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1.
Int J Gynecol Cancer ; 31(5): 775-778, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1476710

ABSTRACT

Cervical cancer is a global health problem which disproportionally affects women in low- and middle- income countries. The World Health Organization recently launched its global strategy to eliminate this disease in the next two decades. For those women diagnosed today with cervical cancer better strategies are needed to improve outcome and reduce treatment-related morbidity. Clinical trials are critical to shaping future treatment, and much has been achieved already. However, such opportunities are limited in low resource settings, and the Cervical Cancer Research Network is dedicated to expanding access to new technologies in surgery, radiation, and medical oncology. In this article we review the status of the trials portfolio and outline future objectives, including the launch of a number of research grants for aspiring or established researchers in low- and middle-income settings.

2.
Viruses ; 13(3)2021 03 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1457709

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Efficacy for cervical cancer prevention of opportunistic HPV vaccination in post-pubertal girls is lower than in 11-year-olds. METHODS: Women born between 1986 and 1992 vaccinated at 15-25 years of age (at least one dose of 4-valent HPV vaccine) and screened at 24-27 years of age were included. Frequency of opportunistic vaccination, overall and by birth cohort, was calculated; screening outcomes were compared between vaccinated and unvaccinated women. RESULTS: Overall, 4718 (4.9%) HPV-vaccinated, and 91,512 unvaccinated, women were studied. The frequency of vaccination increased by birth cohort, ranging between 1.8% and 9.8%; age at vaccination decreased progressively by birth cohort (p < 0.0001). Participation in screening was 60.8% among vaccinated, and 56.6% among unvaccinated, women (p < 0.0001). Detection rates (DR) for high-grade lesions were lower in vaccinated women (2.11‰ vs. 3.85‰ in unvaccinated, for CIN3+, p = 0.24; 0.0‰ vs. 0.22‰ for cancer). The DR of CIN3+ increased with age at vaccination, scoring respectively 0.0‰, 0.83‰, and 4.68‰ for women vaccinated when they were 15-16, 17-20, and 21-25 years old (p = 0.17). CONCLUSIONS: In comparison to unvaccinated women, higher compliance with cervical cancer screening invitation and lower CIN3+ DR among vaccinated women was observed. Age at vaccination was inversely correlated to vaccination efficacy.


Subject(s)
Papillomavirus Infections/prevention & control , Papillomavirus Vaccines/administration & dosage , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/prevention & control , Adolescent , Adult , Early Detection of Cancer , Female , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Mass Screening , Retrospective Studies , Young Adult
3.
Nutr Cancer ; : 1-9, 2021 Apr 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1201836

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer among women in developing countries. Malnutrition is associated with poor prognosis and early detection of malnutrition and timely nutritional interventions can improve the outcome for cervical cancer patients. The study was aimed to assess the association between the nutritional status and survival of cervical cancer patients. METHODS: A prospective cohort study design was used. Overall 175 cervical cancer patients were followed over one year period with (median 8.5 mo, range (3.6-12). RESULTS: The prevalence of malnutrition determined by means of the PG-SGA was 17.7% at admission and 47.1% at the end of follow-up. According to the SGA, one in three (29.7%) patients required nutritional intervention at the end of follow-up. Patients who were malnourished (PG-SGA-B and C) had an increased risk of mortality (Hazard Ratio [HR]: 3.12, 95% CI: 1.23 - 7.86) as compared to those who were well nourished (PG-SGA-A). Patients from rural areas had an increased risk of mortality (HR: 6.99, 95% CI: 2.07 - 23.58) compared to patients from urban areas. CONCLUSION: In the context of developing country setting and COVID19 outbreak, malnutrition significantly decreases cervical cancer survival. A thorough nutrition assessment using scored PG-SGA is needed.

4.
Ecancermedicalscience ; 14: 1060, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-615265

ABSTRACT

During the COVID-19 pandemic, health services worldwide are going through important adaptations to assist patients infected with COVID-19, at the same time as continuing to provide assistance to other potentially life-threatening diseases. Although patients with cancer may be at increased risk for severe events related to COVID-19 infection, their oncologic treatments frequently cannot be delayed for long periods without jeopardising oncologic outcomes. Considering this, a careful consideration for treatment management of different malignancies is required. Cervical cancer is concentrated mainly in low-middle income countries (LMICs), which face particular challenges during the COVID-19 pandemic due to the scarcity of health resources in many places. Although cervical cancer is the fourth cause of cancer death among women, it receives little attention from international Oncology societies and scientific research studies. In this review paper, we discuss the cervical cancer landscape and provide specialists recommendations for its management during the COVID-19 pandemic, particularly focused on LMICs' reality.

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