , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Critical Illness , Female , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , Prognosis , Renal Replacement Therapy , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors
8.
Kidney Med ; 3(3): 426-432, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1525989

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is an unprecedented and historic public health crisis that continues to expand and evolve. The National Kidney Foundation held a 2-part continuing medical education live virtual symposium on July 16 and July 24, 2020, to address the multiple challenges of COVID-19 in the context of advanced chronic kidney disease. Faculty addressed the pathophysiology, impact, risks, and management of COVID-19 as it relates to advanced kidney disease. Testing, risk mitigation, and inpatient and outpatient management were also addressed. This concise review addresses major findings of the symposium along with certain updates regarding vaccinations since then. These findings include: (1) severe COVID-19 infection has been associated with acute kidney injury, (2) it is essential to prevent and actively manage acute kidney injury to decrease mortality in these critically ill patients, (3) management of patients with advanced kidney disease should be geared toward minimizing their risk for exposure while making sure they are receiving adequate treatments, and (4) patients with kidney disease, especially ones in advanced stages, should be prioritized for vaccination.

9.
J Am Soc Nephrol ; 32(2): 375-384, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496655

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Recent clinical studies report that women with a history of AKI have an increased incidence of maternal and fetal adverse outcomes during pregnancy, despite fully recovering renal function prior to conception. The mechanisms contributing to such adverse outcomes in pregnancy after AKI are not yet understood. METHODS: To develop a rodent model to investigate fetal and maternal outcomes in female animals with a history of AKI, we used ischemia-reperfusion injury as an experimental model of AKI in female Sprague Dawley rats. The 12-week-old animals underwent warm bilateral ischemia-reperfusion surgery involving clamping of both renal arteries for 45 minutes or sham surgery (control). Rats were allowed to recover for 1 month prior to mating. Recovery from ischemia-reperfusion injury was confirmed by measurements of plasma creatinine and urinary protein excretion. We assessed maternal and fetal outcomes during late pregnancy on gestational day 20. RESULTS: After recovery from ischemia-reperfusion injury, compared with healthy sham-surgery controls, dams exhibited pregnancy-induced renal insufficiency with increases in plasma creatinine and urea, along with increased urinary protein excretion. Additionally, recovered ischemia-reperfusion dams experienced worse fetal outcomes compared with controls, with intrauterine growth restriction leading to higher rates of fetal demise and smaller pups. CONCLUSIONS: In this rat model, despite biochemical resolution of ischemia-reperfusion injury, subsequent pregnancy resulted in maternal renal insufficiency and significant impairments in fetal growth. This mirrors findings in recent reports in the clinical population, indicating that this model may be a useful tool to further explore the alterations in kidney function after AKI in women.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/etiology , Pregnancy Complications/etiology , Reperfusion Injury/etiology , Animals , Disease Models, Animal , Female , Kidney Function Tests , Ligation , Pregnancy , Rats , Rats, Sprague-Dawley , Renal Artery/surgery
10.
BMJ Open ; 10(12): e042035, 2020 12 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1455708

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Acute kidney injury (AKI) is common and is associated with negative long-term outcomes. Given the heterogeneity of the syndrome, the ability to predict outcomes of AKI may be beneficial towards effectively using resources and personalising AKI care. This systematic review will identify, describe and assess current models in the literature for the prediction of outcomes in hospitalised patients with AKI. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: Relevant literature from a comprehensive search across six databases will be imported into Covidence. Abstract screening and full-text review will be conducted independently by two team members, and any conflicts will be resolved by a third member. Studies to be included are cohort studies and randomised controlled trials with at least 100 subjects, adult hospitalised patients, with AKI. Only those studies evaluating multivariable predictive models reporting a statistical measure of accuracy (area under the receiver operating curve or C-statistic) and predicting resolution of AKI, progression of AKI, subsequent dialysis and mortality will be included. Data extraction will be performed independently by two team members, with a third reviewer available to resolve conflicts. Results will be reported using Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis guidelines. Risk of bias will be assessed using Prediction model Risk Of Bias ASsessment Tool. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: We are committed to open dissemination of our results through the registration of our systematic review on PROSPERO and future publication. We hope that our review provides a platform for future work in realm of using artificial intelligence to predict outcomes of common diseases. PROSPERO REGISTRATION NUMBER: CRD42019137274.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury , Artificial Intelligence , Acute Kidney Injury/diagnosis , Acute Kidney Injury/therapy , Adult , Humans , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Renal Dialysis , Systematic Reviews as Topic
13.
Pharmacol Res ; 161: 105107, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1318943

ABSTRACT

Currently, coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is spreading rapidly around the world. This study aimed to investigate whether the presence of acute kidney injury (AKI) might increase the risk of severe infection and fatality in COVID-19 patients. We searched the PubMed, Web of Science, ScienceDirect, MedRxiv and COVID-19 academic research communication platforms for studies reporting severe infection rates and case-fatality rates in COVID-19 patients with and without AKI up to June 20, 2020. The main outcomes were the comparisons of the severe infection rates and fatality rates in COVID-19 patients with and without AKI and the estimation of the odds ratio (OR) and its 95 % confidence interval (CI) for severe infection and mortality. Statistical analyses were performed with R statistical software. A total of 40 studies involving 24,527 patients with COVID-19 were included in our meta-analysis. The incidence of AKI was 10 % (95 % CI 8%-13 %) in COVID-19 patients. The patients had higher severe infection and fatality rates (55.6 % vs. 17.7 % and 63.1 % vs. 12.9 %, respectively, all P < 0.01) with COVID-19. AKI was a predictor of fatality (OR = 14.63, 95 % CI: 9.94-21.51, P < 0.00001) and severe infection (OR = 8.11, 95 % CI: 5.01-13.13, P < 0.00001) in patients with COVID-19. Higher levels of serum creatinine (Scr) and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) were associated with a significant increase in fatality [Scr: mean difference (MD): 20.19 µmol/L, 95 % CI: 14.96-25.42, P < 0.001; BUN: MD: 4.07 mmol/L, 95 % CI: 3.33-4.81, P < 0.001] and severe infection (Scr: MD: 7.78 µmol/L, 95 % CI: 4.43-11.14, P < 0.00001, BUN: MD: 2.12 mmol/L, 95 % CI: 1.74-2.50, P < 0.00001) in COVID-19 patients. In conclusion, AKI is associated with severe infection and higher fatality rates in patients with COVID-19. Clinicians should pay more attention to the monitoring and treatment of COVID-19 patients with AKI.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/complications , Acute Kidney Injury/mortality , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , Acute Kidney Injury/therapy , COVID-19/therapy , Humans
14.
Ther Drug Monit ; 43(4): 455-458, 2021 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1305444

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: In this article, we present a case of apixaban elimination prolonged by 450% in a patient with coronavirus disease 2019 because of multiple conditions, including drug-drug interaction, severe inflammation, and acute kidney injury. Therapeutic drug monitoring was used to explain unusual routine coagulation assays. This grand round highlights the importance of dialog between the clinician and a therapeutic drug monitoring consultant for optimal patient care.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , Drug Monitoring/methods , Pyrazoles/metabolism , Pyridones/metabolism , Renal Elimination/drug effects , Teaching Rounds/methods , Acute Kidney Injury/chemically induced , Acute Kidney Injury/prevention & control , Aged, 80 and over , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Drug Interactions/physiology , Factor Xa Inhibitors/adverse effects , Factor Xa Inhibitors/metabolism , Factor Xa Inhibitors/therapeutic use , Humans , Inflammation/chemically induced , Inflammation/metabolism , Inflammation/prevention & control , Male , Pyrazoles/adverse effects , Pyrazoles/therapeutic use , Pyridones/adverse effects , Pyridones/therapeutic use , Renal Elimination/physiology , Severity of Illness Index , Time Factors
15.
Kidney Med ; 3(3): 353-359.e1, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1291874

ABSTRACT

RATIONALE & OBJECTIVE: Since 1994, the Nephrology and Hypertension Department at the Cleveland Clinic has prepared and used bicarbonate-based solution for continuous venovenous hemodialysis (CVVHD) using a standard volumetric hemodialysis machine rather than purchasing from a commercial vendor. This report describes the process of producing Cleveland Clinic UltraPure Solution (CCUPS), quality and safety monitoring, economic costs, and clinical outcomes. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective study. SETTING & PARTICIPANTS: CVVHD experience at Cleveland Clinic, focusing on dialysate production, institutional factors, and patients requiring continuous kidney replacement therapy. Production is shown at www.youtube.com/watch?v=WGQgephMEwA. OUTCOMES: Feasibility, safety , and cost. RESULTS: Of 6,426 patients treated between 2011 and 2019 with continuous kidney replacement therapy, 59% were men, 71% were White, 40% had diabetes mellitus, and 74% presented with acute kidney injury. 98% of patients were treated with CVVHD using CCUPS, while the remaining 2% were treated with either continuous venovenous hemofiltration or continuous venovenous hemodiafiltration using commercial solution. The prescribed and delivered effluent doses were 24.8 (IQR) versus 20.7 mL/kg/h (IQR), respectively. CCUPS was as effective in restoring electrolyte and serum bicarbonate levels and reducing phosphate, creatinine, and serum urea nitrogen levels as compared with packaged commercial solution over a 3-day period following initiation of dialysis, with a comparable effluent dose. Among those with acute kidney injury, mortality was similar to that predicted with the 60-day acute kidney injury predicted mortality score (r = 0.997; CI: 0.989-0.999). At our institution, the cost of production for 1 L of CCUPS is $0.67, which is considerably less than the cost of commercially purchased fluid. LIMITATIONS: Observational design without a rigorous control group. CONCLUSIONS: CVVHD using locally generated dialysate is safe and cost-effective.

16.
Turk J Med Sci ; 51(3): 947-961, 2021 06 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1289069

ABSTRACT

Background/aim: Hospital-acquired acute kidney injury (HA-AKI) may commonly develop in Covid-19 patients and is expected to have higher mortality. There is little comparative data investigating the effect of HA-AKI on mortality of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients and a control group of general population suffering from Covid-19. Materials and methods: HA-AKI development was assessed in a group of stage 3­5 CKD patients and control group without CKD among adult patients hospitalized for Covid-19. The role of AKI development on the outcome (in-hospital mortality and admission to the intensive care unit [ICU]) of patients with and without CKD was compared. Results: Among 621 hospitalized patients (age 60 [IQR: 47­73]), women: 44.1%), AKI developed in 32.5% of the patients, as stage 1 in 84.2%, stage 2 in 8.4%, and stage 3 in 7.4%. AKI developed in 48.0 % of CKD patients, whereas it developed in 17.6% of patients without CKD. CKD patients with HA-AKI had the highest mortality rate of 41.1% compared to 14.3% of patients with HA-AKI but no CKD (p < 0.001). However, patients with AKI+non-CKD had similar rates of ICU admission, mechanical ventilation, and death rate to patients with CKD without AKI. Adjusted mortality risks of the AKI+non-CKD group (HR: 9.0, 95% CI: 1.9­44.2) and AKI+CKD group (HR: 7.9, 95% CI: 1.9­33.3) were significantly higher than that of the non-AKI+non-CKD group. Conclusion: AKI frequently develops in hospitalized patients due to Covid-19 and is associated with high mortality. HA-AKI has worse outcomes whether it develops in patients with or without CKD, but the worst outcome was seen in AKI+CKD patients.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/etiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Acute Kidney Injury/epidemiology , Aged , COVID-19/complications , Female , Hospital Mortality/trends , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Renal Insufficiency, Chronic/complications , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Survival Rate/trends
17.
Transpl Int ; 34(6): 1074-1082, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1286709

ABSTRACT

Evidence on the evolution of graft function in kidney transplant recipients recovering from coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) is lacking. This multicenter observational study evaluated the short-term clinical outcomes in recipients with acute kidney injury (AKI) secondary to COVID-19. Out of 452 recipients following up at five centers, 50 had AKI secondary to COVID-19. 42 recipients with at least 3-month follow-up were included. Median follow-up was 5.23 months [IQR 4.09-6.99]. Severe COVID-19 was seen in 21 (50%), and 12 (28.6%) had KDIGO stage 3 AKI. Complete recovery of graft function at 3 months was seen in 17 (40.5%) patients. Worsening of proteinuria was seen in 15 (37.5%) patients, and 4 (9.5%) patients had new onset proteinuria. Graft failure was seen in 6 (14.3%) patients. Kidney biopsy revealed acute tubular injury (9/11 patients), thrombotic microangiopathy (2/11), acute cellular rejection (2/11), and chronic active antibody-mediated rejection (3/11). Patients with incomplete recovery were likely to have lower eGFR and proteinuria at baseline, historical allograft rejection, higher admission SOFA score, orthostatic hypotension, and KDIGO stage 3 AKI. Baseline proteinuria and the presence of orthostatic hypotension independently predicted incomplete graft recovery. This shows that graft recovery may remain incomplete after AKI secondary to COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury , COVID-19 , Kidney Transplantation , Acute Kidney Injury/etiology , Humans , Kidney , Kidney Transplantation/adverse effects , SARS-CoV-2 , Transplant Recipients
18.
Int J Infect Dis ; 106: 281-288, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1279602

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The spatiotemporal trend of renal involvement in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients is still unclear. Therefore, the aim of this study was to reveal the dynamics of renal involvement superimposed COVID-19 according to time and space. METHODS: COVID-19 patients reporting renal involvement were included in this study. The following information was collected from relevant articles: first author, patient demographics, patient enrollment period, location, definition of acute kidney injury (AKI), prevalence of AKI, and use of renal replacement therapy (RRT). RESULTS: A total of 17 134 patients were finally included. The overall prevalence of AKI in COVID-19 patients was 19%, with 7% of them undergoing RRT. The overall risk of AKI in patients enrolled before March 1, 2020 (9%) was significantly lower than that after March 1, 2020 (36%) (P < 0.00001). Moreover, the overall risk of AKI outside Asia (35%) was significantly higher than that in Asia (10%) (P < 0.00001). Additionally, similar to patients requiring RRT, AKI patients were more likely to become seriously ill or even to die (P < 0.00001). CONCLUSIONS: This study found that renal involvement superimposed COVID-19, a comorbidity portending a poor prognosis, has become an increasingly serious problem over time and is more common outside Asia. Thus, more attention should be paid to the management of this specific group of patients.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/complications , COVID-19/complications , Acute Kidney Injury/therapy , Adult , Comorbidity , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prevalence , Renal Replacement Therapy , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors
19.
BMC Nephrol ; 22(1): 224, 2021 06 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1277921

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus-19 (COVID-19) has been declared a global pandemic by the World Health Organisation. Severe disease typically presents with respiratory failure but Acute Kidney Injury (AKI) and a hypercoagulable state can also occur. Early reports suggest that thrombosis may be linked with AKI. We studied the development of AKI and outcomes of patients with COVID-19 taking chronic anticoagulation therapy. METHODS: Electronic records were reviewed for all adult patients admitted to Manchester University Foundation Trust Hospitals between March 10 and April 302,020 with a diagnosis of COVID-19. Patients with end-stage kidney disease were excluded. AKI was classified as per KDIGO criteria. RESULTS: Of the 1032 patients with COVID-19 studied,164 (15.9%) were taking anticoagulant therapy prior to admission. There were similar rates of AKI between those on anticoagulants and those not anticoagulated (23.8% versus 19.7%) with no difference in the severity of AKI or requirement of renal replacement therapy between groups (1.2% versus 3.5%). Risk factors for AKI included hypertension, pre-existing renal disease and male sex. There was a higher mortality in those taking anticoagulant therapy (40.2% versus 30%). Patients taking anticoagulants were less likely to be admitted to the Intensive Care Unit (8.5% versus 17.4%) and to receive mechanical ventilation (42.9% versus 78.1%). CONCLUSION: Patients on chronic anticoagulant therapy did not have a reduced incidence or severity of AKI suggesting that AKI is unlikely to be thrombotic in nature. Therapeutic anticoagulation is currently still under investigation in randomised controlled studies to determine whether it has a potential role in COVID-19 treatment.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury , Anticoagulants/therapeutic use , COVID-19 , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Thrombophilia , Thrombosis/prevention & control , Acute Kidney Injury/complications , Acute Kidney Injury/diagnosis , Acute Kidney Injury/prevention & control , Acute Kidney Injury/virology , Aged , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Male , Preexisting Condition Coverage/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Thrombophilia/diagnosis , Thrombophilia/prevention & control , Thrombophilia/virology , Thrombosis/blood , Thrombosis/etiology , United Kingdom/epidemiology
20.
J Nephrol ; 34(4): 1019-1024, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1275023

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Acute respiratory failure (ARF) is the main clinical sign of coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19), but little is known about the outcome of acute kidney injury (AKI) associated with ARF. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study on clinical features of adult patients hospitalized with COVID-19 between March 1st and April 30th, 2020 in the district of Piacenza (Italy). RESULTS: Among 1894 hospitalized patients, 1701 affected by COVID-19 underwent at least two serum creatinine evaluations. According to KDIGO definitions, 233 of 1,701 patients (13.7%) developed AKI: 159, 34, and 40 had stage 1, 2 and 3 AKI, respectively. Patients with AKI were older (mean age 73.5 ± 14 years, range 24-95) than those without AKI (72 ± 14 years, range 20-102). In-hospital mortality was high in COVID patients (567/1701 patients, 33%), which almost doubled among AKI patients (132/233 patients, 57%), compared with those without AKI (p < 0.01). Risk factors for AKI included older age, male gender, diabetes and need for ventilation. Fourteen patients with stage 3 AKI underwent renal replacement therapy (RRT). CONCLUSIONS: Hospitalized COVID-19 patients with AKI associated with ARF have poor chances of survival. Diagnosing and preventing the progression of renal damage is fundamental in order to delay initiating RRT, especially when resources are limited.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury , COVID-19 , Acute Kidney Injury/diagnosis , Acute Kidney Injury/epidemiology , Acute Kidney Injury/therapy , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL