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1.
Health Care Women Int ; 41(11-12): 1240-1254, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1263595

ABSTRACT

In this study, researchers aimed to determine exercise habits, physical activity (PA) levels and anxiety levels of postmenopausal women (PMw) during the self-quarantine period of the COVID-19 pandemic. 104 PMw (59.00 ± 6.61 years old) participated in the study. It was found that PMw who had exercise habits before the pandemic period had higher PA levels, and the women with high anxiety levels during the pandemic had lower PA levels (p < .05). Anxiety levels and PA were negatively associated with each other. Numbers of grandchildren also affected the PA and anxiety levels of the PMw negatively. Women should be encouraged to initiate or maintain PA levels in all circumstances.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Exercise/psychology , Postmenopause/psychology , Aged , Cyprus/epidemiology , Female , Habits , Humans , Mental Health , Middle Aged , Quarantine , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
2.
Eur Arch Psychiatry Clin Neurosci ; 272(1): 81-93, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1233260

ABSTRACT

Facing with COVID-19 epidemic such a catastrophic health emergency, the mental health status of medical staff deserves attention. We conducted a two-stage of psychological status monitoring after the end of the assistance and 14 days of isolation, further targeted the vulnerable groups in need of intervention. The study is a cross-sectional survey on 1156 Yunnan medical staff aid to Hubei. Used Cluster sampling method to collect data at 2 time points (at the end of returning from Wuhan and the 14th day of isolation), from March 18, 2020 to April 6, 2020. Female and nurse had higher rates of depressive symptoms than male and doctors and other occupations. The proportion of female with mild and above moderate anxiety levels (22.91%, 2.61%) was higher than male (17.35%, 1.03%) (p < 0.05). Female had a better impaired sleep quality (45.06%, 17.49%) more than male (28.57%, 7.94%). Medical staff supported in Wuhan and with junior professional titles reported a higher proportion of sleep quality impairment. At the 14th isolation day stage, the proportion of nurses changed from depression to health (9.15%) and from health to depression (6.1%) better than doctors. The front-line medical staffs had suffered greater psychological pressure in the treatment process of major public health emergency. Researches on the dynamic monitor for the change of psychological status after aiding epidemic areas were still in relatively blank stage. Targeting the vulnerable characteristics of aiding medical staff is significant for effective psychological intervention and sustainable operation of health system.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Epidemics , Medical Staff , Mental Disorders , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Epidemics/prevention & control , Female , Health Surveys , Humans , Male , Medical Staff/psychology , Medical Staff/statistics & numerical data , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology
3.
BMC Psychiatry ; 21(1): 224, 2021 05 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1215102

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The psychosocial impact of previous infectious disease outbreaks in adults has been well documented, however, there is limited information on the mental health impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on adults and children in the United Arab Emirate (UAE) community. The aim of this study was to explore anxiety levels among adults and children in the UAE and to identify potential risk and protective factors for well-being during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Using a web-based cross-sectional survey we collected data from 2200 self-selected, assessed volunteers and their children. Demographic information, knowledge and beliefs about COVID-19, generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) using the (GAD-7) scale, emotional problems in children using the strengths and difficulties questionnaire (SDQ), worry and fear about COVID-19, coping mechanisms and general health information were collected. Descriptive analysis was carried out to summarize demographic and participant characteristics, Chi-square analysis to explore associations between categorical variables and anxiety levels and multivariable binary logistic regression analysis to determine predictors of anxiety levels in adults and emotional problems in children. RESULTS: The overall prevalence of GAD in the general population was 71% with younger people (59.8%) and females (51.7%) reporting highest levels of anxiety. Parents who were teachers reported the highest percentage of emotional problems in children (26.7%). Adjusted multivariable logistic regression for GAD-7 scores showed that being female, high levels of worry associated with COVID-19, intention to take the COVID-19 vaccine and smoking were associated with higher levels of anxiety. Adjusted multivariable logistic regression for SDQ showed that higher emotional problems were reported for children in lower and higher secondary education, and parents who had severe anxiety were seven times more likely to report emotional problems in their children. CONCLUSIONS: This study reports the psychological impact of COVID-19 among adults and children in the UAE and highlights the significant association between parental and child anxiety. Findings suggest the urgency for policy makers to develop effective screening and coping strategies for parents and especially children.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Adult , COVID-19 Vaccines , Child , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , United Arab Emirates/epidemiology
4.
Cureus ; 13(1): e12875, 2021 Jan 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1106380

ABSTRACT

Introduction Pregnancy is a beautiful phase in every woman's life in which she undergoes several physical and psychological transformations. The level of stress and anxiety may increase due to a sudden outbreak of contagious diseases. Objective To evaluate the psychological status of pregnant women during the coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) outbreak. Materials and methods A cross-sectional survey was conducted from July 15, 2020, to September 15, 2020, in Dehradun, Haridwar, and Nainital districts of Uttarakhand, India. A total of 333 pregnant women were surveyed through an online platform. The psychological impact of the COVID-19 pandemic was measured using the Impact of Event-Revised (IES-R) scale, and anxiety levels were measured using the Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 (GAD-7) scale. Data were analysed using descriptive and inferential statistics. Results The survey results revealed that around three-fourths (73.6%) of the pregnant women reported minimal psychological impact, with a mean IES-R score of 16.93±11.23, whereas 69.4% of respondents had a minimal level of anxiety, with a mean GAD-7 score of 3.09±3.73. Multivariate linear regression found a positive association between psychological impact and gestational age, occupation, religion, locality, conception, history of abortion (p<0.05). Also, the level of anxiety was significantly associated with education, occupation, monthly income, religion, marital and family support, history of mental illness (p<0.01), conception type, and awareness regarding COVID-19 (p<0.05). Conclusion Psychological impact and anxiety levels were found to be minimal in pregnant women residing in Uttarakhand. Early identification of high-risk women is important to formulate necessary strategic planning to reduce the complications associated with maternal psychological stress on developing fetus.

5.
Perspect Psychiatr Care ; 57(4): 1829-1837, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1105369

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study was carried out in a cross-sectional and correlational design to explore the relationship between anxiety levels and anger expression styles of nurses during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: The sample of this cross-sectional and correlational type of study consisted of 618 nurses calculated with the snowball sampling method. The data were collected using a questionnaire developed by the researchers, the state anxiety inventory, and the trait anger and anger expression scale and was conducted between May 10 and 20, 2020 using an online questionnaire form. Percentage, mean, standard deviation, the Mann-Whitney U test, Kruskal-Wallis test, Spearman correlation analysis, and multiple linear regression analysis were used to evaluate the data. RESULTS: The mean age of nurses was 34.98 ± 8.36 years (min: 20; max: 53), 87.4% were women, and 81.7% experienced a high level of anxiety. The anger scores of the participants were found to be 20.04 ± 4.43, the anger-in score was 15.55 ± 3.34, the anger-out score was 14.01 ± 2.87, and the anger control score was 22.93 ± 3.6. Being married, the presence of chronic disease, living in the Marmara region, working shifts, presence of an individual over 65 years of age at home, and having a COVID-19 test were found to be risk factors that significantly increase nurses' anxieties. A significant positive relationship was found between the anxiety scores, trait anger (r = 0.249, p = 0.000), anger-in (r = 0.174, p = 0.000) and anger-out (r = 0.205, p = 0.000) scores of nurses, and a significant negative relationship was found between the anxiety scores and anger control (r = 0.249, p = 0.000) score. CONCLUSION: The study revealed that in the COVID-19 pandemic the anxiety levels of the nurses were high and that the high anxiety level negatively affected the style of anger expression, but the nurses were successful in maintaining anger control. In line with these results, it is important that nurses develop effective coping strategies to reduce their anxiety levels and that they receive increased levels of support in managing anger expression.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , Adult , Anger , Anxiety/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol ; 132(2): 137-144, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1071828

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has increased anxiety among the general population. The purpose of this project was to investigate attitudes and anxiety among oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMS) residents during the early COVID-19 pandemic. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study. OMS residents were sent electronic invitations to answer a survey. The survey was sent in April and May 2020. Residents enrolled in OMS residency programs accredited by the Commission on Dental Accreditation were included. Predictor variable was attitudes of OMS residents toward the pandemic. The outcome variable was anxiety levels of OMS residents due to the pandemic according to the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale-A. Other variables were demographic characteristics, general knowledge regarding the pandemic, and attitudes of OMS residents toward the pandemic. Statistical analysis was performed using Fisher's exact test, Wilcoxon rank sum test, and univariate and multivariate logistic regression (P < .05). RESULTS: We received 275 responses. The majority of respondents were males (74.5%) aged 26 to 30 (52.7%). Residents reported different levels of anxiety (i.e., mild 58.2%, severe 41.8%). Based on multivariate analysis, moderate or severe anxiety was associated with being female (P = .048) and a senior resident (P = .049). Factors such as potential deployment to other services, availability of personal protective equipment, and unclear disease status of patients contributed to anxiety. CONCLUSION: Our study found that during the early COVID-19 pandemic, all residents experienced some anxiety. Senior OMS residents and female OMS residents experience higher anxiety levels than other residents.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Surgery, Oral , Anxiety/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
7.
Postgrad Med ; 133(2): 223-230, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1015071

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Health-care workers exposed to coronavirus19 disease could be psychologically stressed. The objective of this study is to assess the anxiety, depression levels, and psychological resilience of physicians working during the Covid-19 outbreak and to evaluate the related factors that are associated with their psychological resilience. METHODS: The sample of this descriptive study was composed of medical doctors and dentists. The data were obtained online between April 13-23, 2020 through a survey prepared by the researchers. In addition, a questionnaire about the participants' sociodemographic characteristics, the Psychological Resilience Scale and Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale (HAD-A/HAD-D) was given. RESULTS: The average age of the 671 participants was 44.0 ± 9.0 years. Psychological resilience scores were significantly higher in those who had children, who had worked for 15 years or more, and who had received training about COVID-19 (p < 0.05). Depression scores were higher among women and in those who reported having a chronic disease, whose workload increased after the outbreak, and who had physical contact with COVID-positive patients. The anxiety scores were also higher among women and in those whose workload had increased and who had contact with COVID-positive patients (p < 0.05). The physicians with scores below the cutoff point on the HAD-D/HAD-A had significantly higher scores on the Psychological Resilience Scale (p < 0.05). DISCUSSION: Depression and anxiety levels were found to be significantly lower in physicians with greater psychological resilience. Psychological and social support of all health-care workers, especially physicians, is important in the struggle with the pandemic. It is thought that determining the variables related to psychological resilience in health-care workers will be a guide for psychosocial services.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Mental Health , Pandemics , Physicians/psychology , Stress, Psychological/diagnosis , Adult , COVID-19/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/etiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires
8.
Pediatr Infect Dis J ; 40(4): e134-e136, 2021 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1012878

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The frequency of vaccine refusal, which is associated with many factors, is increasing worldwide. The aim of this study was to predict the frequency of vaccine refusal against domestic and foreign COVID-19 vaccines and identify the factors underlying refusal. METHODS: A survey consisting of 16 questions about COVID-19 vaccination was conducted either face-to-face or online with 428 parents who agreed to participate in the study. The parents had children who were inpatients or outpatients in the Children's Hospital of Ankara City Hospital. In the survey, parents were asked about family sociodemographic characteristics, opinions on domestic and foreign COVID-19 vaccines, and reasons for vaccine refusal. RESULTS: While 66.1% of parents were reluctant to receive foreign COVID-19 vaccines, only 37.4% were reluctant to receive domestic COVID-19 vaccines. The participants' preference for the domestic vaccine was significantly higher for themselves and their children (P < 0.05). Women were less likely to be willing to receive foreign vaccines than men (P < 0.05). As the education level increased, fewer parents preferred the domestic vaccine for themselves (P = 0.046) and their children (P = 0.005). Both domestic and foreign vaccine acceptability for parents and their children was higher among parents with high anxiety levels regarding COVID-19 infection (P < 0.05). The most common reasons for refusal were anxiety about vaccine side effects, lack of knowledge about the effectiveness of vaccines, and distrust of vaccines originating from abroad. CONCLUSION: Most of the participants were hesitant about COVID-19 vaccines. This study demonstrates that vaccine uptake can be increased by considering the higher preference for domestic vaccines.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination Refusal , Adult , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Female , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Public Health Surveillance , Surveys and Questionnaires , Turkey/epidemiology , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data , Vaccination Refusal/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
9.
BMJ Open ; 10(11): e044617, 2020 11 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-944955

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Lockdown has impacts on people's living conditions and mental health. The study aims to assess the relations between social impact and mental health among adults living in Spain during COVID-19 lockdown measures, taking a gender-based approach into account. DESIGN, SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: We conducted a cross-sectional study among adults living in Spain during the lockdown of COVID-19 with an online survey from 8 April to 28 May 2020. The main variable was mental health measured by Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale for anxiety and the Patient Health Questionnaire for depression. Sex-stratified multivariate ordinal logistic regression models were constructed to assess the association between social impact variables, anxiety and depression. RESULTS: A total of 7053 people completed this survey. A total of 31.2% of women and 17.7% of men reported anxiety. Depression levels were reported in 28.5% of women and 16.7% of men. A higher proportion of anxiety and depression levels was found in the younger population (18-35 years), especially in women. Poorer mental health was mainly related to fear of COVID-19 infection, with higher anxiety levels especially in women (adjusted ordinal OR (aOR): 4.23, 95% CI 3.68 to 4.87) and worsened economy with higher levels of depression in women (aOR: 1.51, 95% CI 1.24 to 1.84), and perceived inadequate housing to cope with lockdown was especially associated with anxiety in men (aOR: 2.53, 95% CI 1.93 to 3.44). CONCLUSION: The social impact of the lockdown is related to gender, age and socioeconomic conditions. Women and young people had worse mental health outcomes during lockdown. It is urgent to establish strategies for public health emergencies that include mental health and its determinants, taking a gender-based approach into account, in order to reduce health inequities.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , COVID-19/epidemiology , Mental Health , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Isolation/psychology , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Social Change , Spain/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Young Adult
10.
J Psychosom Obstet Gynaecol ; 43(2): 114-121, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-720868

ABSTRACT

AIM: This study evaluated the level of fear and anxiety related to the COVID-19 outbreak, in infertile women whose ART cycles were delayed due to the pandemic. MATERIALS AND METHODS: An online survey was sent to women whose ART cycles were postponed due to the COVID-19 outbreak between April and May 2020. The study population were 101 participants. The main outcome measure is to determine the levels of fear and anxiety in infertile women by using the Spielberger State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-T and STAI-S) and Fear of COVID-19 scale (FCV-19S). The relationship of the COVID-19 outbreak with the willingness to go ahead with the desire for pregnancy was also assessed. RESULTS: The state-anxiety levels were significantly higher in women above 35 years (45.0 ± 5.2 vs. 42.2 ± 4.5, p = 0.006). Women with diminished ovarian reserve had a higher state-anxiety compared to other causes, but were not found to be significant (44.7 ± 5.2 vs. 42.5 ± 5.0, p = 0.173). Women who thought that the possibility of not being able to get pregnant was more important than being infected with the COVID-19 had higher anxiety levels than women who thought just the opposite. The diminished ovarian reserve and high duration of infertility were found to be significantly associated with higher anxiety levels (OR = 2.5, p < 0.05). The diminished ovarian reserve and previous ART failure significantly predicted the presence of clinical state-anxiety. CONCLUSION: The state-anxiety was found to be higher in women whose cycles were postponed due to the outbreak and the presence of diminished ovarian reserve also significantly affected anxiety levels. Further research is needed to assess whether COVID-19 will have any impact on ART treatments in the next few years.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Infertility, Female , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Infertility, Female/epidemiology , Infertility, Female/therapy , Pandemics , Pregnancy
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