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1.
Curr Psychol ; 41(2): 1057-1064, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1748411

ABSTRACT

As in the whole world, the Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic poses many threats to healthcare workers in our country too, which leads to anxiety in healthcare workers. This study was conducted to explore the anxiety levels of healthcare workers during the COVID-19 pandemic. The study is a cross-sectional study. The population consisted of health care workers employed in hospitals in seven regions in Turkey. All volunteer healthcare workers were included in the study, and 356 healthcare workers responded to the questionnaire. The data were collected using the State Anxiety Inventory and a questionnaire created by the researchers using an online questionnaire between 10 May 2020 and 15 May 2020. In the evaluation of the data, mean, standard deviation, percentages, t-test, one-way ANOVA, Pearson correlation, and multiple regression analysis were used. 33% of healthcare workers did not have anxiety, 50% had mild, and 17% had severe anxiety. The anxiety scores of those who were nurses (p < 0.001), who were working in the emergency room (p < 0.001), who were involved in treatment for COVID-19 patients (p = 0.040), who left their homes to prevent transmission to their families and relatives during the pandemic (p = 0.038), and whose working hours had changed (p = 0.036) were found to be significantly higher. It was observed that there was a positive and significant relationship between the fear of death and disease transmission, uncertainty, loneliness, anger, and hopelessness, and anxiety levels in healthcare workers. The main factors that significantly affected the anxiety levels of healthcare workers were male gender, weekly working hours, the presence of chronic diseases, and feelings of anger and uncertainty. In conclusion, during the COVID-19 pandemic, healthcare workers experienced some negative emotions, their anxiety levels increased, and they were psychologically affected. Planning psychosocial interventions for healthcare workers in the high-risk group will make significant contributions to the health system.

2.
Perspect Psychiatr Care ; 58(1): 149-158, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1238470

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study aims to compare the anxiety levels of COVID-19 patients, individuals under quarantine, and healthy individuals in society. DESIGN AND METHODS: This cross-sectional study was conducted from May 25, 2020 to June 25, 2020 in a city located in the northwest of Turkey. The data were collected using a personal information form, the Beck Anxiety Scale, administered in face-to-face interviews, and online questionnaires. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney U, and logistic regression analyses. FINDINGS: The anxiety level of individuals under quarantine (Median: min-max = 1: 0-55) was significantly lower statistically compared to that of the rest of the society (Median: min-max = 6: 0-63) and hospitalized COVID-19 patients (Median: min-max = 5: 0-42) (p = 0.0001). Female gender, being 61 years of age and older, having psychiatric and chronic illnesses, and experiencing disrupted sleep patterns were determined to be the factors associated with high levels of anxiety. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: This study found that society in general and hospitalized COVID-19 patients had high anxiety levels. The study results can be useful for creating training and population-based screening programs to control the anxiety of individuals under quarantine, hospitalized COVID-19 patients, and the rest of the society during the pandemic. Additionally, the finding from this study on groups at risk for anxiety will provide important data for future research on this subject and for the planning of health services offered to these groups.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Quarantine , Anxiety/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression , Female , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Perspect Psychiatr Care ; 57(4): 1829-1837, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1105369

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study was carried out in a cross-sectional and correlational design to explore the relationship between anxiety levels and anger expression styles of nurses during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: The sample of this cross-sectional and correlational type of study consisted of 618 nurses calculated with the snowball sampling method. The data were collected using a questionnaire developed by the researchers, the state anxiety inventory, and the trait anger and anger expression scale and was conducted between May 10 and 20, 2020 using an online questionnaire form. Percentage, mean, standard deviation, the Mann-Whitney U test, Kruskal-Wallis test, Spearman correlation analysis, and multiple linear regression analysis were used to evaluate the data. RESULTS: The mean age of nurses was 34.98 ± 8.36 years (min: 20; max: 53), 87.4% were women, and 81.7% experienced a high level of anxiety. The anger scores of the participants were found to be 20.04 ± 4.43, the anger-in score was 15.55 ± 3.34, the anger-out score was 14.01 ± 2.87, and the anger control score was 22.93 ± 3.6. Being married, the presence of chronic disease, living in the Marmara region, working shifts, presence of an individual over 65 years of age at home, and having a COVID-19 test were found to be risk factors that significantly increase nurses' anxieties. A significant positive relationship was found between the anxiety scores, trait anger (r = 0.249, p = 0.000), anger-in (r = 0.174, p = 0.000) and anger-out (r = 0.205, p = 0.000) scores of nurses, and a significant negative relationship was found between the anxiety scores and anger control (r = 0.249, p = 0.000) score. CONCLUSION: The study revealed that in the COVID-19 pandemic the anxiety levels of the nurses were high and that the high anxiety level negatively affected the style of anger expression, but the nurses were successful in maintaining anger control. In line with these results, it is important that nurses develop effective coping strategies to reduce their anxiety levels and that they receive increased levels of support in managing anger expression.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , Adult , Anger , Anxiety/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Intern Med J ; 50(11): 1350-1358, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-810874

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Internists who have an important role in the global response to the COVID-19 pandemic are under both physical and psychological pressures. AIMS: To assess the anxiety among physicians working in the internal medicine department of a tertiary care hospital who are on the frontline of the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: This single-centre, non-intervention, cross-sectional descriptive study was conducted using an online survey questionnaire from 1 April to 14 April 2020. Physicians of the Department of Internal Medicine were invited to participate with a self-administered questionnaire. The degree of symptoms of anxiety was assessed by the Turkish versions of the 7-item Generalised Anxiety Disorder scale and Beck Anxiety Inventory, respectively. RESULTS: A total of 113 participants consented for the study and completed the questionnaire. The median age was 29 (IQR = 5) years and 53.1% were male. A total of 72 internists (63.7%) worked as 'frontline' healthcare workers directly engaged in diagnosing, treating or caring for patients with or suspected to have COVID-19. Female gender was significantly associated with high scores and levels in all scales compared to the male gender (P < 0.005). Having family members over 65 years old and with chronic diseases were significantly associated with high anxiety scores and levels (P < 0.005). CONCLUSIONS: In this survey of internists in a university hospital equipped with clinics, wards and intensive care unit for patients with COVID-19, female gender and having family members over 65 years old and with chronic diseases were associated with increased anxiety levels.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/etiology , COVID-19/psychology , Mental Health , Physicians/psychology , Adult , Anxiety Disorders , Cross-Sectional Studies , Family , Female , Humans , Internal Medicine , Male , Sex Factors , Stress, Psychological , Surveys and Questionnaires , Tertiary Care Centers , Turkey
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