Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 368
Filter
1.
J Ayurveda Integr Med ; 13(1): 100324, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1838938

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Siddha Medicine is a valuable therapeutic choice which is classically used for treating viral respiratory infections, this principle of medicine is proven to contain antiviral compounds. OBJECTIVE: The study is aimed to execute the In Silico computational studies of phytoconstituents of Siddha official formulation Kabasura Kudineer and novel herbal preparation - JACOM which are commonly used in treating viral fever and respiratory infectious diseases and could be affective against the ongoing pandemic novel corona virus disease SARS-CoV-2. METHOD: Cresset Flare software was used for molecular docking studies against the spike protein SARS-CoV-2 (PDB ID: 6VSB). Further, we also conducted insilico prediction studies on the pharmacokinetics (ADME) properties and the safety profile in order to identify the best drug candidates by using online pkCSM and SwissADME web servers. RESULTS: Totally 37 compounds were screened, of these 9 compounds showed high binding affinity against SARS-CoV-2 spike protein. All the phytoconstituents were free from carcinogenic and tumorigenic properties. Based on these, we proposed the new formulation called as "SNACK-V" CONCLUSION: Based on further experiments and clinical trials, these formulations could be used for effective treatment of COVID-19.

2.
Biophys J ; 120(14): 2828-2837, 2021 07 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1606137

ABSTRACT

The cell surface receptor Neuropilin-1 (Nrp1) was recently identified as a host factor for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) entry. The Spike protein of SARS-CoV-2 is cleaved into two segments, the S1 (residues (res.) 1-685) and the S2 (res. 686-1273) domains by furin protease. Nrp1 predominantly binds to the C-terminal RRAR amino acid motif (res. 682-685) of the S1 domain. In this study, we firstly modeled the association of an Nrp1 protein (consisting of domains a2-b1-b2) with the Spike protein. Next, we studied the separation of S2 from the S1 domain, with and without Nrp1 bound, by utilizing molecular dynamics pulling simulations. During the separation, Nrp1 stabilizes the S1 C-terminal region (res. 640-685) and thereby assists the detachment of S2 N-terminal region (res. 686-700). Without Nrp1 bound, S1 tends to become stretched, whereas the bound Nrp1 stimulates an earlier separation of S2 from the S1 domain. The liberated S2 domain is known to mediate the fusion of virus and host membranes; thus, Nrp1 likely increases virus infectivity by facilitating the S1 and S2 separation. We further analyzed the possible topological structure of the SARS-CoV-2 Spike protein when bound with Nrp1 and angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). Understanding of such an Nrp1-assisted viral infection opens the gate for the generation of protein-protein inhibitors, such as antibodies, which could attenuate the infection mechanism and protect certain cells in a future Nrp1-ACE2 targeted combination therapy.

3.
Clin Infect Dis ; 73(12): 2155-2162, 2021 12 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1592795

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Assessing the duration of immunity following infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is a first priority to gauge the degree of protection following infection. Such knowledge is lacking, especially in the general population. Here, we studied changes in immunoglobulin isotype seropositivity and immunoglobulin G (IgG) binding strength of SARS-CoV-2-specific serum antibodies up to 7 months following onset of symptoms in a nationwide sample. METHODS: Participants from a prospective representative serological study in the Netherlands were included based on IgG seroconversion to the spike S1 protein of SARS-CoV-2 (N = 353), with up to 3 consecutive serum samples per seroconverted participant (N = 738). Immunoglobulin M (IgM), immunoglobulin A (IgA), and IgG antibody concentrations to S1, and increase in IgG avidity in relation to time since onset of disease symptoms, were determined. RESULTS: While SARS-CoV-2-specific IgM and IgA antibodies declined rapidly after the first month after disease onset, specific IgG was still present in 92% (95% confidence interval [CI], 89%-95%) of the participants after 7 months. The estimated 2-fold decrease of IgG antibodies was 158 days (95% CI, 136-189 days). Concentrations were sustained better in persons reporting significant symptoms compared to asymptomatic persons or those with mild upper respiratory complaints only. Similarly, avidity of IgG antibodies for symptomatic persons showed a steeper increase over time compared with persons with mild or no symptoms (P = .022). CONCLUSIONS: SARS-CoV-2-specific IgG antibodies persist and show increasing avidity over time, indicative of underlying immune maturation. These data support development of immune memory against SARS-CoV-2, providing insight into protection of the general unvaccinated part of the population. CLINICAL TRIALS REGISTRATION: NL8473 (the Dutch trial registry).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Humans , Netherlands/epidemiology , Prospective Studies
4.
Curr Pharm Des ; 27(32): 3476-3489, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1470720

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The main proteases (Mpro) and Spike Proteins (SP) of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) play a major role in viral infection development by producing several non-structural proteins (nsPs) and penetrating the host cells, respectively. In this study, the potential of in silico molecular docking-based drug repositioning approach was exploited for identifying the inhibitors of Mpro and SP of SARS-CoV-2. METHODS: A total of 196 compounds, including various US-FDA-approved drugs, vitamins, and their analogs, were docked with Mpro (PDB IDs: 6YB7 and 6Y84), and the top six ligands were further tested for ADME properties, followed by docking with SP (PDB IDs: 6LXT and 6W41). RESULTS: Out of 196 compounds, binding energy (DE) of Silybin B (6YB7: DE: -11.20 kcal/mol; 6Y84: DE: - 10.18 kcal/mol; 6LXT: DE: -10.47 kcal/mol; 6W41: DE: -10.96 kcal/mol) and Cianidanol (6YB7: DE: -8.85 kcal/mol; 6LXT: DE: -9.36 kcal/mol; 6Y84: DE: -10.02 kcal/mol; 6W41: DE: -9.52 kcal/mol) demonstrated better binding and ADME properties compared with the currently endeavored drugs like Hydroxychloroquine and Lopinavir. Additionally, Elliptinone, Diospyirin, SCHEMBL94263, and Fiboflavin have shown encouraging results. Fiboflavin, an immunity booster, was found to inhibit both the Mpro and spike protein of SARSCoV- 2. It was observed that amino acid residues MET6, ALA7, PHE8, PRO9, ASP295, GLY302, VAL303, and THR304 play significant roles in protein-ligand interactions through hydrogen bonds and Vander Waals forces. CONCLUSION: Silybin B and Cianidanol showed excellent binding and ADME properties compared with the currently endeavored drugs and can be exploited as therapeutic options against SARS-CoV-2 infection after experimental validation and clinical trials.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Catechin , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Humans , Molecular Docking Simulation , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , SARS-CoV-2 , Silybin , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus
5.
Viruses ; 12(5)2020 05 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389513

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 enters cells using its Spike protein, which is also the main target of neutralizing antibodies. Therefore, assays to measure how antibodies and sera affect Spike-mediated viral infection are important for studying immunity. Because SARS-CoV-2 is a biosafety-level-3 virus, one way to simplify such assays is to pseudotype biosafety-level-2 viral particles with Spike. Such pseudotyping has now been described for single-cycle lentiviral, retroviral, and vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) particles, but the reagents and protocols are not widely available. Here, we detailed how to effectively pseudotype lentiviral particles with SARS-CoV-2 Spike and infect 293T cells engineered to express the SARS-CoV-2 receptor, ACE2. We also made all the key experimental reagents available in the BEI Resources repository of ATCC and the NIH. Furthermore, we demonstrated how these pseudotyped lentiviral particles could be used to measure the neutralizing activity of human sera or plasma against SARS-CoV-2 in convenient luciferase-based assays, thereby providing a valuable complement to ELISA-based methods that measure antibody binding rather than neutralization.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Neutralization Tests/methods , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/analysis , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Containment of Biohazards , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Lentivirus , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , Plasma/immunology
6.
J Phys Chem Lett ; 11(19): 8084-8093, 2020 Oct 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1387116

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 is a health threat with dire socioeconomical consequences. As the crucial mediator of infection, the viral glycosylated spike protein (S) has attracted the most attention and is at the center of efforts to develop therapeutics and diagnostics. Herein, we use an original decomposition approach to identify energetically uncoupled substructures as antibody binding sites on the fully glycosylated S. Crucially, all that is required are unbiased MD simulations; no prior knowledge of binding properties or ad hoc parameter combinations is needed. Our results are validated by experimentally confirmed structures of S in complex with anti- or nanobodies. We identify poorly coupled subdomains that are poised to host (several) epitopes and potentially involved in large functional conformational transitions. Moreover, we detect two distinct behaviors for glycans: those with stronger energetic coupling are structurally relevant and protect underlying peptidic epitopes, and those with weaker coupling could themselves be prone to antibody recognition.


Subject(s)
Epitopes/chemistry , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Algorithms , Betacoronavirus/chemistry , Binding Sites, Antibody , Glycosylation , Humans , Models, Molecular , Molecular Conformation , Peptides/chemistry , Polysaccharides/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2
7.
J Phys Chem B ; 124(44): 9785-9792, 2020 11 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1387110

ABSTRACT

Over 50 peptides, which were known to inhibit SARS-CoV-1, were computationally screened against the receptor-binding domain (RBD) of the spike protein of SARS-CoV-2. Based on the binding affinity and interaction, 15 peptides were selected, which showed higher affinity compared to the α-helix of the human ACE2 receptor. Molecular dynamics simulation demonstrated that two peptides, S2P25 and S2P26, were the most promising candidates, which could potentially block the entry of SARS-CoV-2. Tyr489 and Tyr505 residues present in the "finger-like" projections of the RBD were found to be critical for peptide interaction. Hydrogen bonding and hydrophobic interactions played important roles in prompting peptide-protein binding and interaction. Structure-activity relationship indicated that peptides containing aromatic (Tyr and Phe), nonpolar (Pro, Gly, Leu, and Ala), and polar (Asn, Gln, and Cys) residues were the most significant contributors. These findings can facilitate the rational design of selective peptide inhibitors targeting the spike protein of SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/metabolism , Betacoronavirus/chemistry , Peptides/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Antiviral Agents/chemistry , Binding Sites , Hydrogen Bonding , Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Interactions , Molecular Docking Simulation , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Molecular Structure , Peptides/chemistry , Protein Binding , Protein Domains , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Structure-Activity Relationship
8.
3 Biotech ; 10(11): 483, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1384661

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2, which causes severe pneumonia epidemics, probably originated from Chinese horseshoe bats, but the intermediate and host range is still unknown. ACE2 is the entry receptor for SARS-CoV-2. The binding capacity of SARS-CoV-2 spike protein to ACE2 is the critical determinant of viral host range and cross-species infection. Here, we used an in silico approach to predict the potential animals range with high susceptibility to SARS-CoV-2 by modelling and studying the Spike-ACE2 interaction of 22 domestic and wild animals. Our results showed that all studied animals are potentially susceptible to SARS-CoV-2 infection with a slight difference in the binding affinity and stability of their ACE2-RBD complexes. Furthermore, we identified a specific substitution of tyrosine to histidine at position 41 in ACE2 that likely reduces the affinity to SARS-CoV-2 in horses and greater horseshoe bats. These results may help to provide important insights into SARS-CoV-2 host range which will make it possible to control the spread of the virus and identify animal models that could be used for screening antiviral drugs or vaccine candidates against SARS-CoV-2.

9.
medRxiv ; 2020 Nov 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1388082

ABSTRACT

Using the children's toy, Shrinky-Dink ©, we present an aptamer-based electrochemical (E-AB) assay that recognizes the spike protein of SARS-CoV-2 in saliva for viral infection detection. The low-cost electrodes are implementable at population scale and demonstrate detection down to 0.1 fg mL -1 of the S1 subunit of the spike protein.

10.
J Biol Chem ; 295(36): 12686-12696, 2020 09 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1387615

ABSTRACT

Type II transmembrane serine proteases (TTSPs) are a group of enzymes participating in diverse biological processes. Some members of the TTSP family are implicated in viral infection. TMPRSS11A is a TTSP expressed on the surface of airway epithelial cells, which has been shown to cleave and activate spike proteins of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and the Middle East respiratory syndrome coronaviruses (CoVs). In this study, we examined the mechanism underlying the activation cleavage of TMPRSS11A that converts the one-chain zymogen to a two-chain enzyme. By expression in human embryonic kidney 293, esophageal EC9706, and lung epithelial A549 and 16HBE cells, Western blotting, and site-directed mutagenesis, we found that the activation cleavage of human TMPRSS11A was mediated by autocatalysis. Moreover, we found that TMPRSS11A activation cleavage occurred before the protein reached the cell surface, as indicated by studies with trypsin digestion to remove cell surface proteins, treatment with cell organelle-disturbing agents to block intracellular protein trafficking, and analysis of a soluble form of TMPRSS11A without the transmembrane domain. We also showed that TMPRSS11A was able to cleave the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein. These results reveal an intracellular autocleavage mechanism in TMPRSS11A zymogen activation, which differs from the extracellular zymogen activation reported in other TTSPs. These findings provide new insights into the diverse mechanisms in regulating TTSP activation.


Subject(s)
Epithelial Cells/metabolism , Membrane Proteins/metabolism , Proteolysis , Serine Proteases/metabolism , A549 Cells , Cells, Cultured , HEK293 Cells , Humans , Membrane Proteins/chemistry , Membrane Proteins/genetics , Mutation , Protein Domains , Protein Transport , Respiratory Mucosa/cytology , Serine Proteases/chemistry , Serine Proteases/genetics , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Trypsin/metabolism
11.
Front Mol Biosci ; 8: 658687, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389215

ABSTRACT

Many current strategies for inducing an immune response rely on the production of an antigenic protein. Such methods can be problematic if the folding of the antigenic protein is incorrect. To avoid this problem, we propose a method based on grafting specific regions of the chosen antigenic protein onto biocompatible polymeric matrices, so that they can mimic portions of the antigenic protein. These regions are selected following the criterion according to which they are not folded, are exposed to the solvent and are not already present in the human body, so that they are not recognized by the immune system as self. Regions are selected using the primary sequence of the protein and, where possible, its tertiary structure. The application of this strategy to the Spike protein of SARS-CoV-2 is presented.

12.
Front Med (Lausanne) ; 8: 672629, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389198

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 infection across the world has led to immense turbulence in the treatment modality, thus demanding a swift drug discovery process. Spike protein of SARS-CoV-2 binds to ACE2 receptor of human to initiate host invasion. Plethora of studies demonstrate the inhibition of Spike-ACE2 interactions to impair infection. The ancient Indian traditional medicine has been of great interest of Virologists worldwide to decipher potential antivirals. Hence, in this study, phytochemicals (1,952 compounds) from eight potential medicinal plants used in Indian traditional medicine were meticulously collated, based on their usage in respiratory disorders, along with immunomodulatory and anti-viral potential from contemporary literature. Further, these compounds were virtually screened against Receptor Binding Domain (RBD) of Spike protein. The potential compounds from each plant were prioritized based on the binding affinity, key hotspot interactions at ACE2 binding region and glycosylation sites. Finally, the potential hits in complex with spike protein were subjected to Molecular Dynamics simulation (450 ns), to infer the stability of complex formation. Among the compounds screened, Tellimagrandin-II (binding energy of -8.2 kcal/mol and binding free energy of -32.08 kcal/mol) from Syzygium aromaticum L. and O-Demethyl-demethoxy-curcumin (binding energy of -8.0 kcal/mol and binding free energy of -12.48 kcal/mol) from Curcuma longa L. were found to be highly potential due to their higher binding affinity and significant binding free energy (MM-PBSA), along with favorable ADMET properties and stable intermolecular interactions with hotspots (including the ASN343 glycosylation site). The proposed hits are highly promising, as these are resultant of stringent in silico checkpoints, traditionally used, and are documented through contemporary literature. Hence, could serve as promising leads for subsequent experimental validations.

13.
Emerg Infect Dis ; 27(2): 663-666, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389113

ABSTRACT

Antibody response against nucleocapsid and spike proteins of SARS-CoV-2 in 11 persons with mild or asymptomatic infection rapidly increased after infection. At weeks 18-30 after diagnosis, all remained seropositive but spike protein-targeting antibody titers declined. These data may be useful for vaccine development.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/immunology , Immunity, Humoral , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adolescent , Adult , Antibodies, Viral/blood , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Asymptomatic Infections , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/virology , Child , Female , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Middle Aged , Nucleocapsid Proteins/blood , Nucleocapsid Proteins/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/blood , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Time Factors , Vietnam , Young Adult
14.
J Exp Med ; 218(5)2021 05 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1387678

ABSTRACT

Christos Kyratsous, Vice President of Research, Infectious Diseases, and Viral Vector Technologies at Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, and Alina Baum, Associate Director, Infectious Diseases Associate at Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, discuss the development of antibody therapeutics targeting the spike protein of SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
Aging/immunology , Antibodies, Viral , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/therapy , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , Antibodies, Viral/therapeutic use , Humans , Immunization, Passive
15.
Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A ; 118(19)2021 05 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1387612

ABSTRACT

Binding of the spike protein of SARS-CoV-2 to the human angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) receptor triggers translocation of the virus into cells. Both the ACE2 receptor and the spike protein are heavily glycosylated, including at sites near their binding interface. We built fully glycosylated models of the ACE2 receptor bound to the receptor binding domain (RBD) of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein. Using atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, we found that the glycosylation of the human ACE2 receptor contributes substantially to the binding of the virus. Interestingly, the glycans at two glycosylation sites, N90 and N322, have opposite effects on spike protein binding. The glycan at the N90 site partly covers the binding interface of the spike RBD. Therefore, this glycan can interfere with the binding of the spike protein and protect against docking of the virus to the cell. By contrast, the glycan at the N322 site interacts tightly with the RBD of the ACE2-bound spike protein and strengthens the complex. Remarkably, the N322 glycan binds to a conserved region of the spike protein identified previously as a cryptic epitope for a neutralizing antibody. By mapping the glycan binding sites, our MD simulations aid in the targeted development of neutralizing antibodies and SARS-CoV-2 fusion inhibitors.


Subject(s)
Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Glycosylation , Humans , Molecular Dynamics Simulation , Protein Binding , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Virus Internalization
17.
Struct Chem ; : 1-8, 2021 Apr 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1384542

ABSTRACT

In this study, we have investigated the binding mechanism of two FDA-approved drugs (ivermectin and levosalbutamol) with the spike protein of SARs-CoV-2 using three different computational modeling techniques. Molecular docking results predict that ivermectin shows a large binding affinity for spike protein (- 9.0 kcal/mol) compared to levosalbutamol (- 4.1 kcal/mol). Ivermectin binds with LEU492, GLN493, GLY496, and TRY505 residues in the spike protein through hydrogen bonds and levosalbutamol binds with TYR453 and TYR505 residues. Using density functional theory (DFT) studies, we have calculated the binding energies between ivermectin and levosalbutamol with residues in spike protein which favor their binding are - 22.4 kcal/mol and - 21.08 kcal/mol, respectively. The natural bond orbital (NBO) charge analysis has been performed to estimate the amount of charge transfer that occurred by two drugs during interaction with residues. Molecular dynamics (MD) study confirms the stability of spike protein bound with ivermectin through RMSD and RMSF analyses. Three different computer modeling techniques reveal that ivermectin is more stable than levosalbutamol in the active site of spike protein where hACE2 binds. Therefore, ivermectin can be a suitable inhibitor for SARS-CoV-2 to enter into the human cell through hACE2.

18.
J Med Virol ; 93(9): 5560-5567, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1363699

ABSTRACT

Quantitation of antibodies to the spike protein of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2  (SARS-CoV-2) was performed for the detection of adaptive immune response in healthcare workers (HCWs) vaccinated with CorovaVac. We prospectively recruited HCWs from a university hospital in Turkey. Serum samples from 1072 HCWs were obtained following 28 days of the first, and 21 days of the second dose. Detection and quantitation of SARS-CoV-2 antispike antibodies were performed by the chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay (SARS-CoV-2 IgG II Quant; Abbott). Results greater than or equal to the cutoff value 50.0 AU/ml were reported as positive. After the first dose, antispike antibodies were detected in 834 of 1072 (77.8%) HCWs. Seropositivity was higher among females (84.6%) than males (70.6%) (p < 0.001) and was found to be highest in both women and men between the ages of 18-34. After the second dose, antibodies were detected in 1008 of 1012 (99.6%) HCWs. Antibody titers were significantly higher in those who had coronavirus disease-2019 before vaccination than those who did not (p < 0.001). Antibody positivity and median antibody titers were significantly less in HCWs with chronic diseases compared to those without (p < 0.05 and p < 0.001, respectively). In conclusion, our findings indicated that a relatively high frequency (99.6%) of humoral immunity was produced in HCWs aged 18-59 after two doses of CoronaVac. Quantitation of antibodies may help facilitate longitudinal monitoring of the antibody response, which will be especially useful in deciding the dose of the vaccine in vulnerable groups such as those over 60 years of age and those with chronic diseases.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Adolescent , Adult , Antibody Formation , COVID-19/immunology , Female , Health Personnel , Humans , Immunization Schedule , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies , Turkey , Young Adult
19.
Nature ; 588(7838): 498-502, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1343462

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) virions are surrounded by a lipid bilayer from which spike (S) protein trimers protrude1. Heavily glycosylated S trimers bind to the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 receptor and mediate entry of virions into target cells2-6. S exhibits extensive conformational flexibility: it modulates exposure of its receptor-binding site and subsequently undergoes complete structural rearrangement to drive fusion of viral and cellular membranes2,7,8. The structures and conformations of soluble, overexpressed, purified S proteins have been studied in detail using cryo-electron microscopy2,7,9-12, but the structure and distribution of S on the virion surface remain unknown. Here we applied cryo-electron microscopy and tomography to image intact SARS-CoV-2 virions and determine the high-resolution structure, conformational flexibility and distribution of S trimers in situ on the virion surface. These results reveal the conformations of S on the virion, and provide a basis from which to understand interactions between S and neutralizing antibodies during infection or vaccination.


Subject(s)
Cryoelectron Microscopy , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/ultrastructure , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/analysis , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/ultrastructure , Virion/chemistry , Virion/ultrastructure , Antibodies, Neutralizing/immunology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19 Vaccines/immunology , Cell Line, Tumor , Humans , Models, Molecular , Pliability , Protein Conformation , Protein Multimerization , SARS-CoV-2/chemistry , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/isolation & purification , Virion/isolation & purification , Virion/metabolism
20.
Biophys Chem ; 265: 106441, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1343142

ABSTRACT

The possibility of immobilizing a protein with antigenic properties on a solid support offers significant possibilities in the development of immunosensors and vaccine formulations. For both applications, the orientation of the antigen should ensure ready accessibility of the antibodies to the epitope. However, an experimental assessment of the orientational preferences necessarily proceeds through the preparation/isolation of the antigen, the immobilization on different surfaces and one or more biophysical characterization steps. To predict a priori whether favorable orientations can be achieved or not would allow one to select the most promising experimental routes, partly mitigating the time cost towards the final product. In this manuscript, we apply a simple computational model, based on united-residue modelling, to the prediction of the orientation of the receptor binding domain of the SARS-CoV-2 spike protein on surfaces commonly used in lateral-flow devices. These calculations can account for the experimental observation that direct immobilization on gold gives sufficient exposure of the epitope to obtain a response in immunochemical assays.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/metabolism , Epitopes/chemistry , Models, Molecular , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism , Antigens/chemistry , Antigens/immunology , Antigens/metabolism , Epitopes/immunology , Molecular Docking Simulation , Protein Domains , SARS-CoV-2 , Silicon Dioxide/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/chemistry , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/immunology , Surface Properties
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL