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1.
J Ovarian Res ; 13(1): 105, 2020 Sep 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-751179

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The number of cases of novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in Japan have risen since the first case was reported on January 24, 2020, and 6225 infections have been reported as of June 30, 2020. On April 8, 2020, our hospital began screening patients via pre-admission reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and chest computed tomography (CT). Although no patients exhibited apparent pneumonia, treatment delay or changes in treatment plans were required for a few patients based on the results of screening tests. During an emerging infectious disease pandemic, the likelihood of being infected, as well as the disease itself, affects clinical decision making in several ways. We summarized and presented our experience. CASE PRESENTATION: After the introduction of pre-admission screening, RT-PCR and CT were performed in 200 and 76 patients, respectively, as of June 30, 2020. The treatment of five patients, including two patients with cervical cancer, two patients with ovarian tumors, and one patient with ovarian cancer, was affected by the results. Two asymptomatic RT-PCR-positive patients did not develop COVID-19, but their treatment was delayed until the confirmation of negative results. The other three patients were RT-PCR-negative, but abnormal CT findings suggested the possibility of COVID-19, which delayed treatment. The patients receiving first-line preoperative chemotherapy for ovarian cancer had clinically evident exacerbations because of the treatment delay. CONCLUSION: During the epidemic phase of an emerging infectious disease, we found that COVID-19 has several other effects besides its incidence. The postponing treatment was the most common, therefore, treatment of ovarian tumors and ovarian cancer was considered to be the most likely to be affected among gynecological diseases. Protocols that allow for easy over-diagnosis can be disadvantageous, mainly because of treatment delays, and therefore, the protocols must be developed in light of the local infection situation.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Genital Neoplasms, Female/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Cancer Care Facilities , Clinical Decision-Making , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Time-to-Treatment , Tokyo/epidemiology , Treatment Outcome
3.
Ecancermedicalscience ; 14: ed103, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-690781

ABSTRACT

International travel has largely been suspended due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Due to this situation, Zambia has not been able to import radioactive isotopes for High Dose Rate (HDR) brachytherapy, Iridium 192 (I192) and this has led to suspension of treatment for patients. Cancer of the cervix is the most common cancer in Zambia and brachytherapy is a core component of the treatment armamentarium. Mitigation strategies may include external beam radiotherapy boost or hysterectomy but both systems are overburdened and fragile.

4.
Ecancermedicalscience ; 14: 1060, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-615265

ABSTRACT

During the COVID-19 pandemic, health services worldwide are going through important adaptations to assist patients infected with COVID-19, at the same time as continuing to provide assistance to other potentially life-threatening diseases. Although patients with cancer may be at increased risk for severe events related to COVID-19 infection, their oncologic treatments frequently cannot be delayed for long periods without jeopardising oncologic outcomes. Considering this, a careful consideration for treatment management of different malignancies is required. Cervical cancer is concentrated mainly in low-middle income countries (LMICs), which face particular challenges during the COVID-19 pandemic due to the scarcity of health resources in many places. Although cervical cancer is the fourth cause of cancer death among women, it receives little attention from international Oncology societies and scientific research studies. In this review paper, we discuss the cervical cancer landscape and provide specialists recommendations for its management during the COVID-19 pandemic, particularly focused on LMICs' reality.

5.
Radiother Oncol ; 148: 270-273, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-401311

ABSTRACT

Cervical cancer is a deadly disease and the COVID-19 pandemic has the potential to further impact its lethality. Hypofractionated radiotherapy could mitigate this impact, however robust data in cervical cancer setting still is lacking. Information provided here could help institutions in reducing radiotherapy fractions for cervical cancer patients.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/radiotherapy , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Radiation Dose Hypofractionation , SARS-CoV-2
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