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1.
Minerva Urol Nephrol ; 2021 Mar 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2067527

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A randomized, double-blind, non-inferiority clinical study was performed on the efficacy and tolerability of IncobotulinumtoxinA vs OnabotulinumtoxinA intradetrusor injections in patients with refractory neurogenic detrusor overactivity incontinence performing intermittent catheterization. METHODS: Sixty-four patients with Spinal Cord Injury or Multiple Sclerosis were randomized to receive 30 intradetrusor injections of IncobotulinumtoxinA or OnabotulinumtoxinA 200 U; 28 patients in IncobotulinumtoxinA group and 29 in OnabotulinumtoxinA group completed the study. Primary outcome measure was the noninferior variation from baseline in daily urinary incontinence episodes (week 12), with a non-inferiority margin of one episode/day. Secondary outcomes measures were changes in Incontinence- Quality of Life questionnaire, Visual Analog Scale score (bother of symptoms on Quality of Life), urodynamic parameters, occurrence of adverse effects and related costs (week 12). RESULTS: At week 12, mean value of difference in urinary incontinence episodes/day between the two groups was -0.2 (95% two-sided CI: -1; 0.7); the difference in incontinence episodes/day between the two groups was -0.4 with a higher limit of one-sided 95% CI of 0.2 episodes/day which was much lower than the non-inferiority margin of one episode/day. Total score and subscores of Incontinence- Quality of Life questionnaire, Visual Analog Scale Scores and urodynamics did not show differences between the two groups. Adverse effects were similar for both treatments, with urinary tract infection being the most frequent, localised effect. Minor costs were observed following IncobotulinumtoxinA. CONCLUSIONS: In patients with refractory neurogenic incontinence due to Spinal Cord Injury or Multiple Sclerosis, IncobotulinumtoxinA was not inferior to OnabotulinumtoxinA in improving clinical and urodynamic findings in the short-term follow-up, with comparable adverse effects but minor costs.

2.
Curr Opin Neurol ; 34(3): 303-311, 2021 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1895868

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The fact that multiple sclerosis (MS) predominantly affects women has been recognized for many years. As the age at diagnosis is decreasing, and treatment options are becoming more complex, increasing numbers of women are facing decisions about the use of disease modifying therapy (DMT) in and around pregnancy. RECENT FINDINGS: New data are rapidly becoming available, particularly regarding the safety of therapies in both pregnancy and breastfeeding. Effective treatment and suppression of relapses is key to ensuring good outcomes in the longer term for the woman, however this must be balanced against individual risk of relapse and risks to the fetus. Women should be advised that it is possible to breastfeed while taking selected DMT. SUMMARY: In this review, we discuss evidence surrounding the safety of DMTs in both pregnancy and breastfeeding, and use this knowledge to suggest approaches to pregnancy and family planning in women with MS.


Subject(s)
Breast Feeding , Female , Humans , Multiple Sclerosis/drug therapy , Pharmaceutical Preparations , Pregnancy , Recurrence , Treatment Outcome
3.
Sex Disabil ; 40(1): 3-20, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1881511

ABSTRACT

Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is a neurological condition which usually manifests between the ages of 20-40 years. This is a critical period for developing relationships, particularly romantic relationships. People with MS can experience sexual dysfunction, limb weakness, fatigue, pain, reduced mood and bladder/bowel dysfunction; potentially affecting their ability to participate in many meaningful activities, including those associated with romantic relationships, dating or engaging in sexual intercourse. Dating or starting romantic relationships can be difficult for people with physical disabilities as they can experience stigma, negative societal attitudes and the fear of requiring care from potential partners. Dating experiences of people with progressive conditions like MS have not been explored in detail. The aim of this study was to develop a rich understanding of how living with MS interacts with/influences dating and developing romantic relationships. The study used a descriptive phenomenological design and a purposive sampling strategy. Colaizzi's descriptive phenomenological method was used to analyze the data (Colaizzi, 1978). Five females and two males, aged 23-51, participated in two online focus groups. Dating with a diagnosis of MS is a highly personal phenomenon, characterized by individual differences in values and experiences. Core to the phenomenon was personal decision-making about disclosure of the diagnosis and ongoing adaptation to the fluctuating nature of the condition with partners in new/developing relationships. The findings will help health professionals working with adults with MS understand this important aspect of their lives.

4.
Mult Scler ; 28(7): 1060-1071, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1861981

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: People with MS (pwMS) have had higher rates of anxiety and depression than the general population before the COVID-19 pandemic, placing them at higher risk of experiencing poor psychological wellbeing during the pandemic. OBJECTIVE: To assess mental health and its social/lifestyle determinants in pwMS during the first wave of the outbreak in the United Kingdom. METHODS: This is a community-based, prospective longitudinal cohort and cross-sectional case-control online questionnaire study. It includes 2010 pwMS from the UK MS Register and 380 people without MS. RESULTS: The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale scores of pwMS for anxiety and depression during the outbreak did not change from the previous year. PwMS were more likely to have anxiety (using General Anxiety Disorder-7) and/or depression (using Patient Health Questionnaire-9) than controls during the outbreak (OR: 2.14, 95% CI: 1.58-2.91). PwMS felt lonelier (OR: 1.37, 95% CI: 1.04-1.80) reported worse social support (OR: 1.90, 95% CI: 1.18-3.07) and reported worsened exercise habits (OR: 1.65, 95% CI: 1.18-2.32) during the outbreak than controls. CONCLUSION: Early in the pandemic, pwMS remained at higher risk of experiencing anxiety and depression than the general population. It is important that multidisciplinary teams improve their support for the wellbeing of pwMS, who are vulnerable to the negative effects of the pandemic on their lifestyle and social support.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Multiple Sclerosis , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Case-Control Studies , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Humans , Mental Health , Multiple Sclerosis/epidemiology , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Eur J Neurol ; 28(10): 3384-3395, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1608838

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Information regarding multiple sclerosis (MS) patients with the 2019 novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) is scarce. The study objective was to describe the incidence and characteristics of MS patients with COVID-19, to identify susceptibility and severity risk factors and to assess the proportion of positive severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) serologies according to disease-modifying treatments. METHODS: This was a retrospective study of an MS cohort analysing data collected between February and May 2020. Cases were identified through an email survey and clinical visits. The relationship of demographic and MS characteristics with COVID-19 and of the disease-modifying treatments with SARS-CoV-2 serostatus were examined. RESULTS: Data from 48 suspected cases out of 758 valid respondents and from 45 COVID-19 cases identified through clinical visits were collected. Incidence was 6.3%. Nineteen (20.3%) patients were hospitalized and two (2.2%) died. Multivariable models determined that age (odds ratio [OR] per 10 years 0.53, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.34-0.85), contact with a confirmed case (OR 197.02, 95% CI 56.36-688.79), residence in Barcelona (OR 2.23, 95% CI 1.03-4.80), MS duration (OR per 5 years 1.41, 95% CI 1.09-1.83) and time on anti-CD20 treatment (OR per 2 years 3.48, 95% CI 1.44-8.45) were independent factors for presenting COVID-19 and age (OR per 10 years 2.71, 95% CI 1.13-6.53) for a severe COVID-19. Out of the 79 (84.9%) with serological test, 45.6% generated antibodies, but only 17.6% of those on anti-CD20 therapies. Lymphopaenia or immunoglobulin levels did not relate to COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: Multiple sclerosis patients present similar incidence, risk factors and outcomes for COVID-19 as the general population. Patients treated with an anti-CD20 therapy for a longer period of time might be at a higher risk of COVID-19 and less than 20% generate an antibody response. Only age was related to severity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Multiple Sclerosis , Child , Humans , Multiple Sclerosis/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Eur J Neurol ; 28(10): 3375-3383, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1604393

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: In multiple sclerosis (MS), disease-related factors and dysfunctional coping might favor the development of mental distress induced by COVID-19 containment measures. Aim of this study was exploring the relationship between disability, coping strategies, daily life reorganization and neuropsychiatric symptoms in an Italian MS population during the COVID-19 lockdown, in order to identify potentially modifiable factors that could inform clinical management of mental distress in people with MS. METHODS: We explored the relationship between mental distress, disability and coping strategies in the Italian MS population under lockdown. Structural equation modeling was applied to information collected via web survey to identify modifiable factors that could account for mental distress. RESULTS: A total of 845 participants (497 with MS and 348 controls) were included in the study. The MS group had higher scores than the control group for depression (p = 0.005), but not for anxiety, emotional dyscontrol or sleep disturbances. The structural equation modeling explained 74% of the variance observed in depression score. Within the model, three latent factors were characterized from measured variables: motor disability and cognitive dysfunction contributed to disability (ß = 0.509 and ß = 0.836; p < 0.001); positive attitude and exercise contributed to active attitude (ß = 0.386 and ß = 0.297; p < 0.001); and avoidance, social support and watching television contributed to passive attitude (ß = 0.301, ß = 0.243 and ß = 0.212; p < 0.001). With regard to the relationship between latent factors and their influence on depression, disability contributed to passive attitude (ß = 0.855; p < 0.001), while both passive and active attitude significantly influenced depression (ß = 0.729 and ß = -0.456; p < 0.001). CONCLUSION: As a practical implication of our model, favoring exercise would enhance active attitude and its positive impact on mental well-being while, at the same time, reducing the negative impact of disability on depression, representing a valuable tool in facing COVID-19-related mental distress.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disabled Persons , Motor Disorders , Multiple Sclerosis , Anxiety , Communicable Disease Control , Depression/epidemiology , Humans , Multiple Sclerosis/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
7.
Eur J Neurol ; 28(10): 3369-3374, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1604034

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic challenges neurologists in counseling multiple sclerosis (MS) patients with respect to their risk for and by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 and in guiding disease-modifying treatment (DMT). The objective was to determine the frequency and distribution of currently known risk factors for COVID-19 mortality in an MS population. METHODS: Multiple sclerosis patients with at least one complete case report between January 1, 2015 and December 31, 2019 from the Innsbruck MS database were cross-sectionally included. Frequencies of currently estimated COVID-19 mortality risk factors were analyzed, and the cumulative risk was calculated by a recently developed score. For every risk group, the proportions of patients under DMT and immunosuppressive treatment were determined. RESULTS: Of 1931 MS patients, 63.4% had low risk of COVID-19 mortality, 26% had mild risk, 8.8% had a moderate risk, whereas a combined 0.9% had high or very high risk of COVID-19 mortality. Of the patients at high or very high risk, only one patient received DMT and none had an immunosuppressive therapy. CONCLUSIONS: In a population-based MS cohort, the proportion of patients at high risk of COVID-19 mortality is below 1%. Importantly, the vast majority of these MS patients did not receive any DMT.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Multiple Sclerosis , Humans , Immunosuppressive Agents/therapeutic use , Multiple Sclerosis/drug therapy , Multiple Sclerosis/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Eur J Neurol ; 28(10): 3396-3402, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1603954

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: The COVID-19 emergency may cause post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and with regard to people with MS (pwMS) chronic exposure to a wide range of challenging life events has been shown to be correlated with worsening of neurological symptoms, increased lesion burden on brain magnetic resonance imaging and relapses. The aim was to investigate perceived stress, depression, perceived social support, habits and behaviour changes in pwMS through COVID-19 in comparison to a control group. METHODS: A web-based survey was posted on SMsocialnetwork.com to investigate perceived stress (using the Perceived Stress Scale), depression (with Patient Health Questionnaire 2) and perceived social support (using Social Provision Scale 10 item) in pwMS and a control group through the COVID-19 pandemic. A secondary group of people with migraine was investigated. RESULTS: In all, 1286 answers from 612 pwMS and 674 control people were included in the final analysis. The answers from 318 people with migraine were included for a secondary analysis. A higher proportion of pwMS were depressed (43.1% vs. 23.1%; p < 0.001), had a high level of perceived stress (58% vs. 39.8%; p < 0.001) and felt significantly less social support (median 33 vs. 35; Q1-Q3 28-36 vs. 32-37; p < 0.001) compared to the control group. A higher percentage of people with migraine were depressed (50% vs. 43%, p = 0.04) compared to pwMS. CONCLUSIONS: Considering the negative impact that prolonged stress may have on clinical and radiological disease activity of pwMS, and bearing in mind that a beneficial effect has been demonstrated and achieved with stress management, it is suggested to promote stress control in these patients during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Multiple Sclerosis , Humans , Multiple Sclerosis/epidemiology , Neoplasm Recurrence, Local , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Support , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology
9.
Front Neurol ; 12: 676095, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526775

ABSTRACT

Treatment of pediatric-onset multiple sclerosis (POMS) has been tailored after observational studies and data obtained from clinical trials in adult-onset multiple sclerosis (AOMS) patients. There are an increasing number of new therapeutic agents for AOMS, and many will be formally studied for use also in POMS. However, there are important efficacy and safety concerns regarding the use of these therapies in children and young adults. This review will discuss the current state of the art of POMS therapy and will focus on the newer therapies (oral and infusion disease-modifying drugs) and on those still currently under investigation.

10.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(11)2021 May 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1477958

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2/Coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) is responsible for the pandemic, which started in December 2019. In addition to the typical respiratory symptoms, this virus also causes other severe complications, including neurological ones. In diagnostics, serological and polymerase chain reaction tests are useful not only in detecting past infections but can also predict the response to vaccination. It is now believed that an immune mechanism rather than direct viral neuroinvasion is responsible for neurological symptoms. For this reason, it is important to assess the presence of antibodies not only in the serum but also in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), especially in the case of neuro-COVID. A particular group of patients are people with multiple sclerosis (MS) whose disease-modifying drugs weaken the immune system and lead to an unpredictable serological response to SARS-CoV-2 infection. Based on available data, the article summarizes the current serological information concerning COVID-19 in CSF in patients with severe neurological complications and in those with MS.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Multiple Sclerosis , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/cerebrospinal fluid , COVID-19/therapy , Humans , Multiple Sclerosis/blood , Multiple Sclerosis/cerebrospinal fluid , Multiple Sclerosis/therapy , Multiple Sclerosis/virology
11.
Mult Scler ; : 1352458520978354, 2021 Feb 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1394352

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Little information is available regarding the incidence and clinical outcome of the SARS-CoV2 infection in patients with multiple sclerosis (pwMS). OBJECTIVE: To determine the incidence, clinical outcome, and impact of COVID-19 on pwMS. METHODS: This observational study was prospectively performed on a cohort of pwMS (N = 11,560) followed up by 47 out of 51 Brazilian MS referral centers that registered pwMS with COVID-19 at the REDONE platform from 13 March to 4 June 2020. RESULTS: The incidence of COVID-19 for pwMS patients was 27.7/10,000 patients and for the general population was 29.2/10,000 inhabitants. A total of 94 (77 women) pwMS patients, aged 40 ± 10.25 years, presenting 9.9 ± 8.6 years of MS disease duration, developed the COVID-19, most of them (87%) exhibited the mild form of the disease. Eighty (96%) patients maintained the use of MS disease-modifying treatment (DMT) during COVID-19 pandemic and 14 patients were not in use of DMTs. CONCLUSION: Incidence of COVID-19 in Brazilian pwMS was not different from those observed for the general Brazilian population. Most pwMS exhibited mild COVID-19, despite the maintenance of the underlying MS treatment.

12.
Sci Transl Med ; 13(598)2021 06 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1314110

ABSTRACT

Bacterial sepsis and severe COVID-19 share similar clinical manifestations and are both associated with dysregulation of the myeloid cell compartment. We previously reported an expanded CD14+ monocyte state, MS1, in patients with bacterial sepsis and validated expansion of this cell subpopulation in publicly available transcriptomics data. Here, using published datasets, we show that the gene expression program associated with MS1 correlated with sepsis severity and was up-regulated in monocytes from patients with severe COVID-19. To examine the ontogeny and function of MS1 cells, we developed a cellular model for inducing CD14+ MS1 monocytes from healthy bone marrow hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs). We found that plasma from patients with bacterial sepsis or COVID-19 induced myelopoiesis in HSPCs in vitro and expression of the MS1 gene program in monocytes and neutrophils that differentiated from these HSPCs. Furthermore, we found that plasma concentrations of IL-6, and to a lesser extent IL-10, correlated with increased myeloid cell output from HSPCs in vitro and enhanced expression of the MS1 gene program. We validated the requirement for these two cytokines to induce the MS1 gene program through CRISPR-Cas9 editing of their receptors in HSPCs. Using this cellular model system, we demonstrated that induced MS1 cells were broadly immunosuppressive and showed decreased responsiveness to stimulation with a synthetic RNA analog. Our in vitro study suggests a potential role for systemic cytokines in inducing myelopoiesis during severe bacterial or SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation , Sepsis , Humans , Myeloid Cells , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Neurol Clin Pract ; 11(2): e216-e218, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1304436
14.
Eur J Neurol ; 28(10): 3403-3410, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1297617

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a complex chronic, autoimmune inflammatory disease involving multidisciplinary assessments and interventions. Access to outpatient specialist and home healthcare services was explored during the pandemic outbreak and the lockdown amongst MS patients in the Lazio region. Adherence to disease-modifying therapies (DMTs) is also described. METHODS: A population-based study was conducted using regional healthcare administrative databases. A validated algorithm was used to identify MS cases over the period 2011-2018. The numbers of specialist and home-based services were compared between 2019 and 2020. The medication possession ratio was used to measure adherence to DMTs. RESULTS: A total of 9380 MS patients were identified (68% women). A decline in the number of outpatient care services between March and June 2020 compared to the previous year was observed, in particular for rehabilitation (-82%), magnetic resonance imaging (-56%) and neurological specialist services (-91%). Important year-to-year variations were observed in May and June 2020 in home-based nursing and medical care (-91%) and motor re-education services (-74%). Adherence to DMTs was higher in the first 4 months of 2019 compared to the same period of 2020 (67.1% vs. 57.0%). CONCLUSIONS: A notable disruption of rehabilitative therapy and home-based services as well as in DMT adherence was observed. Since the pandemic is still ongoing and interruption of healthcare services could have a major impact on MS patients, it is necessary to monitor access of MS patients to healthcare resources in order to ensure adequate treatments, including rehabilitative therapies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Multiple Sclerosis , Communicable Disease Control , Delivery of Health Care , Female , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Multiple Sclerosis/drug therapy , Multiple Sclerosis/epidemiology , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Neurol Sci ; 43(2): 1207-1214, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1270513

ABSTRACT

In people with multiple sclerosis (PwMS), strict follow-up is essential. Telemedicine has the potential to overcome many of the difficulties in routine management. Herein, we present a structured protocol that can be used to remotely manage patients with MS, describing in detail the steps to be taken and exams needed at each stage. A working group was established which developed a tailored protocol that can be adapted to a variety of settings. The overall protocol consisted of 5 phases: enrolment, document sharing phase, pre-evaluation, virtual visit, and post-visit phase, which was divided into 14 individual steps. As of October 2020, 25 virtual visits have been carried out, all via Skype. The patient's caregiver was present during visits and had an active role. The average duration of the virtual visit was 24 min, and that of the pre-visit and post-visit were around 15 min each. Overall satisfaction as rated by physicians was considered high (8.0 ± 0.5). Using the system usability scale (SUS), patients also favorably rated the virtual visit (96.6 ± 6.1). In 20% of cases, the virtual visit was not sufficient to provide adequate information and an in-person clinical visit was recommended. The described protocol has the potential to provide benefits for the healthcare system as well as patients and their caregivers both during and beyond COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Multiple Sclerosis , Telemedicine , Humans , Multiple Sclerosis/diagnosis , Multiple Sclerosis/epidemiology , Multiple Sclerosis/therapy , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Psychol Health Med ; 27(2): 428-435, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1269457

ABSTRACT

E-health applications can support continuing care for persons with chronic diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS). We have developed a web-based mobile app called VIOLA to be used at home by persons with MS (pwMS) who previously participated in an innovative multidisciplinary rehab program. The purpose of VIOLA is to reinforce what participants have learned about a healthy lifestyle and to keep them motivated to adhere to rehabilitation programs. As the outbreak of the Covid-19 pandemic has severely curtailed pwMS contact with their usual health providers, we quickly updated VIOLA to grant continuity of care to our home-bound patients.By monitoring pwMS subscriptions to individual modules, we found a definite increase after the national lockdown was declared. Subscribers rated the app very positively.Encouraged by the positive feedbacks, we are planning to extend the access to our app also to pwMS with no prior specific learning experience. This would limit the psychophysical consequences of the lockdown. Furthermore, VIOLA could be effective in maintaining a proper lifestyle, contributing to improve the quality of life of pwMS.VIOLA has the potential of increasing the adherence of pwMS to the rehabilitation confirming that digital communication tools are a valuable solution for those home-bound.].


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Computer-Assisted Instruction , Multiple Sclerosis , Chronic Disease , Communicable Disease Control , Healthy Lifestyle , Humans , Multiple Sclerosis/epidemiology , Pandemics , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Neurol Sci ; 42(9): 3523-3526, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1269165

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Several concerns regard the immunogenicity of SARS-CoV-2 vaccines in people with multiple sclerosis (pwMS), since the majority of them is treated with immunomodulating/immunosuppressive disease modifying therapies. Here we report the first data on the humoral response to mRNA SARS-CoV-2 vaccine in a case series of 4 pwMS treated with ocrelizumab (OCR) as compared to a group of healthy subjects (HS). METHODS: We collected serum samples at 0, 14, 21 days after the first dose and 7 days after the second dose of BNT162b2-mRNA-Covid-19 vaccine from 55 health-care workers and 4 relapsing pwMS on OCR, with no history of Covid-19 infection. Sera were tested using the LIAISON®SARS-CoV-2 TrimericS-IgG assay (DiaSorin-S.p.A.) for the detection of IgG antibodies to SARS-CoV-2 spike protein. The anti-spike IgGtiters were expressed in Binding Antibody Units (BAU), an international standard unit. RESULTS: At baseline all subjects were negative for anti-spike IgG. Seven days after the second dose of vaccine all HS mounted a significant humoral response (geometric mean 2010.4 BAU/mL C.I. 95% 1512.7-2672) while the 4 pwMS showed a lower response (range <4.81-175 BAU/mL). DISCUSSION: Humoral response to BNT162b2-mRNA-vaccine in pwMS treated with OCR was clearly blunted. Further data are urgently needed to confirm and expand these preliminary results and to develop strategies to optimize the response to SARSCoV-2 vaccines in pwMS on OCR.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Multiple Sclerosis , Antibodies, Monoclonal, Humanized , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , Immunogenicity, Vaccine , Multiple Sclerosis/drug therapy , RNA, Messenger , SARS-CoV-2 , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus
18.
Mult Scler J Exp Transl Clin ; 7(2): 20552173211017159, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1262487

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Hesitancy to receive COVID-19 vaccination is a major public health concern. COVID-19 vaccine willingness and the factors contributing to willingness in adults with multiple sclerosis (MS) is unknown. We administered an online survey from 1 December 2020 to 7 January 2021 to adults with MS to estimate COVID-19 vaccine willingness among adults with MS. Bivariate analysis with chi-square testing compared categorical variables associated with vaccine willingness. RESULTS: Of 401 respondents, 70.1% were willing to receive an authorized COVID-19 vaccination if it was available to them, 22.7% were unsure, and 7.2% were unwilling. The most frequent concern for those unsure was vaccine safety. Vaccine willingness was associated with increased perceived personal risk of COVID-19 (χ2 = 45.4; p < 0.0001), prior influenza vaccine acceptance (χ2 = 97.6; p < 0.0001), higher educational level (χ2 = 50.2; p < 0.0001), and if respondents discussed or planned to discuss the COVID-19 vaccine with their neurologists (χ2 = 64.3; p < 0.0001). CONCLUSION: While COVID-19 vaccination willingness is high among people with MS, nearly 30% were either unwilling or unsure about being vaccinated. Neurologists should be aware of patient-centered factors associated with COVID-19 vaccine willingness and address COVID-19 vaccine safety concerns in discussions with their vaccine-unsure MS patients.

20.
J Neuroimmunol ; 357: 577627, 2021 08 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1260801

ABSTRACT

In this consensus statement, we provide updated recommendations on multiple sclerosis (MS) management during the COVID-19 crisis and the post-pandemic period applicable to neurology services around the world. Statements/recommendations were generated based on available literature and the experience of 13 MS expert panelists using a modified Delphi approach online. The statements/recommendations give advice regarding implementation of telemedicine; use of disease-modifying therapies and management of MS relapses; management of people with MS at highest risk from COVID-19; management of radiological monitoring; use of remote pharmacovigilance; impact on MS research; implications for lowest income settings, and other key issues.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Internationality , Multiple Sclerosis/epidemiology , Multiple Sclerosis/therapy , Practice Guidelines as Topic/standards , Disease Management , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pharmacovigilance , Telemedicine/standards , Telemedicine/trends
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