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1.
Clinics (Sao Paulo) ; 76: e2507, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1870057

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Since the outbreak of the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), all health services worldwide underwent profound changes, leading to the suspension of many elective surgeries. This study aimed to evaluate the safety of elective colorectal surgery during the pandemic. METHODS: This was a retrospective, cross-sectional, single-center study. Patients who underwent elective colorectal surgery during the COVID-19 pandemic between March 10 and September 9, 2020, were included. Patient data on sex, age, diagnosis, types of procedures, hospital stay, mortality, and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) preoperative screening tests were recorded. RESULTS: A total of 103 colorectal surgical procedures were planned, and 99 were performed. Four surgeries were postponed due to positive preoperative screening for SARS-CoV-2. Surgical procedures were performed for colorectal cancer (n=90) and inflammatory bowel disease (n=9). Laparoscopy was the approach of choice for 43 patients (43.4%), 53 (53.5%) procedures were open, and 3 (3%) procedures were robotic. Five patients developed COVID-19 in the postoperative period, and three of them died in the intensive care unit (n=3/5, 60% mortality). Two other patients died due to surgical complications unrelated to COVID-19 (n=2/94, 2.1% mortality) (p<0.01). Hospital stay was longer in patients with SARS-CoV-2 infection than in those without (38.4 versushttps://doi.org/10.3 days, respectively, p<0.01). Of the 99 patients who received surgical care during the pandemic, 94 were safely discharged (95%). CONCLUSION: Our study demonstrated that elective colorectal surgical procedures may be safely performed during the pandemic; however, preoperative testing should be performed to reduce in-hospital infection rates, since the mortality rate due to SARS-CoV-2 in this setting is particularly high.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Colorectal Neoplasms , Colorectal Surgery , Cross-Sectional Studies , Elective Surgical Procedures/adverse effects , Humans , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
2.
World J Clin Cases ; 9(16): 3919-3926, 2021 Jun 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1554422

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) is the traditional surgical treatment for patellar fractures, and unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA), especially Oxford UKA, has been increasingly used in patients with medial knee osteoarthritis (OA). However, the process of choosing treatment for patients with both patellar fractures and anteromedial knee OA remains unclear. We present the case of a patient with a patellar fracture and anteromedial OA. CASE SUMMARY: We present the case of a 72-year-old woman with a history of bilateral medial compartment OA of the knees and a right Oxford UKA. She also experienced a recent left patellar fracture. ORIF and Oxford UKA were performed in a single stage. The patient showed excellent postoperative clinical results. CONCLUSION: ORIF and Oxford UKA can be performed simultaneously for patients with patellar fracture and anteromedial OA on the same knee.

3.
Minerva Pediatr (Torino) ; 73(5): 460-466, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1513377

ABSTRACT

Inevitably, along with other healthcare specializations, pediatric surgery was affected by the Coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) pandemic. Children were reported to manifest mild to moderate symptoms and mortality was primarily observed in patients aged <1 year and having underlying comorbidities. Most of the cases were asymptomatic in children, hence, posing a challenge for pediatric surgery centers to take drastic measures to reduce the virus transmission. Telemedicine was introduced and out-patient consultations were conducted online as out-patient clinics were closed. Elective surgeries were postponed with delayed appointments while the healthcare sector was diverted towards tackling COVID-19. Case urgency was classified and triaged, leading to limited surgeries being performed only in COVID-19 negative patients following an extensive screening process. The screening process consisted of online history taking and RT-PCR tests. Newer practices such as mouth rinse, video laryngoscopy, and anesthesia were introduced to restrict patients from crying, coughing, and sneezing, as an attempt to avoid aerosolization of viral particles and safely conduct pediatric surgeries during the pandemic. Surgical trainees were also affected as the smaller number of surgeries conducted reduced the clinical experience available to medical enthusiasts. There is still room for advanced practices to be introduced in pediatric surgery and restore all kinds of surgeries to improve the quality of life of the patient.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Pandemics , Pediatrics , Surgical Procedures, Operative , Asymptomatic Infections/epidemiology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing/methods , Child , Child, Preschool , Elective Surgical Procedures , General Surgery/education , Humans , Incidence , Infant , Patient Selection , Pediatrics/education , Preoperative Care/methods , Surgical Procedures, Operative/education , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Triage
4.
Urologe A ; 60(3): 291-300, 2021 Mar.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1453684

ABSTRACT

Urologic cancer care needs to be prioritized despite multiple health care restrictions during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. However, therapies and procedures may be delayed and complicated. In Germany, analysis of the multiple cancer registries provides insights into the actual numbers of treated patients. We provide a review on the registration of urologic cancer care during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in Germany and on potential surgical complications of urologic interventions. We found that during the year 2020 there were generally fewer registrations of newly diagnosed patients with major urologic neoplasms in a representative federal database. The number of surgical interventions in patients with renal cell carcinoma and urothelial bladder cancer decreased, whereas equal numbers of radical prostatectomies were performed when compared to the year 2019. COVID-19 may increase non-urological postoperative complications following surgical treatment of urologic malignancies; however, available data are still very limited.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Urologic Neoplasms , Germany/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Urologic Neoplasms/epidemiology
5.
BJU Int ; 125(1): 182-189, 2020 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1455521

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To describe our technique of extraperitoneal single-port (SP) robot-assisted radical prostatectomy (RARP) and present our clinical experience with the first 10 cases. PATIENTS AND METHODS: In all, 10 consecutive patients diagnosed with localised prostate cancer underwent extraperitoneal SP-RARP using the da Vinci SP® Surgical System (Intuitive Surgical, Sunnyvale, CA, USA). Exclusion criteria included previous surgery through an infra-umbilical midline incision, prostate size >100 g, or preoperative evidence of extraprostatic disease. All surgeries were performed by a single surgeon with previous experience of >3000 cases in robotic surgery. Demographics and perioperative information were collected including: operative time, estimated blood loss (EBL), complications, length of stay, and days with Foley catheter. The extraperitoneal SP-RARP is performed as follows. Firstly, a 3-cm incision ~2 cm below the umbilicus is made. Dissection of the extraperitoneal space is achieved using a kidney shaped Spacemaker™ balloon (Covidien, Dublin, Ireland), placed through the infra-umbilical incision caudally reaching the retropubic space. Thereafter, the balloon is deployed; the space is created and verified under direct vision with a laparoscopic endoscope. A GelPOINT® mini advanced access platform (Applied Medical, Rancho Santa Margarita, CA, USA) is inserted and a dedicated 25-mm multichannel port is placed with a 12-mm accessory laparoscopic port through the gel-seal cap into the same incision. The da Vinci SP surgical platform robot is docked with the patient in a supine position. RARP is performed replicating the technique previously described for multi-arm platforms or transperitoneal SP-RARP. No drain and no additional assistant ports were utilised. RESULTS: The patient's ages ranged between 48 and 70 years, and the mean preoperative prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level was 9 ng/mL. No conversions or intraoperative complications were recorded. The median (interquartile range) operative time was 197.5 (185.5-229.7) min. EBL ranged between 50 and 400 mL, six patients were discharged on the same day as the surgery and the median time with a Foley catheter after surgery was 8 days. CONCLUSIONS: Extraperitoneal SP-RARP is a feasible and safe surgical option to treat localised prostate cancer. In our early experience, promising results and possible advantages were found such as: a small single incision, no additional ports, no Trendelenburg positioning, minimal postoperative pain and use of opioids, and same day discharge. Further investigations need to be done to validate these advantages.


Subject(s)
Prostatectomy/methods , Robotic Surgical Procedures , Aged , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prospective Studies
6.
Surg Endosc ; 34(1): 257-260, 2020 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1453740

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Sleeve gastrectomy is an effective surgical treatment for morbid obesity. The major technical risk of this procedure is staple line dehiscence. Some surgeons are reluctant to place a nasogastric tube (NGT) blindly due to the perceived risk of damage to the staple line. We sought to determine whether such concern was warranted. METHODS: A porcine tissue model (Animal Technologies, Inc., Tyler, TX) was used. Sleeve gastrectomy was performed using a flexible gastroscope as a guide for the Endo GIA stapler (Covidien, New Haven, CT) in an identical fashion used in our patients. The specimen was then placed in a plastic model of the thorax (VATS Trainers, LLC. Lansing, MI). The NGT was blindly advanced to 55 cm for a total of 50 passes, and to 75 cm for another 50 passes. Endoscopy with water submersion was performed to evaluate for injury or leak. RESULTS: After multiple passes of the NGT, no significant injuries, leaks, or perforations were observed to the gastric model, except for several small petechiae of the gastric mucosa, the largest measuring approximately 3 mm. None were of full thickness or penetrated the mucosa. The staple line showed no evidence of trauma. CONCLUSION: In this porcine model, blind NGT placement was not associated with significant mucosal injury or any damage to the sleeve gastrectomy staple line.


Subject(s)
Gastrectomy , Intubation, Gastrointestinal/methods , Surgical Stapling , Surgical Wound Dehiscence/prevention & control , Animals , Gastrectomy/instrumentation , Gastrectomy/methods , Intubation, Gastrointestinal/adverse effects , Intubation, Gastrointestinal/instrumentation , Surgical Wound Dehiscence/etiology , Swine
7.
Cells ; 10(4)2021 04 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1456314

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Intra-articular fractures are a major cause of post-traumatic osteoarthritis (PTOA). Despite adequate surgical treatment, the long-term risk for PTOA is high. Previous studies reported that joint injuries initiate an inflammatory cascade characterized by an elevation of synovial pro-inflammatory cytokines, which can lead to cartilage degradation and PTOA development. This review summarizes the literature on the post-injury regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines and the markers of cartilage destruction in patients suffering from intra-articular fractures. Methods: We searched Medline, Embase, and Cochrane databases (1960-February 2020) and included studies that were performed on human participants, and we included control groups. Two investigators assessed the quality of the included studies using Covidence and the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale. Results: Based on the surveyed literature, several synovial pro-inflammatory cytokines, including interleukins (IL)-1ß, IL-2, IL-6, IL-8, IL-12p70, interferon-y, and tumor necrosis factor-α, were significantly elevated in patients suffering from intra-articular fractures compared to the control groups. A simultaneous elevation of anti-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-10 and IL-1RA was also observed. In contrast, IL-13, CTX-II, and aggrecan concentrations did not differ significantly between the compared cohorts. Conclusions: Overall, intra-articular fractures are associated with an increase in inflammation-related synovial cytokines. However, more standardized studies which focus on the ratio of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines at different time points are needed.


Subject(s)
Cytokines/metabolism , Inflammation Mediators/metabolism , Intra-Articular Fractures/metabolism , Case-Control Studies , Humans , Joints/pathology , Synovial Fluid/metabolism
8.
J Bone Joint Surg Am ; 102(12): e58, 2020 06 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1409847

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: From February 20 to April 2020, the coronavirus SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome)-CoV-2 spread in northern Italy, drastically challenging the care capacities of the national health care system. Unprepared for this emergency, hospitals have quickly reformulated paths of assistance in an effort to guarantee treatment for infected patients. Orthopaedic departments have been focused on elderly traumatology, especially the treatment of femoral neck fractures in patients with coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19). The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the orthopaedic management strategy for femoral fragility fractures in COVID-19-positive patients with the hypothesis that operative treatment may contribute to the overall stability of the patient. METHODS: Sixteen patients affected by proximal femoral fracture and a recent history of fever, shortness of breath, and desaturation were admitted to the emergency room. Thoracic computed tomography (CT) and oropharyngeal swabs confirmed that they were positive for COVID-19, requiring hospitalization and prophylaxis with low-molecular-weight heparin. RESULTS: Three patients died before surgery because of severe respiratory insufficiency and multiple-organ-failure syndrome. Ten patients underwent surgery on the day after admission, whereas 3 patients had suspended their use of direct thrombin inhibitors and needed surgery to be delayed until the third day after admission. In all patients except 1, we noted an improvement in terms of O2 saturation and assisted respiration. In 9 patients, hemodynamic and respiratory stability was observed at an average of 7 days postoperatively. Four patients who underwent surgical treatment died of respiratory failure on the first day after surgery (1 patient), the third day after surgery (2 patients), or the seventh day after surgery (1 patient). CONCLUSIONS: We noted a stabilization of respiratory parameters in 12 COVID-19-positive patients who underwent surgery treatment of proximal femoral fractures. We believe that in elderly patients with COVID-19 who have proximal femoral fractures, surgery may contribute to the overall stability of the patient, seated mobilization, improvement in physiological ventilation, and general patient comfort in bed. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Prognostic Level IV. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence.


Subject(s)
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip/adverse effects , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Femoral Fractures/surgery , Fracture Fixation, Intramedullary/adverse effects , Frailty/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 , Disease Outbreaks , Female , Femoral Fractures/mortality , Femoral Fractures/virology , Frailty/mortality , Hospitalization , Humans , Italy , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Clin Ther ; 43(4): 711-719, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1349418

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: In patients with primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) and severe hypercalcemia, parathyroidectomy remains the only curative therapy. During the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, when many hospital visits are suspended and surgeries cannot be performed, the management of these patients represents a challenging clinical situation. This article presents a literature review and discussion of the pharmacologic management of PHPT and severe hypercalcemia, which can be used as a temporary measure during the COVID-19 pandemic until parathyroidectomy can be performed safely. METHODS: This narrative review was conducted by searching literature on the PubMed, Medline, and Google Scholar databases using the terms primary hyperparathyroidism, hypercalcemia, cinacalcet, bisphosphonates, denosumab, vitamin D, raloxifene, hormone replacement therapy, coronavirus, and COVID-19. FINDINGS: Appropriate monitoring and remote medical follow-up of these patients are essential until the resolution of the pandemic. Cinacalcet is the drug of choice for controlling hypercalcemia, whereas bisphosphonate or denosumab is the drug for improving bone mineral density. Combined therapy with cinacalcet and bisphosphonates or cinacalcet and denosumab should be considered when the effects on serum calcium and bone mineral density are simultaneously desired. IMPLICATIONS: Medical management of PHPT and severe hypercalcemia presents a reasonable alternative for parathyroid surgery during the COVID-19 outbreak and should be instituted until the pandemic ends and surgery can be performed safely.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hypercalcemia/drug therapy , Hyperparathyroidism, Primary/drug therapy , Bone Density/drug effects , Calcium/blood , Cinacalcet/administration & dosage , Diphosphonates/therapeutic use , Humans , Middle Aged , Parathyroidectomy , Raloxifene Hydrochloride/therapeutic use , Vitamin D/pharmacology
10.
J Minim Invasive Gynecol ; 28(7): 1411-1419.e1, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1322221

ABSTRACT

STUDY OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on surgical volume and emergency department (ED) consults across obstetrics-gynecology (OB-GYN) services at a New York City hospital. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. SETTING: Tertiary care academic medical center in New York City. PATIENTS: Women undergoing OB-GYN ED consults or surgeries between February 1, 2020 and April 15, 2020. INTERVENTIONS: March 16 institutional moratorium on elective surgeries. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: The volume and types of surgeries and ED consults were compared before and after the COVID-19 moratorium. During the pandemic, the average weekly volume of ED consults and gynecology (GYN) surgeries decreased, whereas obstetric (OB) surgeries remained stable. The proportions of OB-GYN ED consults, GYN surgeries, and OB surgeries relative to all ED consults, all surgeries, and all labor and delivery patients were 1.87%, 13.8%, 54.6% in the pre-COVID-19 time frame (February 1-March 15) vs 1.53%, 21.3%, 79.7% in the COVID-19 time frame (March 16-April 15), representing no significant difference in proportions of OB-GYN ED consults (p = .464) and GYN surgeries (p = .310) before and during COVID-19, with a proportionate increase in OB surgeries (p <.002). The distribution of GYN surgical case types changed significantly during the pandemic with higher proportions of emergent surgeries for ectopic pregnancies, miscarriages, and concern for cancer (p <.001). Alternatively, the OB surgery distribution of case types remained relatively constant. CONCLUSION: This study highlights how the pandemic has affected the ways that patients in OB-GYN access and receive care. Institutional policies suspending elective surgeries during the pandemic decreased GYN surgical volume and affected the types of cases performed. This decrease was not appreciated for OB surgical volume, reflecting the nonelective and time-sensitive nature of obstetric care. A decrease in ED consults was noted during the pandemic begging the question "Where have all the emergencies gone?" Although the moratorium on elective procedures was necessary, "elective" GYN surgeries remain medically indicated to address symptoms such as pain and bleeding and to prevent serious medical sequelae such as severe anemia requiring transfusion. As we continue to battle COVID-19, we must not lose sight of those patients whose care has been deferred.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Emergencies/epidemiology , Gynecologic Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Obstetric Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , New York City/epidemiology , Outcome and Process Assessment, Health Care , Pregnancy , Referral and Consultation/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
11.
World Neurosurg ; 152: e635-e644, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1287658

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: We present the unique administrative issues as well as specific patient-related and surgeon-related challenges and solutions implemented while treating neurosurgical patients during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic vis-à-vis pre-COVID-19 times at our tertiary-care center. METHODS: This is a retrospective study comparing the outcome of the neurosurgical patients treated from the beginning of lockdown in India on March 25, 2020 to November 30, 2020 with that of same period in the previous year, 2019. RESULTS: There were 687 neurosurgery admissions during the study period compared with 2550 admissions in 2019. The total number of surgeries performed in neurosurgery also showed a similar trend, with only 654 surgeries in 2020 compared with 3165 surgeries in 2019. During COVID-19 times, 474 patients were operated on including both trauma and nontrauma cases. Of the 50 patients with suspected/indeterminate COVID-19 who were operated on, 5 turned out to be positive for COVID-19. Significant differences were seen in the mortality (P < 0.01) and morbidity (P < 0.01) among patients with trauma on comparing COVID and pre-COVID periods. Similarly, a significant difference was observed in the mortality (P < 0.001) and morbidity (P < 0.001) in patients who did not have trauma. CONCLUSIONS: The higher mortality and morbidity during the COVID pandemic is primarily attributable to poorer baseline clinical status. Our experience from this COVID period might not only help us in tackling subsequent waves but also help other institutions in the developing world to be better prepared for similar circumstances.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/surgery , Neurosurgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Tertiary Care Centers/statistics & numerical data , Adult , COVID-19/complications , Communicable Disease Control/statistics & numerical data , Humans , India , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Young Adult
12.
J Am Coll Emerg Physicians Open ; 2(3): e12456, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1286114

ABSTRACT

Tranexamic acid (TXA) is an antifibrinolytic commonly used to reduce blood loss due to surgical procedures, heavy menstruation, trauma, bleeding disorders, among other uses. Possible adverse reactions associated with TXA include abdominal pain, headache, fatigue, cerebral thrombosis, dizziness, retinal artery occlusion, chromatopsia, and more. We present a case of acute color vision disturbance developed soon after initiation of oral TXA for epistaxis prophylaxis in the setting of factor VII deficiency. To our knowledge we report the only case of color vision disturbance in a pediatric patient and the only case after receiving oral TXA. Soon after discontinuing oral TXA the patient's altered perception of color vision resolved. The patient was subsequently discharged home with a prescription for an alternative antifibrinolytic (aminocaproic acid) and follow-up with neuro-ophthalmology.

13.
Jt Dis Relat Surg ; 32(2): 551-555, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1279005

ABSTRACT

Although novel coronavirus-2019 (COVID-19) primarily affects the respiratory system, it can affect multiple organ systems, leading to serious complications, such as acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and multiple organ failure. Nearly 20 to 55% of patients with COVID-19 experience coagulation disorders that cause high mortality in line with the severity of the clinical picture. Thromboembolism can be observed in both venous and arterial systems. The vast majority of thromboembolic events are associated with the venous system and are often observed as pulmonary embolism. Arterial thromboembolisms often involve the arteries in the lower extremities, followed by those in the upper extremities. Herein, we report a rare case of COVID-19 pneumonia whose left arm was amputated at the forearm level after arterial thromboembolism in the left upper extremity. This case report is valuable, as it is the first reported case of upper extremity arterial thromboembolism in Turkey, as well as the only case in the literature in which the patient underwent four surgical interventions and is still alive.


Subject(s)
Amputation/methods , Brachial Artery , COVID-19 , Reoperation/methods , Thrombectomy , Thromboembolism , Upper Extremity , Aged , Brachial Artery/diagnostic imaging , Brachial Artery/pathology , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , Computed Tomography Angiography/methods , Humans , Male , Recurrence , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index , Thrombectomy/adverse effects , Thrombectomy/methods , Thromboembolism/complications , Thromboembolism/diagnosis , Thromboembolism/etiology , Treatment Outcome , Upper Extremity/blood supply , Upper Extremity/pathology , Upper Extremity/surgery
14.
Jt Dis Relat Surg ; 32(2): 279-289, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1279003

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: In this study, we present the use of case specific three-dimensional (3D) printed plastic models and custom-made acetabular implants in orthopedic surgery. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Between March 2018 and September 2020, surgeries were simulated using plastic models manufactured by 3D printers on the two patients with pilon fractures. Also, custom-made acetabular implants were used on two patients with an acetabular bone defect for the revision of total hip arthroplasty (THA). RESULTS: More comfortable surgeries were experienced in pilon fractures using preoperative plastic models. Similarly, during the follow-up period, the patients that applied custom-made acetabular implants showed a fixed and well-positioning in radiographic examination. These patients did not experience any surgical complications and achieved an excellent recovery. CONCLUSION: Preoperative surgical simulation with 3D printed models can increase the comfort of fracture surgeries. Also, custom-made 3D printed acetabular implants can perform an important task in patients treated with revision THA surgery due to severe acetabular defects.


Subject(s)
Acetabulum/surgery , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip/instrumentation , Hip Prosthesis , Printing, Three-Dimensional , Tibial Fractures/surgery , Acetabulum/diagnostic imaging , Adult , Aged , Computer Simulation , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Models, Anatomic , Preoperative Period , Prosthesis Design , Reoperation , Tibial Fractures/diagnostic imaging , Turkey
15.
Pol Przegl Chir ; 93(2): 43-52, 2021 Apr 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1273648

ABSTRACT

The current limitations of surgical treatment, as well as restrictions on professional and sport activities related to COVID-19 pandemic require seeking therapeutic solutions for the vast population of patients with chronic venous insufficiency (CVI, chronic venous insufficiency). To understand the principles of pharmacotherapy of this disease, the authors used data related to epidemiology and pathophysiology of CVI. They provided the latest data on venoactive drugs and recommendations that should be followed and summarized the literature based on the EBM. The article should provide the answer to the question of how to deal with patients with varicose veins or, more broadly, chronic venous insufficiency during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Conservative Treatment/statistics & numerical data , Venous Insufficiency/physiopathology , Venous Insufficiency/therapy , Age Factors , Chronic Disease , Humans , Varicose Veins/physiopathology , Varicose Veins/therapy , Venous Insufficiency/epidemiology
16.
SAGE Open Med ; 9: 20503121211020167, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1262485

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The majority of patients with COVID-19 showed mild symptoms. However, approximately 5% of them were critically ill and require intensive care unit admission for advanced life supports. Patients in the intensive care unit were high risk for venous thromboembolism and hemorrhage due to the immobility and anticoagulants used during advanced life supports. The aim of the study was to report the incidence and treatments of the two complications in such patients. METHOD: Patients with COVID-19 (Group 1) and patients with community-acquired pneumonia (Group 2) that required intensive care unit admission were enrolled in this retrospective study. Their demographics, laboratory results, ultrasound findings and complications such as venous thromboembolism and hemorrhage were collected and compared. RESULTS: Thirty-four patients with COVID-19 and 51 patients with community-acquired pneumonia were included. The mean ages were 66 and 63 years in Groups 1 and 2, respectively. Venous thromboembolism was detected in 6 (18%) patients with COVID-19 and 18 (35%) patients with community-acquired pneumonia (P = 0.09). The major type was distal deep venous thrombosis. Twenty-one bleeding events occurred in 12 (35%) patients with COVID-19 and 5 bleeding events occurred in 5 (10%) patients with community-acquired pneumonia, respectively (P = 0.01). Gastrointestinal system was the most common source of bleeding. With the exception of one death due to intracranial bleeding, blood transfusion with or without surgical/endoscopic treatments was able to manage the bleeding in the remaining patients. Multivariable logistic regression showed increasing odds of hemorrhage with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (odds ratio: 13.9, 95% confidence interval: 4.0-48.1) and COVID-19 (odds ratio: 4.7, 95% confidence interval: 1.2-17.9). CONCLUSION: Venous thromboembolism and hemorrhage were common in both groups. The predominant type of venous thromboembolism was distal deep venous thrombosis, which presented a low risk of progression. COVID-19 and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation were risk factors for hemorrhage. Blood transfusion with or without surgical/endoscopic treatments was able to manage it in most cases.

17.
Epilepsy Behav ; 118: 107919, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1253750

ABSTRACT

Insular epilepsy is increasingly recognized in epilepsy surgery centers. Recent studies suggest that resection of an epileptogenic zone that involves the insula as a treatment for drug-resistant seizures is associated with good outcomes in terms of seizure control. However, despite the existing evidence of a role of the insula in emotions and affective information processing, the long-term psychological outcome of patients undergoing these surgeries remain poorly documented. A group of 27 adults (18 women) who underwent an insulo-opercular resection (in combination with a part of the temporal lobe in 10, and of the frontal lobe in 5) as part of epilepsy surgery at our center between 2004 and 2019 completed psychometric questionnaires to assess depression (Beck Depression Inventory - 2nd edition; BDI-II), anxiety (State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, Trait Version; STAI-T), and quality of life (Patient Weighted Quality of Life In Epilepsy; QOLIE-10-P). Scores were compared to those of patients who had standard temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) surgery with similar socio-demographic and disease characteristics. Seizure control after insular epilepsy surgery was comparable to that observed after TLE surgery, with a majority of patients reporting being seizure free (insular: 63.0%; temporal: 63.2%) or having rare disabling seizures (insular: 7.4%; temporal: 18.4%) at the time of questionnaire completion. Statistical comparisons revealed no significant group difference on scores of depression, anxiety, or quality of life. Hemisphere or extent of insular resection had no significant effect on the studied variables. In the total sample, employment status and seizure control, but not location of surgery, significantly predicted quality of life. Self-reported long-term psychological status after insulo-opercular resection as part of epilepsy surgery thus appears to be similar to that observed after TLE surgery, which is commonly performed in epilepsy surgery centers.


Subject(s)
Epilepsy, Temporal Lobe , Epilepsy , Adult , Anxiety/etiology , Cerebral Cortex , Depression/etiology , Epilepsy/complications , Epilepsy/surgery , Epilepsy, Temporal Lobe/complications , Epilepsy, Temporal Lobe/surgery , Female , Humans , Male , Quality of Life
18.
JSES Int ; 5(3): 342-345, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1248994

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has impeded the treatment of elective shoulder patients all over the world. Owing to the constraints in personnel and operation theater capacities, many patients who should undergo planned surgeries could not receive medical care. In our study, we examined the status quo of elective shoulder arthroscopy during the pandemic in Germany. METHODS: Using a nonprofit database, 40 shoulder units that performed the most arthroscopic rotator cuff repairs in Germany in 2018 were identified. Following a standardized protocol, the web pages of these units were screened, and their strategy for elective procedures during the COVID-19 pandemic was analyzed. Special emphasis was put on the use of new digital technologies. RESULTS: At the time of the study, no unit had stopped scheduling appointments for elective shoulder patients because of the pandemic. Almost all units (97.5%) offered explicit information about COVID-19 and their strategies toward it. The possibilities of visiting patients in shoulder units varied owing to local restrictions. Two units (5%) offered digital consultations. CONCLUSION: At the time of the study, elective shoulder procedures could be planned and carried out at the largest centers in Germany. Local restrictions had a great influence on the organization of the procedure and hospital stay during the COVID-19 pandemic. Digital consultations were not available in every unit.

19.
Minerva Surg ; 76(5): 397-406, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1248531

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In early 2020, the novel coronavirus infection (COVID-19) spread rapidly throughout the whole world, causing a massive response in terms of health resource disposal. Moreover, lockdowns were imposed in entire countries. This study aims to assess whether there was a downward trend in emergency general surgery (EGS) procedures accomplished throughout the COVID-19 pandemic and to determine patients' and diseases' characteristics. METHODS: This is a multicentric retrospective observational cohort analysis conducted on patients who underwent EGS procedures during the lockdown and the same period of the previous year in the three Third Level Hospitals of Friuli Venezia Giulia, Italy. RESULTS: During the study period, 138 patients underwent EGS procedures versus the 197 patients operated on in 2019, meaning a 30.0% decrease in the number of surgeries performed. The incidence rate for EGS procedures was 2.5 surgeries per day during the COVID-19 pandemic compared to 3.5 surgeries per day in 2019 (P<0.001). The characteristics of patients operated on in 2020 were comparable to those of patients who underwent EGS in 2019, except for the higher prevalence of male patients during the COVID-19 pandemic (76.8 vs. 55.8; P<0.001). No difference was recorded in disease severity between the two study periods. CONCLUSIONS: During the COVID-19 pandemic, a significant reduction in EGS procedures carried out was recorded. However, no clear explanation can be given to elucidate this fact.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Male , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
20.
J Orthop Surg Res ; 16(1): 336, 2021 May 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1243813

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We report our experiences with COVID-19 in one of the largest referral orthopedic centers in the Middle East and aimed to describe the epidemiology and clinical characteristics of these patients. METHODS: During February 20 and April 20, 2020, patients who underwent orthopedic surgery and healthcare staff who were in contact with these patients were screened for COVID-19. To identify patients who were in the incubation period of COVID-19 during their hospital stay, all patients were tested again for COVID-19 4 weeks after discharge. RESULTS: Overall, 1244 patients underwent orthopedic surgery (1123 emergency and 121 elective) during the study period. Overall, 17 patients were diagnosed with COVID-19 during hospital admission and seven after discharge. Among the total 24 patients with COVID-19, 15 were (62.5%) males with a mean (SD) age of 47.0±1.6 years old. Emergency surgeries were performed in 20 (83.3%) patients, and elective surgery was done in the remaining 4 patients which included one case of posterior spinal fusion, spondylolisthesis, acromioclavicular joint dislocation, and one case of leg necrosis. A considerable number of infections occurred in patients with intertrochanteric fractures (n=7, 29.2%), followed by pelvic fractures (n=2, 8.3%), humerus fractures (n=2, 8.3%), and tibial plateau fractures (n=2, 8.3%). Fever (n=11, 45.8%) and cough (n=10, 37.5%) were the most common symptoms among patients. Laboratory examinations showed leukopenia in 2 patients (8.3%) and lymphopenia in 4 (16.7%) patients. One patient with a history of cancer died 2 weeks after discharge due to myocardial infarction. Among hospital staff, 26 individuals contracted COVID-19 during the study period, which included 13 (50%) males. Physicians were the most commonly infected group (n = 11), followed by operation room technicians (n = 5), nurses (n = 4), and paramedics (n = 4). CONCLUSIONS: Patients who undergo surgical treatment for orthopedic problems, particularly lower limb fractures with limited ambulation, are at a higher risk of acquiring COVID-19 infections, although they may not be at higher risks for death compared to the general population. Orthopedic surgeons in particular and other hospital staff who are in close contact with these patients must be adequately trained and given appropriate personal protective equipment during the COVID-19 outbreak.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Health Personnel/trends , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional , Orthopedic Procedures/trends , Personal Protective Equipment/trends , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , Female , Hospitalization/trends , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Male , Middle Aged , Middle East/epidemiology , Occupational Exposure/prevention & control , Orthopedic Procedures/methods
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