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1.
Curr Psychol ; 41(2): 1057-1064, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1748411

ABSTRACT

As in the whole world, the Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic poses many threats to healthcare workers in our country too, which leads to anxiety in healthcare workers. This study was conducted to explore the anxiety levels of healthcare workers during the COVID-19 pandemic. The study is a cross-sectional study. The population consisted of health care workers employed in hospitals in seven regions in Turkey. All volunteer healthcare workers were included in the study, and 356 healthcare workers responded to the questionnaire. The data were collected using the State Anxiety Inventory and a questionnaire created by the researchers using an online questionnaire between 10 May 2020 and 15 May 2020. In the evaluation of the data, mean, standard deviation, percentages, t-test, one-way ANOVA, Pearson correlation, and multiple regression analysis were used. 33% of healthcare workers did not have anxiety, 50% had mild, and 17% had severe anxiety. The anxiety scores of those who were nurses (p < 0.001), who were working in the emergency room (p < 0.001), who were involved in treatment for COVID-19 patients (p = 0.040), who left their homes to prevent transmission to their families and relatives during the pandemic (p = 0.038), and whose working hours had changed (p = 0.036) were found to be significantly higher. It was observed that there was a positive and significant relationship between the fear of death and disease transmission, uncertainty, loneliness, anger, and hopelessness, and anxiety levels in healthcare workers. The main factors that significantly affected the anxiety levels of healthcare workers were male gender, weekly working hours, the presence of chronic diseases, and feelings of anger and uncertainty. In conclusion, during the COVID-19 pandemic, healthcare workers experienced some negative emotions, their anxiety levels increased, and they were psychologically affected. Planning psychosocial interventions for healthcare workers in the high-risk group will make significant contributions to the health system.

2.
Pediatr Int ; 64(1): e14887, 2021 Jun 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1673263

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since the emergence and worldwide spread of the new coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, it has caused people to experience adverse psychological effects. This study aimed to assess anxiety levels during COVID-19 in children with chronic kidney disease (CKD), including nephrotic syndrome (NS) and kidney transplantation (Tx). METHODS: A case-controlled, cross-sectional study was conducted with children aged 10-18 years, who had a diagnosis of CKD or NS, or Tx, and followed in our center between April and July 2020. A healthy control group was recruited with age- and gender-matched children. A questionnaire with printed and online versions was designed in three parts: the first addressed demographic characteristics, the second addressed opinions about the pandemic, and the third was the Turkish version of the Revised Child Anxiety and Depression Scale - Child Version. RESULTS: A total of 88 children completed the questionnaire. The patient and control groups were similar in terms of gender, age, household members and history of psychiatric treatment. Both groups stated that coronavirus is a risky disease for children (63.6%), and that they were afraid of contagion (69.3%). Only half of them were receiving realistic and informative answers from family members. In the Revised Child Anxiety and Depression Scale - Child Version, 66% of them received a high score on at least one subscale. The social phobia scores of the control group were higher than those of the patient group, although the proportion of high scores was similar in both groups. The ratio of high-scored participants was higher in CKD patients for panic disorder, and was lower in the immunosuppressive agent group for social phobia. CONCLUSION: The current COVID-19 pandemic is a disaster that children encounter for the first time in their lives. It does not exclusively cause anxiety among children with chronic kidney diseases but also affects healthy children.

3.
Telemed J E Health ; 27(12): 1355-1362, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1574147

ABSTRACT

Introduction: In this study, we aimed to detect anxiety levels of the physicians during the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and to assess the knowledge, perspective, and willingness of the physicians about telemedicine. Materials and Methods: This was a survey study of physicians from different specialties who provided patient care during the pandemic in Turkey. A total of 824 physicians responded to questionnaire, which consisted of 5 sections: (1) demographic characteristics; (2) anxiety level; (3) knowledge; (4) perspective; and (5) willingness to use telemedicine. Results: Fifty-six percent of the participants were found to experience mild-to-severe anxiety during the pandemic. It was found that the early career physicians most likely report anxiety about COVID-19 (p = 0.012). Physicians working in training and research hospital settings had higher Beck Anxiety Inventory scores compared to their colleagues working in private health care institutions (p = 0.011). Anxiety levels of physicians were not affected by working experience, existence of comorbidities, or living conditions of the participants (p = 0.138, p = 0.317, and p = 0.123, respectively). The results showed that the participants had a low level of knowledge about telemedicine. Only 61.1% of the physicians stated that they had heard of telemedicine before. The physicians who experienced telemedicine before (N = 76, 9.2% of all the participants) were more likely to find telemedicine beneficial both in pandemic (p < 0.001) and postpandemic period (p = 0.002). Conclusions: About half of our physicians had different levels of anxiety during the pandemic, and this anxiety seemed to be more related to infecting their relatives. Participants thought that providing health care services with telemedicine during the pandemic period would be beneficial and reduce the spread of hospital-acquired COVID-19. However, there was no consensus among the participants regarding the use of telemedicine in the postpandemic period.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Physicians , Telemedicine , Humans , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
4.
Pediatr Int ; 64(1): e14887, 2021 Jun 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1270866

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since the emergence and worldwide spread of the new coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, it has caused people to experience adverse psychological effects. This study aimed to assess anxiety levels during COVID-19 in children with chronic kidney disease (CKD), including nephrotic syndrome (NS) and kidney transplantation (Tx). METHODS: A case-controlled, cross-sectional study was conducted with children aged 10-18 years, who had a diagnosis of CKD or NS, or Tx, and followed in our center between April and July 2020. A healthy control group was recruited with age- and gender-matched children. A questionnaire with printed and online versions was designed in three parts: the first addressed demographic characteristics, the second addressed opinions about the pandemic, and the third was the Turkish version of the Revised Child Anxiety and Depression Scale - Child Version. RESULTS: A total of 88 children completed the questionnaire. The patient and control groups were similar in terms of gender, age, household members and history of psychiatric treatment. Both groups stated that coronavirus is a risky disease for children (63.6%), and that they were afraid of contagion (69.3%). Only half of them were receiving realistic and informative answers from family members. In the Revised Child Anxiety and Depression Scale - Child Version, 66% of them received a high score on at least one subscale. The social phobia scores of the control group were higher than those of the patient group, although the proportion of high scores was similar in both groups. The ratio of high-scored participants was higher in CKD patients for panic disorder, and was lower in the immunosuppressive agent group for social phobia. CONCLUSION: The current COVID-19 pandemic is a disaster that children encounter for the first time in their lives. It does not exclusively cause anxiety among children with chronic kidney diseases but also affects healthy children.

5.
Health Care Women Int ; 41(11-12): 1240-1254, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1263595

ABSTRACT

In this study, researchers aimed to determine exercise habits, physical activity (PA) levels and anxiety levels of postmenopausal women (PMw) during the self-quarantine period of the COVID-19 pandemic. 104 PMw (59.00 ± 6.61 years old) participated in the study. It was found that PMw who had exercise habits before the pandemic period had higher PA levels, and the women with high anxiety levels during the pandemic had lower PA levels (p < .05). Anxiety levels and PA were negatively associated with each other. Numbers of grandchildren also affected the PA and anxiety levels of the PMw negatively. Women should be encouraged to initiate or maintain PA levels in all circumstances.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Exercise/psychology , Postmenopause/psychology , Aged , Cyprus/epidemiology , Female , Habits , Humans , Mental Health , Middle Aged , Quarantine , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
6.
Reprod Health ; 18(1): 111, 2021 Jun 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1259201

ABSTRACT

|BACKGROUND: Women are at a higher risk for depression progression, especially during pregnancy. The current study purposed to investigate depression, anxiety, and stress levels of pregnant mothers in the initial stage of the COVID-19 infection in the southwest of Iran. METHODS: This cross-sectional study was conducted during March and April, 2020, in Shiraz, Iran. Pregnant mothers registered in maternity clinics affiliated with Shiraz University of Medical Sciences were included. An online self-administered checklist was used. It included socio-demographic, obstetric and medical histories, and the short form of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales (DASS-21) to evaluate depression, anxiety, and stress. A p-value < 0.05 was considered significant. RESULTS: In total, 540 pregnant mothers answered the questionnaire. 83.5% had no comorbidity. Abnormal depression scores were significantly higher in those who had no insurance (OR = 2.5) and in those with poor self-rated health (SRH) (OR = 27.8). Pregnant mothers with lower SRH and two or more comorbidities had a higher chance of having an abnormal level of anxiety subscale (6.9, 3.7 times, retrospectively). CONCLUSION: The results revealed that an abnormal level of depression was associated with SRH and medical insurance status. Moreover, the number of comorbidities and poor SRH significantly increased the chance of achieving abnormal anxiety levels in pregnant mothers during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Children of mothers who experience high psychological distress during pregnancy are more susceptible to cognitive and behavioral problems. Few studies have reported the psychological distress of pregnant mothers during the COVID-19 pandemic, and it may be considered as a risk factor for child developmental disorders.In total, 540 out of 920 registered pregnant mothers in maternity clinics affiliated with Shiraz University of Medical Sciences answered the online questionnaire and were included in this study. An online self-administered data gathering tool was used so that the respondents felt more secure. The data gathering tool had three main parts: socio-demographic, obstetric and medical histories, and the short form of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales (DASS-21) which consisting of 21 questions, 7 in each subscale; depression (DASS-D), anxiety (DASS-A) and stress (DASS-S).Pregnant mothers who had two or more comorbidities or those with lower self-rated health (SRH) had a higher chance of having an abnormal anxiety level. Depression levels were higher in pregnant mothers who had no insurance. Additionally, depression symptoms were more prevalent in pregnant mothers who had low health status than in those with good or intermediated SRH.In conclusion, the COVID-19 pandemic contributes to a significant increase in depression and anxiety symptoms among pregnant mothers. Moreover, lack of insurance, poor SRH, and having comorbidities are significantly associated with increasing depressive and anxiety scores.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Depression/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pregnant Women/psychology , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Iran/epidemiology , Mothers , Pregnancy , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
7.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(11)2021 May 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1244033

ABSTRACT

Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection, also known as COVID-19, has developed into an alarming situation around the world. Healthcare workers are playing the role of frontline defense to safeguard the lives of everyone during the COVID-19 pandemic. The present study aimed to investigate the anxiety levels and sleep quality among frontline and second-line healthcare workers during the COVID-19 pandemic. In this cross-sectional study, a validated, self-administered, electronic questionnaire was distributed through email to healthcare workers. The selection of 1678 healthcare workers was based on a convenience sampling technique. The General Anxiety Disorder-7 (GAD-7) and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) instrument scales were used to assess healthcare workers' anxiety levels and sleep quality during the COVID-19 pandemic. Out of 1678 respondents, 1200 (71.5%) were frontline healthcare workers, while 478 (28.5%) were second-line healthcare workers. Among all the healthcare workers, 435 (25.92%) were experiencing moderate to severe anxiety. Among them, 713 (59.4%) frontline healthcare workers were experiencing anxiety in comparison with 277 (57.9%) second-line healthcare workers. Severe anxiety symptoms were seen in 137 (11.41%) frontline healthcare workers compared to 44 (9.20%) second-line healthcare workers. In total, 1376 (82.0%) healthcare workers were found to have poor sleep quality; 975 (58.10%) were frontline, and 407 (23.89%) were second-line healthcare workers. The highest poor sleep quality levels were found among 642 (84.6%) of the healthcare workers who work in frontline areas (emergency departments, intensive care units, and wards) compared to 734 (79.9%) of the healthcare workers who work in second-line areas. These findings provide a substantial contribution to the consolidation of evidence concerning the negative impact of the pandemic on the mental health of healthcare workers (HCWs). These results have established an association that the COVID-19 pandemic causes larger negative psychological symptoms in frontline healthcare workers, such as severe anxiety and poor sleep quality. Preventive measures to minimize anxiety levels and maintain sleep quality, addressing this issue nationally and globally, are essential to support the healthcare workers who are sacrificing their mental health for the future of our nations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Anxiety/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression , Health Personnel , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep
8.
Perspect Psychiatr Care ; 58(1): 149-158, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1238470

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study aims to compare the anxiety levels of COVID-19 patients, individuals under quarantine, and healthy individuals in society. DESIGN AND METHODS: This cross-sectional study was conducted from May 25, 2020 to June 25, 2020 in a city located in the northwest of Turkey. The data were collected using a personal information form, the Beck Anxiety Scale, administered in face-to-face interviews, and online questionnaires. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney U, and logistic regression analyses. FINDINGS: The anxiety level of individuals under quarantine (Median: min-max = 1: 0-55) was significantly lower statistically compared to that of the rest of the society (Median: min-max = 6: 0-63) and hospitalized COVID-19 patients (Median: min-max = 5: 0-42) (p = 0.0001). Female gender, being 61 years of age and older, having psychiatric and chronic illnesses, and experiencing disrupted sleep patterns were determined to be the factors associated with high levels of anxiety. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: This study found that society in general and hospitalized COVID-19 patients had high anxiety levels. The study results can be useful for creating training and population-based screening programs to control the anxiety of individuals under quarantine, hospitalized COVID-19 patients, and the rest of the society during the pandemic. Additionally, the finding from this study on groups at risk for anxiety will provide important data for future research on this subject and for the planning of health services offered to these groups.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Quarantine , Anxiety/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression , Female , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Asia Pac Psychiatry ; 13(2): e12406, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1236338

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The long-term closing of schools and home-quarantine during the COVID-19 pandemic cause negative effects on the physical and mental health of young people. Studies evaluating the mental health of adolescents during the pandemic are limited in the literature. AIM: In our study, it was aimed to determine the results of home-quarantine measures taken for adolescents during the pandemic and the affecting factors. METHOD: This study was conducted as an online cross-sectional self-report questionnaire and included children aged between 12 and 18 years. The data were obtained from the children of volunteer families via Facebook family groups, and Google Forms questionnaires sent by the child psychiatry clinic to their smartphones. Sociodemographic form, State-Trait anxiety scale, and UCLA loneliness survey were used as data collection tools. RESULTS: We examined the data of 745 adolescents. The average age of the study group was 16.83 ± 1.66 years, and 69.5% were females. It was determined that 88.2% of the adolescents followed the developments in the COVID-19 process and obtained most information from the television. State anxiety was related to "Former psychiatric referral" by 4.39-fold, "Having a COVID positive patient in the family or your surroundings" by 3.81-fold, and "The most common medium for obtaining COVID-related information" by 2.41-fold. CONCLUSIONS: Closure of schools and home-quarantine during pandemic causes anxiety and loneliness in young people. The identification of risky groups helps to properly support these individuals by various social connections, including healthcare professionals, families, and schools.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety/physiopathology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Loneliness/psychology , Quarantine/psychology , Adolescent , COVID-19/psychology , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Turkey
10.
Curr Psychol ; 41(2): 1057-1064, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1230295

ABSTRACT

As in the whole world, the Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic poses many threats to healthcare workers in our country too, which leads to anxiety in healthcare workers. This study was conducted to explore the anxiety levels of healthcare workers during the COVID-19 pandemic. The study is a cross-sectional study. The population consisted of health care workers employed in hospitals in seven regions in Turkey. All volunteer healthcare workers were included in the study, and 356 healthcare workers responded to the questionnaire. The data were collected using the State Anxiety Inventory and a questionnaire created by the researchers using an online questionnaire between 10 May 2020 and 15 May 2020. In the evaluation of the data, mean, standard deviation, percentages, t-test, one-way ANOVA, Pearson correlation, and multiple regression analysis were used. 33% of healthcare workers did not have anxiety, 50% had mild, and 17% had severe anxiety. The anxiety scores of those who were nurses (p < 0.001), who were working in the emergency room (p < 0.001), who were involved in treatment for COVID-19 patients (p = 0.040), who left their homes to prevent transmission to their families and relatives during the pandemic (p = 0.038), and whose working hours had changed (p = 0.036) were found to be significantly higher. It was observed that there was a positive and significant relationship between the fear of death and disease transmission, uncertainty, loneliness, anger, and hopelessness, and anxiety levels in healthcare workers. The main factors that significantly affected the anxiety levels of healthcare workers were male gender, weekly working hours, the presence of chronic diseases, and feelings of anger and uncertainty. In conclusion, during the COVID-19 pandemic, healthcare workers experienced some negative emotions, their anxiety levels increased, and they were psychologically affected. Planning psychosocial interventions for healthcare workers in the high-risk group will make significant contributions to the health system.

11.
Pediatr Hematol Oncol ; 38(8): 683-694, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1223197

ABSTRACT

Since the World Health Organization declared the COVID-19 pandemic in March 2020, the strain on healthcare services affected patients suffering from various comorbidities and added to the psychological burden. The study aimed to assess the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and anxiety levels of pediatric Hematology/Oncology patients during the COVID19 pandemic and evaluate the association between anxiety levels and physical, emotional, and social aspects of HRQoL. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 292 children between 2.5 - 13 years with chronic hematological/oncological disorders. Pediatric Quality of Life Generic Core Scale and Spence Children's Anxiety Scale were used for assessment of HRQoL and anxiety, respectively. Linear regression was performed to assess the association between background and COVID-19 related factors with anxiety level. Multivariate Analysis of Variance (MANOVA) was performed to assess the association between the three HRQoL dimensions with child anxiety and different independent variables. Transfusion-dependent patients had lower anxiety levels than patients receiving chemotherapy (B=-14.45, 95% CI=-21.94,-6.95).Children who were aware of the pandemic had lower anxiety scores than those who were not, while those suffering from canceled clinic days had higher anxiety levels (B=-8.66,95% CI=-14.86,-2.45, and B = 7.33,95% CI =1.22,13.45, respectively). Anxiety significantly reduced the three HRQoL domains (B=-0.36, 95% CI=-0.47, -0.24 for physical functioning, B=-0.45, 95% CI =-0.56, -0.33 for social functioning and B=-0.50, 95% CI=-0.63,-0.38 for emotional functioning). This study highlights the effect of the pandemic on the anxiety level and hence the HRQoL of chronic hematological/oncological pediatric patients for guiding policies and interventions to maintain their psychological well-being.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Hematologic Diseases , Neoplasms , Quality of Life , COVID-19/psychology , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Hematologic Diseases/psychology , Humans , Neoplasms/psychology , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires
12.
BMC Psychiatry ; 21(1): 224, 2021 05 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1215102

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The psychosocial impact of previous infectious disease outbreaks in adults has been well documented, however, there is limited information on the mental health impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on adults and children in the United Arab Emirate (UAE) community. The aim of this study was to explore anxiety levels among adults and children in the UAE and to identify potential risk and protective factors for well-being during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Using a web-based cross-sectional survey we collected data from 2200 self-selected, assessed volunteers and their children. Demographic information, knowledge and beliefs about COVID-19, generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) using the (GAD-7) scale, emotional problems in children using the strengths and difficulties questionnaire (SDQ), worry and fear about COVID-19, coping mechanisms and general health information were collected. Descriptive analysis was carried out to summarize demographic and participant characteristics, Chi-square analysis to explore associations between categorical variables and anxiety levels and multivariable binary logistic regression analysis to determine predictors of anxiety levels in adults and emotional problems in children. RESULTS: The overall prevalence of GAD in the general population was 71% with younger people (59.8%) and females (51.7%) reporting highest levels of anxiety. Parents who were teachers reported the highest percentage of emotional problems in children (26.7%). Adjusted multivariable logistic regression for GAD-7 scores showed that being female, high levels of worry associated with COVID-19, intention to take the COVID-19 vaccine and smoking were associated with higher levels of anxiety. Adjusted multivariable logistic regression for SDQ showed that higher emotional problems were reported for children in lower and higher secondary education, and parents who had severe anxiety were seven times more likely to report emotional problems in their children. CONCLUSIONS: This study reports the psychological impact of COVID-19 among adults and children in the UAE and highlights the significant association between parental and child anxiety. Findings suggest the urgency for policy makers to develop effective screening and coping strategies for parents and especially children.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Adult , COVID-19 Vaccines , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , United Arab Emirates/epidemiology
14.
J Nurs Manag ; 29(7): 1934-1945, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1177450

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Health care professionals responsible for care and treatment during outbreaks are more likely to experience anxiety, depression, insomnia and stress. AIM: This study investigated operating room nurses' anxiety levels and related factors during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: The research was conducted between July and September 2020. The sample consisted of 192 operating room nurses. Data were collected using a descriptive questionnaire and the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI). RESULTS: Participants had moderate levels of anxiety. The risk factors associated with high levels of anxiety included having chronic diseases, working with patients causing worry, fear of contracting COVID-19 and transmitting it to loved ones, incompetence of hospitals in managing the pandemic, lack of support from hospital managers, taking few breaks and working long shifts due to preventive measures at the workplace. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS OF NURSING MANAGEMENT: The results show that operating room nurses have had moderate anxiety levels since the onset of the pandemic. Therefore, it is critical to regularly identify and meet their mental and emotional needs to implement early preventive interventions. Identifying risk factors will help recognize anxiety in operating room nurses and take measures to protect their mental health while working with high-risk patients in different clinics during the pandemic. What is more, managers should draw up action plans for extraordinary conditions, such as a pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , Depression , Humans , Operating Rooms , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
15.
J Nurs Manag ; 29(7): 1946-1955, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1175097

ABSTRACT

AIMS: To determine the state-trait anxiety levels and solution-focused thinking skills of primary care nurses/midwives during the COVID-19 pandemic, and to evaluate the factors affecting these variables and the determinants of state-trait anxiety levels. BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 outbreak has created intense anxiety in nurses/midwives that may affect the care they provide. Nurses and midwives may manage anxiety using solution-focused thinking skills. METHODS: This descriptive correlational study included 170 nurses/midwives at 61 family health centres evaluated from 1 August to 14 September 2020. RESULTS: The participants' state and trait anxiety scores were above average, indicating a moderate level of anxiety and the mean total solution-focused inventory scores were at a moderate level. It was determined that 47.9% of the variance in state anxiety scores could be explained by trait anxiety, age, years of professional experience, chronic illness, type of work shift during the pandemic, follow-up of patients diagnosed with COVID-19 using computed tomography or a COVID-19 test, and whether the institution was taking necessary measures against COVID-19. There was a negative relationship between state anxiety and solution-focused inventory total score. CONCLUSION: Nurses/midwives displayed a moderate level of anxiety and solution-focused thinking skills during the COVID-19 pandemic. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: Steps should be taken to improve nurses' solution-focused thinking skills to enable them to organise quickly and manage care processes successfully in extraordinary circumstances such as pandemics. Moreover, personal empowerment programmes should be recommended for nurses and midwives to help them cope with anxiety.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Midwifery , Nurse Midwives , Anxiety , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Pregnancy , Primary Health Care , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Thinking
16.
BMC Public Health ; 21(1): 670, 2021 04 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1172830

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The aims of this systematic review and meta-analysis are to examine the prevalence of adverse mental health outcomes, both short-term and long-term, among SARS patients, healthcare workers and the general public of SARS-affected regions, and to examine the protective and risk factors associated with these mental health outcomes. METHODS: We conducted a systematic search of the literature using databases such as Medline, Pubmed, Embase, PsycInfo, Web of Science Core Collection, CNKI, the National Central Library Online Catalog and dissertation databases to identify studies in the English or Chinese language published between January 2003 to May 2020 which reported psychological distress and mental health morbidities among SARS patients, healthcare workers, and the general public in regions with major SARS outbreaks. RESULTS: The literature search yielded 6984 titles. Screening resulted in 80 papers for the review, 35 of which were included in the meta-analysis. The prevalence of post-recovery probable or clinician-diagnosed anxiety disorder, depressive disorder, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among SARS survivors were 19, 20 and 28%, respectively. The prevalence of these outcomes among studies conducted within and beyond 6 months post-discharge was not significantly different. Certain aspects of mental health-related quality of life measures among SARS survivors remained impaired beyond 6 months post-discharge. The prevalence of probable depressive disorder and PTSD among healthcare workers post-SARS were 12 and 11%, respectively. The general public had increased anxiety levels during SARS, but whether there was a clinically significant population-wide mental health impact remained inconclusive. Narrative synthesis revealed occupational exposure to SARS patients and perceived stigmatisation to be risk factors for adverse mental health outcomes among healthcare workers, although causality could not be determined due to the limitations of the studies. CONCLUSIONS: The chronicity of psychiatric morbidities among SARS survivors should alert us to the potential long-term mental health complications of covid-19 patients. Healthcare workers working in high-risk venues should be given adequate mental health support. Stigmatisation against patients and healthcare workers should be explored and addressed. The significant risk of bias and high degree of heterogeneity among included studies limited the certainty of the body of evidence of the review.


Subject(s)
Disease Outbreaks , Mental Disorders , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Disease Outbreaks/history , History, 21st Century , Humans , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Protective Factors , Risk Factors , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/epidemiology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/history , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/psychology
17.
Int J Clin Pract ; 75(8): e14201, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1165970

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: We aimed to determine the effect COVID-19 pandemic on the daily urology practice of the level 3 centre located in one of the most affected regions in Turkey. We also aimed to assess anxiety and depression levels of patients whose procedures and surgeries had to be postponed due to COVID-19-related restrictions. METHODS: The number of patients admitted to the outpatient clinic, outpatient procedures, emergency consultation requests, hospitalised patients and the total number of surgeries between March 10, 2020 and June 15, 2020 were evaluated. These numbers were compared with the same period of 2019. Subsequently, patients who could not be operated or whose elective surgeries were postponed between March 10, 2020 and June 15, 2020 were determined(n:96). These patients were asked to fill out Beck Depression Inventory(BDI) and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory(STAI). The presence of difference between the baseline anxiety levels and the anxiety levels during the COVID-19 pandemic was investigated. Afterwards, these patients were divided into two groups based on planned procedures as oncological group (group1) and non-oncological group (group2). The presence of a difference between the anxiety and depression levels between the groups was investigated. RESULTS: There was a drastic decline in number of patients in all assessed parameters. The least amount of change was seen in the number of emergency consultations. The evaluation of anxiety and depression scores of the patients showed a significant difference between their STAI-S and STAI-T scores (51.8 ± 9.3, 38.2 ± 7.5, respectively)(P < .001). STAI-S scores of the patients were found to be compatible with severe anxiety. The patients' mean BDI score was found to be 15 ± 8.9, which indicated mild depression. However, the age and STAI-S values were significantly higher in group1. CONCLUSION: We noted that anxiety and depression levels increased in patients whose operations were delayed because of pandemic-related restrictions, especially in oncological patients. We believe that an important contribution can be made to the protection of public health by planning advance psychosocial interventions for high-risk groups during pandemics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Urology , Anxiety/epidemiology , Depression/diagnosis , Depression/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Turkey/epidemiology
18.
Isr J Health Policy Res ; 10(1): 28, 2021 03 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1148225

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Increased anxiety was frequently reported during the 2020 global COVID-19 pandemic. An association between anxiety and increased body weight has been documented. Identifying associations between diet quality and anxiety may facilitate the development of preventive dietary policy, particularly relevant since obesity appears to increase the risk of adverse COVID-19 outcomes. In this study we aim to examine associations between changes in diet pattern and body weight and anxiety levels during the COVID-19 pandemic among Israeli respondents to an international online survey. METHODS: Conducted between March 30-April 252,020, this was cross-sectional, international and online study. The questionnaire was developed and tested in Hebrew and translated into six other languages: English, Arabic, Spanish, French, Italian, and Russian. The survey was conducted on a Google Survey platform, the link to which was posted on several social media platforms. Adults aged 18 or older who saw and responded to the link on a social media site comprised the study population. RESULTS: Of the 3979 eligible respondents, 1895 indicated their current location as Israel. Most Israeli respondents completed the survey in Hebrew (83.2%) followed by Arabic (9.4%), though responses were recorded in all seven of the survey languages. The median age was 33 (IQ = 22) years, and 75.7% were female. Almost 60% indicated that their pre-pandemic diet was healthier than their current diet, and 25.2% indicated they had gained weight during the pandemic. The median Mediterranean diet score was 9 (IQ = 3). While the median General Anxiety Disorder (GAD-7) score was 5 (IQ = 8), only 37.3% of participants reported at least mild anxiety (a GAD-7 score of 5 or more), while 10.7% reported moderate anxiety or greater (a GAD-7 score of 10 or more). In a multivariate logistic regression model of at least mild anxiety, being male and completing the survey in Hebrew significantly reduced odds of at least mild anxiety, while a worsening of diet quality during the pandemic, weight gain, and isolation significantly increased odds of at least mild anxiety. CONCLUSIONS: During the COVID pandemic, changes in nutrition quality and habits were associated with greater anxiety. These findings suggest the need for routine and continuous surveillance of the nutritional and psychological consequences of outbreaks as part of healthcare preparedness efforts. Organizations responsible for community-based health services (such as Israeli health plans) should adopt specific interventions to improve case finding and support individuals at increased risk of anxiety and declining nutrition status within primary healthcare settings. These interventions should include the provision of appropriate diagnostic instruments, training of medical staff, feedback to physicians and nurses, and raising awareness among the relevant patient population and their caregivers. Primary care physicians should refer people with high anxiety or substantial weight gain during the pandemic to appropriate mental health and dietetic treatment, as needed. TRIAL REGISTRATION: NCT04353934 .


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Diet/statistics & numerical data , Global Health , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Behavior , Health Status , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Socioeconomic Factors
19.
Eur J Clin Nutr ; 76(1): 84-92, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1142434

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: The 2020 global coronavirus pandemic is characterized by increased anxiety. Anxiety has been associated with poor diet quality and weight gain, which may lead to obesity, a risk factor for adverse COVID-19 outcomes. The present study was designed to examine associations between diet quality and anxiety levels during the COVID-19 pandemic. SUBJECTS/METHODS: This cross-sectional, international online study was conducted between March 30 and April 25, 2020 and available in seven languages: Arabic (7.6%), English (43.7%), French (0.8%), Hebrew (42.1%), Italian (3%), Russian (1.1%), and Spanish (1.6%). Diet quality was assessed using the Mediterranean Diet Score (possible range: 0-17 points) and anxiety scored using the General Anxiety Disorder 7-point scale (GAD-7). The Google Survey platform was used to conduct the survey. RESULTS: A total of 3797 persons were included in the present analysis. More than 75% of respondents were female; most completed the survey in English or Hebrew. Median age was 31 (IQ = 18) years. Almost 60% indicated that their pre-pandemic diet was healthier than their current diet. The median Mediterranean diet score was 9 (IQ = 3). The majority (54%) of participants reported at least mild anxiety, while 25% reported moderate anxiety or more severe. In a logistic regression model of at least moderate anxiety, Mediterranean diet score (OR 0.92, 95% CI 0.89-0.95, p < 0.0001) reduced odds of elevated anxiety, even after controlling for age, sex and other variables. CONCLUSIONS: Though causality cannot be inferred, associations between diet quality and anxiety might suggest public health interventions including diet and stress control during future mass lockdowns.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression , Female , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
20.
Perspect Psychiatr Care ; 57(4): 1913-1921, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1138225

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study was conducted to analyze the anxiety levels and attitudes of nursing students for the nursing profession during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Data collection forms were sent online to nursing students of three different state or foundation universities in Turkey. In all, 456 individuals who answered the data collection forms were included in the study. FINDINGS: Study results revealed that the total average score for the "Attitude Scale for Nursing Profession" was 162 ± 15.6. The Professional characteristics subdimension score average was 80.64 ± 7.02. Furthermore, the state of choosing nursing profession subdimension score average was 50.05 ± 9.23, whereas the Attitude for the general status of nursing profession subdimension score average was 34.38 ± 2.97. Due to the pandemic, anxiety levels for the nursing profession were 4.86 ± 2.76 (between 0 and 10). It was determined that nursing students who studied in cities where the virus was very common had a more positive attitude toward the profession. Anxiety levels of nursing students studying in cities where the virus impact was moderate and in cities where the virus presence was quite common were higher (p > 0.05). PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: It was found that nursing students had a positive and high-level attitude toward the nursing profession. Furthermore, the results demonstrated that attitudes toward the nursing profession decreased significantly as anxiety increased.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Students, Nursing , Anxiety/epidemiology , Attitude , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
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