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1.
Cell Stem Cell ; 27(5): 702-704, 2020 11 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1506843

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has unfortunately halted lab work, conferences, and in-person networking, which is especially detrimental to researchers just starting their labs. Through social media and our reviewer networks, we met some early-career stem cell investigators impacted by the closures. Here, they introduce themselves and their research to our readers.

2.
Ghana Med J ; 54(4 Suppl): 77-85, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1436198

ABSTRACT

Background: A novel coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2 is currently causing a worldwide pandemic. The first cases of SARS-CoV-2 infection were recorded in Ghana on March 12, 2020. Since then, the country has been combatting countrywide community spread. This report describes how the Virology Department, Noguchi Memorial Institute for Medical Research (NMIMR) is supporting the Ghana Health Service (GHS) to diagnose infections with this virus in Ghana. Methods: The National Influenza Centre (NIC) in the Virology Department of the NMIMR, adopted real-time Polymerase Chain Reaction (rRT-PCR) assays for the diagnosis of the SARS-CoV-2 in January 2020. Samples from suspected cases and contact tracing across Ghana were received and processed for SARS-CoV-2. Samples were 'pooled' to enable simultaneous batch testing of samples without reduced sensitivity. Outcomes: From February 3 to August 21, the NMIMR processed 283 946 (10%) samples. Highest number of cases were reported in June when the GHS embarked on targeted contact tracing which led to an increase in number of samples processed daily, peaking at over 7,000 samples daily. There were several issues to overcome including rapid consumption of reagents and consumables. Testing however continued successfully due to revised procedures, additional equipment and improved pipeline of laboratory supplies. Test results are now provided within 24 to 48 hours of sample submission enabling more effective response and containment. Conclusion: Following the identification of the first cases of SARS-CoV-2infection by the NMIMR, the Institute has trained other centres and supported the ramping up of molecular testing capacity in Ghana. This provides a blueprint to enable Ghana to mitigate further epidemics and pandemics. Funding: The laboratory work was supported with materials from the Ghana Health Service Ministry of Health, the US Naval Medical Research Unit #3, the World Health Organization, the Jack Ma Foundation and the University of Ghana Noguchi Memorial Institute for Medical Research. Other research projects hosted by the Noguchi Memorial Institute for Medical Research contributed reagents and laboratory consumables. The funders had no role in the preparation of this manuscript.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing/methods , COVID-19/diagnosis , Infection Control/methods , Population Surveillance , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , COVID-19/epidemiology , Contact Tracing/methods , Contact Tracing/statistics & numerical data , Ghana/epidemiology , Humans , National Health Programs , SARS-CoV-2/genetics
3.
J Glaucoma ; 30(8): 711-717, 2021 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1358502

ABSTRACT

PRECIS: Vascular diseases have been linked to alterations in optic nerve head perfusion. PURPOSE: The main objective was to investigate the changes in peripapillary vessel density (VD) in post coronavirus disease (COVID-19) patients. METHODS: In this prospective pilot exploratory study, patients with COVID-19 that were attended in the Emergency Department of Hospital Clinico San Carlos (Madrid) were included. All patients underwent optic nerve head optical coherence tomography angiography using the Cirrus HD-OCT 500 with AngioPlex OCTA (Zeiss, Dublin, CA) 4 and 12 weeks after diagnosis by positive reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction test from nasopharyngeal swab at the Emergency Department. Sociodemographic data, medical history, disease severity, and laboratory work-up were collected. RESULTS: One hundred and eighty eyes of 90 patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection were included. None of the patients reported visual changes. Severe patients were older, more frequently hispanic, dyslipidemic, and presented lower lymphocytes counts, as well as increased ferritin, D-dimer, fibrinogen, and international normalized ratio levels. No changes in optic nerve head vascularization were observed when both visits were compared. No correlation was found between VD and clinical parameters, disease severity and laboratory work-up. CONCLUSIONS: Changes to peripapillary VD were not observed in patients with COVID-19 in the early months following diagnosis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Optic Disk , Fluorescein Angiography , Humans , Intraocular Pressure , Prospective Studies , Retinal Vessels , SARS-CoV-2 , Tomography, Optical Coherence
4.
Biochem Med (Zagreb) ; 31(2): 020712, 2021 Jun 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1278715

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Effective implementation and continual compliance with ISO 15189:2012 require ongoing commitment and active involvement of laboratory staff. Our aim was to assess attitudes regarding accreditation implementation by conducting a survey in three Croatian accredited medical laboratories. Materials and methods: An anonymous survey consisting of 34 questions was distributed either electronically or in a paper form a week prior to scheduled annual audits. Distributions of answers regarding age, work experience, laboratory workplace, and education level and according to the respective laboratory were compared. Results: The overall response rate was 76% (225/297). Preference towards working in an accredited laboratory and a positive attitude were revealed by 70% and 56% participants, respectively, with better process documentation as the main advantage. Only 14% of responders considered themselves completely familiar with ISO 15189:2012. Total of 68% of responders felt that accreditation increases the usual workload, with excessive paperwork as the main contributor. Half of the responders declared partial agreement that accreditation requirements and expectations were clearly explained and claimed that their suggestions were taken into account only occasionally, which was especially emphasized by technical staff. The vast majority (89%) completely follow the prescribed protocols. Only 27% consider turnaround time monitoring useful. Competence assessment is considered efficient by 41% of responders. The majority (73%) prefer an online audit in times of COVID-19. Conclusions: Despite an overall positive attitude towards accreditation, further efforts are needed in providing better education about ISO 15189:2012 for technical staff and modifying formats of competence assessment, in order to achieve better adherence to ISO 15189:2012 requirements.


Subject(s)
Accreditation , Attitude of Health Personnel , Laboratories, Hospital/standards , Adult , Croatia , Female , Humans , Male , Quality Assurance, Health Care , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
Kardiol Pol ; 79(5): 595-603, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1268476

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic resulted in an urgent need to reorganize the work of echocardiography laboratories in order to ensure the safety of patients and the protection of physicians, technicians, and other staff members. In the previous Expert Opinion of the Working Group on Echocardiography of Polish Cardiac Society we provided recommendations for the echocardiographic services, in order to ensure maximum possible safety and efficiency of imagers facing epidemic threat. Now, with much better knowledge and larger experience in treating COVID-19 patients and with introduction of vaccination programs, we present updated recommendations for performing transthoracic and transesophageal examinations, including information on the potential impact of personnel and the patient vaccination program, and growing numbers of convalescents on performance of echocardiographic laboratories, with the goal of their ultimate reopening.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Echocardiography , Expert Testimony , Humans , Poland , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
6.
BMC Psychiatry ; 21(1): 271, 2021 05 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1243806

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Healthcare workers (HCWs) who are in the frontline during the COVID-19 pandemic are often under significant pressures that may predispose them to symptoms of poor mental health. This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of anxiety and depression among HCWs and factors correlated with mental health concerns during the COVID-19 pandemic in Bangladesh. And, it also aimed to evaluate the psychometric properties of the Bangla version of the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). METHODS: A cross-sectional survey was conducted between July and August, 2020. A self-reported online questionnaire was utilized to collect data. The survey included questions concerning socio-demographic, lifestyle, and work setting, as well as the HADS. A confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) and multiple linear regression analysis were performed. RESULTS: Data from 803 HCWs (50.7% male; mean age: 27.3 [SD = 6.9]; age range: 18-58 years) were included in the final analysis. The Bangla HADS was psychometrically sound, and demonstrated good internal consistency and reliability (α = 0.83), and excellent construct validity. Prevalence estimates of anxiety and depression were 69.5%, and 39.5%, respectively, for less severe symptomology (at least borderline abnormal), and 41.2% and 15.7% for more severe (at least abnormal) symptomology. Regression analyses with the total HADS score as a dependent variable revealed significant (p < 0.05) associations with female gender, moderate and poor health status, infrequent physical exercising, smoking, having had regrets about one's profession because of the pandemic and associated experiences, not updating on the latest COVID-19-related research, experiencing discrimination in the workplace, and facing social problems due to working in a lab or hospital during the COVID-19 pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: Symptoms of anxiety and depression are prevalent among HCWs during the COVID-19 pandemic in Bangladesh. The findings suggest a need for screening for mental health concerns, and employing early intervention to help these individuals.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Adolescent , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , Bangladesh/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Health Personnel , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prevalence , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
7.
Epilepsia Open ; 6(2): 255-265, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1241502

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has changed the face of many practices throughout the world. Through necessity to minimize spread and provide clinical care to those with severe disease, focus has been on limiting face-to-face contact. Research in many areas has been put on hold. We sought to determine the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on epilepsy research from international basic science and clinical researchers. Responses to five questions were solicited through a convenience sample by direct email and through postings on the ILAE social media accounts and an ILAE online platform (utilizing Slack). Information was collected from 15 respondents in 11 countries by email or via Zoom interviews between May 19, 2020, and June 4, 2020. Several themes emerged including a move to virtual working, project delays with laboratory work halted and clinical work reduced, funding concerns, a worry about false data with regard to COVID research and concern about research time lost. However, a number of positive outcomes were highlighted, not least the efficiency of online working and other adaptations that could be sustained in the future.


Subject(s)
Biomedical Research , COVID-19 , Epilepsy/therapy , Telemedicine , Biomedical Research/methods , Biomedical Research/trends , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
8.
J Hematol ; 10(2): 83-88, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1234947

ABSTRACT

This is a case report of a 63-year-old African American female with a past medical history most significant for metastatic cholangiocarcinoma that presented for evaluation of persistent shortness of breath. Initial workup was remarkable for refractory anemia, moderate schistocytes on peripheral smear and lab work suggestive of a hemolytic anemia. Due to concern for thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP), she subsequently underwent several rounds of plasma exchange without significant improvement. Secondary to progressive renal failure, patient eventually had a renal biopsy with findings remarkable for thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA). Simultaneously, patient was also diagnosed with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection. After a few weeks of supportive care, she was stable for discharge. Unfortunately, she did become dialysis dependent. Prior to hospital admission, she was being treated for metastatic cholangiocarcinoma and had received chemotherapy with gemcitabine. Her last chemotherapy session was approximately 3 weeks prior to her first hospitalization. Furthermore, although her hemolytic work did suggest TMA, it was not consistent with the diagnosis of TTP. She was transferred to a tertiary care center where hemolytic labs were trended, and supportive care was maximized. In light of the current COVID-19 pandemic, it is crucial to further investigate the pathophysiology of TMA in patients with active malignancies and COVID-19 infections. To our knowledge, this is the first case of TMA in a patient with both metastatic cholangiocarcinoma and COVID-19 infection.

9.
Phys Ther ; 101(8)2021 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1221482

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to explore the prevalence, personal- and work-related exposures, and signs and symptoms among physical therapists during the first wave of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in Italy. METHODS: This cross-sectional, survey-based study collected demographic and exposure data from physical therapists from April to May 2020. All physical therapists working in inpatient and outpatient care in Italy were eligible. A self-administered questionnaire was distributed among all eligible physical therapists to collect (1) demographic characteristics, (2-3) personal- and work-related exposures, and (4) signs and symptoms of COVID-19. Factors associated with a COVID-19-positive nasopharyngeal swab (NPS) were explored through logistic regression models and multivariate methods. RESULTS: A total of 15,566 respondents completed the survey, with a response rate of 43.3%, achieving high statistical precision (99% CI, 1% type I error). Among physical therapists who received NPS testing, 13.1% (95% CI = 12.1-14.1%) had a positive result, with a peak reached in March 2020 (36%). The top 5 symptoms were fatigue and tiredness (69.1%), loss of smell (64.5%), aches and pains (60.8%), loss of taste (58.3%), and headache (51.1%). No symptoms were reported by 8.9%. Working in a health care institution (odds ratio [OR] = 12.0; 95% CI = 7.8-18.4), being reallocated to a different unit (OR = 1.9; 95% CI = 1.3-2.7), and changing job tasks (OR = 1.6; 95% CI = 1.2-2.3) increased the risk of being COVID-19 positive. In therapists with a confirmed diagnosis of COVID-19, comorbidities were associated with male sex and age older than 51 years. CONCLUSION: During the first wave in Italy, almost 1 out of 7 physical therapists tested positive on the COVID-19 NPS test. Considering personal- and work-related exposures, health care organizations should adopt prevention measures and adequate preparedness to prevent high rate of infections during future pandemics. IMPACT: This is the largest investigation about the spread of and main risk factors for COVID-19 in the physical therapy field.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/statistics & numerical data , Occupational Exposure/statistics & numerical data , Physical Therapists , Adult , Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Prevalence , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
10.
Cureus ; 13(4): e14250, 2021 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1218713

ABSTRACT

Acute myocarditis is commonly caused by viral infections resulting from viruses such as adenovirus, enteroviruses, and, rarely, coronavirus. It presents with nonspecific symptoms like chest pain, dyspnea, palpitation, or arrhythmias and can progress to dilated cardiomyopathy or heart failure. Fulminant myocarditis is a potentially life-threatening form of the condition and presents as acute, severe heart failure with cardiogenic shock. In this report, we discuss a case of a 41-year-old female who presented with cough and chest pain of two days' duration. The patient had a new-onset atrial flutter. Her chest auscultation revealed bilateral crackles. Laboratory workup revealed elevated troponin levels, and the patient tested positive for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) by nasopharyngeal swab polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Transthoracic echocardiogram revealed a low left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction of 35-40% compared to 55% one year prior, as well as a granular appearance of LV myocardium. The patient's condition subsequently improved clinically and she was discharged home. Due to cardiac involvement and characteristic myocardial appearance on the echocardiogram, cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) imaging was performed for further evaluation about two months from the date of admission. CMR showed extensive myocardial inflammation with a typical pattern of sub-epicardial and mid-wall delayed enhancement, confirming the diagnosis of myocarditis. This case highlights myocarditis as a potential complication of COVID-19 that requires early diagnosis and proper management to improve patients' quality of life. Additionally, we highlight the features of myocarditis on CMR in the acute phase and two months after clinical recovery.

11.
Lancet ; 397(10286): 1725-1735, 2021 05 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1201329

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: BNT162b2 mRNA and ChAdOx1 nCOV-19 adenoviral vector vaccines have been rapidly rolled out in the UK from December, 2020. We aimed to determine the factors associated with vaccine coverage for both vaccines and documented the vaccine effectiveness of the BNT162b2 mRNA vaccine in a cohort of health-care workers undergoing regular asymptomatic testing. METHODS: The SIREN study is a prospective cohort study among staff (aged ≥18 years) working in publicly-funded hospitals in the UK. Participants were assigned into either the positive cohort (antibody positive or history of infection [indicated by previous positivity of antibody or PCR tests]) or the negative cohort (antibody negative with no previous positive test) at the beginning of the follow-up period. Baseline risk factors were collected at enrolment, symptom status was collected every 2 weeks, and vaccination status was collected through linkage to the National Immunisations Management System and questionnaires. Participants had fortnightly asymptomatic SARS-CoV-2 PCR testing and monthly antibody testing, and all tests (including symptomatic testing) outside SIREN were captured. Data cutoff for this analysis was Feb 5, 2021. The follow-up period was Dec 7, 2020, to Feb 5, 2021. The primary outcomes were vaccinated participants (binary ever vacinated variable; indicated by at least one vaccine dose recorded by at least one of the two vaccination data sources) for the vaccine coverage analysis and SARS-CoV-2 infection confirmed by a PCR test for the vaccine effectiveness analysis. We did a mixed-effect logistic regression analysis to identify factors associated with vaccine coverage. We used a piecewise exponential hazard mixed-effects model (shared frailty-type model) using a Poisson distribution to calculate hazard ratios to compare time-to-infection in unvaccinated and vaccinated participants and estimate the impact of the BNT162b2 vaccine on all PCR-positive infections (asymptomatic and symptomatic). This study is registered with ISRCTN, number ISRCTN11041050, and is ongoing. FINDINGS: 23 324 participants from 104 sites (all in England) met the inclusion criteria for this analysis and were enrolled. Included participants had a median age of 46·1 years (IQR 36·0-54·1) and 19 692 (84%) were female; 8203 (35%) were assigned to the positive cohort at the start of the analysis period, and 15 121 (65%) assigned to the negative cohort. Total follow-up time was 2 calendar months and 1 106 905 person-days (396 318 vaccinated and 710 587 unvaccinated). Vaccine coverage was 89% on Feb 5, 2021, 94% of whom had BNT162b2 vaccine. Significantly lower coverage was associated with previous infection, gender, age, ethnicity, job role, and Index of Multiple Deprivation score. During follow-up, there were 977 new infections in the unvaccinated cohort, an incidence density of 14 infections per 10 000 person-days; the vaccinated cohort had 71 new infections 21 days or more after their first dose (incidence density of eight infections per 10 000 person-days) and nine infections 7 days after the second dose (incidence density four infections per 10 000 person-days). In the unvaccinated cohort, 543 (56%) participants had typical COVID-19 symptoms and 140 (14%) were asymptomatic on or 14 days before their PCR positive test date, compared with 29 (36%) with typical COVID-19 symptoms and 15 (19%) asymptomatic in the vaccinated cohort. A single dose of BNT162b2 vaccine showed vaccine effectiveness of 70% (95% CI 55-85) 21 days after first dose and 85% (74-96) 7 days after two doses in the study population. INTERPRETATION: Our findings show that the BNT162b2 vaccine can prevent both symptomatic and asymptomatic infection in working-age adults. This cohort was vaccinated when the dominant variant in circulation was B1.1.7 and shows effectiveness against this variant. FUNDING: Public Health England, UK Department of Health and Social Care, and the National Institute for Health Research.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/supply & distribution , Health Personnel , Occupational Diseases/prevention & control , Occupational Exposure/prevention & control , RNA, Messenger , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Cohort Studies , England , Humans , Prospective Studies , Treatment Outcome
12.
Acta Inform Med ; 29(1): 4-9, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1200300

ABSTRACT

Background: Universities have halted non-essential services, with many restricting campus-based teaching, and continuing courses through online resources, including (controversially) lab-work. Such technologically enhanced approaches have been proven to have high levels of engagement among university students. Objective: This study focuses on the perception of quality of online learning by first-year university students, between two semesters, amidst the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: A 24-item questionnaire was designed with Likert response scale. It consisted of general perception questions of academic life and questions specific to the quality of delivery of a specific class. Eighty one eligible students were asked to fill the same questionnaire for each semester. Students' responses and their grades from the final exams in each semester were compared. Results: Out of 81 eligible students, 75.31% of students responded to the survey. They were less interested in their studies in the second "online" semester (p=0.05). Students expressed dissatisfaction with the quality of online classes (p=0.03). Academic life fulfillment was also affected (p=0.02). Students' perception of the amount of free time they had between semesters did not change significantly (p=0.16). Students appeared dissatisfied with their active participation during the online class (p=0.007), even though they felt less stressed attending lectures from home (p=0.041). However, they found that workload was bearable and similar between semesters (p=0.83). Students also had significantly more trouble concentrating during online lectures (p<0.001). Students' grades significantly improved by an average of 1.07 (out of 10) in the final exams at the end of the second semester (p<0.001). Conclusion: These unprecedented circumstances require innovation and cooperation on the part of university programs to maintain rigorous standards of higher education, taking into account students' evolving perception and needs.

13.
SAGE Open Med Case Rep ; 9: 2050313X211005996, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1199845

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) was first identified at the end of 2019 as a cluster of pneumonia cases in Wuhan, China. By February 2020, this virus quickly spread, becoming a global pandemic. The spectrum of symptomatic infection severity can range from mild, severe, and critical disease. Many correlated comorbidities were established, including smoking, socioeconomic background, gender (male prevalence), hypertension, obesity, cardiovascular disease, chronic lung disease, diabetes mellitus, cancer, and chronic kidney disease. In an extensive literature search, post-COVID-19 necrotizing Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia with pneumothorax has not been recorded. We present a case about a 62-year-old male who presented with symptoms of COVID-19 with many underlying comorbidities, including hypertension and hyperlipidemia. He was on ventilatory support during his first week in the hospital and then received supplemental oxygenation as he recovered from his COVID-19 pneumonia. Nearly a month and a half after his initial presentation, he quickly decompensated and was started on supplemental oxygen and the necessary treatments. It was then, with the aid of lab work and imaging, that we determined that he had developed necrotizing Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia with pneumothorax. He was adequately treated, and once he was stable, he was discharged home and was told to continue his therapy.

14.
Bundesgesundheitsblatt Gesundheitsforschung Gesundheitsschutz ; 64(4): 388-394, 2021 Apr.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1196560

ABSTRACT

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic the routine surveillance system for infectious diseases had to be adapted. The disease was unknown before the first cases were reported under a catch-all notification requirement for new and threatening pathogens and diseases, but specific notification requirements for SARS-CoV­2 detection by laboratories as well as for suspect cases of COVID-19 diagnosed by physicians were soon integrated in the infectious diseases protection act. This article describes how the notification system for infectious diseases was adapted in 2020 to meet the requirements of the COVID-19 pandemic.In addition to the notification requirements, the list of data that is collected through the notification system was also amended. To facilitate the work of laboratories and local health authorities we have established the possibility for electronic reporting.Additionally, the software used for case and contact management within the local health authorities had to be adapted accordingly.COVID-19 notification data is important for the assessment of the current epidemiological situation and daily updated data was published by the Robert Koch Institute. To ensure timely data and good data quality, the IT infrastructure within the public health system has to be further modernized and the electronic notification system should be further strengthened.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communicable Diseases , Communicable Diseases/epidemiology , Disease Notification , Germany/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Population Surveillance , SARS-CoV-2
15.
J Thromb Haemost ; 19(7): 1819-1822, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1194161

ABSTRACT

Cases of unusual thrombosis and thrombocytopenia after administration of the ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 vaccine (AstraZeneca) have been reported. The term vaccine-induced prothrombotic immune thrombocytopenia (VIPIT) was coined to reflect this new phenomenon. In vitro experiments with VIPIT patient sera indicated that high-dose intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIG) competitively inhibit the platelet-activating properties of ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 vaccine induced antibodies. Here, we report a case of a 62-year-old woman who had received this vaccine and developed VIPIT. She visited the emergency ward because of petechiae and hematomas. In the laboratory work-up, thrombocytopenia, low fibrinogen, elevated D-dimer, and positivity in the platelet factor 4/heparin-enzyme-immunoassay were present. Signs and symptoms of thrombosis were absent. Upon immediate therapy with non-heparin anticoagulation, high-dose IVIG, and prednisolone, laboratory parameters steadily improved and the patient was discharged from hospital without thrombotic complications. We conclude that early initiation of VIPIT treatment results in a swift response without thrombotic complications.


Subject(s)
Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic , Thrombocytopenia , Vaccines , COVID-19 Vaccines , Female , Heparin , Humans , Middle Aged , Platelet Factor 4 , Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic/chemically induced , Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic/diagnosis , Purpura, Thrombocytopenic, Idiopathic/drug therapy , Thrombocytopenia/chemically induced , Thrombocytopenia/diagnosis , Thrombocytopenia/drug therapy
16.
J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg ; 50(1): 24, 2021 Apr 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1192204

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The SARS-CoV-2 (COVID) pandemic has resulted in an increase in virtual care. While some specialties are well suited to virtual care, Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery could be limited due to reliance on physical examination and nasal endoscopy, including Rhinology. It is likely virtual care will remain integrated for the foreseeable future and it is important to determine the strengths and weaknesses of this treatment modality for rhinology. METHODS: A survey on virtual care in rhinology was distributed to 61 Canadian rhinologists. The primary objective was to determine how virtual care compared to in-person care in each area of a typical appointment. Other areas focused on platforms used to deliver virtual care and which patients could be appropriately assessed by virtual visits. RESULTS: 43 participants responded (response rate 70.5%). The majority of participants use the telephone as their primary platform. History taking and reviewing results (lab work, imaging) were reported to be equivalent in virtual care. Non-urgent follow up and new patients were thought to be the most appropriate for virtual care. The inability to perform exams and nasal endoscopy were reported to be significant limitations. CONCLUSION: It is important to understand the strengths and limitations of virtual care. These results identify the perceived strengths and weaknesses of virtual care in rhinology, and will help rhinologists understand the role of virtual care in their practices.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Otolaryngology/organization & administration , Otorhinolaryngologic Diseases/epidemiology , Pandemics , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Canada/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Otorhinolaryngologic Diseases/therapy , Patient Satisfaction , Surveys and Questionnaires
17.
Bundesgesundheitsblatt Gesundheitsforschung Gesundheitsschutz ; 64(4): 388-394, 2021 Apr.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1179026

ABSTRACT

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic the routine surveillance system for infectious diseases had to be adapted. The disease was unknown before the first cases were reported under a catch-all notification requirement for new and threatening pathogens and diseases, but specific notification requirements for SARS-CoV­2 detection by laboratories as well as for suspect cases of COVID-19 diagnosed by physicians were soon integrated in the infectious diseases protection act. This article describes how the notification system for infectious diseases was adapted in 2020 to meet the requirements of the COVID-19 pandemic.In addition to the notification requirements, the list of data that is collected through the notification system was also amended. To facilitate the work of laboratories and local health authorities we have established the possibility for electronic reporting.Additionally, the software used for case and contact management within the local health authorities had to be adapted accordingly.COVID-19 notification data is important for the assessment of the current epidemiological situation and daily updated data was published by the Robert Koch Institute. To ensure timely data and good data quality, the IT infrastructure within the public health system has to be further modernized and the electronic notification system should be further strengthened.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communicable Diseases , Communicable Diseases/epidemiology , Disease Notification , Germany/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Population Surveillance , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Cell Stem Cell ; 28(4): 600-602, 2021 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1164507

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has unfortunately halted lab work, conferences, and in-person networking, which is especially detrimental to researchers just starting their labs. Through social media and our reviewer networks, we met some early-career stem cell investigators impacted by the closures. Here, they introduce themselves and their research to our readers.


Subject(s)
Research Personnel , Stem Cells , COVID-19 , Humans
19.
Curr Opin Rheumatol ; 33(3): 262-269, 2021 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1142724

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: In early 2020, the COVID-19 global pandemic shifted most healthcare to remote delivery methods to protect patients, clinicians, and hospital staff. Such remote care delivery methods include the use of telehealth technologies including clinical video telehealth or telephone visits. Prior to this, research on the acceptability, feasibility, and efficacy of telehealth applied to rheumatology, or telerheumatology, has been limited. RECENT FINDINGS: Telerheumatology visits were found to be noninferior to in-person visits and are often more time and cost effective for patients. Clinicians and patients both noted the lack of a physical exam in telehealth visits and patients missed the opportunity to have lab work done or other diagnostic tests they are afforded with in-person visits. Overall, patients and clinicians had positive attitudes toward the use of telerheumatology and agreed on its usefulness, even beyond the pandemic. SUMMARY: Although telerheumatology has the potential to expand the reach of rheumatology practice, some of the most vulnerable patients still lack the most basic resources required for a telehealth visit. As the literature on telerheumatology continues to expand, attention should be paid to health equity, the digital divide, as well as patient preferences in order to foster true shared decision-making over telehealth.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Rheumatic Diseases/therapy , Rheumatology/methods , Telemedicine/trends , Comorbidity , Humans , Patient Preference , Rheumatic Diseases/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
20.
BMJ Case Rep ; 14(3)2021 Mar 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1138315

ABSTRACT

We report a case of a 91-year-old Caucasian woman with a history of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia who developed acute hypoxic respiratory failure (AHRF) requiring intubation for less than 24 hours after receiving rasburicase. Laboratory workup was significant for methemoglobinemia and acute anaemia, and blood film demonstrated evidence of oxidative haemolysis with bite cells. The patient was given a presumptive diagnosis of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency and was managed conservatively with successful resolution of AHRF and stabilisation of haemoglobin level. Seven days after admission, she passed away due to subsequent complications; hence, follow-up G6PD level could not be obtained. Haemolytic anaemia and methemoglobinemia in the setting of recent rasburicase administration should raise clinical suspicion for G6PD deficiency. In non-emergent cases, patients should be screened prior to receiving rasburicase regardless of risk factors. Because rasburicase is often needed emergently, patients at high risk of tumour lysis syndrome should be screened early for G6PD deficiency.


Subject(s)
Glucosephosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency , Methemoglobinemia , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Glucosephosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency/complications , Hemolysis , Humans , Methemoglobinemia/chemically induced , Methemoglobinemia/diagnosis , Methemoglobinemia/drug therapy , Urate Oxidase/adverse effects
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