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1.
Curr Psychol ; 41(2): 1057-1064, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1748411

ABSTRACT

As in the whole world, the Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic poses many threats to healthcare workers in our country too, which leads to anxiety in healthcare workers. This study was conducted to explore the anxiety levels of healthcare workers during the COVID-19 pandemic. The study is a cross-sectional study. The population consisted of health care workers employed in hospitals in seven regions in Turkey. All volunteer healthcare workers were included in the study, and 356 healthcare workers responded to the questionnaire. The data were collected using the State Anxiety Inventory and a questionnaire created by the researchers using an online questionnaire between 10 May 2020 and 15 May 2020. In the evaluation of the data, mean, standard deviation, percentages, t-test, one-way ANOVA, Pearson correlation, and multiple regression analysis were used. 33% of healthcare workers did not have anxiety, 50% had mild, and 17% had severe anxiety. The anxiety scores of those who were nurses (p < 0.001), who were working in the emergency room (p < 0.001), who were involved in treatment for COVID-19 patients (p = 0.040), who left their homes to prevent transmission to their families and relatives during the pandemic (p = 0.038), and whose working hours had changed (p = 0.036) were found to be significantly higher. It was observed that there was a positive and significant relationship between the fear of death and disease transmission, uncertainty, loneliness, anger, and hopelessness, and anxiety levels in healthcare workers. The main factors that significantly affected the anxiety levels of healthcare workers were male gender, weekly working hours, the presence of chronic diseases, and feelings of anger and uncertainty. In conclusion, during the COVID-19 pandemic, healthcare workers experienced some negative emotions, their anxiety levels increased, and they were psychologically affected. Planning psychosocial interventions for healthcare workers in the high-risk group will make significant contributions to the health system.

2.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(11)2021 May 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1244033

ABSTRACT

Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection, also known as COVID-19, has developed into an alarming situation around the world. Healthcare workers are playing the role of frontline defense to safeguard the lives of everyone during the COVID-19 pandemic. The present study aimed to investigate the anxiety levels and sleep quality among frontline and second-line healthcare workers during the COVID-19 pandemic. In this cross-sectional study, a validated, self-administered, electronic questionnaire was distributed through email to healthcare workers. The selection of 1678 healthcare workers was based on a convenience sampling technique. The General Anxiety Disorder-7 (GAD-7) and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) instrument scales were used to assess healthcare workers' anxiety levels and sleep quality during the COVID-19 pandemic. Out of 1678 respondents, 1200 (71.5%) were frontline healthcare workers, while 478 (28.5%) were second-line healthcare workers. Among all the healthcare workers, 435 (25.92%) were experiencing moderate to severe anxiety. Among them, 713 (59.4%) frontline healthcare workers were experiencing anxiety in comparison with 277 (57.9%) second-line healthcare workers. Severe anxiety symptoms were seen in 137 (11.41%) frontline healthcare workers compared to 44 (9.20%) second-line healthcare workers. In total, 1376 (82.0%) healthcare workers were found to have poor sleep quality; 975 (58.10%) were frontline, and 407 (23.89%) were second-line healthcare workers. The highest poor sleep quality levels were found among 642 (84.6%) of the healthcare workers who work in frontline areas (emergency departments, intensive care units, and wards) compared to 734 (79.9%) of the healthcare workers who work in second-line areas. These findings provide a substantial contribution to the consolidation of evidence concerning the negative impact of the pandemic on the mental health of healthcare workers (HCWs). These results have established an association that the COVID-19 pandemic causes larger negative psychological symptoms in frontline healthcare workers, such as severe anxiety and poor sleep quality. Preventive measures to minimize anxiety levels and maintain sleep quality, addressing this issue nationally and globally, are essential to support the healthcare workers who are sacrificing their mental health for the future of our nations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Anxiety/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression , Health Personnel , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep
3.
J Nurs Manag ; 29(7): 1934-1945, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1177450

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Health care professionals responsible for care and treatment during outbreaks are more likely to experience anxiety, depression, insomnia and stress. AIM: This study investigated operating room nurses' anxiety levels and related factors during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: The research was conducted between July and September 2020. The sample consisted of 192 operating room nurses. Data were collected using a descriptive questionnaire and the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI). RESULTS: Participants had moderate levels of anxiety. The risk factors associated with high levels of anxiety included having chronic diseases, working with patients causing worry, fear of contracting COVID-19 and transmitting it to loved ones, incompetence of hospitals in managing the pandemic, lack of support from hospital managers, taking few breaks and working long shifts due to preventive measures at the workplace. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS OF NURSING MANAGEMENT: The results show that operating room nurses have had moderate anxiety levels since the onset of the pandemic. Therefore, it is critical to regularly identify and meet their mental and emotional needs to implement early preventive interventions. Identifying risk factors will help recognize anxiety in operating room nurses and take measures to protect their mental health while working with high-risk patients in different clinics during the pandemic. What is more, managers should draw up action plans for extraordinary conditions, such as a pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , Depression , Humans , Operating Rooms , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
4.
BMC Public Health ; 21(1): 670, 2021 04 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1172830

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The aims of this systematic review and meta-analysis are to examine the prevalence of adverse mental health outcomes, both short-term and long-term, among SARS patients, healthcare workers and the general public of SARS-affected regions, and to examine the protective and risk factors associated with these mental health outcomes. METHODS: We conducted a systematic search of the literature using databases such as Medline, Pubmed, Embase, PsycInfo, Web of Science Core Collection, CNKI, the National Central Library Online Catalog and dissertation databases to identify studies in the English or Chinese language published between January 2003 to May 2020 which reported psychological distress and mental health morbidities among SARS patients, healthcare workers, and the general public in regions with major SARS outbreaks. RESULTS: The literature search yielded 6984 titles. Screening resulted in 80 papers for the review, 35 of which were included in the meta-analysis. The prevalence of post-recovery probable or clinician-diagnosed anxiety disorder, depressive disorder, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) among SARS survivors were 19, 20 and 28%, respectively. The prevalence of these outcomes among studies conducted within and beyond 6 months post-discharge was not significantly different. Certain aspects of mental health-related quality of life measures among SARS survivors remained impaired beyond 6 months post-discharge. The prevalence of probable depressive disorder and PTSD among healthcare workers post-SARS were 12 and 11%, respectively. The general public had increased anxiety levels during SARS, but whether there was a clinically significant population-wide mental health impact remained inconclusive. Narrative synthesis revealed occupational exposure to SARS patients and perceived stigmatisation to be risk factors for adverse mental health outcomes among healthcare workers, although causality could not be determined due to the limitations of the studies. CONCLUSIONS: The chronicity of psychiatric morbidities among SARS survivors should alert us to the potential long-term mental health complications of covid-19 patients. Healthcare workers working in high-risk venues should be given adequate mental health support. Stigmatisation against patients and healthcare workers should be explored and addressed. The significant risk of bias and high degree of heterogeneity among included studies limited the certainty of the body of evidence of the review.


Subject(s)
Disease Outbreaks , Mental Disorders , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Disease Outbreaks/history , History, 21st Century , Humans , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Protective Factors , Risk Factors , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/epidemiology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/history , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/psychology
5.
Int Emerg Nurs ; 56: 100996, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1121191

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Viral epidemics have negative and sometimes extreme impacts on psychological well-being, particularly in health care workers. Studies have reported higher levels of depression, anxiety, insomnia, stress, distress, fear, burnout, and post-traumatic symptoms. OBJECTIVE: This research aimed to explore the psychological impacts of COVID 19 on paramedicine students. METHODS: A convergent mixed method design study was undertaken using self-reporting instruments and qualitative interviews. RESULTS: Responses were received from 151 students (38.3% responses rate). Most students experienced some level of anxiety (62%), although severe levels were only reported by 6% of respondents. Students had significantly greater odds (OR = 2.05, p = 0.045, 95% CI: 1.02, 4.12) of higher anxiety levels if they were female. Thematic analysis of the interviews largely supported these results, with themes focused on changing approaches to study, financial situation, social support, University adaptation, acceptance and career pathway choice. CONCLUSIONS: This study identified and explored the anxiety and coping strategies in an undergraduate paramedicine cohort when faced with a viral epidemic. Although most of the responding paramedic students reported above normal levels of anxiety in the initial stages of the COVID-19 outbreak, many students, with the help of learning, financial and social support, and a range of positive coping strategies, have adapted well to the impact of the pandemic and associated lockdown period.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Emergency Medical Technicians/education , Emergency Medical Technicians/psychology , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Sex Factors , Socioeconomic Factors
6.
Przegl Epidemiol ; 74(3): 441-448, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1079928

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID 19 pandemic has led to economic downturn worldwide, and it has negatively affected mental health of the health workers as well as the general population. The pandemic has created psychological impact in the minds of people that even after recovery from critical illness assessment of anxiety symptoms is necessary. OBJECTIVE: This study was undertaken to assess the knowledge and anxiety levels among health care workers and non-medico/ general population of Indore, Madhya Pradesh. METHODS: A descriptive, cross sectional study was conducted among 247 participants comprising of medical and dental professionals , paramedical staff and non medico/ general population of Indore city, India. The questionnaire was divided into three sections, the first section comprised questions pertaining to socio demographic characteristics, second section comprised ten questions pertaining to awareness and attitude towards preventive measures whereas the third section assessed anxiety levels by use of 21 item Depression, Anxiety , Stress Scale ( DASS-21). RESULTS: Participants of medical profession (50.2%) outnumbered other participants; significant difference (p=0.001) was reported among dental professionals on answering minimum physical distance to be maintained. Anxiety scores were found to be low (92.7%) and statistically significant association was seen between age of participants and anxiety levels (p=0.021). CONCLUSION: Participants in the present study reported good knowledge regarding COVID-19 pandemic. Anxiety scores among the participants were found to be low.


Subject(s)
Anxiety , COVID-19/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Adult , Female , Humans , India , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
7.
JMIR Public Health Surveill ; 6(4): e24206, 2020 12 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1067563

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic caused by SARS-CoV-2 has become a serious concern among the global medical community and has resulted in an unprecedented psychological impact on health care workers, who were already working under stressful conditions. OBJECTIVE: In this study, we aimed to evaluate and measure the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on the anxiety levels and sleep quality among health care workers in India, as well as to determine how the unavailability of personal protective equipment affects their willingness to provide patient-related care. METHODS: We conducted an online cross-sectional study using piloted, structured questionnaires with self-reported responses from 368 volunteer male and female health care workers in India. Study participants were identified through social networking platforms such as Facebook and WhatsApp. The survey evaluated the participants' degree of signs and symptoms of anxiety and sleep quality based on the 7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD-7) scale and single-item Sleep Quality Scale, respectively. Information on the availability of personal protective equipment was collected based on responses to relevant survey questions. RESULTS: The majority of health care workers (126/368, 34.2%) were in the age group 45-60 years, and 52.2% (192/368) were doctors. Severe anxiety (ie, GAD-7 score >10) was observed among 7.3% (27/368) health care workers, whereas moderate, mild, and minimal anxiety was observed among 12.5% (46/368), 29.3% (108/368), and 50.8% (187/368) health care workers, respectively. Moreover, 31.5% (116/368) of the health care workers had poor-to-fair sleep quality (ie, scores <6). Univariate analysis showed female gender and inadequate availability of personal protective equipment was significantly associated with higher anxiety levels (P=.01 for both). Sleep disturbance was significantly associated with age <30 years (P=.04) and inadequate personal protective equipment (P<.001). Multivariable analysis showed that poorer quality of sleep was associated with higher anxiety levels (P<.001). CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic has potentially caused significant levels of anxiety and sleep disturbances among health care workers, particularly associated with the female gender, younger age group, and inadequate availability of personal protective equipment. These factors put health care workers at constant risk of contracting the infection themselves or transmitting it to their families. Early identification of at-risk health care workers and implementation of situation-tailored mitigation measures could help alleviate the risk of long-term, serious psychological sequelae as well as reduce current anxiety levels among health care workers.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Personnel/psychology , Pandemics , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Humans , India/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Surveys and Questionnaires
8.
Clin Med (Lond) ; 21(1): 66-72, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1044152

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 has caused acute changes in healthcare delivery; this may impact mental health and wellbeing needs of healthcare professionals (HCPs). AIMS: We aimed to identify the causes of anxiety in HCPs during the COVID-19 pandemic, to assess whether HCPs felt they had adequate mental health and wellbeing support and to identify their unmet support needs. METHOD: We used a web-based survey utilising an online tool circulated to UK HCPs over 5 weeks. Self-perceived anxiety levels prior to and during the COVID-19 pandemic were measured on a 10-point Likert-type rating scale. RESULTS: The survey was completed by 558 HCPs. During the pandemic, self-perceived anxiety scores significantly increased from a median of 2 to 7 (paired Wilcoxon signed-rank test; p<0.001). The main reasons were concerns about exposure to SARS-CoV-2 and lack of personal protective equipment. Other wide-ranging reasons were identified. Only 41% of respondents felt there was adequate support. Thematic analysis of what support HCPs wanted identified 13 wide-ranging themes; including effective leadership and peer support. CONCLUSION: Anxiety levels in HCPs significantly increased during the COVID-19 pandemic and the main causes were identified. Many HCPs felt there was inadequate support and identified what support they needed. Implementing effective strategies to support HCPs' unmet wellbeing needs are required as a matter of urgency.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/etiology , COVID-19/complications , Delivery of Health Care/standards , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Mental Health , Pandemics , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , Burnout, Professional/complications , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , United Kingdom/epidemiology , Young Adult
9.
Postgrad Med ; 133(2): 223-230, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1015071

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Health-care workers exposed to coronavirus19 disease could be psychologically stressed. The objective of this study is to assess the anxiety, depression levels, and psychological resilience of physicians working during the Covid-19 outbreak and to evaluate the related factors that are associated with their psychological resilience. METHODS: The sample of this descriptive study was composed of medical doctors and dentists. The data were obtained online between April 13-23, 2020 through a survey prepared by the researchers. In addition, a questionnaire about the participants' sociodemographic characteristics, the Psychological Resilience Scale and Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale (HAD-A/HAD-D) was given. RESULTS: The average age of the 671 participants was 44.0 ± 9.0 years. Psychological resilience scores were significantly higher in those who had children, who had worked for 15 years or more, and who had received training about COVID-19 (p < 0.05). Depression scores were higher among women and in those who reported having a chronic disease, whose workload increased after the outbreak, and who had physical contact with COVID-positive patients. The anxiety scores were also higher among women and in those whose workload had increased and who had contact with COVID-positive patients (p < 0.05). The physicians with scores below the cutoff point on the HAD-D/HAD-A had significantly higher scores on the Psychological Resilience Scale (p < 0.05). DISCUSSION: Depression and anxiety levels were found to be significantly lower in physicians with greater psychological resilience. Psychological and social support of all health-care workers, especially physicians, is important in the struggle with the pandemic. It is thought that determining the variables related to psychological resilience in health-care workers will be a guide for psychosocial services.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Mental Health , Pandemics , Physicians/psychology , Stress, Psychological/diagnosis , Adult , COVID-19/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/etiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires
10.
J Infect Public Health ; 13(10): 1432-1437, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-863277

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The novel coronavirus (COVID-19) was recently declared a pandemic by the World Health Organization (WHO). The first confirmed case in Saudi Arabia was announced on March 2, 2020. Several psychiatric manifestations may appear during pandemics, especially among frontline healthcare providers. OBJECTIVES: This study sought to explore depression and anxiety levels among healthcare providers during the COVID-19 outbreak in Saudi Arabia. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study of a convenience sample of 502 healthcare providers in the Ministry of Health. Depression and anxiety were assessed via the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7 (GAD-7) questionnaires, respectively. RESULTS: The respondents represented various healthcare occupations: administrators (28.49%), nurses (26.29%), physicians (22.11%), non-physician specialists (13.94%), technicians (6.77%), and pharmacists (2.30%). The majority of them were male (68.1%). More than half of them had depressive disorder (55.2%), which ranged from mild (24.9%), moderate (14.5%), and moderately severe (10%) to severe (5.8%). Half of the sample had generalized anxiety disorder (51.4%), which ranged from mild (25.1%) and moderate (11%) to severe (15.3%). Multivariate analysis showed that males were significantly less predicted to have anxiety (Beta=-0.22, P-value <0.04), 30-39 years age group were significantly more predicted to have depression and anxiety group (Beta=0.204, P-value <0.001 and beta=0.521, P-value <0.003 respectively), and nurses had significantly higher mean score of anxiety (Beta=0.445, P-value <0.026). CONCLUSIONS: This study revealed that depression and anxiety are prevailing conditions among healthcare providers. Although efforts were accelerated to support their psychological well-being, more attention should be paid to the mental health of female, 30-39 age group and nursing staff. Promoting healthcare service as a humanitarian and national duty may contribute to making it a more meaningful experience in addition to advocating for solidarity, altruism, and social inclusion. Longitudinal research studies need to be conducted to follow up on healthcare providers' mental health symptoms and develop evidence-based interventions.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Health Personnel/psychology , Mental Health , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Administrative Personnel/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , Age Factors , Anxiety/psychology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/psychology , Emotions , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Nurses/psychology , Pharmacists/psychology , Physicians/psychology , SARS-CoV-2 , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Severity of Illness Index , Sex Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
11.
J Infect Public Health ; 13(11): 1645-1651, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-813692

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During pandemics, healthcare workers (HCWs) may be prone to higher levels of anxiety than those of the general population. This study aimed to explore the anxiety levels among HCWs in Saudi Arabia during the COVID-19 pandemic and the predictors of increased anxiety levels. METHOD: HCW participants in this cross-section study were solicited by email from the database of registered practitioners of the Saudi Commission for Health Specialties between 15 May and 18 May 2020. Sociodemographic characteristics, work-related factors, and organization-related factors were collected. RESULTS: Four thousand nine hundred and twenty HCWs (3.4%) responded. Reported levels of anxiety were low anxiety (31.5%; n = 1552), medium (36.1%; n = 1778), and high (32.3%; n = 1590). Participants reporting high anxiety levels were more likely to be unmarried (OR = 1.32, 95% CI: 1.14-1.52); nurses (OR = 1.54, 95% 1.24-1.91); workers in radiology (OR = 1.52, 95% CI: 1.01-2.28); or respiratory therapists (OR = 2.28, 95% CI: 1.14-4.54). Social factors associated with high anxiety levels were: living with a person who is elderly (p = 0.01), has a chronic disease (p < 0.0001), has immune deficiency (p < 0.0001), or has a respiratory disease (p-value <0.0001). Organization-related factors associated with a high level of anxiety were: working in an organization that hosts COVID-19 patients and working with such patients (p-value <0.0001). CONCLUSION: Self-reported medium and high levels of anxiety were present in 68.5% of HCWs in the COVID-19 pandemic. This highlights the urgent need to identify high-risk individuals to offer psychological support and provide up to date information on the pandemic. These data should help policymakers drive initiatives forward to protect and prepare HCWs psychological wellbeing.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Adult , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2 , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
12.
J Perianesth Nurs ; 35(5): 472-477, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-733742

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Tremendous physical and psychological pressure has been placed on health care workers because of the outbreak of novel coronavirus disease 2019. This study aimed to examine the anxiety and depression levels and related factors among health care professionals working in operating theaters (anesthetic technicians and nurses) during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic. DESIGN: The universe of this descriptive study consisted of health care professionals working in operating theaters in various health care institutions in Turkey. METHODS: Data were collected online between April 9, 2020 and April 12, 2020 using a SurveyMonkey Questionnaire (SurveyMonkey, San Mateo, CA) and health care workers who volunteered to participate in the study were contacted via the social media platforms Twitter, LinkedIn, and WhatsApp and asked to answer the questionnaire. Statistical analysis was performed using the SPSS version 22.0 software. FINDINGS: A total of 702 health care professionals working in operating theaters participated in the study. The mean depression and anxiety scores of the participants were found to be 9.4 ± 4.6 (min 0 to max 21) and 10.0 ± 4.5 (min 0 to max 21), respectively. Depression scores were statistically significantly higher among females, single individuals, those who had children, those living with a person aged 60 years or older (P < .05). Meanwhile, anxiety scores were statistically significantly higher among females, single individuals (including widowed and divorced), university graduates, those with at least one chronic disease, and those whose workload increased (P < .05). CONCLUSIONS: The present study showed that anxiety and depression symptoms were high among health care professionals working in operating theaters. To reduce these symptoms, psychological conditions of health care professionals can be followed continuously and regularly via standard procedures, and necessary interventions can be provided in the early period.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Health Personnel/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Adult , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Male , Operating Rooms , Pandemics , Risk Factors , Sex Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires , Turkey , Workload/statistics & numerical data
13.
Br Dent J ; 229(2): 127-132, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-679643

ABSTRACT

Introduction As COVID-19 rapidly developed across the UK, health services were forced to make radical changes. Within the dental department, all elective procedures were cancelled and staff members were redeployed to support other services within the trust. Studies have demonstrated increased prevalence of psychiatric disorders among healthcare workers during virus pandemics.Aims To assess the psychosocial implications of COVID-19 on members of the dental team working within a large dental teaching hospital.Methodology A survey comprising a series of questions (closed and open) and a Generalised Anxiety Disorder assessment (GAD-7) was distributed to members of the dental team between 1-3 April 2020.Results A total of 120 surveys were completed; 53.3% of respondents displayed symptoms of generalised anxiety. The highest average GAD-7 score was noted among dental nurses. The most common concern was the impact of COVID-19 on friends and family followed by personal health and nature of the disease.Conclusion(s) High anxiety levels and significant psychosocial implications were noted among dental staff during this virus pandemic. Our findings add to a growing body of data on the psychosocial impact of virus outbreaks on healthcare workers and highlight the importance of wellbeing initiatives for healthcare workers to be placed at the forefront of future pandemic crisis planning.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Hospitals, Teaching , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
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