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1.
J Infect Dis ; 225(6): 965-970, 2022 03 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1740882

ABSTRACT

Antibody responses to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) in serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from 16 patients with coronavirus disease 2019 and neurological symptoms were assessed using 2 independent methods. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) specific for the virus spike protein was found in 81% of patients in serum and in 56% in CSF. SARS-CoV-2 IgG in CSF was observed in 2 patients with negative serological findings. Levels of IgG in both serum and CSF were associated with disease severity (P < .05). All patients with elevated markers of central nervous system damage in CSF also had CSF antibodies (P = .002), and CSF antibodies had the highest predictive value for neuronal damage markers of all tested clinical variables.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , Immunoglobulin G/blood , Nervous System Diseases/blood , Nervous System Diseases/cerebrospinal fluid , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Aged , Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood , Antibody Formation , Biomarkers/blood , Biomarkers/cerebrospinal fluid , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/cerebrospinal fluid , COVID-19/complications , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Nervous System Diseases/diagnosis , Nervous System Diseases/etiology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus
2.
Eur J Neurol ; 28(10): 3303-3323, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1603795

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic is a global public health issue. Neurological complications have been reported in up to one-third of affected cases, but their distribution varies significantly in terms of prevalence, incidence and phenotypical characteristics. Variability can be mostly explained by the differing sources of cases (hospital vs. community-based), the accuracy of the diagnostic approach and the interpretation of the patients' complaints. Moreover, after recovering, patients can still experience neurological symptoms. To obtain a more precise picture of the neurological manifestations and outcome of the COVID-19 infection, an international registry (ENERGY) has been created by the European Academy of Neurology in collaboration with European national neurological societies and the Neurocritical Care Society and Research Network. ENERGY can be implemented as a stand-alone instrument for patients with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 and neurological findings or as an addendum to an existing registry not targeting neurological symptoms. Data are also collected to study the impact of neurological symptoms and neurological complications on outcomes. The variables included in the registry have been selected in the interests of most countries, to favour pooling with data from other sources and to facilitate data collection even in resource-poor countries. Included are adults with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 infection, ascertained through neurological consultation, and providing informed consent. Key demographic and clinical findings are collected at registration. Patients are followed up to 12 months in search of incident neurological manifestations. As of 19 August, 254 centres from 69 countries and four continents have made requests to join the study.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Neurology , Adult , Humans , Pandemics , Registries , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Childs Nerv Syst ; 37(12): 3919-3922, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1525534

ABSTRACT

Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis is a clinical condition characterized by acute behavioral and mood changes, abnormal movements, autonomic instability, seizures, and encephalopathy. We describe a 7-year-old boy diagnosed with autoimmune encephalitis due to NMDAR antibody in association with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) (coronavirus disease 2019) (COVID-19), without pulmonary involvement or fever. The patient presented with acute ataxia, rapidly developed encephalopathy, and autoimmune encephalitis was suspected. Steroid treatment was withheld because of lymphopenia and intravenous immunoglobulin was started. The absence of clinical response prompted plasmapheresis and, when lymphocyte counts improved, pulse steroid treatment was applied. The latter was followed by significant improvement and the patient was discharged in a conscious and ambulatory state. Autoimmune encephalitis should be considered in the presence of neurological symptoms accompanying SARS-CoV-2 infection and steroid treatment should be preferred unless limited by contraindications.


Subject(s)
Anti-N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor Encephalitis , COVID-19 , Anti-N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor Encephalitis/complications , Anti-N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor Encephalitis/drug therapy , Child , Humans , Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/therapeutic use , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Seizures
4.
Neurol Neuroimmunol Neuroinflamm ; 8(4)2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1518339

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Pediatric inflammatory multisystem syndrome temporally associated with SARS-CoV-2 (PIMS-TS) is a severe immune-mediated disorder. We aim to report the neurologic features of children with PIMS-TS. METHODS: We identified children presenting to a large children's hospital with PIMS-TS from March to June 2020 and performed a retrospective medical note review, identifying clinical and investigative features alongside short-term outcome of children presenting with neurologic symptoms. RESULTS: Seventy-five patients with PIMS-TS were identified, 9 (12%) had neurologic involvement: altered conciseness (3), behavioral changes (3), focal neurology deficits (2), persistent headaches (2), hallucinations (2), excessive sleepiness (1), and new-onset focal seizures (1). Four patients had cranial images abnormalities. At 3-month follow-up, 1 child had died, 1 had hemiparesis, 3 had behavioral changes, and 4 completely recovered. Systemic inflammatory and prothrombotic markers were higher in patients with neurologic involvement (mean highest CRP 267 vs 202 mg/L, p = 0.05; procalcitonin 30.65 vs 13.11 µg/L, p = 0.04; fibrinogen 7.04 vs 6.17 g/L, p = 0.07; d-dimers 19.68 vs 7.35 mg/L, p = 0.005). Among patients with neurologic involvement, these markers were higher in those without full recovery at 3 months (ferritin 2284 vs 283 µg/L, p = 0.05; d-dimers 30.34 vs 6.37 mg/L, p = 0.04). Patients with and without neurologic involvement shared similar risk factors for PIMS-TS (Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic ethnicity 78% vs 70%, obese/overweight 56% vs 42%). CONCLUSIONS: Broad neurologic features were found in 12% patients with PIMS-TS. By 3-month follow-up, half of these surviving children had recovered fully without neurologic impairment. Significantly higher systemic inflammatory markers were identified in children with neurologic involvement and in those who had not recovered fully.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Inflammation/complications , Nervous System Diseases/etiology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/complications , Adolescent , Biomarkers/blood , Brain/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/psychology , Child , Child Behavior Disorders/epidemiology , Child Behavior Disorders/etiology , Child, Preschool , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Infant , Inflammation/pathology , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Male , Nervous System Diseases/pathology , Nervous System Diseases/psychology , Retrospective Studies , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/pathology , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/psychology , Thrombosis/blood , Thrombosis/etiology
5.
Childs Nerv Syst ; 37(7): 2305-2312, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1384405

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To describe the temporal association of specific acute neurological symptoms in pediatric patients with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection between May and August 2020. METHODS: We performed a recollection of all the clinical and laboratory data of patients having acute neurological symptoms temporally associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection at a third-level referral hospital in Mexico City (Instituto Nacional de Pediatría). Patients in an age group of 0-17 years with acute neurological signs (including ascending weakness with areflexia, diminished visual acuity, encephalopathy, ataxia, stroke, or weakness with plasma creatinine kinase (CK) elevation) were evaluated. RESULTS: Out of 23 patients with neurological manifestations, 10 (43%) had a confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection. Among the infected patients, 5 (50%) were males aged 2-16 years old (median age 11.8 years old). Four (40%) patients confirmed a close contact with a relative positive for SARS-CoV-2, while 6 (60%) cases had a history of SARS-CoV-2-related symptoms over the previous 2 weeks. The following diagnoses were established: 3 cases of GBS, 2 of ON, 2 of AIS, one of myositis with rhabdomyolysis, one ACA, and one of anti-NMDA-R encephalitis. CONCLUSIONS: Neurological manifestations temporally associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection were noticed in the pediatric population even without respiratory symptoms. In this study, 2 of 6 symptomatic patients had mild respiratory symptoms and 4 had unspecific symptoms. During this pandemic, SARS-CoV-2 infection should be considered as etiology in patients with acute neurological symptoms, with or without previous respiratory manifestations, particularly in teenagers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Stroke , Adolescent , Child , Child, Preschool , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Mexico/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
6.
J Infect Public Health ; 14(7): 903-905, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1322215

ABSTRACT

The effect of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) on the nervous system remains undefined. Some studies have shown that headache is one of the most common symptoms and often the first neurological symptom in patients with confirmed infection. There are only a few reports concerning the effects of COVID-19 on the course of migraine. This article investigates three female patients with prolonged history of migraine, in which atypical phenomenology and course of migraine attacks were observed during COVID-19 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Migraine Disorders , Female , Humans , Migraine Disorders/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Brain ; 144(4): 1263-1276, 2021 05 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1313840

ABSTRACT

During the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic, neurological symptoms increasingly moved into the focus of interest. In this prospective cohort study, we assessed neurological and cognitive symptoms in hospitalized coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) patients and aimed to determine their neuronal correlates. Patients with reverse transcription-PCR-confirmed COVID-19 infection who required inpatient treatment primarily because of non-neurological complications were screened between 20 April 2020 and 12 May 2020. Patients (age > 18 years) were included in our cohort when presenting with at least one new neurological symptom (defined as impaired gustation and/or olfaction, performance < 26 points on a Montreal Cognitive Assessment and/or pathological findings on clinical neurological examination). Patients with ≥2 new symptoms were eligible for further diagnostics using comprehensive neuropsychological tests, cerebral MRI and 18fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET as soon as infectivity was no longer present. Exclusion criteria were: premorbid diagnosis of cognitive impairment, neurodegenerative diseases or intensive care unit treatment. Of 41 COVID-19 inpatients screened, 29 patients (65.2 ± 14.4 years; 38% female) in the subacute stage of disease were included in the register. Most frequently, gustation and olfaction were disturbed in 29/29 and 25/29 patients, respectively. Montreal Cognitive Assessment performance was impaired in 18/26 patients (mean score 21.8/30) with emphasis on frontoparietal cognitive functions. This was confirmed by detailed neuropsychological testing in 15 patients. 18FDG PET revealed pathological results in 10/15 patients with predominant frontoparietal hypometabolism. This pattern was confirmed by comparison with a control sample using voxel-wise principal components analysis, which showed a high correlation (R2 = 0.62) with the Montreal Cognitive Assessment performance. Post-mortem examination of one patient revealed white matter microglia activation but no signs of neuroinflammation. Neocortical dysfunction accompanied by cognitive decline was detected in a relevant fraction of patients with subacute COVID-19 initially requiring inpatient treatment. This is of major rehabilitative and socioeconomic relevance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , Cerebral Cortex/metabolism , Cognitive Dysfunction/metabolism , Glucose/metabolism , Mental Status and Dementia Tests , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/diagnostic imaging , COVID-19/psychology , Cerebral Cortex/diagnostic imaging , Cognitive Dysfunction/diagnostic imaging , Cognitive Dysfunction/psychology , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Magnetic Resonance Imaging/methods , Male , Middle Aged , Positron-Emission Tomography/methods
8.
BMJ Case Rep ; 13(10)2020 Oct 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1304206

ABSTRACT

We report the first case of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS) associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection in Japan. A 54-year-old woman developed neurological symptoms after SARS-CoV-2 infection. We tested for various antiganglioside antibodies, that had not been investigated in previous cases. The patient was diagnosed with GBS based on neurological and electrophysiological findings; no antiganglioside antibodies were detected. In previous reports, most patients with SARS-CoV-2-infection-related GBS had lower limb predominant symptoms, and antiganglioside antibody tests were negative. Our findings support the notion that non-immune abnormalities such as hyperinflammation following cytokine storms and microvascular disorders due to vascular endothelial damage may lead to neurological symptoms in patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection. Our case further highlights the need for careful diagnosis in suspected cases of GBS associated with SARS-CoV-2 infection.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/diagnosis , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/etiology , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , COVID-19 , Electromyography/methods , Female , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/therapy , Humans , Hypesthesia/diagnosis , Hypesthesia/etiology , Japan , Middle Aged , Muscle Weakness/diagnosis , Muscle Weakness/etiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Rare Diseases , Risk Assessment , Severity of Illness Index , Treatment Outcome
9.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 12888, 2021 06 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1275957

ABSTRACT

The first systematic review and meta-analysis to help clinician to identify early signs and symptoms of neurological manifestation in COVID-19 positive patients which will further help in early management of patients. Present systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to discuss the prevalence of neurological involvement of the 2019-nCoV patients and assess the symptomatic trend of events as compared to the 2002 "SARS" and 2012 "MERS" pandemics. The articles were systematically screened through several search engine and databases. The articles published or in preprint were included in the study till 15th May 2020. The systematic review done as per the published literatures which included 31 cross sectional, observational studies and case reports which revealed neurological signs and symptoms in SARS-COV-2 disease. For meta-analysis, we included 09 observational and cross-sectional studies which included COVID-19 positive patients and assessed the predominance of various neurological signs and symptoms in COVID-19 patients with relation to SARS-2002 and MERS-2012. Data was analyzed by using the "MedCalc" Statistical Software version 19.2.6 and reported as pooled prevalence. Standard I2 test was used to analyze the heterogeneity. We have collected and screened about a total 2615articles, finally we have included 31articles for the systematic review and 09 for meta-analysis as per the inclusion/exclusion criteria. The analysis was made as per the prevalence rate of neurological symptoms in COVID-19 positive patients. The cumulative neurological outcome of SARS-2002 and MERS-2012 was assessed to get the trends which was further tried to correlate the events with the current pandemic. During the analysis severity and outcome of neurological manifestations range from simple headache to vague non-focal complaints to severe neurologic impairment associated with seizure or meningitis. Central and peripheral nervous system (CNS/PNS) manifestations were seen during the SARS-2002, MERS-2012 and COVID-19. However, none of the publication had primary or secondary objectives of searching neurological manifestations in the COVID-19 patients and the pathogenic mechanism which will subsequently strengthen the importance to start more prospective clinical trials. The prevalence of neurological signs and symptoms were taken as primary objective. Thereafter, the prevalence of each CNS/PNS symptoms was categorized and their prevalence studied. The selection of Bagheri et al., 2020 may be discussed because they have done the cross-sectional study with the neurological finding and correlated the data with prevalence of the COVID-19 positive patients. The proportion of patients presenting with neurological outcome and clinical/PCR positivity were done. We had searched and followed all the possible online/web source, still the data collection process may remain a limitation of work due to addition of several publications on COVID-19 every day. Due to lack of data of SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV, we have included the case reports, MERS and COVID-19 in CNS/PNS manifestations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Nervous System Diseases/virology , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Humans , Nervous System Diseases/epidemiology , Prevalence
10.
Mol Neurobiol ; 58(8): 4178-4187, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1274943

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease that presumably began in 2019 (COVID-19) is a highly infectious disease caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and has resulted in a pandemic. Initially, COVID-19 was thought to only affect respiration. However, accumulating evidence shows a wide range of neurological symptoms are also associated with COVID-19, such as anosmia/ageusia, headaches, seizures, demyelination, mental confusion, delirium, and coma. Neurological symptoms in COVID-19 patients may arise due to a cytokine storm and a heighten state of inflammation. The nuclear factor kappa-light-chain enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) is a central pathway involved with inflammation and is shown to be elevated in a dose-dependent matter in response to coronaviruses. NF-κB has a role in cytokine storm syndrome, which is associated with greater severity in COVID-19-related symptoms. Therefore, therapeutics that reduce the NF-κB pathway should be considered in the treatment of COVID-19. Neuro-COVID-19 units have been established across the world to examine the neurological symptoms associated with COVID-19. Neuro-COVID-19 is increasingly becoming an accepted term among scientists and clinicians, and interdisciplinary teams should be created to implement strategies for treating the wide range of neurological symptoms observed in COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/metabolism , NF-kappa B/metabolism , Nervous System Diseases/virology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Brain/pathology , Brain/virology , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Inflammation/pathology
11.
CNS Neurosci Ther ; 27(10): 1127-1135, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1270830

ABSTRACT

AIMS: To determine if neurologic symptoms at admission can predict adverse outcomes in patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). METHODS: Electronic medical records of 1053 consecutively hospitalized patients with laboratory-confirmed infection of SARS-CoV-2 from one large medical center in the USA were retrospectively analyzed. Univariable and multivariable Cox regression analyses were performed with the calculation of areas under the curve (AUC) and concordance index (C-index). Patients were stratified into subgroups based on the presence of encephalopathy and its severity using survival statistics. In sensitivity analyses, patients with mild/moderate and severe encephalopathy (defined as coma) were separately considered. RESULTS: Of 1053 patients (mean age 52.4 years, 48.0% men [n = 505]), 35.1% (n = 370) had neurologic manifestations at admission, including 10.3% (n = 108) with encephalopathy. Encephalopathy was an independent predictor for death (hazard ratio [HR] 2.617, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.481-4.625) in multivariable Cox regression. The addition of encephalopathy to multivariable models comprising other predictors for adverse outcomes increased AUCs (mortality: 0.84-0.86, ventilation/ intensive care unit [ICU]: 0.76-0.78) and C-index (mortality: 0.78 to 0.81, ventilation/ICU: 0.85-0.86). In sensitivity analyses, risk stratification survival curves for mortality and ventilation/ICU based on severe encephalopathy (n = 15) versus mild/moderate encephalopathy (n = 93) versus no encephalopathy (n = 945) at admission were discriminative (p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Encephalopathy at admission predicts later progression to death in SARS-CoV-2 infection, which may have important implications for risk stratification in clinical practice.


Subject(s)
Brain Diseases/diagnosis , Brain Diseases/mortality , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , Patient Admission/trends , Adult , Aged , Brain Diseases/therapy , COVID-19/therapy , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Predictive Value of Tests , Retrospective Studies
12.
Mol Neurobiol ; 58(9): 4575-4587, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1263176

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV)-2 or COVID-19 has been declared as a pandemic disease by the World Health Organization (WHO). Globally, this disease affected 159 million of the population and reported ~ 3.3 million deaths to the current date (May 2021). There is no definitive treatment strategy that has been identified, although this disease has prevailed in its current form for the past 18 months. The main challenges in the (SARS-CoV)-2 infections are in identifying the heterogeneity in viral strains and the plausible mechanisms of viral infection to human tissues. In parallel to the investigations into the patho-mechanism of SARS-CoV-2 infection, understanding the fundamental processes underlying the clinical manifestations of COVID-19 is very crucial for designing effective therapies. Since neurological symptoms are very apparent in COVID-19 infected patients, here, we tried to emphasize the involvement of redox imbalance and subsequent mitochondrial dysfunction in the progression of the COVID-19 infection. It has been articulated that mitochondrial dysfunction is very apparent and also interlinked to neurological symptoms in COVID-19 infection. Overall, this article provides an in-depth overview of redox imbalance and mitochondrial dysfunction involvement in aggravating COVID-19 infection and its probable contribution to the neurological manifestation of the disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Mitochondria/physiology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Animals , Antiviral Agents/pharmacology , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/metabolism , Central Nervous System/virology , Drug Repositioning , Endothelium, Vascular/physiopathology , Endothelium, Vascular/virology , Humans , Mice , Mitochondria/drug effects , Mitochondria/pathology , Models, Biological , Olfactory Nerve/virology , Organ Specificity , Oxidation-Reduction , Oxidative Stress/drug effects , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Viral Proteins/physiology , Viral Tropism , Viremia/complications , Virulence , Virus Internalization
13.
J Neuroimaging ; 31(5): 826-848, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1262366

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: We reviewed the literature to evaluate cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) results from patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) who had neurological symptoms and had an MRI that showed (1) central nervous system (CNS) hyperintense lesions not attributed to ischemia and/or (2) leptomeningeal enhancement. We sought to determine if these findings were associated with a positive CSF severe acute respiratory syndrome associated coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) polymerase chain reaction (PCR). METHODS: We performed a systematic review of Medline and Embase from December 1, 2019 to November 18, 2020. CSF results were evaluated based on the presence/absence of (1) ≥ 1 CNS hyperintense lesion and (2) leptomeningeal enhancement. RESULTS: In 117 publications, we identified 193 patients with COVID-19 who had an MRI of the CNS and CSF testing. There were 125 (65%) patients with CNS hyperintense lesions. Patients with CNS hyperintense lesions were significantly more likely to have a positive CSF SARS-CoV-2 PCR (10% [9/87] vs. 0% [0/43], p = 0.029). Of 75 patients who had a contrast MRI, there were 20 (27%) patients who had leptomeningeal enhancement. Patients with leptomeningeal enhancement were significantly more likely to have a positive CSF SARS-CoV-2 PCR (25% [4/16] vs. 5% [2/42], p = 0.024). CONCLUSION: The presence of CNS hyperintense lesions or leptomeningeal enhancement on neuroimaging from patients with COVID-19 is associated with increased likelihood of a positive CSF SARS-CoV-2 PCR. However, a positive CSF SARS-CoV-2 PCR is uncommon in patients with these neuroimaging findings, suggesting they are often related to other etiologies, such as inflammation, hypoxia, or ischemia.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nervous System Diseases , Brain , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Spinal Cord
14.
Eur Neurol ; 84(5): 307-324, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1247453

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Recently, it has been shown that coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), which has caused a pandemic since December 2019, can be accompanied by some neurological disorders. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of the most common neurological symptoms and comorbidities and systematically review the literature regarding the most prevalent neurological complications of COVID-19 infection. METHODS: All relevant studies had been collected from PubMed, Scopus, Embase, and Web of Science databases. All extracted data were analyzed using Stata version 11.2. The I2 index was applied, and a random-effects model or a fixed-effects model was used for pooled estimation to assess the heterogeneity of studies. Furthermore, Egger and Beeg's tests were used to evaluate the publication bias. RESULTS: Fifty-seven studies (26 observational and 31 case reports) were included (including 6,597 COVID-19 patients). The most prevalent general symptoms were fever, cough, and dyspnea with 84.6% (95% CI: 75.3-92.1; I2 = 98.7%), 61.3% (95% CI: 55.3-67.0; I2 = 94.6%), and 34.2% (95% CI: 25.6-43.4; I2 = 97.7%), respectively. Neurological symptoms observed among COVID-19 patients were fatigue, gustatory dysfunction, anorexia, olfactory dysfunction, headache, dizziness, and nausea with 42.9% (95% CI: 36.7-49.3; I2 = 92.8%), 35.4% (95% CI: 11.2-64.4; I2 = 99.2%), 28.9% (95% CI: 19.9-38.8; I2 = 96.3%), 25.3% (95% CI: 1.6-63.4; I2 = 99.6%), 10.1% (95% CI: 2.7-21.0; I2 = 99.1%), 6.7% (95% CI: 3.7-10.5; I2 = 87.5%), and 5.9% (95% CI: 3.1-9.5; I2 = 94.5%). The most prevalent neurological comorbidity in COVID-19 was cerebrovascular disease with 4.3% (95% CI: 2.7-6.3; I2 = 78.7%). CONCLUSION: The most prevalent neurological manifestations of COVID-19 include fatigue, gustatory dysfunction, anorexia, olfactory dysfunction, headache, dizziness, and nausea. Cerebrovascular disorders can either act as a risk factor for poorer prognosis in COVID-19 patients or occur as a critical complication in these patients. Guillain-Barre syndrome, encephalitis, and meningitis have also been reported as complications of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Nervous System Diseases/epidemiology , Cerebrovascular Disorders/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Observational Studies as Topic , SARS-CoV-2
15.
J Neurovirol ; 27(5): 802-805, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1245766

ABSTRACT

Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) is spreading around the world. Patients with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) typically present fever, cough, and respiratory illnesses. It has been revealed that the comorbidities can turn it into severe types, and the managements meet unpredicted complications. Here, we report a case of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) coincidence with confirmed acute Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS). Ten days after admission and therapeutic process, the patient developed autonomic dysfunction. Despite respiratory support and receiving intravenous immunoglobulin, the patient died due to cardiac arrest. Albeit it is yet scientifically doubtful, there are raising concerns toward a possible association between GBS and SARS-CoV-2 infection, demonstrating potential neurological symptoms of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Guillain-Barre Syndrome/virology , Aged , Fatal Outcome , Humans , Male , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Anaerobe ; 70: 102389, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1242868

ABSTRACT

Botulism is a neuroparalytic syndrome caused by a neurotoxin produced by Clostridium botulinum. We describe a patient with neurological symptoms associated with intoxication by Clostridium botulinum and infection by SARSCoV2. This report underlines that it is mandatory, even in case of SARS-CoV-2 positivity, to investigate all the causes of a clinical pattern.


Subject(s)
Botulism/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Adolescent , Botulism/microbiology , COVID-19/virology , Clostridium botulinum/genetics , Clostridium botulinum/isolation & purification , Diagnosis, Differential , Female , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
17.
Mol Neurobiol ; 58(9): 4487-4494, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1242821

ABSTRACT

Headache is the most common neurological symptom in COVID-19, reported in 6.5 to 34% of patients. Few studies have analyzed its characteristics, and some of them included cases without laboratory confirmation or reported only critical patients. We aimed to analyze the clinical characteristics of COVID-19 associated headache in laboratory-confirmed cases. We conducted a retrospective evaluation of patients with COVID-19 and neurological symptoms. Patients who reported headache answered an interview about its clinical characteristics. Twenty-four patients with COVID-19 associated headache completed the interview. Mean age of patients was 53.8 (standard deviation-17.44), and 14 out of 24 (58.3%) were male. The majority (75%) had no previous history of headache. Fever was documented in 19 out of the 24 patients (79.1%). Headache was predominantly bifrontal or holocranial, in pressure, during hours, worsening with cough or physical activity. COVID-19 headache tends to appear in the first days of symptoms, be either frontal or holocranial and last for days. The quality of pain in pressure and the worsening with cough or physical activity were reported in most cases. We have not found any characteristic that could differentiate COVID-19 associated headache from other causes of headache, possibly because of its multifactorial mechanism.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Headache/etiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Adolescent , Adult , Antihypertensive Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Testing , Comorbidity , Cytokines/physiology , Endothelium, Vascular/physiopathology , Endothelium, Vascular/virology , Female , Fever/etiology , Headache/physiopathology , Humans , Inflammation , Male , Models, Biological , Neoplasms/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Symptom Assessment , Trigeminal Nerve/virology , Young Adult
18.
Neurol Neurochir Pol ; 55(3): 314-321, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1244327

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the spectrum of neurological symptoms in patients with COVID-19 during the first 14 days of hospitalisation and its association with in-hospital mortality. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We included 200 patients with RT-PCR-confirmed COVID-19 admitted to University Hospital in Krakow, Poland. In 164 patients, a detailed questionnaire concerning neurological symptoms and signs was performed prospectively within 14 days of hospitalisation. In the remaining 36 patients, such questionnaires were completed retrospectively based on daily observations in the Department of Neurology. RESULTS: During hospitalisation, 169 patients (84.5%) experienced neurological symptoms; the most common were: fatigue (62.5%), decreased mood (45.5%), myalgia (43.5%), and muscle weakness (42.5%). Patients who died during hospitalisation compared to the remainder were older (79 [70.5-88.5] vs. 63.5 [51-77] years, p = 0.001), and more often had decreased level of consciousness (50.0% vs. 9.3%, p < 0.001), delirium (33.3% vs. 4.4%, p < 0.001), arterial hypotension (50.0% vs. 19.6%, p = 0.005) or stroke during (18.8% vs. 3.3%, p = 0.026) or before hospitalisation (50.0% vs. 7.1, p < 0.001), whereas those who survived more often suffered from headache (42.1% vs. 0%, p = 0.012) or decreased mood (51.7% vs. 0%, p = 0.003). CONCLUSIONS: Most hospitalised patients with COVID-19 experience neurological symptoms. Decreased level of consciousness, delirium, arterial hypotension, and stroke during or before hospitalisation increase the risk of in-hospital mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Poland , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Mol Neurobiol ; 58(9): 4477-4486, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1241710

ABSTRACT

The Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), the causative agent of human COVID-19, not only causes flu-like symptoms and gut microbiome complications but a large number of infected individuals also experience a host of neurological symptoms including loss of smell and taste, seizures, difficulty concentrating, decreased alertness, and brain inflammation. Although SARS-CoV-2 infections are not more prevalent in Parkinson's disease patients, a higher mortality rate has been reported not only associated with older age and longer disease duration, but also through several mechanisms, such as interactions with the brain dopaminergic system and through systemic inflammatory responses. Indeed, a number of the neurological symptoms seen in COVID-19 patients, as well as the alterations in the gut microbiome, are also prevalent in patients with Parkinson's disease. Furthermore, biochemical pathways such as oxidative stress, inflammation, and protein aggregation have shared commonalities between Parkinson's disease and COVID-19 disease progression. In this review, we describe and compare the numerous similarities and intersections between neurodegeneration in Parkinson's disease and RNA viral infections, emphasizing the current SARS-CoV-2 global health crisis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/physiopathology , Gastrointestinal Microbiome , Parkinson Disease/physiopathology , SARS-CoV-2 , Aged , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , Cognition Disorders/etiology , Cytokines/physiology , Diet , Disease Progression , Dysbiosis/etiology , Dysbiosis/physiopathology , Humans , Inflammation , Metals, Heavy/toxicity , Models, Neurological , Nerve Degeneration , Olfactory Bulb/physiopathology , Olfactory Bulb/virology , Oxidative Stress , Parkinson Disease/etiology , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Protein Aggregation, Pathological/etiology , RNA Virus Infections/metabolism , RNA Virus Infections/physiopathology , Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism , Sensation Disorders/etiology , alpha-Synuclein/metabolism
20.
Int J Clin Health Psychol ; 22(1): 100253, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1240382

ABSTRACT

A subset of recovered COVID-19 patients report persistent neurological symptoms. These include non-specific symptoms (e.g., headaches and fatigue) which were found to be affected by psychological processes in other disorders (e.g., post-concussion syndrome, PCS, after mild traumatic brain injury). The current study assessed the impact of diagnosis threat (i.e., information regarding the long-term neurological impact of COVID-19) and suggestibility on endorsed symptoms of both recovered patients and healthy controls. Method: Recovered patients (n = 90) and healthy controls (n = 210) described their cognitive functioning after being randomly assigned to: (a) Experimental group: These participants read an article that explored long-term neurological symptoms among COVID-19 survivors. (b) Control group: These participants read an article providing general information regarding the disease. Results: Recovered patients, but not healthy controls, endorsed more symptoms in the experimental condition compared to the control condition. Moreover, suggestibility was correlated with endorsement of symptoms. Conclusions: Post COVID-19 neurological symptoms may, at least partially, be affected by non-neurological factors such as diagnosis threat. Information regarding long-term effects of COVID-19 may skew reported symptoms with highly suggestible individuals particularly susceptible to these effects. Further research, however, is needed to validate and elaborate upon these initial findings.


Pacientes con COVID-19 recuperados informan síntomas neurológicos persistentes (e.g., dolor de cabeza y fatiga) que se vieron afectados por procesos psicológicos en otros trastornos (e.g., Síndrome postconmoción cerebral después de una lesión cerebral traumática leve). Se evaluó el impacto de la amenaza del diagnóstico (i.e., información sobre el impacto neurológico a largo plazo del COVID-19) y la sugestión sobre los síntomas respaldados tanto de pacientes recuperados como de controles sanos. Método: Pacientes recuperados (n = 90) y controles sanos (n = 210) informaron sobre su funcionamiento cognitivo después de haber sido asignados al azar a: (a) condición que exploró los síntomas neurológicos a largo plazo entre los sobrevivientes de COVID-19; (b) condición de control que proporciona información general sobre la enfermedad. Resultados: Pacientes recuperados, pero no los controles sanos, aprobaron más síntomas en la condición experimental que en la control. La sugestión se asoció con una mayor aprobación de síntomas. Conclusiones: Los síntomas neurológicos posteriores al COVID-19 pueden verse afectados, al menos parcialmente, por factores no neurológicos como la amenaza del diagnóstico. La información sobre los efectos a largo plazo de COVID-19 puede sesgar los síntomas informados en individuos altamente sugestionables. Se necesitan más investigaciones para validar y desarrollar estos hallazgos iniciales.

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