Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 97
Filter
1.
AACE Clin Case Rep ; 7(5): 288-292, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1397116

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: During the ongoing coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic, procalcitonin (PCT) levels have proven useful in assisting clinicians to diagnose bacterial superinfection. However, in the absence of signs of infection or at the resolution thereof, inappropriately and persistently high PCT levels may suggest and reveal the presence of other pathologies. We report a patient with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 pneumonia with initially elevated PCT levels that persisted during recovery, prompting the diagnosis of medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). METHODS: A 43-year-old man presented with a 2-day history of fever, sneezing, sore throat, and dry cough. His PCT was 94 ng/mL (normal value, 0.00-0.10 ng/mL), and he was positive for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 RNA. RESULTS: Empirical antibiotic therapy was administered for 7 days, but despite a clinical improvement, serum PCT remained high (84 ng/mL). Serum calcitonin (CTN) was 2120 pg/mL (normal, ≤12 pg/mL). Cytologic examination of thyroid nodules and CTN measurement of the aspiration needle washout confirmed MTC. The patient underwent total thyroidectomy with bilateral cervical lymph node dissection. Lowered CTN (986 pg/mL) and PCT (16 ng/mL) levels were observed 48 hours after surgery. A close follow-up was planned following the results of RET gene analysis. CONCLUSION: PCT can be a useful biochemical marker of MTC suspicion in patients with inflammatory conditions and persistently elevated PCT, even after resolution. In our case, high levels of PCT in a patient with coronavirus disease 2019 pneumonia without signs of bacterial infection led to MTC diagnosis.

2.
Scand J Work Environ Health ; 47(4): 306-317, 2021 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1339682

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the effects of the promotion of active breaks and postural shifts on new onset of neck and low-back pain during a 6-month follow-up among high-risk office workers. METHODS: A 3-arm cluster-randomized controlled trial with 6-month follow-up was conducted among healthy but high-risk office workers. Participants were recruited from six organizations in Bangkok, Thailand (N=193) and randomly assigned at cluster level into active break intervention (N=47), postural shift intervention (N=46), and control (N=100) groups. Participants in the intervention groups received a custom-designed apparatus to facilitate designated active breaks and postural shifts during work. Participants in the control group received a placebo seat pad. The primary outcome measure was new onset of neck and low-back pain during 6-month follow-up. Analyses were performed using Cox proportional hazard models. RESULTS: One-hundred and eighty-six (96%) predominantly female participants were successfully followed up over six months. New onset of neck pain during the 6-month follow-up occurred in 17%, 17%, and 44% of the participants in the active break, postural shift, and control groups, respectively. For new onset of low-back pain, these percentages were 9%, 7%, and 33%, respectively. Hazard rate (HR) ratios after adjusting for biopsychosocial factors indicated a protective effect of the active break and postural shift interventions for neck pain [HRadj 0.45, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.20-0.98 for active break and HRadj 0.41, 95% CI 0.18-0.94 for postural shift] and low-back pain (HRadj 0.34, 95% CI 0.12-0.98 for active break and HRadj 0.19, 95% CI 0.06-0.66 for postural shift). CONCLUSION: Interventions to increase either active breaks or postural shifts reduced new onset of neck and low-back pain among high-risk office workers.


Subject(s)
Low Back Pain , Occupational Diseases , Female , Health Status , Humans , Low Back Pain/prevention & control , Neck Pain/prevention & control , Thailand
3.
BJOG ; 128(9): 1503-1510, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1315738

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To describe the immediate impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on cervical screening, colposcopy and treatment volumes in Ontario, Canada. DESIGN: Population-based retrospective observational study. SETTING: Ontario, Canada. POPULATION: People with a cervix age of 21-69 years who completed at least one cervical screening cytology test, colposcopy or treatment procedure for cervical dysplasia between January 2019 and August 2020. METHODS: Administrative databases were used to compare cervical screening cytology, colposcopy and treatment procedure volumes before (historical comparator) and during the first 6 months of the COVID-19 pandemic (March-August 2020). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Changes in cervical screening cytology, colposcopy and treatment volumes; individuals with high-grade cytology awaiting colposcopy. RESULTS: During the first 6 months of the COVID-19 pandemic, the monthly average number of cervical screening cytology tests, colposcopies and treatments decreased by 63.8% (range: -92.3 to -41.0%), 39.7% (range: -75.1 to -14.3%) and 31.1% (range: -43.5 to -23.6%), respectively, when compared with the corresponding months in 2019. Between March and August 2020, on average 292 (-51.0%) fewer high-grade cytological abnormalities were detected through screening each month. As of August 2020, 1159 (29.2%) individuals with high-grade screening cytology were awaiting follow-up colposcopy. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic has had a substantial impact on key cervical screening and follow-up services in Ontario. As the pandemic continues, ongoing monitoring of service utilisation to inform system response and recovery is required. Future efforts to understand the impact of COVID-19-related disruptions on cervical cancer outcomes will be needed. TWEETABLE ABSTRACT: COVID-19 has had a substantial impact on cervical screening and follow-up services in Ontario, Canada.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Colposcopy/statistics & numerical data , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/diagnosis , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/therapy , Vaginal Smears/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , Databases, Factual , Delivery of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Early Detection of Cancer/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Ontario , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
4.
Am J Trop Med Hyg ; 104(5): 1651-1654, 2021 Apr 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1302662

ABSTRACT

This is a case report of a 37-year-old woman evaluated with 18F-fludeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) positron emission computed tomography/CT with recurrent fever after treatment with itraconazole for 6 weeks for histoplasmosis. The examination demonstrated a decrease in the dimensions of the pulmonary opacities previously identified in the left lower lobe and attributed to histoplasmosis. In addition to these pulmonary opacities, increased FDG uptake was also observed in lymph nodes present in the cervical region, mediastinum, left lung hilum, and hepatic hilum. Notably, other pulmonary opacities with ground-glass pattern that were not present in the previous computed tomography were detected in the right lower lobe, with mild 18F-FDG uptake. Nasal swab performed shortly after the examination was positive for COVID-19. In this case, the 18F-FDG positron emission computed tomography/CT study demonstrated findings consistent with active COVID-19 infection coexisting with inflammatory changes associated with histoplasmosis infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , Histoplasmosis/diagnostic imaging , Positron Emission Tomography Computed Tomography/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Female , Fever/etiology , Fluorodeoxyglucose F18 , Histoplasmosis/drug therapy , Humans , Recurrence
6.
Cancers (Basel) ; 12(6)2020 Jun 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1268328

ABSTRACT

Cancers that arise in the head and neck region are comprised of a heterogeneous group of malignancies that include carcinogen- and human papillomavirus (HPV)-driven mucosal squamous cell carcinoma as well as skin cancers such as cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma, basal cell carcinoma, melanoma, and Merkel cell carcinoma. These malignancies develop in critical areas for eating, talking, and breathing and are associated with substantial morbidity and mortality despite advances in treatment. Understanding of advances in the management of these various cancers is important for all multidisciplinary providers who care for patients across the cancer care continuum. Additionally, the recent Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has necessitated adaptations to head and neck cancer care to accommodate the mitigation of COVID-19 risk and ensure timely treatment. This review explores advances in diagnostic criteria, prognostic factors, and management for subsites including head and neck squamous cell carcinoma and the various forms of skin cancer (basal cell carcinoma, cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma, Merkel cell carcinoma, and melanoma). Then, this review summarizes emerging developments in immunotherapy, radiation therapy, cancer survivorship, and the delivery of care during the COVID-19 era.

7.
J Dent ; 110: 103689, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1265751

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study compared survival, restoration quality and costs of glass hybrid (GH; EQUIA Forte Fil/EQUIA Forte Coat) and resin composite restorations (RC; OptiBond FL/Filtek Supreme XTE) of sclerotic non-carious cervical lesions. METHODS: This is a cluster-randomized trial (ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02631161). 88 patients (50-70 years) with 175 sNCCLs were randomized to receive GH or RC. Restorations were placed without mechanical cavity preparation and followed for a mean 36 (min/max: 31/55) months (variable follow-up due to COVID-19 lockdown). Restoration quality was re-evaluated at 1-, 18- and 36-months using FDI-criteria. Survival was assessed using multi-level Cox-regression analysis. Costs were estimated from a payer's perspective in Germany. Initial costs were determined based on micro-costing using time recordings and hourly costs, and follow-up costs based on statutory insurance fee-item-catalogues. RESULTS: 88 patients (175 restorations) were treated; 43 received GH (83 restorations), 45 RC (92 restorations). 17  GH and 19 RC showed total retention loss, 5  GH were partially lost (p = 0.396/Cox). FDI ratings were not sufficiently different for any domain except surface luster, where RC showed higher score (p < 0.001). Costs were initially lower for GH (32.57; SD 16.36 €) than RC (44.25; SD 21.40 €), while re-treatment costs were similar (GH: 9.15; SD 15.70 €; RC: 7.35; SD 14.51 €), resulting in significantly lower costs for GH (GH: 41.72; SD 25.08 €) than RC (51.60; 26.17 €) (p < 0.001/GLM). CONCLUSIONS: While survival was not significantly different, GH was significantly less costly both initially and long-term than RC for restoring non-carious cervical lesions. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: Within this trial, survival was not significantly different between GH and RC to restore sclerotic NCCLs. As GH was significantly less costly both initially and long-term than RC, using RC was only cost-effective for payers willing to invest high additional expenses per minimal survival gains.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communicable Disease Control , Composite Resins , Dental Restoration, Permanent , Germany , Glass Ionomer Cements , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol ; 279(3): 1453-1460, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1265494

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In the present study, we have shared our experience in managing head neck cancers, especially the oral malignancies, during the crisis of COVID 19. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients with oral cancers underwent pedicle/local flaps and free flaps reconstruction based on the availability of intensive care unit and comorbidities of the patients. The clinical outcomes were compared at the end of one week, one month, and three months after the primary surgery. RESULTS: Pedicle/local flaps were used in 25 cases and radial/fibular free flaps were used in 8 cases for the reconstruction of soft tissue defects. Patients with pedicle flap reconstruction had better clinical outcomes, including lesser ICU stay as compared to free flaps. CONCLUSION: Pedicle flap can be a valid alternative to the free flap for the soft tissue reconstruction in advanced oral malignancies during the COVID pandemic period in the Indian subcontinent, especially with limited infrastructure of the hospitals.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Free Tissue Flaps , Head and Neck Neoplasms , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures , COVID-19/epidemiology , Head and Neck Neoplasms/surgery , Humans , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Front Public Health ; 9: 675788, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1264396

ABSTRACT

It took a white police officer's knee on George Floyd's neck before white people began to reckon with 400 years of slavery and its aftermath, the effects of which Black people have endured for generations. Monuments are being taken down, flags are being redesigned, and institutions that honored those who denied the humanity of Black people are being renamed. Unfortunately for Sandra Bland, Breonna Taylor, Sha-Asia Washington and countless other Black transgender people including those with capacity for pregnancy, there was no justice even prior to the global pandemic of SARS-Cov-2 or coronavirus; namely racism, violence, and the Black Maternal Health crisis that makes it less likely that Black women will survive pregnancy and childbirth. The purpose of this article is to situate the state of Black people with the capacity for pregnancy in the context of these existing crises to illuminate the myths that racism has perpetuated through science, health services provision and policy. The greatest of these is the myth of a default human that can serve as a standard for the rest of the population. This racist ideal underpins education, provision of care, research, policies, and public health praxis. Demolishing the myth starts with acknowledging that Black people are not the architects of their own destruction: the default standard of whiteness is. The article begins with a historical background on how this myth came to be and elucidates the development and perpetuations of the myth of the default human. Next, we present an evidence based scoping review of the literature to summarize current thinking with specific focus on the Black maternal health crisis, we make policy recommendations and retrofits of upstream public health approaches for existing programs toward health equity. We also situate Black maternal health as part of a reproductive justice frame that centers Black women and birthing people's autonomy and agency. In other words, we use the scoping review to end with reimagining public health policy and provide an actionable roadmap to specifically disrupt the myth of the default human and dismantle racism in education, provision of care, research, policies, and public health praxis.


Subject(s)
African Americans , COVID-19 , Maternal Health , Asia , Female , Humans , Mothers , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2 , Washington
10.
Womens Health (Lond) ; 17: 17455065211017070, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1242233

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has led to an unprecedented upheaval within global healthcare systems and resulted in the temporary pausing of the National Health Service (NHS) Scotland Cervical Screening Programme. With several months of backlogs in appointments, there has not only been a reduction in primary samples being taken for human papilloma virus (HPV) testing but there have also been fewer women referred to colposcopy for investigation and treatment of precancerous or cancerous changes as a result. Encouraging uptake for cervical screening was always a priority before the pandemic, but it is even more important now, considering that the fears and barriers to screening that women may have are now exacerbated by COVID-19. OBJECTIVES: This article explores the impact of the pandemic on the uptake of cervical screening within NHS Ayrshire & Arran and evaluates potential strategies to improve uptake now and in future such as self-sampling and telemedicine. METHODS: This article presents evidence-based literature and local health board data relating to cervical screening during the pandemic. RESULTS: Human papilloma virus self-sampling carried out by the woman in her home has been shown to improve uptake, especially in non-attenders, whilst maintaining a high sensitivity and, crucially, reducing the need for face-to-face contact. Increased education is key to overcoming barriers women have to screening and telemedicine can strengthen engagement with women during this time. CONCLUSION: There are lessons to be learned from the pandemic, and we must use this opportunity to improve cervical screening uptake for the future.


Subject(s)
Early Detection of Cancer/methods , Mass Screening/methods , Mass Screening/statistics & numerical data , Papillomaviridae , Self Care , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/prevention & control , Adult , Appointments and Schedules , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia/prevention & control , Colposcopy , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Papanicolaou Test , Scotland/epidemiology , Vaginal Smears
11.
Prev Med ; 151: 106623, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1240652

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has disrupted cervical screening in several countries, due to a range of policy-, health-service and participant-related factors. Using three well-established models of cervical cancer natural history adapted to simulate screening across four countries, we compared the impact of a range of standardised screening disruption scenarios in four countries that vary in their cervical cancer prevention programs. All scenarios assumed a 6- or 12-month disruption followed by a rapid catch-up of missed screens. Cervical screening disruptions could increase cervical cancer cases by up to 5-6%. In all settings, more than 60% of the excess cancer burden due to disruptions are likely to have occurred in women aged less than 50 years in 2020, including settings where women in their 30s have previously been offered HPV vaccination. Approximately 15-30% of cancers predicted to result from disruptions could be prevented by maintaining colposcopy and precancer treatment services during any disruption period. Disruptions to primary screening had greater adverse effects in situations where women due to attend for screening in 2020 had cytology (vs. HPV) as their previous primary test. Rapid catch-up would dramatically increase demand for HPV tests in 2021, which it may not be feasible to meet because of competing demands on the testing machines and reagents due to COVID tests. These findings can inform future prioritisation strategies for catch-up that balance potential constraints on resourcing with clinical need.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Papillomavirus Infections , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms , Early Detection of Cancer , Female , Humans , Mass Screening , Papillomavirus Infections/diagnosis , Papillomavirus Infections/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/diagnosis , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/prevention & control
12.
BMJ Case Rep ; 14(5)2021 May 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1238491

ABSTRACT

A 71-year-old man with residual poliomyelitis was referred to the orthopaedic surgeons with a neglected left femoral neck fracture of the paralytic limb. He had presented at another hospital with left groin pain and inability to weight bear 4 weeks earlier after a fall from standing height, but had delayed treatment due to his insistence on waiting until he returned to his home country.Successful treatment of residual poliomyelitis fractures requires early union as well as early mobilisation and rehabilitation. This patient presented to the orthopaedic surgeons with a challenging case due to the delay in treatment and the fact that the fracture was basicervical which results in an unstable fracture. Surgical expertise was required to decide on the optimum surgical option and a total hip arthroplasty was performed. The patient made a good recovery following physiotherapy as evidenced clinically and radiologically.


Subject(s)
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip , Femoral Neck Fractures , Poliomyelitis , Aged , Early Ambulation , Femoral Neck Fractures/diagnostic imaging , Femoral Neck Fractures/surgery , Humans , Male , Poliomyelitis/complications , Weight-Bearing
13.
BJOG ; 128(9): 1503-1510, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1226637

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To describe the immediate impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on cervical screening, colposcopy and treatment volumes in Ontario, Canada. DESIGN: Population-based retrospective observational study. SETTING: Ontario, Canada. POPULATION: People with a cervix age of 21-69 years who completed at least one cervical screening cytology test, colposcopy or treatment procedure for cervical dysplasia between January 2019 and August 2020. METHODS: Administrative databases were used to compare cervical screening cytology, colposcopy and treatment procedure volumes before (historical comparator) and during the first 6 months of the COVID-19 pandemic (March-August 2020). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Changes in cervical screening cytology, colposcopy and treatment volumes; individuals with high-grade cytology awaiting colposcopy. RESULTS: During the first 6 months of the COVID-19 pandemic, the monthly average number of cervical screening cytology tests, colposcopies and treatments decreased by 63.8% (range: -92.3 to -41.0%), 39.7% (range: -75.1 to -14.3%) and 31.1% (range: -43.5 to -23.6%), respectively, when compared with the corresponding months in 2019. Between March and August 2020, on average 292 (-51.0%) fewer high-grade cytological abnormalities were detected through screening each month. As of August 2020, 1159 (29.2%) individuals with high-grade screening cytology were awaiting follow-up colposcopy. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic has had a substantial impact on key cervical screening and follow-up services in Ontario. As the pandemic continues, ongoing monitoring of service utilisation to inform system response and recovery is required. Future efforts to understand the impact of COVID-19-related disruptions on cervical cancer outcomes will be needed. TWEETABLE ABSTRACT: COVID-19 has had a substantial impact on cervical screening and follow-up services in Ontario, Canada.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Colposcopy/statistics & numerical data , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/diagnosis , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/therapy , Vaginal Smears/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , Databases, Factual , Delivery of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Early Detection of Cancer/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Ontario , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
14.
Ear Nose Throat J ; : 1455613211012114, 2021 May 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1223689

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: As a result of the COVID-19 pandemic that occurred in the last year, it has been revealed that severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) does not only cause viral respiratory tract infection but can also affect many organs in the short or long term. In our study, we aimed to reveal that COVID-19 infection affects the endocrine system and triggers subacute thyroiditis (SAT) in the acute period. MATERIAL AND METHOD: In our retrospective study, the ear-nose-throat examination, internal diseases consultation (investigation of COVID-19 symptoms and polymerase chain reaction [PCR] test), routine blood tests, T3, T4, thyroid-stimulating hormone, antithyroglobulin (anti-TG), antithyroid peroxidase (anti-TPO), thyroid scintigraphy, and thyroid ultrasonography results of 5 patients who applied to the otorhinolaryngology clinic due to complaints of neck pain and odynophagia between April 2020 and February 2021 were examined. FINDINGS: All 5 patients were female patients (30.4 years) with odynophagia and pain in the front lower region of the neck. These patients had no previous history of thyroiditis. COVID-19 PCR tests of the patients diagnosed with SAT were positive, and there were no typical COVID-19 signs and symptoms except odynophagia and neck pain. RESULT: It comes in view that SARS-COV-2 affects thyroid functions and causes SAT and the main symptoms in patients are pain in the neck and odynophagia.

15.
Lancet Public Health ; 6(7): e522-e527, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1211226

ABSTRACT

Disruptions to cancer screening services have been experienced in most settings as a consequence of the COVID-19 pandemic. Ideally, programmes would resolve backlogs by temporarily expanding capacity; however, in practice, this is often not possible. We aim to inform the deliberations of decision makers in high-income settings regarding their cervical cancer screening policy response. We caution against performance measures that rely solely on restoring testing volumes to pre-pandemic levels because they will be less effective at mitigating excess cancer diagnoses than will targeted measures. These measures might exacerbate pre-existing inequalities in accessing cervical screening by disregarding the risk profile of the individuals attending. Modelling of cervical screening outcomes before and during the pandemic supports risk-based strategies as the most effective way for screening services to recover. The degree to which screening is organised will determine the feasibility of deploying some risk-based strategies, but implementation of age-based risk stratification should be universally feasible.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Early Detection of Cancer , Mass Screening , Pandemics , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/diagnosis , Female , Health Services Accessibility , Healthcare Disparities , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol ; 279(2): 907-943, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1198430

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The coronavirus pandemic has redefined the practice of head and neck surgeons in the management of oncology patients. Several countries have issued practice recommendations in that context. This review is a collaboration of the YO-IFOS (Young Otolaryngologists of the International Federation of Otolaryngological Societies) group in order to summarize, in a systematic way, all available guidelines and provide clear guidelines for the management of head and neck cancer patients in the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: This systematic review was performed according to the PRISMA statements. Inclusion criteria for the systematic review were based on the population, intervention, comparison, and outcomes according to (PICO) framework. The AGREE II (Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation II) instrument was used to assess quality of all practice guidelines included in this review. RESULTS: Recommendations include adjustments regarding new patients' referral such as performing a pre-appointment triage and working in telemedicine when possible. Surgical prioritization must be adjusted in order to respect pandemic requirements. High-grade malignancies should, howeve,r not be delayed, due to potential serious consequences. Many head and neck interventions being aerosol-generating procedures, COVID-19 testing prior to a surgery and adequate PPE precautions are essential in operating rooms. CONCLUSION: These recommendations for head and neck oncology patients serve as a guide for physicians in the pandemic. Adjustments and updates are necessary as the pandemic evolves.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Head and Neck Neoplasms , COVID-19 Testing , Head and Neck Neoplasms/therapy , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Neurol Res ; 43(8): 633-641, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1192511

ABSTRACT

Background׃COVID-19 (CoranaVirus disease 2019) is an ongoing infectious disease caused by the RNA SARS-CoV-2 virus (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome CoronaVirus-2). More than one-third of COVID-19 patients report neurological symptoms and cases of neurological diseases are increasingly accumulating. The aim of this systematic review was to characterize all - to date - reported cases with COVID-19 related myelopathy. Methods׃Eighteen papers were included in this review. Patients of all ages could be affected, although there is a predilection for middle-aged people. Results׃There were no significant co-morbidities or immunodeficiencies in the affected patients. COVID-19 related myelopathy started roughly within the first month after COVID-19 onset, either concomitantly with COVID-19 symptoms or within 10 days after their remission. The vast majority of cases fulfilled our criteria for postinfectious transverse myelitis. However, some cases were considered to have had parainfectious or infectious myelitis or, in one case, vascular myelopathy. Motor, sensory and bowel and/or bladder symptoms predominated the clinical presentation of myelopathies, explained mainly by centrally localized and longitudinally extensive lesions within the cervical and/or thoracic segments of the spinal cord. Occasionally lesions were complicated by necrosis and hemorrhages. Treatment with corticosteroids, intravenous immunoglobulin or plasma exchange was offered mostly a mild to marked improvement within a period of some weeks. Conclusions׃ Considering the imminent arrival of new vaccines against COVID-19 pandemic, and their potential risk for postvaccination transverse myelitis, this characterization of COVID-19 related myelopathy is of utmost importance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Spinal Cord Diseases/virology , Adult , Aged , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
18.
Tumori ; : 3008916211007927, 2021 Apr 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1181055

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To describe the approach and outcomes from two cancer centres in Southern and Northern Europe during the first wave of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) of patients with head and neck cancer (HNC). METHODS: Data collection was performed on a retrospective cohort of patients surgically treated for primary HNC between March and May 2020, using data from two tertiary hospitals: the European Institute of Oncology (Milan) and Guy's & St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust (London). RESULTS: We included 77 patients with HNC. More patients with COVID-19 were taking angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors and had Clavien-Dindo Classification grade I compared to negative patients, respectively (60% vs 22% [p = 0.058] and 40% vs 8% [p = 0.025]). Multivariate logistic regression analyses confirmed our data (p = 0.05 and 0.03, respectively). Sex and age were statistically significantly different (p = 0.05 and <0.001 respectively), showing more male patients (75% vs 53.66%, respectively) and more elderly patients in Italy than in the United Kingdom (patients aged >63 years: 69.44% vs 29.27%). CONCLUSIONS: This study presents a large cohort of patients with HNC with nasopharyngeal swab during the first peak of the COVID-19 pandemic in Europe. Patients with HNC with COVID-19 appeared more likely to develop postsurgical complications and to be taking ACE inhibitors. The preventive measures adopted guaranteed the continuation of therapeutic surgical intervention.

19.
Expert Rev Respir Med ; 15(3): 393-401, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-897071

ABSTRACT

Objective: To assess the patterns and trends of influenza and pneumonia-attributed deaths among cancer patients in the United States.Methods: Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) database was accessed and cancer patients diagnosed 1975-2016 who have been included in the SEER-9 registries were included. The primary endpoint of the study is standardized mortality rate (SMR; calculated as observed/ Expected (O/E) ratio for death from influenza and pneumonia among cancer patients).Results: The current study evaluates a total of 3,579,199 cancer patients (diagnosed 1975-2016) within the SEER-9 registries; and influenza and pneumonia-attributed deaths represent 1.5% of the recorded deaths for this cohort. SMR for influenza/ pneumonia-attributed death within the first year following cancer diagnosis was 1.88 (1.83-1.94);while SMR for influenza/pneumonia-attributed death following the first year was 1.11 (1.10-1.12). Within the first year following cancer diagnosis, SMR from influenza/pneumonia was higher among individuals with black race (SMR for white race: 1.75 (95% CI: 1.69-1.81) while SMR for black race: 2.90 (95% CI: 2.65-3.16), lung cancer (SMR for lung cancer: 4.39 (95% CI: 4.11-4.69)), head and neck cancer (SMR for oral cavity/ pharynx cancer: 4.02 (95% CI: 3.50-4.59)), lymphomas (SMR for lymphoma: 3.28 (95% CI: 2.92-3.68)), leukemias (SMR for leukemia: 3.32 (95% CI: 2.89-3.80)) and myeloma (SMR for myeloma: 3.91 (95% CI: 3.28-4.63)).Conclusions: Cancer patients are more likely to have influenza/ pneumonia-attributed death compared to the general US population. This risk is higher among patients with lung cancer, head and neck cancer, and hematological malignancies.


Subject(s)
Influenza, Human , Lung Neoplasms , Occupational Diseases , Pneumonia , Cohort Studies , Humans , Pneumonia/diagnosis , United States/epidemiology
20.
Eur Spine J ; 30(6): 1699-1707, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1168984

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of working from home on neck pain (NP) among office workers during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Participants from two Swiss organisations, aged 18-65 years and working from home during the lockdown (n = 69) were included. Baseline data collected in January 2020 before the lockdown (office work) were compared with follow-up data in April 2020 during lockdown (working from home). The primary outcome of NP was assessed with a measure of intensity and disability. Secondary outcomes were quality of workstation ergonomics, number of work breaks, and time spent working at the computer. Two linear mixed effects models were fitted to the data to estimate the change in NP. RESULTS: No clinically relevant change in the average NP intensity and neck disability was found between measurement time points. Each working hour at the computer increased NP intensity by 0.36 points (95% CI: 0.09 to 0.62) indicating strong evidence. No such effect was found for neck disability. Each work break taken reduced neck disability by 2.30 points (95% CI: - 4.18 to - 0.42, evidence). No such effect was found for NP intensity. There is very strong evidence that workstation ergonomics was poorer at home. CONCLUSION: The number of work breaks and hours spent at the computer seem to have a greater effect on NP than the place of work (office, at home), measurement time point (before COVID-19, during lockdown) or the workstation ergonomics. Further research should investigate the effect of social and psychological factors. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT04169646. Registered 15 November 2019-Retrospectively registered, https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT04169646 .


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neck Pain , Ergonomics , Humans , Neck Pain/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Switzerland/epidemiology
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL