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1.
Theranostics ; 11(14): 7005-7017, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1524524

ABSTRACT

The tumor suppressor protein p53 remains in a wild type but inactive form in ~50% of all human cancers. Thus, activating it becomes an attractive approach for targeted cancer therapies. In this regard, our lab has previously discovered a small molecule, Inauhzin (INZ), as a potent p53 activator with no genotoxicity. Method: To improve its efficacy and bioavailability, here we employed nanoparticle encapsulation, making INZ-C, an analog of INZ, to nanoparticle-encapsulated INZ-C (n-INZ-C). Results: This approach significantly improved p53 activation and inhibition of lung and colorectal cancer cell growth by n-INZ-C in vitro and in vivo while it displayed a minimal effect on normal human Wi38 and mouse MEF cells. The improved activity was further corroborated with the enhanced cellular uptake observed in cancer cells and minimal cellular uptake observed in normal cells. In vivo pharmacokinetic evaluation of these nanoparticles showed that the nanoparticle encapsulation prolongates the half-life of INZ-C from 2.5 h to 5 h in mice. Conclusions: These results demonstrate that we have established a nanoparticle system that could enhance the bioavailability and efficacy of INZ-C as a potential anti-cancer therapeutic.


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Agents/pharmacology , Colorectal Neoplasms/drug therapy , Indoles/pharmacology , Lung Neoplasms/drug therapy , Nanoparticles/chemistry , Phenothiazines/pharmacology , Tumor Suppressor Protein p53/metabolism , Animals , Antineoplastic Agents/chemistry , Antineoplastic Agents/pharmacokinetics , Antineoplastic Agents/therapeutic use , Biological Availability , Cell Line, Tumor , Cell Movement/drug effects , Cell Proliferation/drug effects , Humans , Indoles/chemistry , Indoles/pharmacokinetics , Indoles/therapeutic use , Mice , Mice, Inbred C57BL , Microscopy, Electron, Transmission , Nanoparticles/toxicity , Nanoparticles/ultrastructure , Phenothiazines/chemistry , Phenothiazines/pharmacokinetics , Phenothiazines/therapeutic use , Spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared , Tumor Suppressor Protein p53/genetics , Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
2.
Oncology (Williston Park) ; 35(1): 26-28, 2021 Jan 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1485807

ABSTRACT

Against the difficult and trying backdrop of the pandemic, cancer investigators persisted, and for patients with lung cancer, that persistence paid off in spectacular ways. With several new FDA approved treatments, as well as 2 new targetable mutations in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), 2020 was a banner year in the overall lung cancer space. ONCOLOGY® recently sat down with Jennifer W. Carlisle, MD, of Emory University's Winship Cancer Institute, to discuss the many advances made during the last year for patients with lung cancer along with her hopes for further significant milestones in the year to come.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Lung Neoplasms/drug therapy , Medical Oncology/organization & administration , Antineoplastic Agents, Immunological/therapeutic use , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/drug therapy , Carcinoma, Non-Small-Cell Lung/genetics , Humans , Lung Neoplasms/genetics , Precision Medicine , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Ecancermedicalscience ; 15: 1189, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1394745

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic presents serious challenges to cancer care because of the associated risks from the infection itself and the disruption of care delivery. Therefore, many professional societies have published recommendations to help manage patients with cancer during the current pandemic. The objective of our study is to assess the national responses of Middle East North Africa (MENA) countries in terms of publishing relevant guidelines and analyse various components of these guidelines. METHODS: A survey based on the preliminary review of the literature regarding cancer care adaptations has been developed and then completed by a group of oncologists from the following Arab countries affected by the pandemic: Algeria, Egypt, Iraq, Jordan, Kuwait, Lebanon, Morocco, Oman, Saudi Arabia, Syria, Tunisia, United Arab Emirates and Yemen. The survey inquired about COVID-19 cases, national recommendations regarding general measures of COVID-19 prevention and patient care in oncology as well as their implementation about cancer care adaptations during the pandemic. RESULTS: Analysis of the COVID-19 pandemic-related guidelines revealed at least 30 specific recommendations that we categorised into seven essential components. All included countries had national guidelines except one country. Estimated full compliances with all specific category recommendations ranged from 30% to 69% and partial compliance ranged from 23% to 61%. CONCLUSION: There is a very good response and preparedness in the Arab Middle East and North Africa region surveyed. However, there are inconsistencies in the various components of the guidelines across the region, which reflects the evolving status of the pandemic in each country as well as the lack of clear evidence-based guidelines for many of the issues in question. There is a need for a clear framework on essential components that should be included in these guidelines to assure providing the best guidance to the oncology community.

5.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 2459, 2021 01 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1387462

ABSTRACT

A deeper understanding of the molecular biology of SARS-CoV-2 infection, including the host response to the virus, is urgently needed. Commonalities exist between the host immune response to viral infections and cancer. Here, we defined transcriptional signatures of SARS-CoV-2 infection involving hundreds of genes common across lung adenocarcinoma cell lines (A549, Calu-3) and normal human bronchial epithelial cells (NHBE), with additional signatures being specific to one or both adenocarcinoma lines. Cross-examining eight transcriptomic databases, we found that host transcriptional responses of lung adenocarcinoma cells to SARS-CoV-2 infection shared broad similarities with host responses to multiple viruses across different model systems and patient samples. Furthermore, these SARS-CoV-2 transcriptional signatures were manifested within specific subsets of human cancer, involving ~ 20% of cases across a wide range of histopathological types. These cancer subsets show immune cell infiltration and inflammation and involve pathways linked to the SARS-CoV-2 response, such as immune checkpoint, IL-6, type II interferon signaling, and NF-κB. The cell line data represented immune responses activated specifically within the cancer cells of the tumor. Common genes and pathways implicated as part of the viral host response point to therapeutic strategies that may apply to both SARS-CoV-2 and cancer.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , Host Microbial Interactions/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , A549 Cells , Bronchi/metabolism , COVID-19/metabolism , Epithelial Cells/metabolism , Epithelial Cells/virology , Humans , Immunity , Lung Neoplasms/pathology , Lung Neoplasms/virology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Transcription, Genetic , Transcriptome , Virus Replication/genetics
6.
Oncol Nurs Forum ; 48(4): 403-411, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1378127

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To describe the experiences of Turkish parents of hospitalized children with cancer during the COVID-19 pandemic. PARTICIPANTS & SETTING: Participants were recruited at the pediatric hematology-oncology clinic of a university hospital in Turkey. A purposive sampling strategy was used to identify participants. Parents who had a child aged 0-18 years with cancer were eligible. METHODOLOGIC APPROACH: This study was conducted using a descriptive qualitative research design. Semistructured individual interviews with 14 parents of children with cancer were used for data collection. Data were analyzed using the content analysis method. FINDINGS: Two main themes with related subthemes were identified that revealed the lived experiences of parents of children with cancer. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING: Pediatric oncology nurses can develop clinical practices that help parents to cope with anxiety about COVID-19. Nurses should share with parents current and valid information about the child's care during the pandemic. Future research should examine the experiences of children with cancer and their parents from different cultures during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Child, Hospitalized , Neoplasms , Child , Humans , Neoplasms/therapy , Pandemics , Parents , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2 , Turkey
7.
AJR Am J Roentgenol ; 217(4): 975-983, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1341589

ABSTRACT

As mass COVID-19 vaccination is underway, radiologists are encountering transient FDG uptake in normal or enlarged axillary, supraclavicular, and cervical lymph nodes after ipsilateral deltoid vaccination. This phenomenon may confound interpretation in patients with cancer undergoing FDG PET/CT. In this article, we present our institutional approach for management of COVID-19 vaccine-related lymphadenopathy on FDG PET/CT according to early experience. We suggest performing PET/CT at least 2 weeks after vaccination in patients with a cancer for which interpretation is anticipated to be potentially impacted by the vaccination but optimally 4-6 weeks after vaccination given increased immunogenicity of mRNA vaccines and potentially longer time for resolution than lymphadenopathy after other vaccines. PET/CT should not be delayed when clinically indicated to be performed sooner. Details regarding vaccination should be collected at the time of PET/CT to facilitate interpretation. Follow-up recommendations for postvaccination lymphadenopathy are provided, considering the lymph node's morphology and likely clinical relevance. Consideration should be given to administering the vaccine in the arm contralateral to a unilateral cancer to avoid confounding FDG uptake on the side of cancer. Our preliminary experience and suggested institutional approach should guide radiologists in management of patients with cancer undergoing PET/CT after COVID-19 vaccination.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19/prevention & control , Fluorodeoxyglucose F18/pharmacokinetics , Lymphadenopathy/diagnostic imaging , Lymphadenopathy/etiology , Positron Emission Tomography Computed Tomography/methods , Radiopharmaceuticals/pharmacokinetics , COVID-19 Vaccines/therapeutic use , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Cancers (Basel) ; 12(10)2020 Oct 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1295760

ABSTRACT

Prostate cancer is the most common malignancy among men, and progression to metastasis and the emergence of therapeutically resistant disease confers a high mortality rate. Growing evidence implicates inflammation as a driver of prostate cancer development and progression, resulting in increased cancer risk for prostate cancer. Population-based studies revealed that the use of antinflammatory drugs led to a 23% risk reduction prostate cancer occurrence, a negative association that was stronger in men who specifically used COX-2 inhibitors. Furthermore, patients that were taking aspirin had a 21% reduction in prostate cancer risk, and further, long-term users of daily low dose aspirin had a 29% prostate cancer risk reduction as compared to the controls. Environmental exposure to bacterial and viral infections, exposure to mutagenic agents, and genetic variations predispose the prostate gland to inflammation, with a coordinated elevated expression of inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, TGF-ß). It is the dynamics within the tumor microenvironment that empower these cytokines to promote survival and growth of the primary tumor and facilitate disease progression by navigating the immunoregulatory network, phenotypic epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), angiogenesis, anoikis resistance, and metastasis. In this review, we discuss the sources of inflammation in the prostate, the functional contribution of the critical inflammatory effectors to prostate cancer initiation and metastatic progression, and the therapeutic challenges that they impose on treatment of advanced disease and overcoming therapeutic resistance. Growing mechanistic evidence supports the significance of inflammation in localized prostate cancer, and the systemic impact of the process within the tumor microenvironment on disease progression to advanced therapeutically-resistant prostate cancer. Rigorous exploitation of the role of inflammation in prostate cancer progression to metastasis and therapeutic resistance will empower the development of precise biomarker signatures and effective targeted therapeutics to reduce the clinical burden and lethal disease in the future.

9.
Int J Clin Oncol ; 26(8): 1569-1574, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1274856

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19, the novel coronavirus has caused a global pandemic affecting millions of people around the world. Although children, including children with cancer, have been found to be affected less commonly and less severely than adults, indirect effects of the pandemic on the diagnosis and treatment of children with cancer have been less described. METHODS: A survey was performed in the four largest tertiary pediatric hematology-oncology medical centers in Israel. Clinical and laboratory data were collected from the medical files of patients diagnosed or treated with cancer during April-October 2020. RESULTS: Seventeen patients are described, who had a significant delay in diagnosis or treatment of cancer. These represent approximately 10% of all pediatric cancer diagnosed during the study period in these centers. A main cause of delay was fear of exposure to COVID-19 (fears felt by the patient, parent, physician, or decision-makers at the institution; or the implementation of national guidelines). Delays also resulted from co-infection with COVID-19 and the attribution of the oncologic symptoms to the infection. In addition, treatment was delayed of patients already diagnosed with cancer, due to COVID-19 infection detected in the patient, a family member, or a bone marrow donor. CONCLUSION: Fear from the COVID-19 pandemic may result in delayed diagnosis and treatment of children with cancer, which may carry a risk to dismal prognosis. It is crucial that pediatricians and patients alike remember that other diseases still prevail and must be thought of and treated in a timely fashion.

11.
JCO Clin Cancer Inform ; 5: 695-700, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1278134

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Health care priorities of individuals may change during a pandemic, which may, in turn, affect health services utilization. We examined Canadians' online relative search interest in five common solid tumors (breast, colon, lung, prostate, and thyroid) during the COVID-19 pandemic to that observed in the same months in the prior 5 years. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional retrospective study using Google Trends aggregate anonymous online search data from Canada. We compared the respective relative search volumes for breast, colon, lung, prostate, and thyroid cancers for the months March-November 2020 with the mean for the same months in 2015-2019. Welch's two-sample t tests were performed and the raw P values were then adjusted using Benjamini-Hochberg procedure to correct for multiple comparisons. The level of statistical significance was defined by choosing false discovery rate at .05 for the primary analysis. RESULTS: We observed temporary statistically significant reductions in Canadians' relative search volumes for various cancers, largely early in the pandemic, in the spring of 2020. Specifically, significant reductions (after adjustment for multiple comparisons) were observed for breast cancer in April, May, and October 2020; colon cancer in March and April of 2020; lung cancer in April and September 2020; and prostate cancer in April and May 2020. Thyroid cancer relative search volumes were not significantly different from those observed prior to the pandemic. CONCLUSION: Although Canadians' online interest in various cancers temporarily waned early in the COVID-19 pandemic, recent relative search volumes for various cancers are largely not significantly different from prior to the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Information Seeking Behavior , Internet , Neoplasms , Search Engine , Canada , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies
12.
Andrologia ; 53(6): e14061, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1276536

ABSTRACT

Testicular cancer, in particular testicular germ cell tumours, is the most common malignancy in young adult men. Defining prognosis and the best therapeutic strategy is challenging since accurate staging could be controversial. We report an unusual case of seminoma with pagetoid spread into the rete testis and, unexpectedly, also within the epithelium of the vas deferens, up to the margin of excision of the spermatic cord. Focussing on the extremely rare pathological finding and the challenge in defining the stage and the best post-surgical management, we would like to raise some issues about the knowledge gap on this topic.


Subject(s)
Neoplasms, Germ Cell and Embryonal , Seminoma , Testicular Neoplasms , Humans , Male , Neoplasm Invasiveness , Seminoma/surgery , Testicular Neoplasms/surgery , Vas Deferens , Young Adult
13.
JMIR Cancer ; 7(2): e27384, 2021 Jun 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1273310

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patients with cancer are particularly vulnerable to stress and anxiety during the COVID-19 pandemic. Social distancing is critical for patients with cancer; however, it can also reduce their access to psychosocial coping resources. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to explore patient experiences to generate a model of how virtual mind-body programs can support the psychosocial well-being of patients with cancer. METHODS: We conducted a qualitative study among patients (aged ≥18 years) who participated in a virtual mind-body program offered by a National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center during the COVID-19 pandemic. The program consisted of mind-body group therapy sessions of fitness, yoga, tai chi, dance therapy, music therapy, and meditation. Live integrative medicine clinicians held each session via Zoom videoconferencing for 30-45 minutes. In semistructured phone interviews (n=30), patients were asked about their overall impressions and perceptions of the benefits of the sessions, including impacts on stress and anxiety. Interviews were analyzed using grounded theory. RESULTS: Among the 30 participants (average age 64.5 years, SD 9.36, range 40-80, 29 female), three major themes were identified relating to experiences in the virtual mind-body program: (1) the sessions helped the patients maintain structured routines and motivated them to adhere to healthy behaviors; (2) the sessions enhanced coping with COVID-19-related-stressors, allowing patients to "refocus" and "re-energize"; and (3) the sessions allowed patients to connect, fostering social relationships during a time of isolation. These themes informed the constructs of a novel behavioral-psychological-social coping model for patients with cancer. CONCLUSIONS: Virtual mind-body programming supported patients with cancer during the COVID-19 pandemic through a behavioral-psychological-social coping model by enhancing psychological coping for external stressors, supporting adherence to motivation and health behaviors, and increasing social connection and camaraderie. These programs have potential to address the behavioral, psychological, and social challenges faced by patients with cancer during and beyond the COVID-19 pandemic. The constructs of the conceptual model proposed in this study can inform future interventions to support isolated patients with cancer. Further clinical trials are needed to confirm the specific benefits of virtual mind-body programming for the psychosocial well-being and healthy behaviors of patients with cancer.

14.
Res Sq ; 2021 Jun 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1270324

ABSTRACT

Background: While pre-existing cardiovascular disease (CVD) appears to be associated with poor outcomes in patients with Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19), data on patients with CVD and concomitant cancer is limited. Evaluate the effect of underlying CVD and CVD risk factors with cancer history on in-hospital mortality in those with COVID-19. Methods: Data from symptomatic adults hospitalized with COVID-19 at 86 hospitals in the US enrolled in the American Heart Association’s COVID-19 CVD Registry was analyzed. The primary exposure was cancer history. The primary outcome was in-hospital death. Multivariable logistic regression models were adjusted for demographics, CVD risk factors, and CVD. Interaction between history of cancer with concomitant CVD and CVD risk factors were tested. Results: Among 8222 patients, 892 (10.8%) had a history of cancer and 1501 (18.3%) died. Cancer history had significant interaction with CVD risk factors of age, body mass index (BMI), and smoking history, but not underlying CVD itself. History of cancer was significantly associated with increased in-hospital death (among average age and BMI patients, adjusted odds ratio [aOR]=3.60, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.07-6.24; p<0.0001 in those with a smoking history and aOR=1.33, 95%CI: 1.01 - 1.76; p=0.04 in non-smokers). Among the cancer subgroup, prior use of chemotherapy within 2 weeks of admission was associated with in-hospital death (aOR=1.72, 95%CI: 1.05-2.80; p=0.03). Underlying CVD demonstrated a numerical but statistically nonsignificant trend toward increased mortality (aOR=1.18, 95% CI: 0.99 - 1.41; p=0.07). Conclusion: Among hospitalized COVID-19 patients, cancer history was a predictor of in-hospital mortality. Notably, among cancer patients, recent use of chemotherapy, but not underlying CVD itself, was associated with worse survival. These findings have important implications in cancer therapy considerations and vaccine distribution in cancer patients with and without underlying CVD and CVD risk factors.

15.
J Bone Oncol ; 29: 100375, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1267729

ABSTRACT

Optimum management of patients with cancer during the COVID-19 pandemic has proved extremely challenging. Patients, clinicians and hospital authorities have had to balance the risks to patients of attending hospital, many of whom are especially vulnerable, with the risks of delaying or modifying cancer treatment. Those whose care has been significantly impacted include patients suffering from the effects of cancer on bone, where delivering the usual standard of care for bone support has often not been possible and clinicians have been forced to seek alternative options for adequate management. At a virtual meeting of the Cancer and Bone Society in July 2020, an expert group shared experiences and solutions to this challenge, following which a questionnaire was sent internationally to the symposium's participants, to explore the issues faced and solutions offered. 70 respondents, from 9 countries (majority USA, 39%, followed by UK, 19%) included 50 clinicians, spread across a diverse range of specialties (but with a high proportion, 64%, of medical oncologists) and 20 who classified themselves as non-clinical (solely lab-based). Spread of clinician specialty across tumour types was breast (65%), prostate (27%), followed by renal, myeloma and melanoma. Analysis showed that management of metastatic bone disease in all solid tumour types and myeloma, adjuvant bisphosphonate breast cancer therapy and cancer treatment induced bone loss, was substantially impacted. Respondents reported delays to routine CT scans (58%), standard bone scans (48%) and MRI scans (46%), though emergency scans were less affected. Delays in palliative radiotherapy for bone pain were reported by 31% of respondents with treatments often involving only a single dose without fractionation. Delays to, or cancellation of, prophylactic surgery for bone pain were reported by 35% of respondents. Access to treatments with intravenous bisphosphonates and subcutaneous denosumab was a major problem, mitigated by provision of drug administration at home or in a local clinic, reduced frequency of administration or switching to oral bisphosphonates taken at home. The questionnaire also revealed damaging delays or complete stopping of both clinical and laboratory research. In addition to an analysis of the questionnaire, this paper presents a rationale and recommendations for adaptation of the normal guidelines for protection of bone health during the pandemic.

16.
Front Oncol ; 10: 577696, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1264351

ABSTRACT

Immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICI) have become the standard of care treatment for several tumor types. ICI-induced pneumonitis is a serious complication seen with treatment with these agents. Cancer has been reported to be one of the risk factors for severe coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), that has engulfed the world in the last couple of months. In patients with cancer treated with ICI who present at the emergency department with respiratory symptoms during the COVID-19 pandemic, correct diagnosis can be challenging. Symptoms and radiological features of ICI pneumonitis can be overlapping with those of COVID-19 related pneumonia. For the latter, dexamethasone and remdesivir have shown encouraging results, while vaccines are currently being evaluated in phase III trials. The mainstay of treatment in ICI pneumonitis is immunosuppressive therapy, as this is a potentially fatal adverse event. It has been speculated that immunosuppression may be associated with increased risk of progression to severe COVID-19, especially during the early stage of infection with SARS-CoV-2. Therefore, distinction between these two entities is warranted. We summarize the clinical, radiological features as well as additional investigations of both entities, and suggest a diagnostic algorithm for distinction between the two. This algorithm may be a supportive tool for clinicians to diagnose the underlying cause of the pneumonitis in patients treated with ICI during this COVID-19 pandemic.

17.
Int J Nurs Stud Adv ; 3: 100030, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1260755

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Healthcare services have responded to the challenges of service delivery during COVID-19 with telehealth and hybrid models of care. However, there is limited understanding of the experiences of care amongst people affected by cancer and how their experiences may change and evolve against the shifting landscape of COVID-19 incidence, mortality, vaccination and refinements in service delivery. OBJECTIVES: This study explores the experiences of cancer care amongst people affected by cancer in Ireland during the COVID-19 pandemic. This paper presents the results of the initial cross-sectional semi-structured interviews and the longitudinal qualitative research design which will be employed in this study. DESIGN: A longitudinal descriptive qualitative study. SETTING: Ireland. PARTICIPANTS: People living with and after cancer or caring for someone with cancer during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Participants were recruited to the study via social media advertisements and consented to participate in up to three semi-structured interviews between January and July 2021. Initial semi-structured interviews were conducted with 16 participants in January 2021. Participants completed measures of resilience (2-item Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale) and distress (The National Comprehensive Cancer Network Distress Thermometer). Interviews were recorded, transcribed and analysed thematically. RESULTS: Participants reported low levels of distress and moderate to high levels of resilience on average. Three themes were generated from analysis of the first phase of cross-sectional interviews. Participants described a counterbalance of being cautious of infection and keeping safe through prevention and shielding strategies. Although hospitals felt safe and were working efficiently, some participants felt COVID-19 had compromised person-centredness and empathy in care. While participants valued the measures taken to minimize infection risk, substitution of face-to-face appointments with telehealth services and attending essential face-to-face appointments alone restricted participants' access to professional and social support. Despite this, many participants felt public health measures to reduce transmission of COVID-19 had created a sense of not missing out, feeling safe and reduced difficult social interactions requiring explanation of their diagnosis. CONCLUSIONS: There is an opportunity to learn from the experiences of healthcare delivery from the perspectives of people affected by cancer during the COVID-19 pandemic. The results highlight the complexities and dualities of living with, after or caring for someone with cancer during the COVID-19 pandemic. Opportunities for longitudinal qualitative research to explore the evolving experiences, concerns and persistent and emerging unmet information and clinical needs within the rapidly changing socio-political, socio-cultural and healthcare contexts of the COVID-19 pandemic are highlighted.

18.
BMJ Open ; 11(6): e045679, 2021 06 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1255597

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Childhood cancers are a leading cause of non-communicable disease deaths for children around the world. The COVID-19 pandemic may have impacted on global children's cancer services, which can have consequences for childhood cancer outcomes. The Global Health Research Group on Children's Non-Communicable Diseases is currently undertaking the first international cohort study to determine the variation in paediatric cancer management during the COVID-19 pandemic, and the short-term to medium-term impacts on childhood cancer outcomes. METHODS AND ANALYSIS: This is a multicentre, international cohort study that will use routinely collected hospital data in a deidentified and anonymised form. Patients will be recruited consecutively into the study, with a 12-month follow-up period. Patients will be included if they are below the age of 18 years and undergoing anticancer treatment for the following cancers: acute lymphoblastic leukaemia, Burkitt lymphoma, Hodgkin lymphoma, Wilms tumour, sarcoma, retinoblastoma, gliomas, medulloblastomas and neuroblastomas. Patients must be newly presented or must be undergoing active anticancer treatment from 12 March 2020 to 12 December 2020. The primary objective of the study was to determine all-cause mortality rates of 30 days, 90 days and 12 months. This study will examine the factors that influenced these outcomes. χ2 analysis will be used to compare mortality between low-income and middle-income countries and high-income countries. Multilevel, multivariable logistic regression analysis will be undertaken to identify patient-level and hospital-level factors affecting outcomes with adjustment for confounding factors. ETHICS AND DISSEMINATION: At the host centre, this study was deemed to be exempt from ethical committee approval due to the use of anonymised registry data. At other centres, participating collaborators have gained local approvals in accordance with their institutional ethical regulations. Collaborators will be encouraged to present the results locally, nationally and internationally. The results will be submitted for publication in a peer-reviewed journal.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Adolescent , Child , Cohort Studies , Developed Countries , Humans , Multicenter Studies as Topic , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Observational Studies as Topic , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Nutr Cancer ; 74(2): 450-462, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1254176

ABSTRACT

Cancer is making patients vulnerable to diseases by impairing immunity directly or by anticancer therapy. In COVID-19 era, it is mandatory to face cancer with more organized & prompter response. Nutrition plays an important role in prevention & management of cancer patients. The objective of this study is to understand the role of nutrition in cancer patients during Corvid 19 era. We conducted literature searches till May 2020, electronic databases, evidence-based collections, relevant websites and trial registries about SARS-CoV2/COVID-19 and nutrition in cancer patients. Search generated 836 sources; 83/836 sources were relevant. This review summarized role of nutrition in predisposition, prevention and management of COVID-19 in cancer patient and role of vitamins, mineral supplements and microbiota in era of COVID-19. In this review, implementing appropriate nutritional care with vitamins or mineral supplementation & their effect on outcome remain largely unknown. COVID co-infection with cancer whether under chemotherapy or not have worse outcome especially in male adults. Findings may help in creating recommendations on nutritional protocol of management & prevention of complications during ongoing COVID-19 pandemic for all cancer patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neoplasms , Adult , Humans , Male , Neoplasms/complications , Pandemics , RNA, Viral , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Indian J Orthop ; : 1-13, 2020 May 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1245805

ABSTRACT

With the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) being declared a global pandemic by the World Health Organization, the Indian healthcare sector is at the forefront to deliver optimal care. Patients with cancer especially are at serious risk for increased chances of morbidity and mortality due to their immunocompromised state. Currently there is a paucity of definitive guidelines for the management of sarcomas during the pandemic in a resource-constrained and diverse population setting like India. Health care professionals from various specialties involved in the management of sarcomas have collaborated to discuss various aspects of evidence-based sarcoma management during the COVID-19 pandemic. This article provides structured recommendations for HCP to adapt to the situation, optimize treatment protocols with judicious use of all resources while providing evidence-based treatment for sarcoma patients.

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